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API students studying at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV ) have the option of taking a Spanish language course at the beginning, intermediate or advanced level with other visiting international students, as well as elective coursework in English or Spanish. No minimum study of Spanish is required for Spanish language courses and English electives. Four semesters of college-level Spanish or the equivalent is required for coursework in Spanish for study abroad students. Students who place into the advanced level of Spanish on the PUCV placement test are welcome to take coursework with local Chilean students in lieu of some elective courses. Advanced Spanish proficiency is also a requirement of students wishing to earn the Latin American Studies Certificate.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing (including meals and laundry)

Language and Culture Tools

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to a variety of language levels
  • Four semesters of college-level Spanish or the equivalent required for coursework in Spanish for international students
  • Six semesters of college-level Spanish or the equivalent required for students taking coursework with Chileans
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with student visa

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Valparaíso programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Isla Negra

    Isla Negra was made famous by the decision of Pablo Neruda, one of Chile’s greatest poets, to establish a home there. Neruda described the island to be a place where “todo florece” (“everything flourishes”). Today, the island is filled with artists and writers and considered as an amazing source of creative inspiration.

  • Mendoza

    Mendoza, located in western Argentina, is one of the most beautiful cities in South America. Nestled in the foothills of the majestic Andes, this vibrant city is home to over 1 million inhabitants. Adventure tourism is a major industry in Mendoza, as is mountain rescue training. Mendoza is brimming with young European travelers looking to experience the beautiful Andes and all the opportunities for adventure that are available. Mendoza is also the center of Argentina’s wine industry and considered one of the seven wine capitals of the world with over 700 wineries or bodegas located near the town. Glamorous wine bars dot the city and the harvest, which takes place between February and April, is a major event. Since the 1990’s, wine tourism has become another sizable industry.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Isla Negra

    Isla Negra was made famous by the decision of Pablo Neruda, one of Chile’s greatest poets, to establish a home there. Neruda described the island to be a place where “todo florece” (“everything flourishes”). Today, the island is filled with artists and writers and considered as an amazing source of creative inspiration.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • Vineyard

    Chile is widely recognized for the quality of its wines, especially Carmenere, a variety of grape that was once close to extinction due to a plague in France. Students have the opportunity to learn more about Chilean wine and its roots dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century.

  • Mendoza

    Mendoza, located in western Argentina, is one of the most beautiful cities in South America. Nestled in the foothills of the majestic Andes, this vibrant city is home to over 1 million inhabitants. Adventure tourism is a major industry in Mendoza, as is mountain rescue training. Mendoza is brimming with young European travelers looking to experience the beautiful Andes and all the opportunities for adventure that are available. Mendoza is also the center of Argentina’s wine industry and considered one of the seven wine capitals of the world with over 700 wineries or bodegas located near the town. Glamorous wine bars dot the city and the harvest, which takes place between February and April, is a major event. Since the 1990’s, wine tourism has become another sizable industry.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Isla Negra

    Isla Negra was made famous by the decision of Pablo Neruda, one of Chile’s greatest poets, to establish a home there. Neruda described the island to be a place where “todo florece” (“everything flourishes”). Today, the island is filled with artists and writers and considered as an amazing source of creative inspiration.

  • Mendoza

    Mendoza, located in western Argentina, is one of the most beautiful cities in South America. Nestled in the foothills of the majestic Andes, this vibrant city is home to over 1 million inhabitants. Adventure tourism is a major industry in Mendoza, as is mountain rescue training. Mendoza is brimming with young European travelers looking to experience the beautiful Andes and all the opportunities for adventure that are available. Mendoza is also the center of Argentina’s wine industry and considered one of the seven wine capitals of the world with over 700 wineries or bodegas located near the town. Glamorous wine bars dot the city and the harvest, which takes place between February and April, is a major event. Since the 1990’s, wine tourism has become another sizable industry.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Isla Negra

    Isla Negra was made famous by the decision of Pablo Neruda, one of Chile’s greatest poets, to establish a home there. Neruda described the island to be a place where “todo florece” (“everything flourishes”). Today, the island is filled with artists and writers and considered as an amazing source of creative inspiration.

  • Mendoza

    Mendoza, located in western Argentina, is one of the most beautiful cities in South America. Nestled in the foothills of the majestic Andes, this vibrant city is home to over 1 million inhabitants. Adventure tourism is a major industry in Mendoza, as is mountain rescue training. Mendoza is brimming with young European travelers looking to experience the beautiful Andes and all the opportunities for adventure that are available. Mendoza is also the center of Argentina’s wine industry and considered one of the seven wine capitals of the world with over 700 wineries or bodegas located near the town. Glamorous wine bars dot the city and the harvest, which takes place between February and April, is a major event. Since the 1990’s, wine tourism has become another sizable industry.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • San Pedro de Atacama

    The Atacama Desert is like no place on earth! Students will have the opportunity to enjoy and discover the little town of San Pedro de Atacama and its surroundings. We will visit several fascinating places such as Valley of the Moon, Death Valley, Salar de Atacama (Chile’s largest salt flat) and Cejar Lagoon, a natural pool contains such large quantities of salt that swimming is virtually impossible! We will also visit an interesting museum where it is possible to see some of the archaeological finds that were made in the region, and nearby there can be found one of the oldest Churches in this part of the world. This is truly an excursion you will not forget!

