Chile Valparaiso Statue 596862455

Students who choose to study abroad in Valparaíso in API’s Business Internship Program will complete a credit-bearing internship with a complementary classroom component. Students who wish to complete an additional academic course may do so if time permits for an additional fee.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing (including meals and laundry)

Language and Culture Tools

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Open to rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Advanced level of Spanish language proficiency
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • CV or resume
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with supporting documents

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Valparaíso programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • Vineyard

    Chile is widely recognized for the quality of its wines, especially Carmenere, a variety of grape that was once close to extinction due to a plague in France. Students have the opportunity to learn more about Chilean wine and its roots dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • Isla Negra

    Isla Negra was made famous by the decision of Pablo Neruda, one of Chile’s greatest poets, to establish a home there. Neruda described the island to be a place where “todo florece” (“everything flourishes”). Today, the island is filled with artists and writers and considered as an amazing source of creative inspiration.

  • Parque Tricao

    More than 120 hectares to appreciate the rescue of the native forest of the central zone of Chile and the recovery of wetlands and original fauna of the area. We will discover the largest aviary in South America with beautiful exotic species.

  • Natural Monument Island of Cachagua

    A beautiful ride along the coast of the region until we reach the Natural Monument Island of Cachagua, also called Island of the Penguins to surprise us with the sighting of one of the five most important nesting sites of the Humboldt penguin.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 6 semester credits

Students who choose to study abroad in Valparaíso in API’s Business Internship Program will complete a credit-bearing internship with a complementary classroom component. Students who wish to complete an additional academic course may do so if time permits for an additional fee.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive a transcript from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Alejandra Rojas

    Alejandra Rojas will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Gabi Perches

    Gabi Perches will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - gabriela.perches@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

Students with an advanced Spanish level are eligible to complete a credit-bearing internship in the field of business. The program is designed for students interested in business administration, family, and small business management, marketing, tourism, and entrepreneurship. The internship represents a total of 90 work hours and students will complete a complementary course alongside the internship to orient them to the economic and business environment of Chile.

Students who select the internship option may enroll in one or two additional courses during the summer session, selecting from advanced language courses, an English-taught elective entitled Identity Issues in Contemporary Latin American History: An Intercultural Approach or one of the following options taught in Spanish:

  • Literatura Hispanoamericana Contemporaranea (Contemporary Hispanic American Literature)
  • Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Film and Latin American Literature)
  • Historia Sociopolítica de América Latina, siglos XX-XXI (Sociopolitical History of Latin America, 20th and 21st Centuries)

Students selecting this option and completing one course will pay an additional fee of US$250; those who select the internship and two courses will pay an additional fee of US$650.CREDIT INFORMATION

API’s university partners in Chile operate according to the contact hour system; the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class with a professor. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. semester credits, similarly, divide the Chilean contact hours in a given course by 15.

Track 1: Business Internship

Students with an advanced Spanish level are eligible to complete a credit-bearing internship in the field of business. The program is designed for students interested in business administration, family, and small business management, marketing, tourism, and entrepreneurship. The internship represents a total of 90 work hours and students will complete a complementary course alongside the internship to orient them to the economic and business environment of Chile.

Students who select the internship option may enroll in one or two additional courses during the summer session, selecting from advanced language courses, an English-taught elective entitled Identity Issues in Contemporary Latin American History: An Intercultural Approach or one of the following options taught in Spanish:

  • Literatura Hispanoamericana Contemporaranea (Contemporary Hispanic American Literature)
  • Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Film and Latin American Literature)
  • Historia Sociopolítica de América Latina, siglos XX-XXI (Sociopolitical History of Latin America, 20th and 21st Centuries)

Students selecting this option and completing one course will pay an additional fee of US$250; those who select the internship and two courses will pay an additional fee of US$650.

