Costa Rica San Jose Garden 125008199 Small

Students who choose to study abroad in San José through API’s Multidisciplinary and Environmental Studies Program at the Universidad Veritas will complete a combination of intensive Spanish language courses and elective course offerings in English or Spanish. The number of Spanish language courses desired dictates how many elective courses students complete each term.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing (including meals and laundry)

Language and Culture Tools

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.6 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • No previous knowledge of Spanish is required, but one semester is recommended
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Additional supplemental materials
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with supporting documents (more information provided post-acceptance)

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API San José programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Monumento Nacional Guayabo and Valle de Orosí

    This is the largest archaeological site found in Costa Rica. Largely unexplored, the area contains ancient trails, bridges, water tanks and home sites, as well as petroglyphs estimated to be about 3,000 years old. San Jose Guayabo is thought to have been inhabited from about 500 B.C. to 1400 A. D. Archeologists believe that Guayabo was an important religious and cultural center. The picturesque Valle de Orosí was home to the first Spanish settlement in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

  • Bocas del Toro

    The archipelago of Bocas del Toro offers white-sand beaches, lagoons, and incredible opportunities for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sunbathing. It is also an area rich in wildlife. Students may visit the Bastimentos Island National Marine Park, featuring incredible coral reefs and marine life, and a nearby bird sanctuary with a variety of local and migratory species. Four species of endangered sea turtles still visit the waters of Bocas and the turtles come ashore in great numbers during certain seasons.

    Depending on the term, students will either participate in this excursion or one to Nicaragua.

  • Rincon de la Vieja

    On this excursion, students will stay at Buena Vista Lodge, and old Hacienda that has been changed into a mountain lodge. All meals and attractions are within the land of the hacienda, such as horseback riding, canopy tours, water slides, and natural hot springs. The lodge is a great example of sustainability, as all of the vegetables and goods for every meal come directly from its fields. Students typically enjoy this excursion because it is all inclusive!

  • Arenal & Fortuna

    Arenal Volcano National Park is located in central Costa Rica. The park is surrounded by rainforests and cloud forests with waterfalls and hot springs (heated by the volcano) nearby.

  • Volcán Irazú National Park and Valle de Orosí

    At over 11,000 feet, Volcán Irazú is the highest volcano in Costa Rica. Its awe-inspiring height allows visitors standing at its peak to see both the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans. The volcano’s name was taken from the name of an indigenous village that was built on the flanks of the volcano, Iztaru, which means “shaking thunder of the hill.” The picturesque Valle de Orosí was home to the first Spanish settlement in the Central Valley of Costa Rica

  • Bocas del Toro

    The archipelago of Bocas del Toro offers white-sand beaches, lagoons, and incredible opportunities for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sunbathing. It is also an area rich in wildlife. Students may visit the Bastimentos Island National Marine Park, featuring incredible coral reefs and marine life, and a nearby bird sanctuary with a variety of local and migratory species. Four species of endangered sea turtles still visit the waters of Bocas and the turtles come ashore in great numbers during certain seasons.

    Depending on the term, students will either participate in this excursion or one to Nicaragua.

  • Arenal & Fortuna

    Arenal Volcano National Park is located in central Costa Rica. The park is surrounded by rainforests and cloud forests with waterfalls and hot springs (heated by the volcano) nearby.

  • Volcán Irazú National Park and Valle de Orosí

    At over 11,000 feet, Volcán Irazú is the highest volcano in Costa Rica. Its awe-inspiring height allows visitors standing at its peak to see both the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans. The volcano’s name was taken from the name of an indigenous village that was built on the flanks of the volcano, Iztaru, which means “shaking thunder of the hill.” The picturesque Valle de Orosí was home to the first Spanish settlement in the Central Valley of Costa Rica

  • Monumento Nacional Guayabo and Valle de Orosí

    This is the largest archaeological site found in Costa Rica. Largely unexplored, the area contains ancient trails, bridges, water tanks and home sites, as well as petroglyphs estimated to be about 3,000 years old. San Jose Guayabo is thought to have been inhabited from about 500 B.C. to 1400 A. D. Archeologists believe that Guayabo was an important religious and cultural center. The picturesque Valle de Orosí was home to the first Spanish settlement in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

  • Bocas del Toro

    The archipelago of Bocas del Toro offers white-sand beaches, lagoons, and incredible opportunities for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sunbathing. It is also an area rich in wildlife. Students may visit the Bastimentos Island National Marine Park, featuring incredible coral reefs and marine life, and a nearby bird sanctuary with a variety of local and migratory species. Four species of endangered sea turtles still visit the waters of Bocas and the turtles come ashore in great numbers during certain seasons.

    Depending on the term, students will either participate in this excursion or one to Nicaragua.

  • Montezuma

    Description currently unavailable.
  • Monumento Nacional Guayabo and Valle de Orosí

    This is the largest archaeological site found in Costa Rica. Largely unexplored, the area contains ancient trails, bridges, water tanks and home sites, as well as petroglyphs estimated to be about 3,000 years old. San Jose Guayabo is thought to have been inhabited from about 500 B.C. to 1400 A. D. Archeologists believe that Guayabo was an important religious and cultural center. The picturesque Valle de Orosí was home to the first Spanish settlement in the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

  • Bocas del Toro

    The archipelago of Bocas del Toro offers white-sand beaches, lagoons, and incredible opportunities for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sunbathing. It is also an area rich in wildlife. Students may visit the Bastimentos Island National Marine Park, featuring incredible coral reefs and marine life, and a nearby bird sanctuary with a variety of local and migratory species. Four species of endangered sea turtles still visit the waters of Bocas and the turtles come ashore in great numbers during certain seasons.

    Depending on the term, students will either participate in this excursion or one to Nicaragua.

  • Montezuma

    Description currently unavailable.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-22 credits per session (15-22 for early start quarter; 12-17 for regular quarter)

Students who choose to study abroad in San José through API’s Multidisciplinary and Environmental Studies Program at the Universidad Veritas will complete a combination of intensive Spanish language courses and elective course offerings in English or Spanish. The number of Spanish language courses desired dictates how many elective courses students complete each term. Language courses are four weeks long and consist of 80 contact hours in the classroom. Elective courses generally range from 48 to 60 contact hours and most home institutions award between 3 and 4 U.S. semester credits per elective course.

All students will complete a Spanish placement test online prior to their departure to determine their Spanish level.

INTENSIVE LANGUAGE FOCUS

Students wishing to focus on language study can choose to complete as many as three, month-long intensive language courses during the quarter program option or four, month-long intensive language courses during the semester program option. In combination with the intensive language courses, students generally select 1-2 elective courses.

QUARTER OPTIONS

Students selecting a “quarter” program will complete 12 weeks of coursework, selecting a total of four classes. Even students from semester schools can select a “quarter” program, as they will have the opportunity to earn 14-18 credit hours.

SEMESTER OPTIONS

Students selecting a “semester” program will complete 16 weeks of coursework, selecting a total of five classes in total. In the fall semester program, the first month will consist of an intensive language course. During the following three months, fall students will complete elective courses along with additional Spanish language courses if desired.

Spring semester participants will begin their elective courses immediately (in combination with any desired Spanish language courses) and conclude them by the end of March. During the fourth and final month of the program, all students will be required to complete an intensive language course.

ACADEMIC YEAR OPTIONS

Students who select the academic year early-start option complete the equivalent of the fall semester and the winter quarter programs. Students selecting the academic year option complete the equivalent of the fall quarter and winter quarter programs.

All academic year students will have a short break period between the fall and spring sessions of approximately two weeks. Students should plan to return home or travel during that time, as housing is not provided. Upon their return to San José, students will complete an additional three months of courses, until early April.

CERTIFICATE OPTIONS

The Universidad Veritas invites students to consider completing one of eight certificate options. If selected, students will complete select courses in a given area of study. A minimum of four electives in the subject area in question must be completed to earn the certificate. More information is available on the course information section.

The certificate option is best combined with a semester or academic year program.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive a transcript from the Universidad Veritas upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Francy Orozco

    Francy Orozco will be your Resident Director in San Jose and a resource for you on-site.

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    Gabi Perches

    Gabi Perches will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - gabriela.perches@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

QUARTER PROGRAMS

Students may select a total of four courses listed below. One of the courses must be an intensive Spanish language course or an additional course fee will be assessed.

SEMESTER PROGRAMS

Students may select a total of five courses listed below. At least one of the courses must be an intensive Spanish language course, though students are welcome to complete as many as four intensive Spanish courses (one each month of the program). During the fall semester, an intensive language course must be completed during the first month. During the spring semester, the mandatory intensive language course must be completed during the fourth month.

ACADEMIC YEAR PROGRAMS

Students selecting the early-start program will begin their experience abroad with an intensive Spanish language course the first month and then continue with additional language or elective courses for the next three months. Students selecting the standard academic year program will begin their experience in late September with any combination of language and elective offerings

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OPTIONS

  • Artistic Development
  • Environmental Policy and Sustainable Awareness
  • Global Leadership
  • Healthcare Approaches and Systems
  • Human Rights and Conflict Resolution
  • International Marketing and Communication
  • Latin American Politics
  • Tropical & Environmental Sciences

To earn a certificate, students must complete select courses in the subject area. For details on specific certificate requirements, please contact your API Program Coordinator.

CREDIT INFORMATION

The Universidad Veritas operates on the contact hour system; the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class with a professor. To determine the conversion of Costa Rican contact hours to U.S. credits, divide the contact hours per course by 15. At the Universidad Veritas, elective courses vary between 3 and 4 U.S. semester credits and language courses can equate to 3-5 U.S. semester credits.

Básico I (Basic Spanish I)

This intensive month course is an introduction to Spanish for beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Students develop basic linguistic skills necessary in order to communicate in common situations. The course covers basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, communicative expressions and frequent situations in settings such as restaurants, stores, buses and others.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Básico II (Basic Spanish 2)

This intensive month course is for students who have completed a minimum of 60 contact hours in Spanish studies and already have a command of elementary grammatical tenses. Students advance their previous experiential knowledge and further develop their oral, reading, written and listening skills. Students expand their vocabulary and language usage in order to facilitate interaction with the Costa Rican environment and be able to express themselves in the past.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish I

Students in this course should have a good command of communicative skills for everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s oral and written skills and emphasizes more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish II

This course emphasizes discourse enrichment, specifically related to description and simple narrations. The content of the course includes vocabulary building and detailed wok with the subjunctive mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

View Syllabus   

Español Conversacional Intermedio (Intermediate Conversational Spanish)

This intensive month course is for students who already have a high intermediate level of Spanish and wish to better their communication skills and pronunciation. The course emphasizes situational, everyday conversations and certain cultural issues. The methodology enhances structured speech to provide a firm foundation in patterns of spoken Spanish with progression toward unstructured conversation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Avanzado I (Advanced Spanish I)

This intensive month course is based on grammatical analysis, expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions through readings, and student compositions at a complex level. The objective is for students to acquire a high level of communicative Spanish that will permit them to express their opinions and thoughts on complex and controversial subjects.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Avanzado II (Advanced Spanish II)

Students in this intensive month course should have a high linguistic level and full knowledge of grammatical structures in order to work on polishing stylistics. Students practice narrative constructions, reactions within non-expected contexts, and how to report compiled information. The course also covers important aspects of myths, as well as cultural issues in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Español Conversacional Avanzado (Advanced Conversational Spanish)

Students in this intensive month course acquire higher levels of diction and fluency through the exposure to oral contexts idiomatic language and the varieties of Spanish spoken in different Spanish-speaking nations. This course develops skills in reading discussion, analysis, self-correction and research. Emphasis is placed on pragmatic production and students must be prepared to spend a minimum of 2 extra hours per day on assignments.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Técnicas de Expresión Oral (Oral Expression Techniques)

This intensive month course focuses on advanced communication and presentation skills. Students work on communication techniques and efficient oral expression in formal contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Redacción Avanzada (Advanced Spanish)

This intensive month course is intended for high advanced-level students who want to further develop their written skills through different composition practices and techniques. The course covers complex and difficult questions of syntax. Special attention is given to stylistics and composition structure.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Latin American Architecture and Art

This course provides a chronological overview of the main inventions and influences that contributed to the making of past and present architecture in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Tropical Architecture and Design

This course teaches students to develop the skill to analyze a particular architectural situation and be able to offer adequate design solutions that will guarantee a good quality environment. No previous knowledge of design projection and means of graphic expression is needed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Basic Principles of Drawing

This studio art course introduces basic principles of drawing. The course includes model drawings, landscape drawings, and experimental (abstract) drawings. The focus of this course is on the development of expression and observational drawing from still life, a model, and landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Art Fundamentals: Theory and Practice

This course is designed for the beginner student to help find personal meaning in works of art and develop a better understanding of the nature and validity of art as visual and space language (line, shape, volume, light, space, time, motion, color, and texture). Emphasis is on the diversity of form and content in the artwork. Upon completion, students should understand the basics of art materials used and have a basic overview of the history of art and how art represents its society, especially, Latin American culture.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Mural Painting and Public Art

This studio art course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of large-scale painting, murals, and public art. The course includes an actual practicum in large-scale media and experimentation of early and contemporary techniques including drawing, fresco, painting, aerosol and various industrial materials. Students will incorporate a Service Learning component by either conducting a collective workshop with children from a rural location or actually painting a collective mural as a donation to a community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Documentary Appreciation

This course will focus on the critical analysis of audiovisual documentaries, exploring film and photography mediums in traditional and new media. Class interactions will comprise academic learning, viewing and discussion of material, practical exercises and written assignments.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Theory of Latin American Tropical Dance

This course will provide students with a general overview and a better understanding of the folklore and history of Latin American dance. It will explore the technique, rhythm and movement style of Latin American Tropical dance, along with its history, anthropology, folklore videos and songs.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Selected Topics in Afro-Caribbean Studies

This course examines a particular topic, theme, issue, or problem concerning the Black presence in Costa Rica and Central America. Sample offerings could include Central America and ethnic politics, history, and Culture, Blacks in Central American governments, Contemporary Black literature, History of the Black experience in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Philosophy and Integrated Thought of the Classic World

This course provides an overview of the history and somes selected concepts in majorEastern and Western philosophical movements, from ancient to the middle age periods. Students will reflect on certain topics, such as mind-body, concept of God, knowledge of self and others, predestination and free will, cause and effect, and other fundamental ideas in classical knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Ecological Photography

Students in this course will learn about about the possibilities and stages of digital photography as applied to ecological exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips, students will apply the information provided in lectures. Students will be able to consciously create and manipulate digital photographic images while exploring Costa Rican ecological systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Cultural Photography

The course offers the acquisition of basic photographic skills as a means of cultural exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips aiming to apply the information provided through lectures, students will consciously explore Costa Rican culture through the creation of photographic images and essays. Students will be able to consciously create photographs that document aspects of Costa Rican Culture through Portraiture and Landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Diversity and Sexual Identity in Latin America

This course will study the LGBTQ+ community and related social issues in the Latin American Context. Special attention will be given to the Costa Rican case study. This course has three main objectives: 1) to explore LGBTQ+ Latin American community issues, 2) to appreciate how particular countries are advancing in relation to equality before the law while studying the social groups pushing for change, and 3) to critically assess present-day contexts that are struggling with recently developed anti-discriminatory framework

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

"Habitudes": Habits and Attitudes for Emerging Christian Leadership

This course is designed to be used by a instructor who will be leading a group discussion on the four book series called Habitudes: Images That Form Leadership Habits & Attitudes. The objectives of the course are 1) to increase the awareness of the need for mature leadership within oneself in the areas of character development, self-care, authenticity, people skills, emotional security, core values, team-building, setting priorities, focused vision, and leader development and 2) to instruct the student in connecting with people and leveraging their influence to lead teams of people efficiently and strategically.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Revolution, Spirituality, and Religion in Latin America

This course provides students with a panoramic view of the influence of gods and religions on Latin America. The course will review the Latin American region’s successful combination of religion and sustainable development and the most influential thinkers, such as Leonardo Boff. The course also covers historical analysis and the impact of various tendencies on cultural, social and political aspects of Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Major World Religions

In this course, we will study the world’s major religions: Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. We will discuss the following questions: What is the core belief? Is there a future? What is the expectation of religious believers? Each religion represents the people of God, and understanding the different worldviews of religion will help us to better respect and love religion.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Creative Conflict Resolution

["The course is based on the Alternatives to Violence Project","a program started in NY State in the seventies. Fundacion CEPPA, Center for Peace Studies, has implemented this program in Costa Rica, Switzerland, and other Latin American countries since 1990. Using a participatory and interactive methodology, the emphasis is made on the following themes: Self-esteem and self-care, communication skills, cooperation, community building and conflict resolution, including mediation, bias awareness, and cultural diversity. Mandatory fieldwork sessions will be conducted at a school, a communal group or a penal institution."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Economics in Latin America