  • Vineyard

    Chile is widely recognized for the quality of its wines, especially Carmenere, a variety of grape that was once close to extinction due to a plague in France. Students have the opportunity to learn more about Chilean wine and its roots dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Mendoza

    Mendoza, located in western Argentina, is one of the most beautiful cities in South America. Nestled in the foothills of the majestic Andes, this vibrant city is home to over 1 million inhabitants. Adventure tourism is a major industry in Mendoza, as is mountain rescue training. Mendoza is brimming with young European travelers looking to experience the beautiful Andes and all the opportunities for adventure that are available. Mendoza is also the center of Argentina’s wine industry and considered one of the seven wine capitals of the world with over 700 wineries or bodegas located near the town. Glamorous wine bars dot the city and the harvest, which takes place between February and April, is a major event. Since the 1990’s, wine tourism has become another sizable industry.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • San Pedro de Atacama

    The Atacama Desert is like no place on earth! Students will have the opportunity to enjoy and discover the little town of San Pedro de Atacama and its surroundings. We will visit several fascinating places such as Valley of the Moon, Death Valley, Salar de Atacama (Chile’s largest salt flat) and Cejar Lagoon, a natural pool contains such large quantities of salt that swimming is virtually impossible! We will also visit an interesting museum where it is possible to see some of the archaeological finds that were made in the region, and nearby there can be found one of the oldest Churches in this part of the world. This is truly an excursion you will not forget!

  • Vineyard

    Chile is widely recognized for the quality of its wines, especially Carmenere, a variety of grape that was once close to extinction due to a plague in France. Students have the opportunity to learn more about Chilean wine and its roots dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century.

  • Parque Tricao

    More than 120 hectares to appreciate the rescue of the native forest of the central zone of Chile and the recovery of wetlands and original fauna of the area. We will discover the largest aviary in South America with beautiful exotic species.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • San Pedro de Atacama

    The Atacama Desert is like no place on earth! Students will have the opportunity to enjoy and discover the little town of San Pedro de Atacama and its surroundings. We will visit several fascinating places such as Valley of the Moon, Death Valley, Salar de Atacama (Chile’s largest salt flat) and Cejar Lagoon, a natural pool contains such large quantities of salt that swimming is virtually impossible! We will also visit an interesting museum where it is possible to see some of the archaeological finds that were made in the region, and nearby there can be found one of the oldest Churches in this part of the world. This is truly an excursion you will not forget!

  • Vineyard

    Chile is widely recognized for the quality of its wines, especially Carmenere, a variety of grape that was once close to extinction due to a plague in France. Students have the opportunity to learn more about Chilean wine and its roots dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century.

  • Aromatics Farm

    Be prepared for a sensory delight! API students will enjoy visiting an organic farm that produces oils used for aromatherapy. Students will participate in a hands-on demonstration of how the oils are produced, starting with a tour of the gardens where the herbs are grown to the packaging of the final product.

  • Mendoza

    Mendoza, located in western Argentina, is one of the most beautiful cities in South America. Nestled in the foothills of the majestic Andes, this vibrant city is home to over 1 million inhabitants. Adventure tourism is a major industry in Mendoza, as is mountain rescue training. Mendoza is brimming with young European travelers looking to experience the beautiful Andes and all the opportunities for adventure that are available. Mendoza is also the center of Argentina’s wine industry and considered one of the seven wine capitals of the world with over 700 wineries or bodegas located near the town. Glamorous wine bars dot the city and the harvest, which takes place between February and April, is a major event. Since the 1990’s, wine tourism has become another sizable industry.

  • Santiago

    Housing more than one-third of the total Chilean population, Santiago defines Chile for many visitors. It is a thriving metropolis with a wealth of museums, restaurants and other cultural activities. Surrounded by mountains, the city’s cleanliness and order enthrall visitors. With its mixture of architecture reminiscent of both Europe and the United States, visitors from around the world feel comfortable in this most modern of Chilean cities.

  • San Pedro de Atacama

    The Atacama Desert is like no place on earth! Students will have the opportunity to enjoy and discover the little town of San Pedro de Atacama and its surroundings. We will visit several fascinating places such as Valley of the Moon, Death Valley, Salar de Atacama (Chile’s largest salt flat) and Cejar Lagoon, a natural pool contains such large quantities of salt that swimming is virtually impossible! We will also visit an interesting museum where it is possible to see some of the archaeological finds that were made in the region, and nearby there can be found one of the oldest Churches in this part of the world. This is truly an excursion you will not forget!