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Contemporary Latin American History: An Intercultural Approach

In contemporary Latin American History of Ideas, a division is frequently made between a center and an identity tradition. The center tradition would emphasize the; we-want-to-be-like-the- center, meaning that the traditions are directed at how best to implement ideas from the center, mostly referred to either Europe or the USA. The identity tradition would emphasize the; we- want-to-be-like-ourselves, meaning that we need to find our own roots and lead ourselves. This the course is an introduction to the main issues of the identity tradition.The separation between center and identity appears, at first sight, a political and theoretical divide. But what is more interesting is that it represents a much deeper divide in the Latin American mentality, something visible not just in the history of ideas but also in general everyday experiences. The Intercultural approach is meant to draw forth this link between the theoretical insight and the common experience by relating the ordinary experience of the teacher and thestudents with the theoretical tradition.The reason for focusing on the contemporary identity tradition is partly because this is where we find the most original distinction from the traditional western mentality and partly because this is where the most critical approach to Latin American is to be found, reflected both theoretically and in common experience.This course will work with a limited number of texts of primary as well as second nature that displays central problems in the identity traditions in the 20th century. The modules will be based on different themes related to identity throughout contemporary Latin American History and each theme will be centered on the questions and the problems that have sparked its existence. Themes will include discussions on race, name, origin, authority as well as ideas on dependency and liberation.The course will consist of discussions based on oral presentations in the class by the teacher as well as by the students. Furthermore, the students will prepare papers on themes that will be the basis for the presentations and the spark of the discussions. The presentations of themes will demand not just the theoretical part but also that each student presents a brief explanation of a personal intercultural experience with Latin American o Chilean society which draws a relation to the theoretical content. In doing so we try to ask the questions; how do these (theoretical) problems appear to us in real life?, and how can this add to our understanding of the theoretical content? The course is a didactic and intercultural attempt at relating our practical life world to our theoretical world.

Language of Instruction: English   

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Literatura Hispanoamericana Contemporaranea (Contemporary Hispanic American Literature)

El curso está diseñado especialmente para alumnos extranjeros y pretende entregar desde una

perspectiva histórica, social y cultural, un panorama de la literatura hispanoamericana contemporánea a

través de sus principales figuras, obras y problemáticas. No obstante, la asignatura también procura

establecer ciertas relaciones entre la Literatura y otras áreas del saber como la Historia, la Filosofía, el

Cine y el Arte en general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Film and Latin American Literature)

Este curso se propone como una invitación a los estudiantes a conocer, pensar y problematizar

la idea de América Latina a través de textos literarios y fílmicos producidos en la región. Por

una parte, se espera contribuir a que alumnos extranjeros se informen y conozcan las

múltiples realidades que el nombre América Latina involucra; y por otra, que aprendan a

reconocer en el arte –literario y cinematográfico- una puerta de entrada a la percepción del

mundo en el que habitamos.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Historia Sociopolítica de América Latina, siglos XX-XXI (Sociopolitical History of Latin America, 20th and 21st Centuries)

La Historia Política de América Latina desde el siglo XIX, XX y XXI no es otra cosa que una incesante

búsqueda por lograr una estabilidad política. No cabe duda que la endeble estructura política

latinoamericana se debe a factores estructurales que dicen relación, principalmente, a factores

económico‐sociales y culturales. Proliferan, entonces, los caudillismos, los populismos, las

dictaduras, que hacen que la democracia sea mucho más difícil de implantar. Y, por lo mismo,

resulta fácil de observar en Latinoamérica, encontradas posiciones respecto al rol que le cabe al

Estado y su relación con el individuo, esto es, la presencia de un liberalismo absoluto (siempre

asociado a la derecha) frente a un intervencionismo estatal (de izquierda) que recuerda las luchas

ideológicas de la guerra fría.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Business Internship

Students with an advanced Spanish level are eligible to complete a credit-bearing internship in the field of business. The program is designed for students interested in business administration, family, and small business management, marketing, tourism, and entrepreneurship. The internship represents a total of 90 work hours and students will complete a complementary course alongside the internship to orient them to the economic and business environment of Chile.

Students who select the internship option may enroll in one or two additional courses during the summer session, selecting from advanced language courses, an English-taught elective entitled Identity Issues in Contemporary Latin American History: An Intercultural Approach or one of the following options taught in Spanish:

  • Literatura Hispanoamericana Contemporaranea (Contemporary Hispanic American Literature)
  • Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Film and Latin American Literature)
  • Historia Sociopolítica de América Latina, siglos XX-XXI (Sociopolitical History of Latin America, 20th and 21st Centuries)

Students selecting this option and completing one course will pay an additional fee of US$250; those who select the internship and two courses will pay an additional fee of US$650.