This course examines Latin American policies that affect the international economy. Special attention will be given to trade barriers, economic nationalism and regionalism, international political economy, exchange market intervention and international transmission of economic perturbations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Introduction to International Business

This course provides an overview of the cultural environment of international business and the institutions which affect business today. The Latin American perspective with regard to the U.S., Asia and Europe is examined: NAFTA, Mercosur, the EC, and other common market areas and agreements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Creative Leadership Skills

This course is designed to give the student the concepts and tools for the understanding of the science and art of creative leadership. The course will explore concepts such as human behavior, leadership, positive mental attitude, organizations, managers, management versus leadership, leadership ethics, planning, group control, personal branding, etc. Students will analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Introduction to Genetics: Current Applications

This course is an introduction to genetics, focused on its applications for current issues related to the diagnosis of human diseases, paternity, taxonomy, ecology, conservation, agronomy, and the environment. After having gained a general understanding of the concepts related to genetics, students will perform research projects in Costa Rica, which will then be presented and discussed in order to learn what types of questions science can answer using genetics as a tool. Field trips and laboratory practice will provide an opportunity for students to study how samples are collected, processed and analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Impact and Social Devolopment

["This course is an introduction to the study of major environmental problems and issues confronting modern society. Students will examine ecosystems, population patterns, and dynamics","use and misuse of resources","population and environmental quality","environmental citizenship and economic incentives and Costa Rican initiatives in eco-tourism."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Marine Molecular Biology

This course focuses on the use of molecular markers based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to highlight the importance of conservation genetics and the implications on a global scale to manage marine species in danger of extinction. Students will experience field activities to understand some controversial conservation issues related to the endangered trapezoidal marine species in Costa Rica, such as sea turtles and sharks, gathering Tissue samples and later performing hands-on activities in the laboratory such as DNA extractions, PCRs, electrophoresis, and introduction to bioinformatics analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Biology of Edible Insects: A Sustainable Food Source

This entomology course explores the use of insects as food sources for human and animal feeding. This course is theoretical and practical look at the origins of entomophagy, its current state and how to use it for a sustainable future. This course will be based on the study of multimedia, literature, visits and practical contact with edible insects whenever possible.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Tropical Birds (Tropical Ornithology)

This course provides an introduction to the main topics of ornithology, with an emphasis on neotropical avifauna. Major topics include the unique features that make neotropical avifauna a highlight of bird studies, including its evolutionary relationships, the extremely high species diversity of the neotropics, and the natural history of Costa Rican birds. Two field trips will introduce the main bird groups present in Costa Rica, their behavior, and the skills needed to identify them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Land Vertebrates of Costa Rica

This course is an introduction to the zoology of terrestrial vertebrates in Costa Rica. Students will gain insight into various biological characteristics of the groups of land chordates. Emphasis will be given to the study of Costa Rican species, but others will be discussed as well

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Tropical Botany: Useful Plants Workshop

This lecture/field course will provide students with a general overview of tropical plants. Students will gain insight about basic botanical concepts and explore a variety of ecosystems, their plants, and the multiple and complex ecological interactions that can be found in these areas. Emphasis will be given to the most common plant families in Costa Rica, but others will be discussed as well.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Conservation Biology and Endangered Marine Species

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of conservation biology in managing endangered marine species by emphasizing recent conservation efforts of umbrella species such as sea turtles and sharks in the Pacific of Costa Rica. This course will help students develop a critical understanding of conservation biology, by emphasizing the general concept of biodiversity and in current case studies that focus on scientific investigations to answer critical life history aspects, recovery programs, species management, community conservation actions and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Freshwater Ecology

Water is a vital resource and limited resource that is in danger, and demand for this resource is growing. The goal of this course is to help students understand the physical, chemical and biological properties of inland aquatic environments (wetlands, lakes, rivers, mangroves, and reservoirs). It aims to emphasize the problems and conservation efforts for water resources, and to review methods for monitoring aquatic environments through field trips and laboratory work.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Tropical Marine Biology

This course has been designed to introduce the basic concepts of oceanography, marine geology, marine ecology and marine biology, with emphasis on the interaction between species, between species and their environment and between ecosystems. It also provides information on the natural and human environmental impact, and the utility, management and conservation of the ecosystems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Marine Mammals of Costa Rica: Biology for Conservation

This course is an introduction to the biology of marine mammals of Costa Rica, including whales, dolphins, manatees fur seals and sea lions. Topics covered include the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of marine mammals. Fieldwork will focus on basic ecological monitoring techniques and primary care on marine mammals strandings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Climate Change Impacts and Adaptations

Mankind is facing serious natural disasters and events caused by global warming and climate change. This course is an introduction to renewable energies and their impact on development and future needs of the planet Earth. It will be focused on Costa Rica’s potential for renewable energies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

This course will examine agricultural and food systems from an ecological systems perspective. Consumption and production issues related to food system sustainability will be analyzed, and students will explore their own role in the food system. Field trips will provide opportunities for direct observation of (and interaction with) different approaches to food production and distribution in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Sustainable Development and Environmental Awareness

This course is an introduction to current world problems related to natural resource management and conservation, and their effects on sustainable development efforts in tropical countries. Current issues that impact the possibility for development, such as poverty, global warming, deforestation and access to potable water will be analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biotechnology for Sustainability

This course emphasizes the vast possibilities offered by biotechnology for sustainable development through the study of specific cases in Costa Rica. Fundamental and applied concepts of biotechnology will be explored and discussed in terms of life, environmental and social sciences. Work will be heavily based on the study of cases in which biotechnology has become into the best solution for social and environmental situations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecotourism: Costa Rica

The course will offer the chance to analyze this dynamic process from different socio-economic perspectives. It will discuss the economic importance of ecotourism for the Costa Rican national economy, the stimulation of grassroots, community ecotourism projects, and the role of ecotourism in securing environmental protection. The advances and limitations of ecotourism will be explored.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Consumption & Production

Sustainable consumption (SC) and production is a holistic approach to minimizing the negative environmental impacts from consumption and production systems while promoting quality of life for all. This course will help students acquire the knowledge, capacities, and values to help them contribute to shaping a better tomorrow as more responsible consumers. It will trace the history and the justification for the focus on sustainable consumption.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainable Lifestyles

This course builds upon the results of the Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles (GSSL), document, Visions for Change: Recommendations for Effective Policies on Sustainable Lifestyles, which incorporates the voices of 8,000 young adults from 20 different countries. The main objective of the course is designed to give youth a voice and work together to better understand and educate young adults, therefore empowering them to create their own positive versions of sustainable lifestyles and become agents of change.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Gender and Sustainable Development

This course will study the intersection between gender, socio-economic discrimination and the shift toward sustainable development. The main issues will be explored in the context of the Latin America and Caribbean case study with special emphasis on the Costa Rican context where possible. Students will carry out surveys, develop research projects, and participate in two field trips to help them to understand the dynamics and complexities of gender and sustainable development.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Physical Therapy

This course will introduce basic concepts of human anatomy, an overview of the most common injuries and illnesses that require physical therapy, and an introduction to the different tools and methods used to treat them. The course will consist of lectures about the theoretical concepts, and also laboratory practice, which will allow the student a hands-on experience of the different techniques given during the lectures. At the end of the course, the student will have general knowledge on various areas of expertise, and on techniques such as massage therapy, electrotherapy, and therapeutic exercises, among others. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Alternative Health Approaches

This course will introduce basic concepts of alternative medicine. Also this course will explore, and evaluate alternatives approaches and philosophies to personal health and wellness. Some of the topics included are: Homeopathy, TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) Acupuncture, Herbal and Nutritional Therapies, Massage, Chiropractic, Electromagnetic Therapy, Breathing Exercise and others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Conflict Resolution and Health Care

This interactive, hands-on course offers a framework to integrate professional experience with functional communication and mediation skills. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their leadership into progress on matters of public health importance. Mandatory fieldwork sessions at a hospital, clinic, community or school end this challenging experience.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Costa Rican Health Care and Tropical Medicine

The course focuses on the history and development of the public health care system within the context of the Costa Rican sociopolitical and economic situation. It also gives a strong emphasis on how the system actually works and points out not only the strongholds of the systems but also its weak points. A third objective, of fundamental importance in order to understand this system, is the study of Costa Rica as a tropical country. Pre-requisite: Student must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Health and Psychology

Health care professionals require knowledge and skills in the field of psychology to better use an integral approach for their patients. Knowledge on theory, activities and techniques that facilitate the adoption of a multisystem, multilevel, and multivariate orientation, are for the benefit of their patients. This course will discuss some of the most common topics related to Health Psychology and pertinent to practice in the healthcare professions. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Cultural Psychology

This course introduces students to the field of psychology that examines the influence of culture upon human behavior and cognitive processes. We will focus on such topics as cultural factors in self-concept, gender roles, motivation, cognition, emotions, relationships, and social values. Our exploration will be based on psychological theories, research, guest lecturers, and field experiences. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Contemporary Latin American History

This course is a survey of the main events in Latin American History after its independence. Topics include the historical causes and effects of the independence, some of the main issues on social, economic and political problems and the main historical leaders in modern Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainability and Resources Management in the Ancient World

Students will learn about the relationship ancient civilizations like Egypt, China, Mesopotamia, India, Greece, Rome, the Celts, and the Pre-Colombian Americans had with their environment. Students will explore how these cultures interacted with nature and its resources, as land, forests, water and minerals. In addition, they will be able to identify the main characteristics that allow civilizations to create a sustainable relationship with their surroundings and habitat, if this is the case.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Economic and Human Development

This course introduces the principal socio-economic and political features that have shaped and defined the history and development of Costa Rica. This course will not deal with economic equations or statistics, but rather will trace the changes in approaches to the issues of development, from when the topic emerged following World War II to the present, in effect tracking the evolution of the thinking that has led to moving away from a strict economic approach to development issues, and on to human development as the key to improvement in living conditions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica Colloquium: History and Culture

This course provides general survey of the complex heritage and social evolution of Costa Rica, using a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach and focusing on the historical development and present day dynamics of economy, society, politics, natural resources and culture. Emphasis will be placed upon different topics throughout the course, based on participating students’ diverse backgrounds and expectations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Human Rights in Latin America

This course will provide students with an introduction to the issues surrounding the development and abuse of human rights in Latin America. A particular emphasis will be given to the case of Costa Rica, giving the students an opportunity to explore the development of human rights in the following areas: women’s rights, children’s rights, HIV/AIDS, the CAFTA agreement and labor rights, indigenous groups and human rights, disability and age issues, and the prison environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Tradition: Peace and Democracy

The general objective of this course is to discuss the social, economic and political issues of the process of construction of peace and democracy in Costa Rica and Central America (1948-2005). Special attention will be given to present day issues of peace, democracy, environment, economic and political trends, population, and the emergence of old and new paradigms and ideological movements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Migration, Globalization, and Social Change

The course introduces students to the theories and practices of international human migration as a phenomenon that, while present throughout history, has a particular emphasis in today’s world. We will review the phenomenon based on its most prominent manifestations: forced migrations, voluntary migrations and internal displacements of groupings of people, and the motivational underpinnings that provoke such drastic actions as the uprooting of home and family in pursuit of presumably better opportunities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica's Environmental Policy: A History of Policy, Politics, and Action

This course will explore the dynamics of environmental management, environmental histories, policy, politics and action in the case study of Costa Rica and beyond.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Relations in Latin America

The course will analyze the aspects of the Economic Integration, globalization and conditions for a successful integration between economies and the effects of free trade in the region as well as the effects of protectionism. There will be a special treatment on foreign investments and joint ventures in the Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Programming and Coding: Java

This course is an Introduction to programming and coding, focused on teaching the basics in programming to develop projects. The programming language that will be used is Java because of its ease to use and powerful applications in online applets. Students will develop at least one full project assisted by the professor and fellow students to demonstrate the knowledge gained.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Digital Media Installations

This course will focus on the conceptual role that an artist or a multidisciplinary creative director has in the Digital Media field. Students will work on three creative projects. A film-animation, a website-portfolio, and a digital painting project. Throughout the course many team management skills will also be practiced including daily icebreakers, ideation-brainstorming, team leading and following, selling pitch presentations, sketching and fast Prototyping.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Comunicación Oral Básica (Basic Oral Communication)

This course is designed for students who are studying Spanish as a second language and have already completed a Basic I course. Throughout the course, students will develop their oral communicative competence, which will help them to function effectively in everyday situations.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Introducción al Análisis Literario (Introduction to Literary Analysis)

This course offers an introduction to the study of Spanish literature. Students will develop their develop their ability to conduct literary analysis and commentary.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Lecturas Selectas de la Literatura Latinoamericana (Select Readings from Latin American Literature)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major Latin American authors and literature. The course will cover early Latin American authors to contemporary authors.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Fonética y Fonología (Phonetics and Phonology)

This course is intended for students with a high-intermediate or advanced level of Spanish who want to achieve a more specialized knowledge of this language. The course will cover the major concepts of phonetics and phonetics. Students will study articulation, graphic representation, and pronunciation of American Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introducción a la Traducción (Introduction to Translation)

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical tools of language translation (English to Spanish). Students will work to translate simple texts, which mantaining as much of the author's intention and style as possible.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Dialectología Latinoamericana (Latin American Dialects)

This course aims to provide a representative sample of dialects from the Latin American linguistic community, which has a diversity of aspects: phonological, morphological, and lexical.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Escritoras Contemporaneas Costarricenses (Contemporary Costa Rican Female Writers)

The course deals with the female literary production in Costa Rica. It focuses on the analysis of issues presented in different texts and their relationship with the national reality.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tópicos Selectos en la Literatura Española (Select Topics in Spanish Literature)

This course is an overview of Spanish literature, from early Spanish literature to the first half of contemporary literature. It presents a general overview of each period as well as its main characteristics. The most representative texts of each period will be studied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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El Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Latin American Literature in Film)

This course aims to study film productions based on the literature of renowned Latin American writers. Students will analyze and discuss the main characteristics of the culture, along with the Latin American values and themes presented in these literary and cinematographic exhibitions. Pre-requisite: SPAN 301

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Básico I (Basic Spanish I)

This intensive month course is an introduction to Spanish for beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Students develop basic linguistic skills necessary in order to communicate in common situations. The course covers basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, communicative expressions and frequent situations in settings such as restaurants, stores, buses and others.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Básico II (Basic Spanish 2)

This intensive month course is for students who have completed a minimum of 60 contact hours in Spanish studies and already have a command of elementary grammatical tenses. Students advance their previous experiential knowledge and further develop their oral, reading, written and listening skills. Students expand their vocabulary and language usage in order to facilitate interaction with the Costa Rican environment and be able to express themselves in the past.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Students in this course should have a good command of communicative skills for everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s oral and written skills and emphasizes more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Intermediate Spanish II

This course emphasizes discourse enrichment, specifically related to description and simple narrations. The content of the course includes vocabulary building and detailed wok with the subjunctive mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Español Conversacional Intermedio (Intermediate Conversational Spanish)

This intensive month course is for students who already have a high intermediate level of Spanish and wish to better their communication skills and pronunciation. The course emphasizes situational, everyday conversations and certain cultural issues. The methodology enhances structured speech to provide a firm foundation in patterns of spoken Spanish with progression toward unstructured conversation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Avanzado I (Advanced Spanish I)

This intensive month course is based on grammatical analysis, expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions through readings, and student compositions at a complex level. The objective is for students to acquire a high level of communicative Spanish that will permit them to express their opinions and thoughts on complex and controversial subjects.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Avanzado II (Advanced Spanish II)

Students in this intensive month course should have a high linguistic level and full knowledge of grammatical structures in order to work on polishing stylistics. Students practice narrative constructions, reactions within non-expected contexts, and how to report compiled information. The course also covers important aspects of myths, as well as cultural issues in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Español Conversacional Avanzado (Advanced Conversational Spanish)

Students in this intensive month course acquire higher levels of diction and fluency through the exposure to oral contexts idiomatic language and the varieties of Spanish spoken in different Spanish-speaking nations. This course develops skills in reading discussion, analysis, self-correction and research. Emphasis is placed on pragmatic production and students must be prepared to spend a minimum of 2 extra hours per day on assignments.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Técnicas de Expresión Oral (Oral Expression Techniques)

This intensive month course focuses on advanced communication and presentation skills. Students work on communication techniques and efficient oral expression in formal contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Redacción Avanzada (Advanced Spanish)