  • Vineyard

    Chile is widely recognized for the quality of its wines, especially Carmenere, a variety of grape that was once close to extinction due to a plague in France. Students have the opportunity to learn more about Chilean wine and its roots dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century.

  • Parque Tricao

    More than 120 hectares to appreciate the rescue of the native forest of the central zone of Chile and the recovery of wetlands and original fauna of the area. We will discover the largest aviary in South America with beautiful exotic species.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-19 credits per semester

API students studying at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV ) have the option of taking a Spanish language course at the beginning, intermediate or advanced level with other visiting international students, as well as elective coursework in English or Spanish. No minimum study of Spanish is required for Spanish language courses and English electives. Four semesters of college-level Spanish or the equivalent is required for coursework in Spanish for study abroad students. Students who place into the advanced level of Spanish on the PUCV placement test are welcome to take coursework with local Chilean students in lieu of some elective courses. Advanced Spanish proficiency is also a requirement for students wishing to earn the Latin American Studies Certificate.

Courses with Chilean students will end later than courses with international students and will require an extra fee for extended housing.

Students selecting the Early Start option arrive four weeks prior to the start of the standard university semester and complete a 90-contact hour Spanish course to improve their Spanish skills.

ACADEMIC AND CALENDAR YEAR STUDENTS

The Chilean academic calendar follows the calendar year. The first semester in Chile is actually the equivalent of the spring semester in the U.S. Students who wish to study for two semesters in Chile are encouraged to consider the Calendar Year option (spring/fall). Students selecting a Calendar Year program have access to API housing throughout their program. In contrast, students selecting the more traditional Academic Year option will have approximately a 2-month break between semesters during which API housing is not provided. Both Early Start options include an intensive Spanish course prior to the start of the first semester in Chile.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive a transcript from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Alejandra Rojas

    Alejandra Rojas will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Hannah Stack

    Hannah Stack will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - hannah.stack@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

COURSE INFORMATION

API students studying at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV ) have the option of taking a Spanish language course at the beginning, intermediate or advanced level with other visiting international students, as well as elective coursework in English or Spanish. No minimum study of Spanish is required for Spanish language courses and English electives.

COURSES IN SPANISH WITH CHILEAN STUDENTS

In addition to the courses listed below, advanced-level students (those with four semesters of college-level Spanish or the equivalent) may also choose to complete coursework with Chilean students in Spanish. Students will be able to consider course options with Chileans upon arrival in Chile. Courses are offered in the following disciplines:

  • Accounting
  • Agronomy
  • Architecture
  • Art
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Engineering
  • Education
  • Graphic/Industrial Design
  • History
  • Journalism
  • Kinesiology
  • Law
  • Linguistics
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Social Work
  • Spanish and Communication
  • Statistics
  • Translation

CREDIT INFORMATION

API’s university partners in Chile operate according to the contact hour system; the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class with a professor. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. semester credits, similarly, divide the Chilean contact hours in a given course by 15.

Gramática

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature hispanoamericana contemporánea

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cine y literatura latinoamericanos

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia sociopolítica de américa latina, siglos XX-XXI

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión Lectiva y Escritura (Reading Comprehension and Writing Production)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to introduce students -at a basic level- to discourse modes in order to comprehend and produce different types of written texts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature hispanoamericana contemporánea

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cine y literatura latinoamericanos

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia sociopolítica de américa latina, siglos XX-XXI

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión Lectiva y Escritura (Reading Comprehension and Writing Production)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to introduce students -at a basic level- to discourse modes in order to comprehend and produce different types of written texts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión Lectiva y Escritura (Reading Comprehension and Writing Production)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to introduce students -at a basic level- to discourse modes in order to comprehend and produce different types of written texts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión Lectiva y Escritura (Reading Comprehension and Writing Production)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to introduce students -at a basic level- to discourse modes in order to comprehend and produce different types of written texts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature hispanoamericana contemporánea

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cine y literatura latinoamericanos

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia sociopolítica de américa latina, siglos XX-XXI

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human - Computer Interactions

This course presents Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) as a key interdisciplinary area. HCI is traditionally considered a main Computer Science area, but it involves many others fields of knowledge: design, psychology, sociology, anthropology, engineering, media, and ergonomics, among others.

ACM SIGCHI defines HCI as the discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, implementation of interactive computing systems for human use, and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. As software systems are usually part of complex services that a company/institution offers to its customers, traditional HCI also extends to Service Science.