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Contemporary Latin American History: An Intercultural Approach

In contemporary Latin American History of Ideas, a division is frequently made between a center and an identity tradition. The center tradition would emphasize the; we-want-to-be-like-the- center, meaning that the traditions are directed at how best to implement ideas from the center, mostly referred to either Europe or the USA. The identity tradition would emphasize the; we- want-to-be-like-ourselves, meaning that we need to find our own roots and lead ourselves. This the course is an introduction to the main issues of the identity tradition.The separation between center and identity appears, at first sight, a political and theoretical divide. But what is more interesting is that it represents a much deeper divide in the Latin American mentality, something visible not just in the history of ideas but also in general everyday experiences. The Intercultural approach is meant to draw forth this link between the theoretical insight and the common experience by relating the ordinary experience of the teacher and thestudents with the theoretical tradition.The reason for focusing on the contemporary identity tradition is partly because this is where we find the most original distinction from the traditional western mentality and partly because this is where the most critical approach to Latin American is to be found, reflected both theoretically and in common experience.This course will work with a limited number of texts of primary as well as second nature that displays central problems in the identity traditions in the 20th century. The modules will be based on different themes related to identity throughout contemporary Latin American History and each theme will be centered on the questions and the problems that have sparked its existence. Themes will include discussions on race, name, origin, authority as well as ideas on dependency and liberation.The course will consist of discussions based on oral presentations in the class by the teacher as well as by the students. Furthermore, the students will prepare papers on themes that will be the basis for the presentations and the spark of the discussions. The presentations of themes will demand not just the theoretical part but also that each student presents a brief explanation of a personal intercultural experience with Latin American o Chilean society which draws a relation to the theoretical content. In doing so we try to ask the questions; how do these (theoretical) problems appear to us in real life?, and how can this add to our understanding of the theoretical content? The course is a didactic and intercultural attempt at relating our practical life world to our theoretical world.

Language of Instruction: English   

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Literatura Hispanoamericana Contemporaranea (Contemporary Hispanic American Literature)

El curso está diseñado especialmente para alumnos extranjeros y pretende entregar desde una

perspectiva histórica, social y cultural, un panorama de la literatura hispanoamericana contemporánea a

través de sus principales figuras, obras y problemáticas. No obstante, la asignatura también procura

establecer ciertas relaciones entre la Literatura y otras áreas del saber como la Historia, la Filosofía, el

Cine y el Arte en general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Film and Latin American Literature)

Este curso se propone como una invitación a los estudiantes a conocer, pensar y problematizar

la idea de América Latina a través de textos literarios y fílmicos producidos en la región. Por

una parte, se espera contribuir a que alumnos extranjeros se informen y conozcan las

múltiples realidades que el nombre América Latina involucra; y por otra, que aprendan a

reconocer en el arte –literario y cinematográfico- una puerta de entrada a la percepción del

mundo en el que habitamos.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Track 1: Historia Sociopolítica de América Latina, siglos XX-XXI (Sociopolitical History of Latin America, 20th and 21st Centuries)

La Historia Política de América Latina desde el siglo XIX, XX y XXI no es otra cosa que una incesante

búsqueda por lograr una estabilidad política. No cabe duda que la endeble estructura política

latinoamericana se debe a factores estructurales que dicen relación, principalmente, a factores

económico‐sociales y culturales. Proliferan, entonces, los caudillismos, los populismos, las

dictaduras, que hacen que la democracia sea mucho más difícil de implantar. Y, por lo mismo,

resulta fácil de observar en Latinoamérica, encontradas posiciones respecto al rol que le cabe al

Estado y su relación con el individuo, esto es, la presencia de un liberalismo absoluto (siempre

asociado a la derecha) frente a un intervencionismo estatal (de izquierda) que recuerda las luchas

ideológicas de la guerra fría.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Highlights
  • Complete an international business internship 
  • Earn academic credit

Semester and summer students living in Valparaíso will live with local host families in either Valparaíso or nearby Viña del Mar. In Chile, API places one student per family, and all students have a private bedroom. Host families serve as a unique introduction to Chilean culture and may be made up of a retirement-age couple, a single woman with or without children, or a traditional two-parent household. Students are provided with two to three meals per day, as well as laundry service once per week. Generally, if a student is at the university during the family’s lunch hour, the host mother will prepare a light meal for the student to bring to the university or lunch is saved for the student and eaten later.

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Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 May, 2020 - Jun, 2020 $5,180 Apr 1, 2020 Apr 15, 2020
Summer 2 Jun, 2020 - Jul, 2020 $5,180 Apr 1, 2020 Apr 15, 2020
Summer 1 May 19, 2019 - Jun 22, 2019 $5,180 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 2 Jun 21, 2019 - Jul 27, 2019 $5,180 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019