This intensive month course is intended for high advanced-level students who want to further develop their written skills through different composition practices and techniques. The course covers complex and difficult questions of syntax. Special attention is given to stylistics and composition structure.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Latin American Architecture and Art

This course provides a chronological overview of the main inventions and influences that contributed to the making of past and present architecture in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Tropical Architecture and Design

This course teaches students to develop the skill to analyze a particular architectural situation and be able to offer adequate design solutions that will guarantee a good quality environment. No previous knowledge of design projection and means of graphic expression is needed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Basic Principles of Drawing

This studio art course introduces basic principles of drawing. The course includes model drawings, landscape drawings, and experimental (abstract) drawings. The focus of this course is on the development of expression and observational drawing from still life, a model, and landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Art Fundamentals: Theory and Practice

This course is designed for the beginner student to help find personal meaning in works of art and develop a better understanding of the nature and validity of art as visual and space language (line, shape, volume, light, space, time, motion, color, and texture). Emphasis is on the diversity of form and content in the artwork. Upon completion, students should understand the basics of art materials used and have a basic overview of the history of art and how art represents its society, especially, Latin American culture.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Mural Painting and Public Art

This studio art course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of large-scale painting, murals, and public art. The course includes an actual practicum in large-scale media and experimentation of early and contemporary techniques including drawing, fresco, painting, aerosol and various industrial materials. Students will incorporate a Service Learning component by either conducting a collective workshop with children from a rural location or actually painting a collective mural as a donation to a community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Documentary Appreciation

This course will focus on the critical analysis of audiovisual documentaries, exploring film and photography mediums in traditional and new media. Class interactions will comprise academic learning, viewing and discussion of material, practical exercises and written assignments.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Theory of Latin American Tropical Dance

This course will provide students with a general overview and a better understanding of the folklore and history of Latin American dance. It will explore the technique, rhythm and movement style of Latin American Tropical dance, along with its history, anthropology, folklore videos and songs.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Selected Topics in Afro-Caribbean Studies

This course examines a particular topic, theme, issue, or problem concerning the Black presence in Costa Rica and Central America. Sample offerings could include Central America and ethnic politics, history, and Culture, Blacks in Central American governments, Contemporary Black literature, History of the Black experience in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Philosophy and Integrated Thought of the Classic World

This course provides an overview of the history and somes selected concepts in majorEastern and Western philosophical movements, from ancient to the middle age periods. Students will reflect on certain topics, such as mind-body, concept of God, knowledge of self and others, predestination and free will, cause and effect, and other fundamental ideas in classical knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecological Photography

Students in this course will learn about about the possibilities and stages of digital photography as applied to ecological exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips, students will apply the information provided in lectures. Students will be able to consciously create and manipulate digital photographic images while exploring Costa Rican ecological systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Cultural Photography

The course offers the acquisition of basic photographic skills as a means of cultural exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips aiming to apply the information provided through lectures, students will consciously explore Costa Rican culture through the creation of photographic images and essays. Students will be able to consciously create photographs that document aspects of Costa Rican Culture through Portraiture and Landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Diversity and Sexual Identity in Latin America

This course will study the LGBTQ+ community and related social issues in the Latin American Context. Special attention will be given to the Costa Rican case study. This course has three main objectives: 1) to explore LGBTQ+ Latin American community issues, 2) to appreciate how particular countries are advancing in relation to equality before the law while studying the social groups pushing for change, and 3) to critically assess present-day contexts that are struggling with recently developed anti-discriminatory framework

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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"Habitudes": Habits and Attitudes for Emerging Christian Leadership

This course is designed to be used by a instructor who will be leading a group discussion on the four book series called Habitudes: Images That Form Leadership Habits & Attitudes. The objectives of the course are 1) to increase the awareness of the need for mature leadership within oneself in the areas of character development, self-care, authenticity, people skills, emotional security, core values, team-building, setting priorities, focused vision, and leader development and 2) to instruct the student in connecting with people and leveraging their influence to lead teams of people efficiently and strategically.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Revolution, Spirituality, and Religion in Latin America

This course provides students with a panoramic view of the influence of gods and religions on Latin America. The course will review the Latin American region’s successful combination of religion and sustainable development and the most influential thinkers, such as Leonardo Boff. The course also covers historical analysis and the impact of various tendencies on cultural, social and political aspects of Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Major World Religions

In this course, we will study the world’s major religions: Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. We will discuss the following questions: What is the core belief? Is there a future? What is the expectation of religious believers? Each religion represents the people of God, and understanding the different worldviews of religion will help us to better respect and love religion.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Conflict Resolution

["The course is based on the Alternatives to Violence Project","a program started in NY State in the seventies. Fundacion CEPPA, Center for Peace Studies, has implemented this program in Costa Rica, Switzerland, and other Latin American countries since 1990. Using a participatory and interactive methodology, the emphasis is made on the following themes: Self-esteem and self-care, communication skills, cooperation, community building and conflict resolution, including mediation, bias awareness, and cultural diversity. Mandatory fieldwork sessions will be conducted at a school, a communal group or a penal institution."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Economics in Latin America

This course examines Latin American policies that affect the international economy. Special attention will be given to trade barriers, economic nationalism and regionalism, international political economy, exchange market intervention and international transmission of economic perturbations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to International Business

This course provides an overview of the cultural environment of international business and the institutions which affect business today. The Latin American perspective with regard to the U.S., Asia and Europe is examined: NAFTA, Mercosur, the EC, and other common market areas and agreements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Leadership Skills

This course is designed to give the student the concepts and tools for the understanding of the science and art of creative leadership. The course will explore concepts such as human behavior, leadership, positive mental attitude, organizations, managers, management versus leadership, leadership ethics, planning, group control, personal branding, etc. Students will analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Genetics: Current Applications

This course is an introduction to genetics, focused on its applications for current issues related to the diagnosis of human diseases, paternity, taxonomy, ecology, conservation, agronomy, and the environment. After having gained a general understanding of the concepts related to genetics, students will perform research projects in Costa Rica, which will then be presented and discussed in order to learn what types of questions science can answer using genetics as a tool. Field trips and laboratory practice will provide an opportunity for students to study how samples are collected, processed and analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Molecular Biology

This course focuses on the use of molecular markers based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to highlight the importance of conservation genetics and the implications on a global scale to manage marine species in danger of extinction. Students will experience field activities to understand some controversial conservation issues related to the endangered trapezoidal marine species in Costa Rica, such as sea turtles and sharks, gathering Tissue samples and later performing hands-on activities in the laboratory such as DNA extractions, PCRs, electrophoresis, and introduction to bioinformatics analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biology of Edible Insects: A Sustainable Food Source

This entomology course explores the use of insects as food sources for human and animal feeding. This course is theoretical and practical look at the origins of entomophagy, its current state and how to use it for a sustainable future. This course will be based on the study of multimedia, literature, visits and practical contact with edible insects whenever possible.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Birds (Tropical Ornithology)

This course provides an introduction to the main topics of ornithology, with an emphasis on neotropical avifauna. Major topics include the unique features that make neotropical avifauna a highlight of bird studies, including its evolutionary relationships, the extremely high species diversity of the neotropics, and the natural history of Costa Rican birds. Two field trips will introduce the main bird groups present in Costa Rica, their behavior, and the skills needed to identify them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Land Vertebrates of Costa Rica

This course is an introduction to the zoology of terrestrial vertebrates in Costa Rica. Students will gain insight into various biological characteristics of the groups of land chordates. Emphasis will be given to the study of Costa Rican species, but others will be discussed as well

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Botany: Useful Plants Workshop

This lecture/field course will provide students with a general overview of tropical plants. Students will gain insight about basic botanical concepts and explore a variety of ecosystems, their plants, and the multiple and complex ecological interactions that can be found in these areas. Emphasis will be given to the most common plant families in Costa Rica, but others will be discussed as well.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Conservation Biology and Endangered Marine Species

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of conservation biology in managing endangered marine species by emphasizing recent conservation efforts of umbrella species such as sea turtles and sharks in the Pacific of Costa Rica. This course will help students develop a critical understanding of conservation biology, by emphasizing the general concept of biodiversity and in current case studies that focus on scientific investigations to answer critical life history aspects, recovery programs, species management, community conservation actions and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Freshwater Ecology

Water is a vital resource and limited resource that is in danger, and demand for this resource is growing. The goal of this course is to help students understand the physical, chemical and biological properties of inland aquatic environments (wetlands, lakes, rivers, mangroves, and reservoirs). It aims to emphasize the problems and conservation efforts for water resources, and to review methods for monitoring aquatic environments through field trips and laboratory work.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Marine Biology

This course has been designed to introduce the basic concepts of oceanography, marine geology, marine ecology and marine biology, with emphasis on the interaction between species, between species and their environment and between ecosystems. It also provides information on the natural and human environmental impact, and the utility, management and conservation of the ecosystems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Mammals of Costa Rica: Biology for Conservation

This course is an introduction to the biology of marine mammals of Costa Rica, including whales, dolphins, manatees fur seals and sea lions. Topics covered include the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of marine mammals. Fieldwork will focus on basic ecological monitoring techniques and primary care on marine mammals strandings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Climate Change Impacts and Adaptations

Mankind is facing serious natural disasters and events caused by global warming and climate change. This course is an introduction to renewable energies and their impact on development and future needs of the planet Earth. It will be focused on Costa Rica’s potential for renewable energies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

This course will examine agricultural and food systems from an ecological systems perspective. Consumption and production issues related to food system sustainability will be analyzed, and students will explore their own role in the food system. Field trips will provide opportunities for direct observation of (and interaction with) different approaches to food production and distribution in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Development and Environmental Awareness

This course is an introduction to current world problems related to natural resource management and conservation, and their effects on sustainable development efforts in tropical countries. Current issues that impact the possibility for development, such as poverty, global warming, deforestation and access to potable water will be analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biotechnology for Sustainability

This course emphasizes the vast possibilities offered by biotechnology for sustainable development through the study of specific cases in Costa Rica. Fundamental and applied concepts of biotechnology will be explored and discussed in terms of life, environmental and social sciences. Work will be heavily based on the study of cases in which biotechnology has become into the best solution for social and environmental situations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecotourism: Costa Rica

The course will offer the chance to analyze this dynamic process from different socio-economic perspectives. It will discuss the economic importance of ecotourism for the Costa Rican national economy, the stimulation of grassroots, community ecotourism projects, and the role of ecotourism in securing environmental protection. The advances and limitations of ecotourism will be explored.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Consumption & Production

Sustainable consumption (SC) and production is a holistic approach to minimizing the negative environmental impacts from consumption and production systems while promoting quality of life for all. This course will help students acquire the knowledge, capacities, and values to help them contribute to shaping a better tomorrow as more responsible consumers. It will trace the history and the justification for the focus on sustainable consumption.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainable Lifestyles

This course builds upon the results of the Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles (GSSL), document, Visions for Change: Recommendations for Effective Policies on Sustainable Lifestyles, which incorporates the voices of 8,000 young adults from 20 different countries. The main objective of the course is designed to give youth a voice and work together to better understand and educate young adults, therefore empowering them to create their own positive versions of sustainable lifestyles and become agents of change.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Gender and Sustainable Development

This course will study the intersection between gender, socio-economic discrimination and the shift toward sustainable development. The main issues will be explored in the context of the Latin America and Caribbean case study with special emphasis on the Costa Rican context where possible. Students will carry out surveys, develop research projects, and participate in two field trips to help them to understand the dynamics and complexities of gender and sustainable development.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Physical Therapy

This course will introduce basic concepts of human anatomy, an overview of the most common injuries and illnesses that require physical therapy, and an introduction to the different tools and methods used to treat them. The course will consist of lectures about the theoretical concepts, and also laboratory practice, which will allow the student a hands-on experience of the different techniques given during the lectures. At the end of the course, the student will have general knowledge on various areas of expertise, and on techniques such as massage therapy, electrotherapy, and therapeutic exercises, among others. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Alternative Health Approaches

This course will introduce basic concepts of alternative medicine. Also this course will explore, and evaluate alternatives approaches and philosophies to personal health and wellness. Some of the topics included are: Homeopathy, TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) Acupuncture, Herbal and Nutritional Therapies, Massage, Chiropractic, Electromagnetic Therapy, Breathing Exercise and others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Conflict Resolution and Health Care

This interactive, hands-on course offers a framework to integrate professional experience with functional communication and mediation skills. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their leadership into progress on matters of public health importance. Mandatory fieldwork sessions at a hospital, clinic, community or school end this challenging experience.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Costa Rican Health Care and Tropical Medicine

The course focuses on the history and development of the public health care system within the context of the Costa Rican sociopolitical and economic situation. It also gives a strong emphasis on how the system actually works and points out not only the strongholds of the systems but also its weak points. A third objective, of fundamental importance in order to understand this system, is the study of Costa Rica as a tropical country. Pre-requisite: Student must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Health and Psychology

Health care professionals require knowledge and skills in the field of psychology to better use an integral approach for their patients. Knowledge on theory, activities and techniques that facilitate the adoption of a multisystem, multilevel, and multivariate orientation, are for the benefit of their patients. This course will discuss some of the most common topics related to Health Psychology and pertinent to practice in the healthcare professions. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Cultural Psychology

This course introduces students to the field of psychology that examines the influence of culture upon human behavior and cognitive processes. We will focus on such topics as cultural factors in self-concept, gender roles, motivation, cognition, emotions, relationships, and social values. Our exploration will be based on psychological theories, research, guest lecturers, and field experiences. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Contemporary Latin American History

This course is a survey of the main events in Latin American History after its independence. Topics include the historical causes and effects of the independence, some of the main issues on social, economic and political problems and the main historical leaders in modern Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainability and Resources Management in the Ancient World

Students will learn about the relationship ancient civilizations like Egypt, China, Mesopotamia, India, Greece, Rome, the Celts, and the Pre-Colombian Americans had with their environment. Students will explore how these cultures interacted with nature and its resources, as land, forests, water and minerals. In addition, they will be able to identify the main characteristics that allow civilizations to create a sustainable relationship with their surroundings and habitat, if this is the case.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Economic and Human Development

This course introduces the principal socio-economic and political features that have shaped and defined the history and development of Costa Rica. This course will not deal with economic equations or statistics, but rather will trace the changes in approaches to the issues of development, from when the topic emerged following World War II to the present, in effect tracking the evolution of the thinking that has led to moving away from a strict economic approach to development issues, and on to human development as the key to improvement in living conditions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica Colloquium: History and Culture

This course provides general survey of the complex heritage and social evolution of Costa Rica, using a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach and focusing on the historical development and present day dynamics of economy, society, politics, natural resources and culture. Emphasis will be placed upon different topics throughout the course, based on participating students’ diverse backgrounds and expectations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Human Rights in Latin America

This course will provide students with an introduction to the issues surrounding the development and abuse of human rights in Latin America. A particular emphasis will be given to the case of Costa Rica, giving the students an opportunity to explore the development of human rights in the following areas: women’s rights, children’s rights, HIV/AIDS, the CAFTA agreement and labor rights, indigenous groups and human rights, disability and age issues, and the prison environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Tradition: Peace and Democracy

The general objective of this course is to discuss the social, economic and political issues of the process of construction of peace and democracy in Costa Rica and Central America (1948-2005). Special attention will be given to present day issues of peace, democracy, environment, economic and political trends, population, and the emergence of old and new paradigms and ideological movements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Migration, Globalization, and Social Change

The course introduces students to the theories and practices of international human migration as a phenomenon that, while present throughout history, has a particular emphasis in today’s world. We will review the phenomenon based on its most prominent manifestations: forced migrations, voluntary migrations and internal displacements of groupings of people, and the motivational underpinnings that provoke such drastic actions as the uprooting of home and family in pursuit of presumably better opportunities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica's Environmental Policy: A History of Policy, Politics, and Action

This course will explore the dynamics of environmental management, environmental histories, policy, politics and action in the case study of Costa Rica and beyond.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Relations in Latin America

The course will analyze the aspects of the Economic Integration, globalization and conditions for a successful integration between economies and the effects of free trade in the region as well as the effects of protectionism. There will be a special treatment on foreign investments and joint ventures in the Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Programming and Coding: Java

This course is an Introduction to programming and coding, focused on teaching the basics in programming to develop projects. The programming language that will be used is Java because of its ease to use and powerful applications in online applets. Students will develop at least one full project assisted by the professor and fellow students to demonstrate the knowledge gained.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Digital Media Installations