The course focuses on User eXperience (UX), usability, and Customer eXperience (CX). Topics include interaction challenges, interaction design, and UX and usability evaluation. It uses an HCI approach, without necessary limiting to software systems; it also focuses on products and services in general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Colonization and Decolonization: Global and Latin American Perspectives

The general purpose of this course is to give an introductory understanding into current intellectual and theoretical contributions in terms of processes of colonization and decolonization, or alternatively, hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought.

The word colonialism has often had the connotation of a ‘past stage’ from which we have “moved beyond” in contemporary times. This perspective, however, stands in contrast to an increasing number of currents that re-appropriate the term for contemporary use, while being inspired by early postcolonial thought. Contemporary currents and theories of subaltern, counter-hegemonic and decolonial studies continuously propose that colonialism is not dead, but instead continuously emerge in new o ‘neo’ colonial, hegemonic and asymmetrical relationships in areas such as knowledge production, economic exploitation, and political diaspora. These constructions are frequently found and most easily detectable in the global south.

The course will begin by way of an introduction to Latin American colonialism in the past. We will ask how it operated and how it constructed its colonial/racial subjects through a general historical introduction as well as some specialized readings. Secondly, the course will approach some post-colonial thinkers of the 20th century to create a framework that will allow us to understand more contemporary 21st century currents of similar projections. As such, the course will move from some of the earliest ideas of the ‘postcolonial discourse’ as developed in the mid 20th century up until some recent contributions in the 21st century.

Many of these areas, while often having been initiated from a specific discipline, do not limit themselves to any traditional university discipline of knowledge. As such, the course will be decidedly interdisciplinary and cross over between different disciplines such as history, sociology, psychology, economics, and political theory.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Gramática

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature hispanoamericana contemporánea

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cine y literatura latinoamericanos

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia sociopolítica de américa latina, siglos XX-XXI

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human - Computer Interactions

This course presents Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) as a key interdisciplinary area. HCI is traditionally considered a main Computer Science area, but it involves many others fields of knowledge: design, psychology, sociology, anthropology, engineering, media, and ergonomics, among others.

ACM SIGCHI defines HCI as the discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, implementation of interactive computing systems for human use, and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. As software systems are usually part of complex services that a company/institution offers to its customers, traditional HCI also extends to Service Science.

The course focuses on User eXperience (UX), usability, and Customer eXperience (CX). Topics include interaction challenges, interaction design, and UX and usability evaluation. It uses an HCI approach, without necessary limiting to software systems; it also focuses on products and services in general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Colonization and Decolonization: Global and Latin American Perspectives

The general purpose of this course is to give an introductory understanding into current intellectual and theoretical contributions in terms of processes of colonization and decolonization, or alternatively, hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought.

The word colonialism has often had the connotation of a ‘past stage’ from which we have “moved beyond” in contemporary times. This perspective, however, stands in contrast to an increasing number of currents that re-appropriate the term for contemporary use, while being inspired by early postcolonial thought. Contemporary currents and theories of subaltern, counter-hegemonic and decolonial studies continuously propose that colonialism is not dead, but instead continuously emerge in new o ‘neo’ colonial, hegemonic and asymmetrical relationships in areas such as knowledge production, economic exploitation, and political diaspora. These constructions are frequently found and most easily detectable in the global south.

The course will begin by way of an introduction to Latin American colonialism in the past. We will ask how it operated and how it constructed its colonial/racial subjects through a general historical introduction as well as some specialized readings. Secondly, the course will approach some post-colonial thinkers of the 20th century to create a framework that will allow us to understand more contemporary 21st century currents of similar projections. As such, the course will move from some of the earliest ideas of the ‘postcolonial discourse’ as developed in the mid 20th century up until some recent contributions in the 21st century.

Many of these areas, while often having been initiated from a specific discipline, do not limit themselves to any traditional university discipline of knowledge. As such, the course will be decidedly interdisciplinary and cross over between different disciplines such as history, sociology, psychology, economics, and political theory.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human - Computer Interactions

This course presents Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) as a key interdisciplinary area. HCI is traditionally considered a main Computer Science area, but it involves many others fields of knowledge: design, psychology, sociology, anthropology, engineering, media, and ergonomics, among others.

ACM SIGCHI defines HCI as the discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, implementation of interactive computing systems for human use, and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. As software systems are usually part of complex services that a company/institution offers to its customers, traditional HCI also extends to Service Science.

The course focuses on User eXperience (UX), usability, and Customer eXperience (CX). Topics include interaction challenges, interaction design, and UX and usability evaluation. It uses an HCI approach, without necessary limiting to software systems; it also focuses on products and services in general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Colonization and Decolonization: Global and Latin American Perspectives

The general purpose of this course is to give an introductory understanding into current intellectual and theoretical contributions in terms of processes of colonization and decolonization, or alternatively, hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought.

