Croatia Dubrovnik Student And Ocean

Students who choose to study abroad in Dubrovnik with API will take courses at Libertas International University (formerly known as DIU Libertas International University). Libertas is the first private university in Croatia, ideally situated along the Adriatic Sea and located within the ancient city walls of Dubrovnik.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Transit Pass

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Completed API Application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Dubrovnik programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Plitvice Lakes National Park

    Plitvice Lakes National Park is the oldest national park in Southeastern Euorpe, and the largest in Croatia. It contains breathtaking waterfalls, streams, and lakes, that remind you of a mashup of landscapes from Yosemite, Costa Rica, and Hawaii. The unique water features were formed by above and below ground rivers which are interconnected. The lakes are known for their unqiue colors (blues, greens and grays) which are affected by the various minerals, flora and fauna, and the angle of the sunlight.
  • Split

    Split is the second largest city in Croatia and one of the country’s oldest. Students will have the chance to see Roman emperor Diocletian’s Palace, visit one of the nearby Dalmatian islands of Hvar or Brac, and hike up Marjan Hill for a spectacular view of the city.


  • Mostar, Bosnia & Herzegovina

    A rich history has left numerous historic and cultural traces in these parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, none more so than the town of Mostar. The vivid city has many cultural and religious features, including some impressive relics left by the Turkish, during the rule of the Ottoman Empire. Mostar’s most recognizable landmark is the bridge and the Old City. In this Bosnian town you can also visit Old Bazaar and a typical Turkish house.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Elafiti Islands

    The Elafiti Islands are a small archipelago of islands northwest of Dubrovnik. API students may visit the neighboring inhabited islands of Lopud, Kalamota, and Šipan. Full of peaceful woodlands, vineyards, orchards, and summer homes, these small islands are easily explored by foot and are a great spot for a relaxing day trip.

  • Perast and Kotor

    Just a short drive from Dubrovnik, Montenegro offers a peek into a corner of the Balkans that has been relatively unexplored by Western tourists until recently. Perast sits at the foot of St. Elijah Hill on a cape between the Bay of Risano and the Bay of Kotor, among a series of “fjords” inland from the Adriatic sea. Perast was at its peak in the 18th century under the republic of Venice, and was at one point annexed by Mussolini’s Italy before joining the Yugoslav Republic. Today it is a prize of Montenegro, one of the “newest” countries in the world.

  • Zagreb

    The capital and largest city the Republic of Croatia, Zagreb has a population of nearly 800,000. Parts of its old city bring to mind images of other Central European capitals such as Budapest, Prague, and Vienna. The Gornji grad (upper town) and Donji grad (lower town) are considered the cultural heart(s) of the city. Students will have the chance to see many of Zagrebs attractions – both old and new – including the Old Town Gate, the new Museum of Contemporary Art, the traditional Dolac Market, and the Strossmayer šetalište (a popular promenade offering stunning views over the city rooftops).

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Mostar, Bosnia & Herzegovina

    A rich history has left numerous historic and cultural traces in these parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, none more so than the town of Mostar. The vivid city has many cultural and religious features, including some impressive relics left by the Turkish, during the rule of the Ottoman Empire. Mostar’s most recognizable landmark is the bridge and the Old City. In this Bosnian town you can also visit Old Bazaar and a typical Turkish house.

  • Plitvice Lakes National Park

    Plitvice Lakes National Park is the oldest national park in Southeastern Euorpe, and the largest in Croatia. It contains breathtaking waterfalls, streams, and lakes, that remind you of a mashup of landscapes from Yosemite, Costa Rica, and Hawaii. The unique water features were formed by above and below ground rivers which are interconnected. The lakes are known for their unqiue colors (blues, greens and grays) which are affected by the various minerals, flora and fauna, and the angle of the sunlight.
  • Split

    Split is the second largest city in Croatia and one of the country’s oldest. Students will have the chance to see Roman emperor Diocletian’s Palace, visit one of the nearby Dalmatian islands of Hvar or Brac, and hike up Marjan Hill for a spectacular view of the city.


  • Elafiti Islands

    The Elafiti Islands are a small archipelago of islands northwest of Dubrovnik. API students may visit the neighboring inhabited islands of Lopud, Kalamota, and Šipan. Full of peaceful woodlands, vineyards, orchards, and summer homes, these small islands are easily explored by foot and are a great spot for a relaxing day trip.

  • Perast and Kotor

    Just a short drive from Dubrovnik, Montenegro offers a peek into a corner of the Balkans that has been relatively unexplored by Western tourists until recently. Perast sits at the foot of St. Elijah Hill on a cape between the Bay of Risano and the Bay of Kotor, among a series of “fjords” inland from the Adriatic sea. Perast was at its peak in the 18th century under the republic of Venice, and was at one point annexed by Mussolini’s Italy before joining the Yugoslav Republic. Today it is a prize of Montenegro, one of the “newest” countries in the world.