This course will focus on the conceptual role that an artist or a multidisciplinary creative director has in the Digital Media field. Students will work on three creative projects. A film-animation, a website-portfolio, and a digital painting project. Throughout the course many team management skills will also be practiced including daily icebreakers, ideation-brainstorming, team leading and following, selling pitch presentations, sketching and fast Prototyping.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Comunicación Oral Básica (Basic Oral Communication)

This course is designed for students who are studying Spanish as a second language and have already completed a Basic I course. Throughout the course, students will develop their oral communicative competence, which will help them to function effectively in everyday situations.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Introducción al Análisis Literario (Introduction to Literary Analysis)

This course offers an introduction to the study of Spanish literature. Students will develop their develop their ability to conduct literary analysis and commentary.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Lecturas Selectas de la Literatura Latinoamericana (Select Readings from Latin American Literature)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major Latin American authors and literature. The course will cover early Latin American authors to contemporary authors.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Fonética y Fonología (Phonetics and Phonology)

This course is intended for students with a high-intermediate or advanced level of Spanish who want to achieve a more specialized knowledge of this language. The course will cover the major concepts of phonetics and phonetics. Students will study articulation, graphic representation, and pronunciation of American Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introducción a la Traducción (Introduction to Translation)

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical tools of language translation (English to Spanish). Students will work to translate simple texts, which mantaining as much of the author's intention and style as possible.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Dialectología Latinoamericana (Latin American Dialects)

This course aims to provide a representative sample of dialects from the Latin American linguistic community, which has a diversity of aspects: phonological, morphological, and lexical.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Escritoras Contemporaneas Costarricenses (Contemporary Costa Rican Female Writers)

The course deals with the female literary production in Costa Rica. It focuses on the analysis of issues presented in different texts and their relationship with the national reality.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tópicos Selectos en la Literatura Española (Select Topics in Spanish Literature)

This course is an overview of Spanish literature, from early Spanish literature to the first half of contemporary literature. It presents a general overview of each period as well as its main characteristics. The most representative texts of each period will be studied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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El Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Latin American Literature in Film)

This course aims to study film productions based on the literature of renowned Latin American writers. Students will analyze and discuss the main characteristics of the culture, along with the Latin American values and themes presented in these literary and cinematographic exhibitions. Pre-requisite: SPAN 301

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Tropical Ecology

Students will learn about the interactions between earth and land and how these interactions or processes affect our life and the stability of the planet. Emphasis will be given to the study of the most relevant tropical ecosystems such as: tropical rain forest, cloud forests, coral reefs and mangroves. Field trips to selected environments will provide on-site examples of some of the issues learned through class work and readings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Básico I (Basic Spanish I)

This intensive month course is an introduction to Spanish for beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Students develop basic linguistic skills necessary in order to communicate in common situations. The course covers basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, communicative expressions and frequent situations in settings such as restaurants, stores, buses and others.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Básico II (Basic Spanish 2)

This intensive month course is for students who have completed a minimum of 60 contact hours in Spanish studies and already have a command of elementary grammatical tenses. Students advance their previous experiential knowledge and further develop their oral, reading, written and listening skills. Students expand their vocabulary and language usage in order to facilitate interaction with the Costa Rican environment and be able to express themselves in the past.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Students in this course should have a good command of communicative skills for everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s oral and written skills and emphasizes more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Intermediate Spanish II

This course emphasizes discourse enrichment, specifically related to description and simple narrations. The content of the course includes vocabulary building and detailed wok with the subjunctive mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Español Conversacional Intermedio (Intermediate Conversational Spanish)

This intensive month course is for students who already have a high intermediate level of Spanish and wish to better their communication skills and pronunciation. The course emphasizes situational, everyday conversations and certain cultural issues. The methodology enhances structured speech to provide a firm foundation in patterns of spoken Spanish with progression toward unstructured conversation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Avanzado I (Advanced Spanish I)

This intensive month course is based on grammatical analysis, expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions through readings, and student compositions at a complex level. The objective is for students to acquire a high level of communicative Spanish that will permit them to express their opinions and thoughts on complex and controversial subjects.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Avanzado II (Advanced Spanish II)

Students in this intensive month course should have a high linguistic level and full knowledge of grammatical structures in order to work on polishing stylistics. Students practice narrative constructions, reactions within non-expected contexts, and how to report compiled information. The course also covers important aspects of myths, as well as cultural issues in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Español Conversacional Avanzado (Advanced Conversational Spanish)

Students in this intensive month course acquire higher levels of diction and fluency through the exposure to oral contexts idiomatic language and the varieties of Spanish spoken in different Spanish-speaking nations. This course develops skills in reading discussion, analysis, self-correction and research. Emphasis is placed on pragmatic production and students must be prepared to spend a minimum of 2 extra hours per day on assignments.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Técnicas de Expresión Oral (Oral Expression Techniques)

This intensive month course focuses on advanced communication and presentation skills. Students work on communication techniques and efficient oral expression in formal contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Redacción Avanzada (Advanced Spanish)

This intensive month course is intended for high advanced-level students who want to further develop their written skills through different composition practices and techniques. The course covers complex and difficult questions of syntax. Special attention is given to stylistics and composition structure.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Latin American Architecture and Art

This course provides a chronological overview of the main inventions and influences that contributed to the making of past and present architecture in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Tropical Architecture and Design

This course teaches students to develop the skill to analyze a particular architectural situation and be able to offer adequate design solutions that will guarantee a good quality environment. No previous knowledge of design projection and means of graphic expression is needed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Basic Principles of Drawing

This studio art course introduces basic principles of drawing. The course includes model drawings, landscape drawings, and experimental (abstract) drawings. The focus of this course is on the development of expression and observational drawing from still life, a model, and landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Art Fundamentals: Theory and Practice

This course is designed for the beginner student to help find personal meaning in works of art and develop a better understanding of the nature and validity of art as visual and space language (line, shape, volume, light, space, time, motion, color, and texture). Emphasis is on the diversity of form and content in the artwork. Upon completion, students should understand the basics of art materials used and have a basic overview of the history of art and how art represents its society, especially, Latin American culture.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Mural Painting and Public Art

This studio art course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of large-scale painting, murals, and public art. The course includes an actual practicum in large-scale media and experimentation of early and contemporary techniques including drawing, fresco, painting, aerosol and various industrial materials. Students will incorporate a Service Learning component by either conducting a collective workshop with children from a rural location or actually painting a collective mural as a donation to a community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Documentary Appreciation

This course will focus on the critical analysis of audiovisual documentaries, exploring film and photography mediums in traditional and new media. Class interactions will comprise academic learning, viewing and discussion of material, practical exercises and written assignments.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Theory of Latin American Tropical Dance

This course will provide students with a general overview and a better understanding of the folklore and history of Latin American dance. It will explore the technique, rhythm and movement style of Latin American Tropical dance, along with its history, anthropology, folklore videos and songs.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Selected Topics in Afro-Caribbean Studies

This course examines a particular topic, theme, issue, or problem concerning the Black presence in Costa Rica and Central America. Sample offerings could include Central America and ethnic politics, history, and Culture, Blacks in Central American governments, Contemporary Black literature, History of the Black experience in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Philosophy and Integrated Thought of the Classic World

This course provides an overview of the history and somes selected concepts in majorEastern and Western philosophical movements, from ancient to the middle age periods. Students will reflect on certain topics, such as mind-body, concept of God, knowledge of self and others, predestination and free will, cause and effect, and other fundamental ideas in classical knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecological Photography

Students in this course will learn about about the possibilities and stages of digital photography as applied to ecological exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips, students will apply the information provided in lectures. Students will be able to consciously create and manipulate digital photographic images while exploring Costa Rican ecological systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Cultural Photography

The course offers the acquisition of basic photographic skills as a means of cultural exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips aiming to apply the information provided through lectures, students will consciously explore Costa Rican culture through the creation of photographic images and essays. Students will be able to consciously create photographs that document aspects of Costa Rican Culture through Portraiture and Landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Diversity and Sexual Identity in Latin America

This course will study the LGBTQ+ community and related social issues in the Latin American Context. Special attention will be given to the Costa Rican case study. This course has three main objectives: 1) to explore LGBTQ+ Latin American community issues, 2) to appreciate how particular countries are advancing in relation to equality before the law while studying the social groups pushing for change, and 3) to critically assess present-day contexts that are struggling with recently developed anti-discriminatory framework

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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"Habitudes": Habits and Attitudes for Emerging Christian Leadership

This course is designed to be used by a instructor who will be leading a group discussion on the four book series called Habitudes: Images That Form Leadership Habits & Attitudes. The objectives of the course are 1) to increase the awareness of the need for mature leadership within oneself in the areas of character development, self-care, authenticity, people skills, emotional security, core values, team-building, setting priorities, focused vision, and leader development and 2) to instruct the student in connecting with people and leveraging their influence to lead teams of people efficiently and strategically.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Revolution, Spirituality, and Religion in Latin America

This course provides students with a panoramic view of the influence of gods and religions on Latin America. The course will review the Latin American region’s successful combination of religion and sustainable development and the most influential thinkers, such as Leonardo Boff. The course also covers historical analysis and the impact of various tendencies on cultural, social and political aspects of Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Major World Religions

In this course, we will study the world’s major religions: Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. We will discuss the following questions: What is the core belief? Is there a future? What is the expectation of religious believers? Each religion represents the people of God, and understanding the different worldviews of religion will help us to better respect and love religion.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Conflict Resolution

["The course is based on the Alternatives to Violence Project","a program started in NY State in the seventies. Fundacion CEPPA, Center for Peace Studies, has implemented this program in Costa Rica, Switzerland, and other Latin American countries since 1990. Using a participatory and interactive methodology, the emphasis is made on the following themes: Self-esteem and self-care, communication skills, cooperation, community building and conflict resolution, including mediation, bias awareness, and cultural diversity. Mandatory fieldwork sessions will be conducted at a school, a communal group or a penal institution."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Economics in Latin America

This course examines Latin American policies that affect the international economy. Special attention will be given to trade barriers, economic nationalism and regionalism, international political economy, exchange market intervention and international transmission of economic perturbations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to International Business

This course provides an overview of the cultural environment of international business and the institutions which affect business today. The Latin American perspective with regard to the U.S., Asia and Europe is examined: NAFTA, Mercosur, the EC, and other common market areas and agreements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Leadership Skills

This course is designed to give the student the concepts and tools for the understanding of the science and art of creative leadership. The course will explore concepts such as human behavior, leadership, positive mental attitude, organizations, managers, management versus leadership, leadership ethics, planning, group control, personal branding, etc. Students will analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Genetics: Current Applications

This course is an introduction to genetics, focused on its applications for current issues related to the diagnosis of human diseases, paternity, taxonomy, ecology, conservation, agronomy, and the environment. After having gained a general understanding of the concepts related to genetics, students will perform research projects in Costa Rica, which will then be presented and discussed in order to learn what types of questions science can answer using genetics as a tool. Field trips and laboratory practice will provide an opportunity for students to study how samples are collected, processed and analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Environmental Impact and Social Devolopment

["This course is an introduction to the study of major environmental problems and issues confronting modern society. Students will examine ecosystems, population patterns, and dynamics","use and misuse of resources","population and environmental quality","environmental citizenship and economic incentives and Costa Rican initiatives in eco-tourism."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Molecular Biology

This course focuses on the use of molecular markers based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to highlight the importance of conservation genetics and the implications on a global scale to manage marine species in danger of extinction. Students will experience field activities to understand some controversial conservation issues related to the endangered trapezoidal marine species in Costa Rica, such as sea turtles and sharks, gathering Tissue samples and later performing hands-on activities in the laboratory such as DNA extractions, PCRs, electrophoresis, and introduction to bioinformatics analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biology of Edible Insects: A Sustainable Food Source

This entomology course explores the use of insects as food sources for human and animal feeding. This course is theoretical and practical look at the origins of entomophagy, its current state and how to use it for a sustainable future. This course will be based on the study of multimedia, literature, visits and practical contact with edible insects whenever possible.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Birds (Tropical Ornithology)

This course provides an introduction to the main topics of ornithology, with an emphasis on neotropical avifauna. Major topics include the unique features that make neotropical avifauna a highlight of bird studies, including its evolutionary relationships, the extremely high species diversity of the neotropics, and the natural history of Costa Rican birds. Two field trips will introduce the main bird groups present in Costa Rica, their behavior, and the skills needed to identify them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Land Vertebrates of Costa Rica

This course is an introduction to the zoology of terrestrial vertebrates in Costa Rica. Students will gain insight into various biological characteristics of the groups of land chordates. Emphasis will be given to the study of Costa Rican species, but others will be discussed as well

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Botany: Useful Plants Workshop

This lecture/field course will provide students with a general overview of tropical plants. Students will gain insight about basic botanical concepts and explore a variety of ecosystems, their plants, and the multiple and complex ecological interactions that can be found in these areas. Emphasis will be given to the most common plant families in Costa Rica, but others will be discussed as well.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Conservation Biology and Endangered Marine Species

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of conservation biology in managing endangered marine species by emphasizing recent conservation efforts of umbrella species such as sea turtles and sharks in the Pacific of Costa Rica. This course will help students develop a critical understanding of conservation biology, by emphasizing the general concept of biodiversity and in current case studies that focus on scientific investigations to answer critical life history aspects, recovery programs, species management, community conservation actions and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Freshwater Ecology

Water is a vital resource and limited resource that is in danger, and demand for this resource is growing. The goal of this course is to help students understand the physical, chemical and biological properties of inland aquatic environments (wetlands, lakes, rivers, mangroves, and reservoirs). It aims to emphasize the problems and conservation efforts for water resources, and to review methods for monitoring aquatic environments through field trips and laboratory work.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Marine Biology

This course has been designed to introduce the basic concepts of oceanography, marine geology, marine ecology and marine biology, with emphasis on the interaction between species, between species and their environment and between ecosystems. It also provides information on the natural and human environmental impact, and the utility, management and conservation of the ecosystems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Mammals of Costa Rica: Biology for Conservation

This course is an introduction to the biology of marine mammals of Costa Rica, including whales, dolphins, manatees fur seals and sea lions. Topics covered include the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of marine mammals. Fieldwork will focus on basic ecological monitoring techniques and primary care on marine mammals strandings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Climate Change Impacts and Adaptations

Mankind is facing serious natural disasters and events caused by global warming and climate change. This course is an introduction to renewable energies and their impact on development and future needs of the planet Earth. It will be focused on Costa Rica’s potential for renewable energies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

This course will examine agricultural and food systems from an ecological systems perspective. Consumption and production issues related to food system sustainability will be analyzed, and students will explore their own role in the food system. Field trips will provide opportunities for direct observation of (and interaction with) different approaches to food production and distribution in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Development and Environmental Awareness

This course is an introduction to current world problems related to natural resource management and conservation, and their effects on sustainable development efforts in tropical countries. Current issues that impact the possibility for development, such as poverty, global warming, deforestation and access to potable water will be analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biotechnology for Sustainability

This course emphasizes the vast possibilities offered by biotechnology for sustainable development through the study of specific cases in Costa Rica. Fundamental and applied concepts of biotechnology will be explored and discussed in terms of life, environmental and social sciences. Work will be heavily based on the study of cases in which biotechnology has become into the best solution for social and environmental situations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecotourism: Costa Rica

The course will offer the chance to analyze this dynamic process from different socio-economic perspectives. It will discuss the economic importance of ecotourism for the Costa Rican national economy, the stimulation of grassroots, community ecotourism projects, and the role of ecotourism in securing environmental protection. The advances and limitations of ecotourism will be explored.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Consumption & Production

Sustainable consumption (SC) and production is a holistic approach to minimizing the negative environmental impacts from consumption and production systems while promoting quality of life for all. This course will help students acquire the knowledge, capacities, and values to help them contribute to shaping a better tomorrow as more responsible consumers. It will trace the history and the justification for the focus on sustainable consumption.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainable Lifestyles

This course builds upon the results of the Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles (GSSL), document, Visions for Change: Recommendations for Effective Policies on Sustainable Lifestyles, which incorporates the voices of 8,000 young adults from 20 different countries. The main objective of the course is designed to give youth a voice and work together to better understand and educate young adults, therefore empowering them to create their own positive versions of sustainable lifestyles and become agents of change.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Gender and Sustainable Development

This course will study the intersection between gender, socio-economic discrimination and the shift toward sustainable development. The main issues will be explored in the context of the Latin America and Caribbean case study with special emphasis on the Costa Rican context where possible. Students will carry out surveys, develop research projects, and participate in two field trips to help them to understand the dynamics and complexities of gender and sustainable development.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Physical Therapy