The word colonialism has often had the connotation of a ‘past stage’ from which we have “moved beyond” in contemporary times. This perspective, however, stands in contrast to an increasing number of currents that re-appropriate the term for contemporary use, while being inspired by early postcolonial thought. Contemporary currents and theories of subaltern, counter-hegemonic and decolonial studies continuously propose that colonialism is not dead, but instead continuously emerge in new o ‘neo’ colonial, hegemonic and asymmetrical relationships in areas such as knowledge production, economic exploitation, and political diaspora. These constructions are frequently found and most easily detectable in the global south.

The course will begin by way of an introduction to Latin American colonialism in the past. We will ask how it operated and how it constructed its colonial/racial subjects through a general historical introduction as well as some specialized readings. Secondly, the course will approach some post-colonial thinkers of the 20th century to create a framework that will allow us to understand more contemporary 21st century currents of similar projections. As such, the course will move from some of the earliest ideas of the ‘postcolonial discourse’ as developed in the mid 20th century up until some recent contributions in the 21st century.

Many of these areas, while often having been initiated from a specific discipline, do not limit themselves to any traditional university discipline of knowledge. As such, the course will be decidedly interdisciplinary and cross over between different disciplines such as history, sociology, psychology, economics, and political theory.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Gramática

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature hispanoamericana contemporánea

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cine y literatura latinoamericanos

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia sociopolítica de américa latina, siglos XX-XXI

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human - Computer Interactions

This course presents Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) as a key interdisciplinary area. HCI is traditionally considered a main Computer Science area, but it involves many others fields of knowledge: design, psychology, sociology, anthropology, engineering, media, and ergonomics, among others.

ACM SIGCHI defines HCI as the discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, implementation of interactive computing systems for human use, and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. As software systems are usually part of complex services that a company/institution offers to its customers, traditional HCI also extends to Service Science.

The course focuses on User eXperience (UX), usability, and Customer eXperience (CX). Topics include interaction challenges, interaction design, and UX and usability evaluation. It uses an HCI approach, without necessary limiting to software systems; it also focuses on products and services in general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Colonization and Decolonization: Global and Latin American Perspectives

The general purpose of this course is to give an introductory understanding into current intellectual and theoretical contributions in terms of processes of colonization and decolonization, or alternatively, hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought.

The word colonialism has often had the connotation of a ‘past stage’ from which we have “moved beyond” in contemporary times. This perspective, however, stands in contrast to an increasing number of currents that re-appropriate the term for contemporary use, while being inspired by early postcolonial thought. Contemporary currents and theories of subaltern, counter-hegemonic and decolonial studies continuously propose that colonialism is not dead, but instead continuously emerge in new o ‘neo’ colonial, hegemonic and asymmetrical relationships in areas such as knowledge production, economic exploitation, and political diaspora. These constructions are frequently found and most easily detectable in the global south.

The course will begin by way of an introduction to Latin American colonialism in the past. We will ask how it operated and how it constructed its colonial/racial subjects through a general historical introduction as well as some specialized readings. Secondly, the course will approach some post-colonial thinkers of the 20th century to create a framework that will allow us to understand more contemporary 21st century currents of similar projections. As such, the course will move from some of the earliest ideas of the ‘postcolonial discourse’ as developed in the mid 20th century up until some recent contributions in the 21st century.

Many of these areas, while often having been initiated from a specific discipline, do not limit themselves to any traditional university discipline of knowledge. As such, the course will be decidedly interdisciplinary and cross over between different disciplines such as history, sociology, psychology, economics, and political theory.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Gramática

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature hispanoamericana contemporánea

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cine y literatura latinoamericanos

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia sociopolítica de américa latina, siglos XX-XXI

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning, Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Conversación y cultura chilena

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature hispanoamericana contemporánea

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cine y literatura latinoamericanos

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia sociopolítica de américa latina, siglos XX-XXI

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Colonization and Decolonization: Global and Latin American Perspectives

The general purpose of this course is to give an introductory understanding into current intellectual and theoretical contributions in terms of processes of colonization and decolonization, or alternatively, hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought.

The word colonialism has often had the connotation of a ‘past stage’ from which we have “moved beyond” in contemporary times. This perspective, however, stands in contrast to an increasing number of currents that re-appropriate the term for contemporary use, while being inspired by early postcolonial thought. Contemporary currents and theories of subaltern, counter-hegemonic and decolonial studies continuously propose that colonialism is not dead, but instead continuously emerge in new o ‘neo’ colonial, hegemonic and asymmetrical relationships in areas such as knowledge production, economic exploitation, and political diaspora. These constructions are frequently found and most easily detectable in the global south.

The course will begin by way of an introduction to Latin American colonialism in the past. We will ask how it operated and how it constructed its colonial/racial subjects through a general historical introduction as well as some specialized readings. Secondly, the course will approach some post-colonial thinkers of the 20th century to create a framework that will allow us to understand more contemporary 21st century currents of similar projections. As such, the course will move from some of the earliest ideas of the ‘postcolonial discourse’ as developed in the mid 20th century up until some recent contributions in the 21st century.