  • Zagreb

    The capital and largest city the Republic of Croatia, Zagreb has a population of nearly 800,000. Parts of its old city bring to mind images of other Central European capitals such as Budapest, Prague, and Vienna. The Gornji grad (upper town) and Donji grad (lower town) are considered the cultural heart(s) of the city. Students will have the chance to see many of Zagrebs attractions – both old and new – including the Old Town Gate, the new Museum of Contemporary Art, the traditional Dolac Market, and the Strossmayer šetalište (a popular promenade offering stunning views over the city rooftops).

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-15 credits per semester

Students who choose to study abroad in Dubrovnik with API will take courses at Libertas International University (formerly known as DIU Libertas International University). Libertas is the first private university in Croatia, ideally situated along the Adriatic Sea and located within the ancient city walls of Dubrovnik. Dubrovnik’s unique diplomatic and economic history makes it the perfect location to pursue the study of international affairs.

The international relations and diplomacy courses offer an interdisciplinary approach to the constantly evolving field of international relations. Students consider a wide range of contemporary issues in international relations, from globalization to international organizations and international law to the role of civil society in global governance.

The majority of courses are taught in English in an intimate setting with an average of fewer than 10 students per course. The student body consists of a diverse group of international and Croatian students. API students may also elect to take an introductory Croatian language course during their time at Libertas.

Most LIU professors are working diplomats or professionals in their field of study; few live in Dubrovnik. Since they are coming from abroad or from the Croatian capital of Zagreb, course schedules are designed to accommodate their availability. Consequently, some courses are offered only once per week throughout the fifteen-week semester, with each class lasting for four hours. Other courses are taught in an intensive fashion, lasting just one month in total and meeting multiple times per week for 3-4 hours each class period.

INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

API students in Dubrovnik have the opportunity to intern with local NGOs and/or local media/news agencies. These options do not grant credit, though the organizations will be able to issue a certificate of participation. Students will be mentored throughout the process. For more information, contact the Dubrovnik Program Manager.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive their transcript from Libertas International University upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Ivana Bajurin

    Ivana will be one of your Resident Directors in Dubrovnik and will be a resource for you on-site.

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    Nada Raic

    Nada will be one of your Resident Directors in Dubrovnik and will be a resource for you while you are in Croatia!

  • Nd2D68Oszuke9Rutdbli

    Ryan McCann

    Ryan McCann will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - ryan.mccann@apiabroad.com


COURSE OFFERINGS

COURSE STRUCTURE

The structure of the academic semester at Libertas International University is much different than traditional colleges and universities in the U.S. For example, some courses are offered only once per week throughout the fifteen-week semester, with each class lasting for four hours. Other courses are taught in an intensive fashion, lasting just one month in total and meeting multiple times per-week (anytime Monday – Friday) for 3-4 hours each class period. The reason for this rather unusual format is that some of the Libertas instructors are working diplomats and professionals in their respective fields and few live in Dubrovnik. Please note that in addition to the courses listed below, there will be several more course offerings. The official course schedule for each semester will become available closer to the start of the program.

CREDIT INFORMATION

While each student’s course schedule will be unique and will vary greatly depending on when the courses they select are offered, all API students in Croatia will complete the equivalent of 12-15 U.S. semester credits over the fifteen-week period. All courses are taught in English with the exception of any language courses. API advises students to select 6-8 courses if pre-approval is needed prior to the program start. Libertas International University offers programs spanning over 3 years rather than 4 as in the U.S. Courses are offered at the first year (lower level), second year (intermediate level); and 3rd year (higher level). API students can select from courses at any level.

Communication Skills

The students will become familiar with the basic principles of communication, models, strategies of international communication, the importance of cultural context, the basics of verbal and non-verbal communication, barriers in communication, diplomatic and international correspondence, preparation and performing presentations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

History of Diplomacy

The course covers the entire cross section of diplomatic activities, from classic international conflicts, through preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, to the redefinition of threats to collective security and the fight against modern terrorism and the resolution of modern economic inequality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to the History of Civilizations

["The course will explore the evolution of six major civilizations","Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan\/Roman, Hindu and\nChinese. The goal of the course is\nto provide students with critical understanding of the history of\ncivilizations\u2019 tradition, and what this tradition means today in the\nage of globalization."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Relations

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to international relations as a basis of their academic professional profile. It shows an overview of the world of international relations in an era of globalization. Students will understand the complexity of politics and political patterns of interaction in the world and not only between states and will learn the different dynamics, processes and issues facing the contemporary international system. The introduction to the discipline of international relations its main approaches, concepts and instruments of analysis will enable students to analyse and think how the interrelated parts of the international system connect, interrelate and interact.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Introduction to Social Research Methods