This course will introduce basic concepts of human anatomy, an overview of the most common injuries and illnesses that require physical therapy, and an introduction to the different tools and methods used to treat them. The course will consist of lectures about the theoretical concepts, and also laboratory practice, which will allow the student a hands-on experience of the different techniques given during the lectures. At the end of the course, the student will have general knowledge on various areas of expertise, and on techniques such as massage therapy, electrotherapy, and therapeutic exercises, among others. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Alternative Health Approaches

This course will introduce basic concepts of alternative medicine. Also this course will explore, and evaluate alternatives approaches and philosophies to personal health and wellness. Some of the topics included are: Homeopathy, TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) Acupuncture, Herbal and Nutritional Therapies, Massage, Chiropractic, Electromagnetic Therapy, Breathing Exercise and others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Conflict Resolution and Health Care

This interactive, hands-on course offers a framework to integrate professional experience with functional communication and mediation skills. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their leadership into progress on matters of public health importance. Mandatory fieldwork sessions at a hospital, clinic, community or school end this challenging experience.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Costa Rican Health Care and Tropical Medicine

The course focuses on the history and development of the public health care system within the context of the Costa Rican sociopolitical and economic situation. It also gives a strong emphasis on how the system actually works and points out not only the strongholds of the systems but also its weak points. A third objective, of fundamental importance in order to understand this system, is the study of Costa Rica as a tropical country. Pre-requisite: Student must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Health and Psychology

Health care professionals require knowledge and skills in the field of psychology to better use an integral approach for their patients. Knowledge on theory, activities and techniques that facilitate the adoption of a multisystem, multilevel, and multivariate orientation, are for the benefit of their patients. This course will discuss some of the most common topics related to Health Psychology and pertinent to practice in the healthcare professions. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Cultural Psychology

This course introduces students to the field of psychology that examines the influence of culture upon human behavior and cognitive processes. We will focus on such topics as cultural factors in self-concept, gender roles, motivation, cognition, emotions, relationships, and social values. Our exploration will be based on psychological theories, research, guest lecturers, and field experiences. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Contemporary Latin American History

This course is a survey of the main events in Latin American History after its independence. Topics include the historical causes and effects of the independence, some of the main issues on social, economic and political problems and the main historical leaders in modern Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainability and Resources Management in the Ancient World

Students will learn about the relationship ancient civilizations like Egypt, China, Mesopotamia, India, Greece, Rome, the Celts, and the Pre-Colombian Americans had with their environment. Students will explore how these cultures interacted with nature and its resources, as land, forests, water and minerals. In addition, they will be able to identify the main characteristics that allow civilizations to create a sustainable relationship with their surroundings and habitat, if this is the case.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Economic and Human Development

This course introduces the principal socio-economic and political features that have shaped and defined the history and development of Costa Rica. This course will not deal with economic equations or statistics, but rather will trace the changes in approaches to the issues of development, from when the topic emerged following World War II to the present, in effect tracking the evolution of the thinking that has led to moving away from a strict economic approach to development issues, and on to human development as the key to improvement in living conditions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica Colloquium: History and Culture

This course provides general survey of the complex heritage and social evolution of Costa Rica, using a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach and focusing on the historical development and present day dynamics of economy, society, politics, natural resources and culture. Emphasis will be placed upon different topics throughout the course, based on participating students’ diverse backgrounds and expectations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Human Rights in Latin America

This course will provide students with an introduction to the issues surrounding the development and abuse of human rights in Latin America. A particular emphasis will be given to the case of Costa Rica, giving the students an opportunity to explore the development of human rights in the following areas: women’s rights, children’s rights, HIV/AIDS, the CAFTA agreement and labor rights, indigenous groups and human rights, disability and age issues, and the prison environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Tradition: Peace and Democracy

The general objective of this course is to discuss the social, economic and political issues of the process of construction of peace and democracy in Costa Rica and Central America (1948-2005). Special attention will be given to present day issues of peace, democracy, environment, economic and political trends, population, and the emergence of old and new paradigms and ideological movements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Migration, Globalization, and Social Change

The course introduces students to the theories and practices of international human migration as a phenomenon that, while present throughout history, has a particular emphasis in today’s world. We will review the phenomenon based on its most prominent manifestations: forced migrations, voluntary migrations and internal displacements of groupings of people, and the motivational underpinnings that provoke such drastic actions as the uprooting of home and family in pursuit of presumably better opportunities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica's Environmental Policy: A History of Policy, Politics, and Action

This course will explore the dynamics of environmental management, environmental histories, policy, politics and action in the case study of Costa Rica and beyond.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Relations in Latin America

The course will analyze the aspects of the Economic Integration, globalization and conditions for a successful integration between economies and the effects of free trade in the region as well as the effects of protectionism. There will be a special treatment on foreign investments and joint ventures in the Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Programming and Coding: Java

This course is an Introduction to programming and coding, focused on teaching the basics in programming to develop projects. The programming language that will be used is Java because of its ease to use and powerful applications in online applets. Students will develop at least one full project assisted by the professor and fellow students to demonstrate the knowledge gained.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Digital Media Installations

This course will focus on the conceptual role that an artist or a multidisciplinary creative director has in the Digital Media field. Students will work on three creative projects. A film-animation, a website-portfolio, and a digital painting project. Throughout the course many team management skills will also be practiced including daily icebreakers, ideation-brainstorming, team leading and following, selling pitch presentations, sketching and fast Prototyping.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Comunicación Oral Básica (Basic Oral Communication)

This course is designed for students who are studying Spanish as a second language and have already completed a Basic I course. Throughout the course, students will develop their oral communicative competence, which will help them to function effectively in everyday situations.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Introducción al Análisis Literario (Introduction to Literary Analysis)

This course offers an introduction to the study of Spanish literature. Students will develop their develop their ability to conduct literary analysis and commentary.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Lecturas Selectas de la Literatura Latinoamericana (Select Readings from Latin American Literature)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major Latin American authors and literature. The course will cover early Latin American authors to contemporary authors.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Fonética y Fonología (Phonetics and Phonology)

This course is intended for students with a high-intermediate or advanced level of Spanish who want to achieve a more specialized knowledge of this language. The course will cover the major concepts of phonetics and phonetics. Students will study articulation, graphic representation, and pronunciation of American Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introducción a la Traducción (Introduction to Translation)

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical tools of language translation (English to Spanish). Students will work to translate simple texts, which mantaining as much of the author's intention and style as possible.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Dialectología Latinoamericana (Latin American Dialects)

This course aims to provide a representative sample of dialects from the Latin American linguistic community, which has a diversity of aspects: phonological, morphological, and lexical.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Escritoras Contemporaneas Costarricenses (Contemporary Costa Rican Female Writers)

The course deals with the female literary production in Costa Rica. It focuses on the analysis of issues presented in different texts and their relationship with the national reality.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tópicos Selectos en la Literatura Española (Select Topics in Spanish Literature)

This course is an overview of Spanish literature, from early Spanish literature to the first half of contemporary literature. It presents a general overview of each period as well as its main characteristics. The most representative texts of each period will be studied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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El Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Latin American Literature in Film)

This course aims to study film productions based on the literature of renowned Latin American writers. Students will analyze and discuss the main characteristics of the culture, along with the Latin American values and themes presented in these literary and cinematographic exhibitions. Pre-requisite: SPAN 301

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Tropical Ecology

Students will learn about the interactions between earth and land and how these interactions or processes affect our life and the stability of the planet. Emphasis will be given to the study of the most relevant tropical ecosystems such as: tropical rain forest, cloud forests, coral reefs and mangroves. Field trips to selected environments will provide on-site examples of some of the issues learned through class work and readings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Principles of Medical Entomology in the Tropics

This course will cover basic and applied aspects of Medical Entomology, with a special focus on the ecological and socioeconomical conditions of the tropics. The course will be based on field trips, class discussions, study of multimedia, literature, visits, and practical contact with people working on these subjects. Therefore, this course is intended for any student with an interest in human health, biology, economics, sustainability, and anthropology.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Introduction to the Physical and Chemical Basis of Everyday Life

This course is designed for students of non-scientific fields that strive to understand the chemical and physical (PChem) basis of everyday life. The goal is to deliver information and promote their own interest in scientific and technical issues through a question/answer approach. The course concentrates on simple but important aspects of modern day societies, such as X rays and CAT scans, the production and utilization of gasoline and polymers, the chemical fate and impact of chemicals on the environment and a variety of technical and scientific aspects related to human life concerns.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Biomimicry: Learning from Nature's Strategies

This course is designed to introduce students from different backgrounds, interests and careers the basic fundamentals of Biomimicry, its methodology, and its application as a design tool in creative processes. Participants have the opportunity, through dedicated time and access to sources of interest, to explore the application of these basic foundations in their own field, or area of interest. The course offers the opportunity to connect, see, feel and touch local biodiversity, and to experience the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary nature of biomimicry, learning how to access and communicate with people from diverse perspectives and experiences.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Básico I (Basic Spanish I)

This intensive month course is an introduction to Spanish for beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Students develop basic linguistic skills necessary in order to communicate in common situations. The course covers basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, communicative expressions and frequent situations in settings such as restaurants, stores, buses and others.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Básico II (Basic Spanish 2)

This intensive month course is for students who have completed a minimum of 60 contact hours in Spanish studies and already have a command of elementary grammatical tenses. Students advance their previous experiential knowledge and further develop their oral, reading, written and listening skills. Students expand their vocabulary and language usage in order to facilitate interaction with the Costa Rican environment and be able to express themselves in the past.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Students in this course should have a good command of communicative skills for everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s oral and written skills and emphasizes more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Intermediate Spanish II

This course emphasizes discourse enrichment, specifically related to description and simple narrations. The content of the course includes vocabulary building and detailed wok with the subjunctive mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Español Conversacional Intermedio (Intermediate Conversational Spanish)

This intensive month course is for students who already have a high intermediate level of Spanish and wish to better their communication skills and pronunciation. The course emphasizes situational, everyday conversations and certain cultural issues. The methodology enhances structured speech to provide a firm foundation in patterns of spoken Spanish with progression toward unstructured conversation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Avanzado I (Advanced Spanish I)

This intensive month course is based on grammatical analysis, expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions through readings, and student compositions at a complex level. The objective is for students to acquire a high level of communicative Spanish that will permit them to express their opinions and thoughts on complex and controversial subjects.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Avanzado II (Advanced Spanish II)

Students in this intensive month course should have a high linguistic level and full knowledge of grammatical structures in order to work on polishing stylistics. Students practice narrative constructions, reactions within non-expected contexts, and how to report compiled information. The course also covers important aspects of myths, as well as cultural issues in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Español Conversacional Avanzado (Advanced Conversational Spanish)

Students in this intensive month course acquire higher levels of diction and fluency through the exposure to oral contexts idiomatic language and the varieties of Spanish spoken in different Spanish-speaking nations. This course develops skills in reading discussion, analysis, self-correction and research. Emphasis is placed on pragmatic production and students must be prepared to spend a minimum of 2 extra hours per day on assignments.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Técnicas de Expresión Oral (Oral Expression Techniques)

This intensive month course focuses on advanced communication and presentation skills. Students work on communication techniques and efficient oral expression in formal contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Redacción Avanzada (Advanced Spanish)

This intensive month course is intended for high advanced-level students who want to further develop their written skills through different composition practices and techniques. The course covers complex and difficult questions of syntax. Special attention is given to stylistics and composition structure.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Latin American Architecture and Art

This course provides a chronological overview of the main inventions and influences that contributed to the making of past and present architecture in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Tropical Architecture and Design

This course teaches students to develop the skill to analyze a particular architectural situation and be able to offer adequate design solutions that will guarantee a good quality environment. No previous knowledge of design projection and means of graphic expression is needed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Basic Principles of Drawing

This studio art course introduces basic principles of drawing. The course includes model drawings, landscape drawings, and experimental (abstract) drawings. The focus of this course is on the development of expression and observational drawing from still life, a model, and landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Art Fundamentals: Theory and Practice

This course is designed for the beginner student to help find personal meaning in works of art and develop a better understanding of the nature and validity of art as visual and space language (line, shape, volume, light, space, time, motion, color, and texture). Emphasis is on the diversity of form and content in the artwork. Upon completion, students should understand the basics of art materials used and have a basic overview of the history of art and how art represents its society, especially, Latin American culture.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Mural Painting and Public Art

This studio art course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of large-scale painting, murals, and public art. The course includes an actual practicum in large-scale media and experimentation of early and contemporary techniques including drawing, fresco, painting, aerosol and various industrial materials. Students will incorporate a Service Learning component by either conducting a collective workshop with children from a rural location or actually painting a collective mural as a donation to a community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Documentary Appreciation

This course will focus on the critical analysis of audiovisual documentaries, exploring film and photography mediums in traditional and new media. Class interactions will comprise academic learning, viewing and discussion of material, practical exercises and written assignments.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Theory of Latin American Tropical Dance

This course will provide students with a general overview and a better understanding of the folklore and history of Latin American dance. It will explore the technique, rhythm and movement style of Latin American Tropical dance, along with its history, anthropology, folklore videos and songs.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Selected Topics in Afro-Caribbean Studies

This course examines a particular topic, theme, issue, or problem concerning the Black presence in Costa Rica and Central America. Sample offerings could include Central America and ethnic politics, history, and Culture, Blacks in Central American governments, Contemporary Black literature, History of the Black experience in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Philosophy and Integrated Thought of the Classic World

This course provides an overview of the history and somes selected concepts in majorEastern and Western philosophical movements, from ancient to the middle age periods. Students will reflect on certain topics, such as mind-body, concept of God, knowledge of self and others, predestination and free will, cause and effect, and other fundamental ideas in classical knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecological Photography

Students in this course will learn about about the possibilities and stages of digital photography as applied to ecological exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips, students will apply the information provided in lectures. Students will be able to consciously create and manipulate digital photographic images while exploring Costa Rican ecological systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Cultural Photography

The course offers the acquisition of basic photographic skills as a means of cultural exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips aiming to apply the information provided through lectures, students will consciously explore Costa Rican culture through the creation of photographic images and essays. Students will be able to consciously create photographs that document aspects of Costa Rican Culture through Portraiture and Landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Diversity and Sexual Identity in Latin America

This course will study the LGBTQ+ community and related social issues in the Latin American Context. Special attention will be given to the Costa Rican case study. This course has three main objectives: 1) to explore LGBTQ+ Latin American community issues, 2) to appreciate how particular countries are advancing in relation to equality before the law while studying the social groups pushing for change, and 3) to critically assess present-day contexts that are struggling with recently developed anti-discriminatory framework

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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"Habitudes": Habits and Attitudes for Emerging Christian Leadership

This course is designed to be used by a instructor who will be leading a group discussion on the four book series called Habitudes: Images That Form Leadership Habits & Attitudes. The objectives of the course are 1) to increase the awareness of the need for mature leadership within oneself in the areas of character development, self-care, authenticity, people skills, emotional security, core values, team-building, setting priorities, focused vision, and leader development and 2) to instruct the student in connecting with people and leveraging their influence to lead teams of people efficiently and strategically.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Revolution, Spirituality, and Religion in Latin America

This course provides students with a panoramic view of the influence of gods and religions on Latin America. The course will review the Latin American region’s successful combination of religion and sustainable development and the most influential thinkers, such as Leonardo Boff. The course also covers historical analysis and the impact of various tendencies on cultural, social and political aspects of Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Major World Religions

In this course, we will study the world’s major religions: Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. We will discuss the following questions: What is the core belief? Is there a future? What is the expectation of religious believers? Each religion represents the people of God, and understanding the different worldviews of religion will help us to better respect and love religion.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Conflict Resolution

["The course is based on the Alternatives to Violence Project","a program started in NY State in the seventies. Fundacion CEPPA, Center for Peace Studies, has implemented this program in Costa Rica, Switzerland, and other Latin American countries since 1990. Using a participatory and interactive methodology, the emphasis is made on the following themes: Self-esteem and self-care, communication skills, cooperation, community building and conflict resolution, including mediation, bias awareness, and cultural diversity. Mandatory fieldwork sessions will be conducted at a school, a communal group or a penal institution."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Economics in Latin America

This course examines Latin American policies that affect the international economy. Special attention will be given to trade barriers, economic nationalism and regionalism, international political economy, exchange market intervention and international transmission of economic perturbations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to International Business

This course provides an overview of the cultural environment of international business and the institutions which affect business today. The Latin American perspective with regard to the U.S., Asia and Europe is examined: NAFTA, Mercosur, the EC, and other common market areas and agreements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Leadership Skills

This course is designed to give the student the concepts and tools for the understanding of the science and art of creative leadership. The course will explore concepts such as human behavior, leadership, positive mental attitude, organizations, managers, management versus leadership, leadership ethics, planning, group control, personal branding, etc. Students will analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Genetics: Current Applications