Many of these areas, while often having been initiated from a specific discipline, do not limit themselves to any traditional university discipline of knowledge. As such, the course will be decidedly interdisciplinary and cross over between different disciplines such as history, sociology, psychology, economics, and political theory.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Human - Computer Interactions

This course presents Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) as a key interdisciplinary area. HCI is traditionally considered a main Computer Science area, but it involves many others fields of knowledge: design, psychology, sociology, anthropology, engineering, media, and ergonomics, among others.

ACM SIGCHI defines HCI as the discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, implementation of interactive computing systems for human use, and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. As software systems are usually part of complex services that a company/institution offers to its customers, traditional HCI also extends to Service Science.

The course focuses on User eXperience (UX), usability, and Customer eXperience (CX). Topics include interaction challenges, interaction design, and UX and usability evaluation. It uses an HCI approach, without necessary limiting to software systems; it also focuses on products and services in general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

View Syllabus   

Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

View Syllabus   

Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

View Syllabus   

Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Gramática y Vocabulario (Grammar and vocabulary)

This is a theoretical and practical course designed to address the morphological and syntactic aspects of the Spanish language. In this class, at a basic level, grammar and vocabulary are envisioned as a system with three dimensions that interact among them: the form of the elements, their semantics and the pragmatic conditions governing their use.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

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Comprensión y Producción Oral (Oral Comprehension and Oral Production)

From an intercultural and communicative orientation, this class – at a basic level - integrates language and culture in order to take advantage of the scenario the students are.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

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Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

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Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies. Forms of the organization of different types of texts on an intermediate level, their structure and linguistic elements involved.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language from a descriptive-normative approach where the system of rules of Spanish is revised, analyzed and explained.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Escritura académica (Academic Writing)

This is a practical course oriented to the development of communicative abilities for writing in the academic context. In this course, students will practice writing texts considering the following aspects: text structure, academic genres, the process of writing and rules. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate through writing respecting the main rules of academic communication, which will facilitate their insertion in the Chilean academic culture and in PUCV.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Escritura creativa (Creative Writing)

This introductory course in creative writing in Spanish is aimed at foreign students with no previous experience required in the creative field. The course looks to motivate and refine creative production in short stories (fiction), travel writing (non-fiction), and poetry, with an emphasis, but not exclusively, to reading and writing assignments focused on the space of Valparaíso and the experience of a foreign culture. Through collective and individual exercises developed in class as well as more extensive assignments, the students will perfect their writing in terms of theme and developed ideas, as well as the essential elements of fiction and literary writing, which will allow enriching their experience in the context of a different culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Español Comunicacional y Cultura Chilena (Communicative Spanish and Chilean Culture)

This course integrates language and culture with the main objective of potentiating the total immersion program in which the student is inserted, from a communicative and intercultural approach.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

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Español escrito (Written Spanish)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to text typologies, especially the forms of organization of explanatory and argumentative discourse, as well as journalistic and academic genres such as news items, journalist reports, editorials, abstracts and summaries, articles.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the morphosyntactic aspects of Spanish grammar that are generally considered to be problematic for the students of Spanish as a second language. From a descriptive-normative approach and through a diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish is revised, analyzed and applied in different contexts, both oral and written.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Gramática del Español para Extranjeros (Spanish Grammar for Foreigners)

This is a theoretical-practical course oriented to the pragmatic-discursive aspects of Spanish grammar. Through diverse material, the system of rules and usage of Spanish will be analyzed and applied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Human Rights in Latin America

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of human rights as a concert, as a set of laws and institutions, and as a set of political and cultural practices. Students examine the historical, political, legal, social and cultural aspects of human rights.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Latino Studies

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Americans of Latin American origin. This diverse population includes people who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and many other Latin American and Caribbean nations. The curriculum seeks to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language (Spanglish), history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, drama, film, music) accomplishments in Chicano/Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Political and Social Change in Chile and Latin America

This course will examine Latin America´s political and social development during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, paying particular attention to the Chilean case. This class is structured by two main concepts; first, democracy as the main political concept and in a second place, the importance of the search for social development. These two concepts are going to articulate the history of the region, especially during the 20th century and the current times. The course is divided into three modules: The first one comprehends the construction of the republican order in the 19th century and the economical insertion of the countries region in the world regime. The second module focuses on the political and socio-economical life in the 20th century marked by popular movement, socialist revolutions, dictatorship, populism, human rights violations, among other issues. Finally, the course analyzes the current situation of the Latin American Region in the context of globalization. In this section, we emphasize the importance of the democracy, the role of the region in the global market and the new social movement.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Resistance, Appropriation and Sustainability: Cross-Cultural Encounters with the Native Mapuche People

This course offers a way to learn by engaging in direct contact with the native Mapuche population living in Chile. The center of this learning experience is based on four whole day engagements with Mapuche urban communities centered in the cities of Santiago, Vina del Mar and Valparaíso. This practical didactic will be integrated with the academic content of the course and will require that the students observe and learn in their encounters in order to integrate this knowledge with their academic activities.