This course is an introduction to genetics, focused on its applications for current issues related to the diagnosis of human diseases, paternity, taxonomy, ecology, conservation, agronomy, and the environment. After having gained a general understanding of the concepts related to genetics, students will perform research projects in Costa Rica, which will then be presented and discussed in order to learn what types of questions science can answer using genetics as a tool. Field trips and laboratory practice will provide an opportunity for students to study how samples are collected, processed and analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Environmental Impact and Social Devolopment

["This course is an introduction to the study of major environmental problems and issues confronting modern society. Students will examine ecosystems, population patterns, and dynamics","use and misuse of resources","population and environmental quality","environmental citizenship and economic incentives and Costa Rican initiatives in eco-tourism."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Molecular Biology

This course focuses on the use of molecular markers based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to highlight the importance of conservation genetics and the implications on a global scale to manage marine species in danger of extinction. Students will experience field activities to understand some controversial conservation issues related to the endangered trapezoidal marine species in Costa Rica, such as sea turtles and sharks, gathering Tissue samples and later performing hands-on activities in the laboratory such as DNA extractions, PCRs, electrophoresis, and introduction to bioinformatics analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biology of Edible Insects: A Sustainable Food Source

This entomology course explores the use of insects as food sources for human and animal feeding. This course is theoretical and practical look at the origins of entomophagy, its current state and how to use it for a sustainable future. This course will be based on the study of multimedia, literature, visits and practical contact with edible insects whenever possible.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Birds (Tropical Ornithology)

This course provides an introduction to the main topics of ornithology, with an emphasis on neotropical avifauna. Major topics include the unique features that make neotropical avifauna a highlight of bird studies, including its evolutionary relationships, the extremely high species diversity of the neotropics, and the natural history of Costa Rican birds. Two field trips will introduce the main bird groups present in Costa Rica, their behavior, and the skills needed to identify them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Land Vertebrates of Costa Rica

This course is an introduction to the zoology of terrestrial vertebrates in Costa Rica. Students will gain insight into various biological characteristics of the groups of land chordates. Emphasis will be given to the study of Costa Rican species, but others will be discussed as well

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Botany: Useful Plants Workshop

This lecture/field course will provide students with a general overview of tropical plants. Students will gain insight about basic botanical concepts and explore a variety of ecosystems, their plants, and the multiple and complex ecological interactions that can be found in these areas. Emphasis will be given to the most common plant families in Costa Rica, but others will be discussed as well.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Conservation Biology and Endangered Marine Species

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of conservation biology in managing endangered marine species by emphasizing recent conservation efforts of umbrella species such as sea turtles and sharks in the Pacific of Costa Rica. This course will help students develop a critical understanding of conservation biology, by emphasizing the general concept of biodiversity and in current case studies that focus on scientific investigations to answer critical life history aspects, recovery programs, species management, community conservation actions and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Freshwater Ecology

Water is a vital resource and limited resource that is in danger, and demand for this resource is growing. The goal of this course is to help students understand the physical, chemical and biological properties of inland aquatic environments (wetlands, lakes, rivers, mangroves, and reservoirs). It aims to emphasize the problems and conservation efforts for water resources, and to review methods for monitoring aquatic environments through field trips and laboratory work.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Marine Biology

This course has been designed to introduce the basic concepts of oceanography, marine geology, marine ecology and marine biology, with emphasis on the interaction between species, between species and their environment and between ecosystems. It also provides information on the natural and human environmental impact, and the utility, management and conservation of the ecosystems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Mammals of Costa Rica: Biology for Conservation

This course is an introduction to the biology of marine mammals of Costa Rica, including whales, dolphins, manatees fur seals and sea lions. Topics covered include the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of marine mammals. Fieldwork will focus on basic ecological monitoring techniques and primary care on marine mammals strandings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Climate Change Impacts and Adaptations

Mankind is facing serious natural disasters and events caused by global warming and climate change. This course is an introduction to renewable energies and their impact on development and future needs of the planet Earth. It will be focused on Costa Rica’s potential for renewable energies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

This course will examine agricultural and food systems from an ecological systems perspective. Consumption and production issues related to food system sustainability will be analyzed, and students will explore their own role in the food system. Field trips will provide opportunities for direct observation of (and interaction with) different approaches to food production and distribution in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Development and Environmental Awareness

This course is an introduction to current world problems related to natural resource management and conservation, and their effects on sustainable development efforts in tropical countries. Current issues that impact the possibility for development, such as poverty, global warming, deforestation and access to potable water will be analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biotechnology for Sustainability

This course emphasizes the vast possibilities offered by biotechnology for sustainable development through the study of specific cases in Costa Rica. Fundamental and applied concepts of biotechnology will be explored and discussed in terms of life, environmental and social sciences. Work will be heavily based on the study of cases in which biotechnology has become into the best solution for social and environmental situations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecotourism: Costa Rica

The course will offer the chance to analyze this dynamic process from different socio-economic perspectives. It will discuss the economic importance of ecotourism for the Costa Rican national economy, the stimulation of grassroots, community ecotourism projects, and the role of ecotourism in securing environmental protection. The advances and limitations of ecotourism will be explored.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Consumption & Production

Sustainable consumption (SC) and production is a holistic approach to minimizing the negative environmental impacts from consumption and production systems while promoting quality of life for all. This course will help students acquire the knowledge, capacities, and values to help them contribute to shaping a better tomorrow as more responsible consumers. It will trace the history and the justification for the focus on sustainable consumption.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainable Lifestyles

This course builds upon the results of the Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles (GSSL), document, Visions for Change: Recommendations for Effective Policies on Sustainable Lifestyles, which incorporates the voices of 8,000 young adults from 20 different countries. The main objective of the course is designed to give youth a voice and work together to better understand and educate young adults, therefore empowering them to create their own positive versions of sustainable lifestyles and become agents of change.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Gender and Sustainable Development

This course will study the intersection between gender, socio-economic discrimination and the shift toward sustainable development. The main issues will be explored in the context of the Latin America and Caribbean case study with special emphasis on the Costa Rican context where possible. Students will carry out surveys, develop research projects, and participate in two field trips to help them to understand the dynamics and complexities of gender and sustainable development.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Physical Therapy

This course will introduce basic concepts of human anatomy, an overview of the most common injuries and illnesses that require physical therapy, and an introduction to the different tools and methods used to treat them. The course will consist of lectures about the theoretical concepts, and also laboratory practice, which will allow the student a hands-on experience of the different techniques given during the lectures. At the end of the course, the student will have general knowledge on various areas of expertise, and on techniques such as massage therapy, electrotherapy, and therapeutic exercises, among others. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Alternative Health Approaches

This course will introduce basic concepts of alternative medicine. Also this course will explore, and evaluate alternatives approaches and philosophies to personal health and wellness. Some of the topics included are: Homeopathy, TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) Acupuncture, Herbal and Nutritional Therapies, Massage, Chiropractic, Electromagnetic Therapy, Breathing Exercise and others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Conflict Resolution and Health Care

This interactive, hands-on course offers a framework to integrate professional experience with functional communication and mediation skills. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their leadership into progress on matters of public health importance. Mandatory fieldwork sessions at a hospital, clinic, community or school end this challenging experience.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Costa Rican Health Care and Tropical Medicine

The course focuses on the history and development of the public health care system within the context of the Costa Rican sociopolitical and economic situation. It also gives a strong emphasis on how the system actually works and points out not only the strongholds of the systems but also its weak points. A third objective, of fundamental importance in order to understand this system, is the study of Costa Rica as a tropical country. Pre-requisite: Student must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Health and Psychology

Health care professionals require knowledge and skills in the field of psychology to better use an integral approach for their patients. Knowledge on theory, activities and techniques that facilitate the adoption of a multisystem, multilevel, and multivariate orientation, are for the benefit of their patients. This course will discuss some of the most common topics related to Health Psychology and pertinent to practice in the healthcare professions. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Cultural Psychology

This course introduces students to the field of psychology that examines the influence of culture upon human behavior and cognitive processes. We will focus on such topics as cultural factors in self-concept, gender roles, motivation, cognition, emotions, relationships, and social values. Our exploration will be based on psychological theories, research, guest lecturers, and field experiences. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Contemporary Latin American History

This course is a survey of the main events in Latin American History after its independence. Topics include the historical causes and effects of the independence, some of the main issues on social, economic and political problems and the main historical leaders in modern Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainability and Resources Management in the Ancient World

Students will learn about the relationship ancient civilizations like Egypt, China, Mesopotamia, India, Greece, Rome, the Celts, and the Pre-Colombian Americans had with their environment. Students will explore how these cultures interacted with nature and its resources, as land, forests, water and minerals. In addition, they will be able to identify the main characteristics that allow civilizations to create a sustainable relationship with their surroundings and habitat, if this is the case.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Economic and Human Development

This course introduces the principal socio-economic and political features that have shaped and defined the history and development of Costa Rica. This course will not deal with economic equations or statistics, but rather will trace the changes in approaches to the issues of development, from when the topic emerged following World War II to the present, in effect tracking the evolution of the thinking that has led to moving away from a strict economic approach to development issues, and on to human development as the key to improvement in living conditions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica Colloquium: History and Culture

This course provides general survey of the complex heritage and social evolution of Costa Rica, using a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach and focusing on the historical development and present day dynamics of economy, society, politics, natural resources and culture. Emphasis will be placed upon different topics throughout the course, based on participating students’ diverse backgrounds and expectations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Human Rights in Latin America

This course will provide students with an introduction to the issues surrounding the development and abuse of human rights in Latin America. A particular emphasis will be given to the case of Costa Rica, giving the students an opportunity to explore the development of human rights in the following areas: women’s rights, children’s rights, HIV/AIDS, the CAFTA agreement and labor rights, indigenous groups and human rights, disability and age issues, and the prison environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Tradition: Peace and Democracy

The general objective of this course is to discuss the social, economic and political issues of the process of construction of peace and democracy in Costa Rica and Central America (1948-2005). Special attention will be given to present day issues of peace, democracy, environment, economic and political trends, population, and the emergence of old and new paradigms and ideological movements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Migration, Globalization, and Social Change

The course introduces students to the theories and practices of international human migration as a phenomenon that, while present throughout history, has a particular emphasis in today’s world. We will review the phenomenon based on its most prominent manifestations: forced migrations, voluntary migrations and internal displacements of groupings of people, and the motivational underpinnings that provoke such drastic actions as the uprooting of home and family in pursuit of presumably better opportunities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica's Environmental Policy: A History of Policy, Politics, and Action

This course will explore the dynamics of environmental management, environmental histories, policy, politics and action in the case study of Costa Rica and beyond.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Relations in Latin America

The course will analyze the aspects of the Economic Integration, globalization and conditions for a successful integration between economies and the effects of free trade in the region as well as the effects of protectionism. There will be a special treatment on foreign investments and joint ventures in the Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Programming and Coding: Java

This course is an Introduction to programming and coding, focused on teaching the basics in programming to develop projects. The programming language that will be used is Java because of its ease to use and powerful applications in online applets. Students will develop at least one full project assisted by the professor and fellow students to demonstrate the knowledge gained.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Digital Media Installations

This course will focus on the conceptual role that an artist or a multidisciplinary creative director has in the Digital Media field. Students will work on three creative projects. A film-animation, a website-portfolio, and a digital painting project. Throughout the course many team management skills will also be practiced including daily icebreakers, ideation-brainstorming, team leading and following, selling pitch presentations, sketching and fast Prototyping.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Comunicación Oral Básica (Basic Oral Communication)

This course is designed for students who are studying Spanish as a second language and have already completed a Basic I course. Throughout the course, students will develop their oral communicative competence, which will help them to function effectively in everyday situations.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Introducción al Análisis Literario (Introduction to Literary Analysis)

This course offers an introduction to the study of Spanish literature. Students will develop their develop their ability to conduct literary analysis and commentary.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Lecturas Selectas de la Literatura Latinoamericana (Select Readings from Latin American Literature)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major Latin American authors and literature. The course will cover early Latin American authors to contemporary authors.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Fonética y Fonología (Phonetics and Phonology)

This course is intended for students with a high-intermediate or advanced level of Spanish who want to achieve a more specialized knowledge of this language. The course will cover the major concepts of phonetics and phonetics. Students will study articulation, graphic representation, and pronunciation of American Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introducción a la Traducción (Introduction to Translation)

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical tools of language translation (English to Spanish). Students will work to translate simple texts, which mantaining as much of the author's intention and style as possible.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Dialectología Latinoamericana (Latin American Dialects)

This course aims to provide a representative sample of dialects from the Latin American linguistic community, which has a diversity of aspects: phonological, morphological, and lexical.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Escritoras Contemporaneas Costarricenses (Contemporary Costa Rican Female Writers)

The course deals with the female literary production in Costa Rica. It focuses on the analysis of issues presented in different texts and their relationship with the national reality.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tópicos Selectos en la Literatura Española (Select Topics in Spanish Literature)

This course is an overview of Spanish literature, from early Spanish literature to the first half of contemporary literature. It presents a general overview of each period as well as its main characteristics. The most representative texts of each period will be studied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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El Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Latin American Literature in Film)

This course aims to study film productions based on the literature of renowned Latin American writers. Students will analyze and discuss the main characteristics of the culture, along with the Latin American values and themes presented in these literary and cinematographic exhibitions. Pre-requisite: SPAN 301

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Tropical Ecology

Students will learn about the interactions between earth and land and how these interactions or processes affect our life and the stability of the planet. Emphasis will be given to the study of the most relevant tropical ecosystems such as: tropical rain forest, cloud forests, coral reefs and mangroves. Field trips to selected environments will provide on-site examples of some of the issues learned through class work and readings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Principles of Medical Entomology in the Tropics

This course will cover basic and applied aspects of Medical Entomology, with a special focus on the ecological and socioeconomical conditions of the tropics. The course will be based on field trips, class discussions, study of multimedia, literature, visits, and practical contact with people working on these subjects. Therefore, this course is intended for any student with an interest in human health, biology, economics, sustainability, and anthropology.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Introduction to the Physical and Chemical Basis of Everyday Life

This course is designed for students of non-scientific fields that strive to understand the chemical and physical (PChem) basis of everyday life. The goal is to deliver information and promote their own interest in scientific and technical issues through a question/answer approach. The course concentrates on simple but important aspects of modern day societies, such as X rays and CAT scans, the production and utilization of gasoline and polymers, the chemical fate and impact of chemicals on the environment and a variety of technical and scientific aspects related to human life concerns.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Biomimicry: Learning from Nature's Strategies

This course is designed to introduce students from different backgrounds, interests and careers the basic fundamentals of Biomimicry, its methodology, and its application as a design tool in creative processes. Participants have the opportunity, through dedicated time and access to sources of interest, to explore the application of these basic foundations in their own field, or area of interest. The course offers the opportunity to connect, see, feel and touch local biodiversity, and to experience the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary nature of biomimicry, learning how to access and communicate with people from diverse perspectives and experiences.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Básico I (Basic Spanish I)

This intensive month course is an introduction to Spanish for beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Students develop basic linguistic skills necessary in order to communicate in common situations. The course covers basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, communicative expressions and frequent situations in settings such as restaurants, stores, buses and others.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Básico II (Basic Spanish 2)

This intensive month course is for students who have completed a minimum of 60 contact hours in Spanish studies and already have a command of elementary grammatical tenses. Students advance their previous experiential knowledge and further develop their oral, reading, written and listening skills. Students expand their vocabulary and language usage in order to facilitate interaction with the Costa Rican environment and be able to express themselves in the past.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Students in this course should have a good command of communicative skills for everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s oral and written skills and emphasizes more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Intermediate Spanish II

This course emphasizes discourse enrichment, specifically related to description and simple narrations. The content of the course includes vocabulary building and detailed wok with the subjunctive mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Español Conversacional Intermedio (Intermediate Conversational Spanish)

This intensive month course is for students who already have a high intermediate level of Spanish and wish to better their communication skills and pronunciation. The course emphasizes situational, everyday conversations and certain cultural issues. The methodology enhances structured speech to provide a firm foundation in patterns of spoken Spanish with progression toward unstructured conversation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Avanzado I (Advanced Spanish I)

This intensive month course is based on grammatical analysis, expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions through readings, and student compositions at a complex level. The objective is for students to acquire a high level of communicative Spanish that will permit them to express their opinions and thoughts on complex and controversial subjects.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Avanzado II (Advanced Spanish II)

Students in this intensive month course should have a high linguistic level and full knowledge of grammatical structures in order to work on polishing stylistics. Students practice narrative constructions, reactions within non-expected contexts, and how to report compiled information. The course also covers important aspects of myths, as well as cultural issues in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Español Conversacional Avanzado (Advanced Conversational Spanish)

Students in this intensive month course acquire higher levels of diction and fluency through the exposure to oral contexts idiomatic language and the varieties of Spanish spoken in different Spanish-speaking nations. This course develops skills in reading discussion, analysis, self-correction and research. Emphasis is placed on pragmatic production and students must be prepared to spend a minimum of 2 extra hours per day on assignments.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Técnicas de Expresión Oral (Oral Expression Techniques)

This intensive month course focuses on advanced communication and presentation skills. Students work on communication techniques and efficient oral expression in formal contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Redacción Avanzada (Advanced Spanish)

This intensive month course is intended for high advanced-level students who want to further develop their written skills through different composition practices and techniques. The course covers complex and difficult questions of syntax. Special attention is given to stylistics and composition structure.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Latin American Architecture and Art

This course provides a chronological overview of the main inventions and influences that contributed to the making of past and present architecture in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Tropical Architecture and Design

This course teaches students to develop the skill to analyze a particular architectural situation and be able to offer adequate design solutions that will guarantee a good quality environment. No previous knowledge of design projection and means of graphic expression is needed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Basic Principles of Drawing

This studio art course introduces basic principles of drawing. The course includes model drawings, landscape drawings, and experimental (abstract) drawings. The focus of this course is on the development of expression and observational drawing from still life, a model, and landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Art Fundamentals: Theory and Practice

This course is designed for the beginner student to help find personal meaning in works of art and develop a better understanding of the nature and validity of art as visual and space language (line, shape, volume, light, space, time, motion, color, and texture). Emphasis is on the diversity of form and content in the artwork. Upon completion, students should understand the basics of art materials used and have a basic overview of the history of art and how art represents its society, especially, Latin American culture.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Mural Painting and Public Art

This studio art course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of large-scale painting, murals, and public art. The course includes an actual practicum in large-scale media and experimentation of early and contemporary techniques including drawing, fresco, painting, aerosol and various industrial materials. Students will incorporate a Service Learning component by either conducting a collective workshop with children from a rural location or actually painting a collective mural as a donation to a community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Documentary Appreciation

This course will focus on the critical analysis of audiovisual documentaries, exploring film and photography mediums in traditional and new media. Class interactions will comprise academic learning, viewing and discussion of material, practical exercises and written assignments.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Theory of Latin American Tropical Dance

This course will provide students with a general overview and a better understanding of the folklore and history of Latin American dance. It will explore the technique, rhythm and movement style of Latin American Tropical dance, along with its history, anthropology, folklore videos and songs.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Selected Topics in Afro-Caribbean Studies

This course examines a particular topic, theme, issue, or problem concerning the Black presence in Costa Rica and Central America. Sample offerings could include Central America and ethnic politics, history, and Culture, Blacks in Central American governments, Contemporary Black literature, History of the Black experience in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Philosophy and Integrated Thought of the Classic World

This course provides an overview of the history and somes selected concepts in majorEastern and Western philosophical movements, from ancient to the middle age periods. Students will reflect on certain topics, such as mind-body, concept of God, knowledge of self and others, predestination and free will, cause and effect, and other fundamental ideas in classical knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecological Photography

Students in this course will learn about about the possibilities and stages of digital photography as applied to ecological exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips, students will apply the information provided in lectures. Students will be able to consciously create and manipulate digital photographic images while exploring Costa Rican ecological systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Cultural Photography

The course offers the acquisition of basic photographic skills as a means of cultural exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips aiming to apply the information provided through lectures, students will consciously explore Costa Rican culture through the creation of photographic images and essays. Students will be able to consciously create photographs that document aspects of Costa Rican Culture through Portraiture and Landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Diversity and Sexual Identity in Latin America

This course will study the LGBTQ+ community and related social issues in the Latin American Context. Special attention will be given to the Costa Rican case study. This course has three main objectives: 1) to explore LGBTQ+ Latin American community issues, 2) to appreciate how particular countries are advancing in relation to equality before the law while studying the social groups pushing for change, and 3) to critically assess present-day contexts that are struggling with recently developed anti-discriminatory framework

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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"Habitudes": Habits and Attitudes for Emerging Christian Leadership

This course is designed to be used by a instructor who will be leading a group discussion on the four book series called Habitudes: Images That Form Leadership Habits & Attitudes. The objectives of the course are 1) to increase the awareness of the need for mature leadership within oneself in the areas of character development, self-care, authenticity, people skills, emotional security, core values, team-building, setting priorities, focused vision, and leader development and 2) to instruct the student in connecting with people and leveraging their influence to lead teams of people efficiently and strategically.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Revolution, Spirituality, and Religion in Latin America

This course provides students with a panoramic view of the influence of gods and religions on Latin America. The course will review the Latin American region’s successful combination of religion and sustainable development and the most influential thinkers, such as Leonardo Boff. The course also covers historical analysis and the impact of various tendencies on cultural, social and political aspects of Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Major World Religions

In this course, we will study the world’s major religions: Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. We will discuss the following questions: What is the core belief? Is there a future? What is the expectation of religious believers? Each religion represents the people of God, and understanding the different worldviews of religion will help us to better respect and love religion.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Conflict Resolution

["The course is based on the Alternatives to Violence Project","a program started in NY State in the seventies. Fundacion CEPPA, Center for Peace Studies, has implemented this program in Costa Rica, Switzerland, and other Latin American countries since 1990. Using a participatory and interactive methodology, the emphasis is made on the following themes: Self-esteem and self-care, communication skills, cooperation, community building and conflict resolution, including mediation, bias awareness, and cultural diversity. Mandatory fieldwork sessions will be conducted at a school, a communal group or a penal institution."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Economics in Latin America

This course examines Latin American policies that affect the international economy. Special attention will be given to trade barriers, economic nationalism and regionalism, international political economy, exchange market intervention and international transmission of economic perturbations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to International Business

This course provides an overview of the cultural environment of international business and the institutions which affect business today. The Latin American perspective with regard to the U.S., Asia and Europe is examined: NAFTA, Mercosur, the EC, and other common market areas and agreements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Leadership Skills

This course is designed to give the student the concepts and tools for the understanding of the science and art of creative leadership. The course will explore concepts such as human behavior, leadership, positive mental attitude, organizations, managers, management versus leadership, leadership ethics, planning, group control, personal branding, etc. Students will analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Genetics: Current Applications

This course is an introduction to genetics, focused on its applications for current issues related to the diagnosis of human diseases, paternity, taxonomy, ecology, conservation, agronomy, and the environment. After having gained a general understanding of the concepts related to genetics, students will perform research projects in Costa Rica, which will then be presented and discussed in order to learn what types of questions science can answer using genetics as a tool. Field trips and laboratory practice will provide an opportunity for students to study how samples are collected, processed and analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Environmental Impact and Social Devolopment

["This course is an introduction to the study of major environmental problems and issues confronting modern society. Students will examine ecosystems, population patterns, and dynamics","use and misuse of resources","population and environmental quality","environmental citizenship and economic incentives and Costa Rican initiatives in eco-tourism."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Molecular Biology

This course focuses on the use of molecular markers based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to highlight the importance of conservation genetics and the implications on a global scale to manage marine species in danger of extinction. Students will experience field activities to understand some controversial conservation issues related to the endangered trapezoidal marine species in Costa Rica, such as sea turtles and sharks, gathering Tissue samples and later performing hands-on activities in the laboratory such as DNA extractions, PCRs, electrophoresis, and introduction to bioinformatics analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biology of Edible Insects: A Sustainable Food Source

This entomology course explores the use of insects as food sources for human and animal feeding. This course is theoretical and practical look at the origins of entomophagy, its current state and how to use it for a sustainable future. This course will be based on the study of multimedia, literature, visits and practical contact with edible insects whenever possible.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Birds (Tropical Ornithology)

This course provides an introduction to the main topics of ornithology, with an emphasis on neotropical avifauna. Major topics include the unique features that make neotropical avifauna a highlight of bird studies, including its evolutionary relationships, the extremely high species diversity of the neotropics, and the natural history of Costa Rican birds. Two field trips will introduce the main bird groups present in Costa Rica, their behavior, and the skills needed to identify them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Land Vertebrates of Costa Rica

This course is an introduction to the zoology of terrestrial vertebrates in Costa Rica. Students will gain insight into various biological characteristics of the groups of land chordates. Emphasis will be given to the study of Costa Rican species, but others will be discussed as well

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Botany: Useful Plants Workshop

This lecture/field course will provide students with a general overview of tropical plants. Students will gain insight about basic botanical concepts and explore a variety of ecosystems, their plants, and the multiple and complex ecological interactions that can be found in these areas. Emphasis will be given to the most common plant families in Costa Rica, but others will be discussed as well.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Conservation Biology and Endangered Marine Species

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of conservation biology in managing endangered marine species by emphasizing recent conservation efforts of umbrella species such as sea turtles and sharks in the Pacific of Costa Rica. This course will help students develop a critical understanding of conservation biology, by emphasizing the general concept of biodiversity and in current case studies that focus on scientific investigations to answer critical life history aspects, recovery programs, species management, community conservation actions and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Freshwater Ecology

Water is a vital resource and limited resource that is in danger, and demand for this resource is growing. The goal of this course is to help students understand the physical, chemical and biological properties of inland aquatic environments (wetlands, lakes, rivers, mangroves, and reservoirs). It aims to emphasize the problems and conservation efforts for water resources, and to review methods for monitoring aquatic environments through field trips and laboratory work.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Marine Biology

This course has been designed to introduce the basic concepts of oceanography, marine geology, marine ecology and marine biology, with emphasis on the interaction between species, between species and their environment and between ecosystems. It also provides information on the natural and human environmental impact, and the utility, management and conservation of the ecosystems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Mammals of Costa Rica: Biology for Conservation

This course is an introduction to the biology of marine mammals of Costa Rica, including whales, dolphins, manatees fur seals and sea lions. Topics covered include the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of marine mammals. Fieldwork will focus on basic ecological monitoring techniques and primary care on marine mammals strandings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Climate Change Impacts and Adaptations

Mankind is facing serious natural disasters and events caused by global warming and climate change. This course is an introduction to renewable energies and their impact on development and future needs of the planet Earth. It will be focused on Costa Rica’s potential for renewable energies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

This course will examine agricultural and food systems from an ecological systems perspective. Consumption and production issues related to food system sustainability will be analyzed, and students will explore their own role in the food system. Field trips will provide opportunities for direct observation of (and interaction with) different approaches to food production and distribution in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Development and Environmental Awareness

This course is an introduction to current world problems related to natural resource management and conservation, and their effects on sustainable development efforts in tropical countries. Current issues that impact the possibility for development, such as poverty, global warming, deforestation and access to potable water will be analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biotechnology for Sustainability

This course emphasizes the vast possibilities offered by biotechnology for sustainable development through the study of specific cases in Costa Rica. Fundamental and applied concepts of biotechnology will be explored and discussed in terms of life, environmental and social sciences. Work will be heavily based on the study of cases in which biotechnology has become into the best solution for social and environmental situations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecotourism: Costa Rica

The course will offer the chance to analyze this dynamic process from different socio-economic perspectives. It will discuss the economic importance of ecotourism for the Costa Rican national economy, the stimulation of grassroots, community ecotourism projects, and the role of ecotourism in securing environmental protection. The advances and limitations of ecotourism will be explored.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Sustainable Consumption & Production

Sustainable consumption (SC) and production is a holistic approach to minimizing the negative environmental impacts from consumption and production systems while promoting quality of life for all. This course will help students acquire the knowledge, capacities, and values to help them contribute to shaping a better tomorrow as more responsible consumers. It will trace the history and the justification for the focus on sustainable consumption.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainable Lifestyles

This course builds upon the results of the Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles (GSSL), document, Visions for Change: Recommendations for Effective Policies on Sustainable Lifestyles, which incorporates the voices of 8,000 young adults from 20 different countries. The main objective of the course is designed to give youth a voice and work together to better understand and educate young adults, therefore empowering them to create their own positive versions of sustainable lifestyles and become agents of change.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Gender and Sustainable Development

This course will study the intersection between gender, socio-economic discrimination and the shift toward sustainable development. The main issues will be explored in the context of the Latin America and Caribbean case study with special emphasis on the Costa Rican context where possible. Students will carry out surveys, develop research projects, and participate in two field trips to help them to understand the dynamics and complexities of gender and sustainable development.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Physical Therapy

This course will introduce basic concepts of human anatomy, an overview of the most common injuries and illnesses that require physical therapy, and an introduction to the different tools and methods used to treat them. The course will consist of lectures about the theoretical concepts, and also laboratory practice, which will allow the student a hands-on experience of the different techniques given during the lectures. At the end of the course, the student will have general knowledge on various areas of expertise, and on techniques such as massage therapy, electrotherapy, and therapeutic exercises, among others. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Alternative Health Approaches

This course will introduce basic concepts of alternative medicine. Also this course will explore, and evaluate alternatives approaches and philosophies to personal health and wellness. Some of the topics included are: Homeopathy, TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) Acupuncture, Herbal and Nutritional Therapies, Massage, Chiropractic, Electromagnetic Therapy, Breathing Exercise and others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Conflict Resolution and Health Care

This interactive, hands-on course offers a framework to integrate professional experience with functional communication and mediation skills. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their leadership into progress on matters of public health importance. Mandatory fieldwork sessions at a hospital, clinic, community or school end this challenging experience.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Costa Rican Health Care and Tropical Medicine

The course focuses on the history and development of the public health care system within the context of the Costa Rican sociopolitical and economic situation. It also gives a strong emphasis on how the system actually works and points out not only the strongholds of the systems but also its weak points. A third objective, of fundamental importance in order to understand this system, is the study of Costa Rica as a tropical country. Pre-requisite: Student must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Health and Psychology

Health care professionals require knowledge and skills in the field of psychology to better use an integral approach for their patients. Knowledge on theory, activities and techniques that facilitate the adoption of a multisystem, multilevel, and multivariate orientation, are for the benefit of their patients. This course will discuss some of the most common topics related to Health Psychology and pertinent to practice in the healthcare professions. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Cultural Psychology

This course introduces students to the field of psychology that examines the influence of culture upon human behavior and cognitive processes. We will focus on such topics as cultural factors in self-concept, gender roles, motivation, cognition, emotions, relationships, and social values. Our exploration will be based on psychological theories, research, guest lecturers, and field experiences. Pre-requisite: Must be a health sciences student.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Contemporary Latin American History

This course is a survey of the main events in Latin American History after its independence. Topics include the historical causes and effects of the independence, some of the main issues on social, economic and political problems and the main historical leaders in modern Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sustainability and Resources Management in the Ancient World

Students will learn about the relationship ancient civilizations like Egypt, China, Mesopotamia, India, Greece, Rome, the Celts, and the Pre-Colombian Americans had with their environment. Students will explore how these cultures interacted with nature and its resources, as land, forests, water and minerals. In addition, they will be able to identify the main characteristics that allow civilizations to create a sustainable relationship with their surroundings and habitat, if this is the case.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Economic and Human Development

This course introduces the principal socio-economic and political features that have shaped and defined the history and development of Costa Rica. This course will not deal with economic equations or statistics, but rather will trace the changes in approaches to the issues of development, from when the topic emerged following World War II to the present, in effect tracking the evolution of the thinking that has led to moving away from a strict economic approach to development issues, and on to human development as the key to improvement in living conditions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica Colloquium: History and Culture

This course provides general survey of the complex heritage and social evolution of Costa Rica, using a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach and focusing on the historical development and present day dynamics of economy, society, politics, natural resources and culture. Emphasis will be placed upon different topics throughout the course, based on participating students’ diverse backgrounds and expectations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Human Rights in Latin America

This course will provide students with an introduction to the issues surrounding the development and abuse of human rights in Latin America. A particular emphasis will be given to the case of Costa Rica, giving the students an opportunity to explore the development of human rights in the following areas: women’s rights, children’s rights, HIV/AIDS, the CAFTA agreement and labor rights, indigenous groups and human rights, disability and age issues, and the prison environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rican Tradition: Peace and Democracy

The general objective of this course is to discuss the social, economic and political issues of the process of construction of peace and democracy in Costa Rica and Central America (1948-2005). Special attention will be given to present day issues of peace, democracy, environment, economic and political trends, population, and the emergence of old and new paradigms and ideological movements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Migration, Globalization, and Social Change