The urban communities in question originated in the late 20th century but began their history in a process during which many Mapuche migrated from the rural communities in the south of Chile. The forming of the communities represents a process of ‘old’ identities re-emerged in a space co-habited by Chileans and the dominant Chilean way of life. Given this intercultural situation, the Mapuche communities have had to constantly adapt and transform, both in terms of an appropriation of Chilean forms as well as in terms of resisting them. Many different relations guide the situation of these communities, relations to Chileans, relations to nature as well as relations to the divine and the spiritual aspects of their lives. Communities have had to develop sustainable ways in all of these three areas to sustain the delicate balance in which their communities often live.

The academic content of the course is intended to reflect the intercultural reality in all of these three areas and in terms of all three relationships, resistance, appropriation as well as sustainability. This content will give the students something to relate to when they visit the communities, and vice versa, when they return to class with their experiences. This will allow students to connect the academic content with the reality of the communities, linked and bridged through the experiences of the students themselves.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Arte y Sociedad en Chile Prehispánico

This course will focus on the pre-Hispanic cultures of the north of Chile. On the other hand, the course will present the development of the pre-Hispanic culture that took place in the central Andes in order to provide students a wider view of the macro-Andean region.Because none of the cultures above mentioned developed writing, the class will emphasize the iconographic analysis and archeological data so as to learn about the Cosmo vision and the economic, political and social organization of the pre-Hispanic cultures.Finally, the class will visit Fonck museum in Viña del Mar to put into practice the concepts learn in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Danzas Tradicionales de Chile y Latinoamérica

El curso se desarrolla en quince sesiones en ls cuales se abordará una muestra representativa de danzas de cada área cultural de nuestro país en sus aspectos principalmente prácticos. Además se entregará el contexto de cada una de ellas a través de expresiones con el apoyo de material de audio, fotográfico y bibliográfico.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

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Cuento Latinoamericano

The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the development of the Latin American and Chilean literary production of the twentieth century. Student will work on a selection of short stories and some storytellers besides other artistic productions to work in classes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Historia de América Latina en el siglo XX

This course intends to examine current political issues and problems in Latin American countries, focusing on subjects such as democracy, development, and stability of the statehood. The methodology of the course will be in the form of interdisciplinary perspectives of history and social sciences (political science and economy). The main objective of the course is for students to comprehend and be able to explain the complex social and political processes of Latin America, as well as to distinguish between general tendencies and national particularities.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 2  

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Historia Moderna de Chile

This course will give students a general perspective of the modern history of Chile, emphasizing political and transformative processes. Methodologically, it includes various analytical perspectives and orientations of the political, social and economic history of Chile.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Historia Urbana y Historia Regional de Valparaíso

This course is presented as an instance of knowledge, analysis, and reflection on the main historical processes that have taken place in Valparaíso from the colonial period until de formation of the Chilean Republic. Special emphasis will be given to the independence period from Spaniard monarchy and the nation-state building process in Chile and how these phenomena developed and transformed the city of Valparaiso at a local and global level.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía Chilena del siglo XX: V. Huidobro, P. de Rokha, P. Neruda y N. Parra

This course offers a vision on Chilean poetry in the 20th century, recognizing the main trends, their aesthetic characteristics and their relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts, by Neruda, Huidobro, De Rokha, and Parra, poets that together with Pezoa Véliz and Mistral are decisive for the development of the Chilean and Latin American poetic discourse. The proposed readings are aimed at recognizing the peculiarities of the process of appropriation of the artistic modernity and its contributions to the construction of the Chilean cultural identity. The course is designed especially for foreign students that have Spanish as a second language and have an intermediate level in the language.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Poesía latinoamericana contemporánea

This course offers a vision on of the main developments of Latin American poetry of the end of the 19th century, recognizing the main trends, its aesthetic characteristics and its relation to the cultural and social contexts, through interpretative reading of poems and metapoetic texts that are crucial to this poetic tradition, emphasizing its contributions to the construction of the Latin American cultural identity.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Latin American Films

This course invites students to explore Latin America through the eyes of contemporary Latin American filmmakers. With a thematic emphasis, we will watch and analyze films considering them as complex representations of the region.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Issues in Chile

The course aims at studying and analyzing global environmental problems of modern society. Students will discuss the causes of such problems and analyze their possible solutions. In modern trends of higher education, professor traditional teaching approach is substituted by the concept of student learning. Accordingly, the course will have a few lecture classes by the professor. The course will focus on interactive discussions about global environmental issues. During the discussions in class, every student will have the opportunity of expressing their opinions and discussing (or strengthening) their classmate opinions. The professor will select appropriate cases, articles, and videos for the discussions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Global Entrepreneurship

The course presents all the basics of how to start and became a founder of a technology-based startup. The topics include an overview of what innovation is and entrepreneurship methodologies such as design thinking, business model canvas, customer development, lean startup and general management and team building notions. The content of the course comprehends theoretical and practical lessons guided by the development of a startup idea.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Colonization and Decolonization: Global and Latin American Perspectives

The general purpose of this course is to give an introductory understanding into current intellectual and theoretical contributions in terms of processes of colonization and decolonization, or alternatively, hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought.

The word colonialism has often had the connotation of a ‘past stage’ from which we have “moved beyond” in contemporary times. This perspective, however, stands in contrast to an increasing number of currents that re-appropriate the term for contemporary use, while being inspired by early postcolonial thought. Contemporary currents and theories of subaltern, counter-hegemonic and decolonial studies continuously propose that colonialism is not dead, but instead continuously emerge in new o ‘neo’ colonial, hegemonic and asymmetrical relationships in areas such as knowledge production, economic exploitation, and political diaspora. These constructions are frequently found and most easily detectable in the global south.

The course will begin by way of an introduction to Latin American colonialism in the past. We will ask how it operated and how it constructed its colonial/racial subjects through a general historical introduction as well as some specialized readings. Secondly, the course will approach some post-colonial thinkers of the 20th century to create a framework that will allow us to understand more contemporary 21st century currents of similar projections. As such, the course will move from some of the earliest ideas of the ‘postcolonial discourse’ as developed in the mid 20th century up until some recent contributions in the 21st century.

Many of these areas, while often having been initiated from a specific discipline, do not limit themselves to any traditional university discipline of knowledge. As such, the course will be decidedly interdisciplinary and cross over between different disciplines such as history, sociology, psychology, economics, and political theory.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

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Human - Computer Interactions

This course presents Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) as a key interdisciplinary area. HCI is traditionally considered a main Computer Science area, but it involves many others fields of knowledge: design, psychology, sociology, anthropology, engineering, media, and ergonomics, among others.

ACM SIGCHI defines HCI as the discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, implementation of interactive computing systems for human use, and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. As software systems are usually part of complex services that a company/institution offers to its customers, traditional HCI also extends to Service Science.

The course focuses on User eXperience (UX), usability, and Customer eXperience (CX). Topics include interaction challenges, interaction design, and UX and usability evaluation. It uses an HCI approach, without necessary limiting to software systems; it also focuses on products and services in general.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Contact Hours: 60 Course Level: B2  

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Highlights
  • Classes taught in Spanish and English
  • Options to take courses with Chilean students

Semester and summer students living in Valparaíso will live with local host families in either Valparaíso or nearby Viña del Mar. In Chile, API places one student per family, and all students have a private bedroom. Host families serve as a unique introduction to Chilean culture and may be made up of a retirement-age couple, a single woman with or without children, or a traditional two-parent household. Students are provided with two to three meals per day, as well as laundry service once per week. Generally, if a student is at the university during the family’s lunch hour, the host mother will prepare a light meal for the student to bring to the university or lunch is saved for the student and eaten later.

Host Family 1 35613320132 O
Host Family 2 35651204991 O
Host Family 2 35651205041 O
Host Family 2 35651205111 O
Host Family 3 34942716734 O
Host Family 3 35394723230 O
Host Family 4 35782887435 O
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Fall Jul 18, 2019 - Nov 24, 2019 $11,380 Apr 1, 2019 May 1, 2019
Academic Year Jul 18, 2019 - Jun 27, 2020 $22,280 Apr 1, 2019 May 1, 2019
Spring Early Start Jan 31, 2020 - Jun 27, 2020 $13,980 Oct 1, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Calendar Year Early Start Jan, 2020 - Nov, 2019 $25,480 Oct 1, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Spring Feb 21, 2020 - Jun 27, 2020 $11,380 Oct 1, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Calendar Year Feb, 2020 - Nov, 2020 $22,980 Oct 1, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Spring Early Start Jan 24, 2019 - Jun 22, 2019 $13,890 Oct 1, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Calendar Year Early Start Jan 24, 2019 - Nov 24, 2019 $25,480 Oct 1, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Spring Feb 22, 2019 - Jun 22, 2019 $11,380 Oct 1, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Calendar Year Feb 22, 2019 - Nov 24, 2019 $22,980 Oct 1, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Academic Year Early Start Jun 21, 2019 - Jun 27, 2020 $24,800 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Fall Jun 21, 2019 - Nov 24, 2019 $13,890 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019