The course introduces students to the theories and practices of international human migration as a phenomenon that, while present throughout history, has a particular emphasis in today’s world. We will review the phenomenon based on its most prominent manifestations: forced migrations, voluntary migrations and internal displacements of groupings of people, and the motivational underpinnings that provoke such drastic actions as the uprooting of home and family in pursuit of presumably better opportunities.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Costa Rica's Environmental Policy: A History of Policy, Politics, and Action

This course will explore the dynamics of environmental management, environmental histories, policy, politics and action in the case study of Costa Rica and beyond.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Relations in Latin America

The course will analyze the aspects of the Economic Integration, globalization and conditions for a successful integration between economies and the effects of free trade in the region as well as the effects of protectionism. There will be a special treatment on foreign investments and joint ventures in the Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Programming and Coding: Java

This course is an Introduction to programming and coding, focused on teaching the basics in programming to develop projects. The programming language that will be used is Java because of its ease to use and powerful applications in online applets. Students will develop at least one full project assisted by the professor and fellow students to demonstrate the knowledge gained.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Digital Media Installations

This course will focus on the conceptual role that an artist or a multidisciplinary creative director has in the Digital Media field. Students will work on three creative projects. A film-animation, a website-portfolio, and a digital painting project. Throughout the course many team management skills will also be practiced including daily icebreakers, ideation-brainstorming, team leading and following, selling pitch presentations, sketching and fast Prototyping.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Comunicación Oral Básica (Basic Oral Communication)

This course is designed for students who are studying Spanish as a second language and have already completed a Basic I course. Throughout the course, students will develop their oral communicative competence, which will help them to function effectively in everyday situations.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Introducción al Análisis Literario (Introduction to Literary Analysis)

This course offers an introduction to the study of Spanish literature. Students will develop their develop their ability to conduct literary analysis and commentary.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Lecturas Selectas de la Literatura Latinoamericana (Select Readings from Latin American Literature)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major Latin American authors and literature. The course will cover early Latin American authors to contemporary authors.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Fonética y Fonología (Phonetics and Phonology)

This course is intended for students with a high-intermediate or advanced level of Spanish who want to achieve a more specialized knowledge of this language. The course will cover the major concepts of phonetics and phonetics. Students will study articulation, graphic representation, and pronunciation of American Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introducción a la Traducción (Introduction to Translation)

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical tools of language translation (English to Spanish). Students will work to translate simple texts, which mantaining as much of the author's intention and style as possible.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Dialectología Latinoamericana (Latin American Dialects)

This course aims to provide a representative sample of dialects from the Latin American linguistic community, which has a diversity of aspects: phonological, morphological, and lexical.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Escritoras Contemporaneas Costarricenses (Contemporary Costa Rican Female Writers)

The course deals with the female literary production in Costa Rica. It focuses on the analysis of issues presented in different texts and their relationship with the national reality.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tópicos Selectos en la Literatura Española (Select Topics in Spanish Literature)

This course is an overview of Spanish literature, from early Spanish literature to the first half of contemporary literature. It presents a general overview of each period as well as its main characteristics. The most representative texts of each period will be studied.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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El Cine y Literatura Latinoamericana (Latin American Literature in Film)

This course aims to study film productions based on the literature of renowned Latin American writers. Students will analyze and discuss the main characteristics of the culture, along with the Latin American values and themes presented in these literary and cinematographic exhibitions. Pre-requisite: SPAN 301

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Tropical Ecology

Students will learn about the interactions between earth and land and how these interactions or processes affect our life and the stability of the planet. Emphasis will be given to the study of the most relevant tropical ecosystems such as: tropical rain forest, cloud forests, coral reefs and mangroves. Field trips to selected environments will provide on-site examples of some of the issues learned through class work and readings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Principles of Medical Entomology in the Tropics

This course will cover basic and applied aspects of Medical Entomology, with a special focus on the ecological and socioeconomical conditions of the tropics. The course will be based on field trips, class discussions, study of multimedia, literature, visits, and practical contact with people working on these subjects. Therefore, this course is intended for any student with an interest in human health, biology, economics, sustainability, and anthropology.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Introduction to the Physical and Chemical Basis of Everyday Life

This course is designed for students of non-scientific fields that strive to understand the chemical and physical (PChem) basis of everyday life. The goal is to deliver information and promote their own interest in scientific and technical issues through a question/answer approach. The course concentrates on simple but important aspects of modern day societies, such as X rays and CAT scans, the production and utilization of gasoline and polymers, the chemical fate and impact of chemicals on the environment and a variety of technical and scientific aspects related to human life concerns.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Biomimicry: Learning from Nature's Strategies

This course is designed to introduce students from different backgrounds, interests and careers the basic fundamentals of Biomimicry, its methodology, and its application as a design tool in creative processes. Participants have the opportunity, through dedicated time and access to sources of interest, to explore the application of these basic foundations in their own field, or area of interest. The course offers the opportunity to connect, see, feel and touch local biodiversity, and to experience the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary nature of biomimicry, learning how to access and communicate with people from diverse perspectives and experiences.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Básico I (Basic Spanish I)

This intensive month course is an introduction to Spanish for beginners with no previous knowledge of the language. Students develop basic linguistic skills necessary in order to communicate in common situations. The course covers basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, communicative expressions and frequent situations in settings such as restaurants, stores, buses and others.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Básico II (Basic Spanish 2)

This intensive month course is for students who have completed a minimum of 60 contact hours in Spanish studies and already have a command of elementary grammatical tenses. Students advance their previous experiential knowledge and further develop their oral, reading, written and listening skills. Students expand their vocabulary and language usage in order to facilitate interaction with the Costa Rican environment and be able to express themselves in the past.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Students in this course should have a good command of communicative skills for everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s oral and written skills and emphasizes more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Intermediate Spanish II

This course emphasizes discourse enrichment, specifically related to description and simple narrations. The content of the course includes vocabulary building and detailed wok with the subjunctive mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Español Conversacional Intermedio (Intermediate Conversational Spanish)

This intensive month course is for students who already have a high intermediate level of Spanish and wish to better their communication skills and pronunciation. The course emphasizes situational, everyday conversations and certain cultural issues. The methodology enhances structured speech to provide a firm foundation in patterns of spoken Spanish with progression toward unstructured conversation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Avanzado I (Advanced Spanish I)

This intensive month course is based on grammatical analysis, expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions through readings, and student compositions at a complex level. The objective is for students to acquire a high level of communicative Spanish that will permit them to express their opinions and thoughts on complex and controversial subjects.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Avanzado II (Advanced Spanish II)

Students in this intensive month course should have a high linguistic level and full knowledge of grammatical structures in order to work on polishing stylistics. Students practice narrative constructions, reactions within non-expected contexts, and how to report compiled information. The course also covers important aspects of myths, as well as cultural issues in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Español Conversacional Avanzado (Advanced Conversational Spanish)

Students in this intensive month course acquire higher levels of diction and fluency through the exposure to oral contexts idiomatic language and the varieties of Spanish spoken in different Spanish-speaking nations. This course develops skills in reading discussion, analysis, self-correction and research. Emphasis is placed on pragmatic production and students must be prepared to spend a minimum of 2 extra hours per day on assignments.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Técnicas de Expresión Oral (Oral Expression Techniques)

This intensive month course focuses on advanced communication and presentation skills. Students work on communication techniques and efficient oral expression in formal contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Redacción Avanzada (Advanced Spanish)

This intensive month course is intended for high advanced-level students who want to further develop their written skills through different composition practices and techniques. The course covers complex and difficult questions of syntax. Special attention is given to stylistics and composition structure.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Latin American Architecture and Art

This course provides a chronological overview of the main inventions and influences that contributed to the making of past and present architecture in Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Tropical Architecture and Design

This course teaches students to develop the skill to analyze a particular architectural situation and be able to offer adequate design solutions that will guarantee a good quality environment. No previous knowledge of design projection and means of graphic expression is needed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Basic Principles of Drawing

This studio art course introduces basic principles of drawing. The course includes model drawings, landscape drawings, and experimental (abstract) drawings. The focus of this course is on the development of expression and observational drawing from still life, a model, and landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Art Fundamentals: Theory and Practice

This course is designed for the beginner student to help find personal meaning in works of art and develop a better understanding of the nature and validity of art as visual and space language (line, shape, volume, light, space, time, motion, color, and texture). Emphasis is on the diversity of form and content in the artwork. Upon completion, students should understand the basics of art materials used and have a basic overview of the history of art and how art represents its society, especially, Latin American culture.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Mural Painting and Public Art

This studio art course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of large-scale painting, murals, and public art. The course includes an actual practicum in large-scale media and experimentation of early and contemporary techniques including drawing, fresco, painting, aerosol and various industrial materials. Students will incorporate a Service Learning component by either conducting a collective workshop with children from a rural location or actually painting a collective mural as a donation to a community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Documentary Appreciation

This course will focus on the critical analysis of audiovisual documentaries, exploring film and photography mediums in traditional and new media. Class interactions will comprise academic learning, viewing and discussion of material, practical exercises and written assignments.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Theory of Latin American Tropical Dance

This course will provide students with a general overview and a better understanding of the folklore and history of Latin American dance. It will explore the technique, rhythm and movement style of Latin American Tropical dance, along with its history, anthropology, folklore videos and songs.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Selected Topics in Afro-Caribbean Studies

This course examines a particular topic, theme, issue, or problem concerning the Black presence in Costa Rica and Central America. Sample offerings could include Central America and ethnic politics, history, and Culture, Blacks in Central American governments, Contemporary Black literature, History of the Black experience in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Philosophy and Integrated Thought of the Classic World

This course provides an overview of the history and somes selected concepts in majorEastern and Western philosophical movements, from ancient to the middle age periods. Students will reflect on certain topics, such as mind-body, concept of God, knowledge of self and others, predestination and free will, cause and effect, and other fundamental ideas in classical knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ecological Photography

Students in this course will learn about about the possibilities and stages of digital photography as applied to ecological exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips, students will apply the information provided in lectures. Students will be able to consciously create and manipulate digital photographic images while exploring Costa Rican ecological systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Cultural Photography

The course offers the acquisition of basic photographic skills as a means of cultural exploration. Through practice exercises and field trips aiming to apply the information provided through lectures, students will consciously explore Costa Rican culture through the creation of photographic images and essays. Students will be able to consciously create photographs that document aspects of Costa Rican Culture through Portraiture and Landscapes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Diversity and Sexual Identity in Latin America

This course will study the LGBTQ+ community and related social issues in the Latin American Context. Special attention will be given to the Costa Rican case study. This course has three main objectives: 1) to explore LGBTQ+ Latin American community issues, 2) to appreciate how particular countries are advancing in relation to equality before the law while studying the social groups pushing for change, and 3) to critically assess present-day contexts that are struggling with recently developed anti-discriminatory framework

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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"Habitudes": Habits and Attitudes for Emerging Christian Leadership

This course is designed to be used by a instructor who will be leading a group discussion on the four book series called Habitudes: Images That Form Leadership Habits & Attitudes. The objectives of the course are 1) to increase the awareness of the need for mature leadership within oneself in the areas of character development, self-care, authenticity, people skills, emotional security, core values, team-building, setting priorities, focused vision, and leader development and 2) to instruct the student in connecting with people and leveraging their influence to lead teams of people efficiently and strategically.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Revolution, Spirituality, and Religion in Latin America

This course provides students with a panoramic view of the influence of gods and religions on Latin America. The course will review the Latin American region’s successful combination of religion and sustainable development and the most influential thinkers, such as Leonardo Boff. The course also covers historical analysis and the impact of various tendencies on cultural, social and political aspects of Latin America.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Major World Religions

In this course, we will study the world’s major religions: Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. We will discuss the following questions: What is the core belief? Is there a future? What is the expectation of religious believers? Each religion represents the people of God, and understanding the different worldviews of religion will help us to better respect and love religion.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Conflict Resolution

["The course is based on the Alternatives to Violence Project","a program started in NY State in the seventies. Fundacion CEPPA, Center for Peace Studies, has implemented this program in Costa Rica, Switzerland, and other Latin American countries since 1990. Using a participatory and interactive methodology, the emphasis is made on the following themes: Self-esteem and self-care, communication skills, cooperation, community building and conflict resolution, including mediation, bias awareness, and cultural diversity. Mandatory fieldwork sessions will be conducted at a school, a communal group or a penal institution."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Economics in Latin America

This course examines Latin American policies that affect the international economy. Special attention will be given to trade barriers, economic nationalism and regionalism, international political economy, exchange market intervention and international transmission of economic perturbations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to International Business

This course provides an overview of the cultural environment of international business and the institutions which affect business today. The Latin American perspective with regard to the U.S., Asia and Europe is examined: NAFTA, Mercosur, the EC, and other common market areas and agreements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Creative Leadership Skills

This course is designed to give the student the concepts and tools for the understanding of the science and art of creative leadership. The course will explore concepts such as human behavior, leadership, positive mental attitude, organizations, managers, management versus leadership, leadership ethics, planning, group control, personal branding, etc. Students will analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Introduction to Genetics: Current Applications

This course is an introduction to genetics, focused on its applications for current issues related to the diagnosis of human diseases, paternity, taxonomy, ecology, conservation, agronomy, and the environment. After having gained a general understanding of the concepts related to genetics, students will perform research projects in Costa Rica, which will then be presented and discussed in order to learn what types of questions science can answer using genetics as a tool. Field trips and laboratory practice will provide an opportunity for students to study how samples are collected, processed and analyzed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Environmental Impact and Social Devolopment

["This course is an introduction to the study of major environmental problems and issues confronting modern society. Students will examine ecosystems, population patterns, and dynamics","use and misuse of resources","population and environmental quality","environmental citizenship and economic incentives and Costa Rican initiatives in eco-tourism."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Molecular Biology

This course focuses on the use of molecular markers based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to highlight the importance of conservation genetics and the implications on a global scale to manage marine species in danger of extinction. Students will experience field activities to understand some controversial conservation issues related to the endangered trapezoidal marine species in Costa Rica, such as sea turtles and sharks, gathering Tissue samples and later performing hands-on activities in the laboratory such as DNA extractions, PCRs, electrophoresis, and introduction to bioinformatics analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biology of Edible Insects: A Sustainable Food Source

This entomology course explores the use of insects as food sources for human and animal feeding. This course is theoretical and practical look at the origins of entomophagy, its current state and how to use it for a sustainable future. This course will be based on the study of multimedia, literature, visits and practical contact with edible insects whenever possible.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Birds (Tropical Ornithology)

This course provides an introduction to the main topics of ornithology, with an emphasis on neotropical avifauna. Major topics include the unique features that make neotropical avifauna a highlight of bird studies, including its evolutionary relationships, the extremely high species diversity of the neotropics, and the natural history of Costa Rican birds. Two field trips will introduce the main bird groups present in Costa Rica, their behavior, and the skills needed to identify them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Land Vertebrates of Costa Rica

This course is an introduction to the zoology of terrestrial vertebrates in Costa Rica. Students will gain insight into various biological characteristics of the groups of land chordates. Emphasis will be given to the study of Costa Rican species, but others will be discussed as well

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Botany: Useful Plants Workshop

This lecture/field course will provide students with a general overview of tropical plants. Students will gain insight about basic botanical concepts and explore a variety of ecosystems, their plants, and the multiple and complex ecological interactions that can be found in these areas. Emphasis will be given to the most common plant families in Costa Rica, but others will be discussed as well.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Conservation Biology and Endangered Marine Species

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of conservation biology in managing endangered marine species by emphasizing recent conservation efforts of umbrella species such as sea turtles and sharks in the Pacific of Costa Rica. This course will help students develop a critical understanding of conservation biology, by emphasizing the general concept of biodiversity and in current case studies that focus on scientific investigations to answer critical life history aspects, recovery programs, species management, community conservation actions and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Freshwater Ecology

Water is a vital resource and limited resource that is in danger, and demand for this resource is growing. The goal of this course is to help students understand the physical, chemical and biological properties of inland aquatic environments (wetlands, lakes, rivers, mangroves, and reservoirs). It aims to emphasize the problems and conservation efforts for water resources, and to review methods for monitoring aquatic environments through field trips and laboratory work.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Tropical Marine Biology

This course has been designed to introduce the basic concepts of oceanography, marine geology, marine ecology and marine biology, with emphasis on the interaction between species, between species and their environment and between ecosystems. It also provides information on the natural and human environmental impact, and the utility, management and conservation of the ecosystems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Marine Mammals of Costa Rica: Biology for Conservation

This course is an introduction to the biology of marine mammals of Costa Rica, including whales, dolphins, manatees fur seals and sea lions. Topics covered include the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of marine mammals. Fieldwork will focus on basic ecological monitoring techniques and primary care on marine mammals strandings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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