This first-year course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to understand, explain, interpret and conduct basic research in the social sciences with emphasis on political science. They will be introduced to the principles of social scientific research, learn how to formulate, prove and disprove hypotheses, learn how to interpret measurements, and design their own research projects.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Comparative Political Systems

This course provides an introduction to comparative politics through the study of various case studies, theories, and readings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Organizations

["The Course will explore the historical idea of International Organization that emerged in\nEurope in the 18th century","its development in the 19th century","and finally its rise in the 20th\ncentury, to become the major factor in international life of states."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Qualitative vs. Quantitative: Methods of Social Research

The course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to understand, explain, interpret and conduct basic research in the social sciences with emphasis on political science. They will be introduced into the principles of social scientific research, learn how to formulate, prove and disprove hypotheses, learn how to interpret measurements, and design their own research projects. Additionally, they will learn how to approach their own thesis work with honesty and thoroughness.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Diplomacy

The overall aim of the third-year course will be to introduce students to the art of diplomacy in the Western Tradition, with an emphasis on modern diplomacy, starting in the 19th century and continuing to present-day. In particular, the course will stress the evolution of the ambassador’s role over time and how the impact of such factors as technology, communications, and ideology have affected the efficacy of the diplomatic process.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Ethics in International Relations

In this course we will analyze the role of ethics in international relations. International ethics is one of the prerequisites of global human society. Through critical analysis of various theories of international relations and through the study of various cases, we will engage students in further discussions and obtain a broader understanding of the subject.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Croatian Language

**Course subject to cancellation if minimum enrollment is not met. The Croatian Language course explores the Croatian alphabet and basic words and phrases that students can use during their stay in Dubrovnik. Usually, students meet in the morning to discover not only the language but the cultural differences and history that this location offers.

Language of Instruction: English Croatian    Language Level Required: Beginner  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Business

In this course, students will apply theories, tools, and insights found in the field of international management to common real world scenarios mainly through the use of case studies (specially from the Harvard Business Publishing). Students will demonstrate an understanding of the similarities and differences among the peoples of the world and how they affect business management. The course will discuss how various legal, political, economic, and cultural systems affect business attitudes and behavior, exploring the managerial issues related to strategic planning, human resource management, motivation, and leadership that may arise in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Current Issues in International Affairs

["Couse Objectives: 1. To be familiar with the major\ninternational and national issues","2. To be able to gather information\nregarding these issues, to summarize\ntheir essential features, to formulate an\neducated opinion about them and,\nfinally, to present and defend such\nopinion orally or in a written form","3. To develop and practice\ncommunication skills including critical\nthinking."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

["This course introduces students to the fields of negotiation\nand conflict resolution from a historical, analytical, and\npsychological perspective. Topics will include an overview of the history of conflict resolution","an analysis of modern-day conflicts and their resolutions, including case-studies such as Bosnia, Northern Ireland, and the Israeli-Palestine conflict","theories of causes and preventions of violent conflict","and ways to successfully resolve conflicts."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Comparative Religions

The purpose of this course is to get students acquainted with the different views, ideas and practices of the major world religions with an emphasis on their role in shaping the systems of values and thought of the cultures where these religions are dominant. In addition to giving students an historical and general overview, this course will also allow them to explore some of the social and political issues related to these world religions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to Statistics

["This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of statistics. Topics include: the description of data;","simple probability;","binominal and normal distribution;","confidence interval estimation;","hypothesis testing;","simple regression and chi-squared distribution. \u000bNote: This course in not open to STEM students who should take MAT 280 Statistics for Science Majors."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Political Concepts and Ideologies

This course helps students participate in political life and debates about current and eternal political questions. It will also help students to better understand and use political concepts, to discern between different ideologies and parties, to understand political structures, institutions, rules, and processes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Economics

["This course introduces students to the basic principles of economics and economic\ntheory. The course will cover topics including supply and demand as the basic elements\nof the market","analysis of the behavior of economic subjects such as individuals and\nbusinesses and explanation of their market interactions","basic theories of production\nand expenses","and the functioning of concurrent markets."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Writing Skills

This course aims to prepare students to express their thoughts and ideas in English within the conventions of academic writing. The course provides students with strategies to use when writing essays in a variety of situations related to their academic disciplines. Its approach emphasises process, training and practice in writing and critical reading.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to Law

This second-year course introduces students to the basic principles of Law. Generally, to distinct legal systems and legal institutions and subjects. This course will mostly cover topics and key issues of the international law; analysis international law subjects such as states, international governmental organizations, entities, and some individuals and their role in the international community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Theories of International Relations

This second-year course introduces students to the mainstream theories/perspectives (realism, idealism, constructivism, (neo)marxism) and issues (modernization and development, gender and globalization) in international relations. The goal of the course is to explain the above-mentioned theories and issues and show how they apply to world events and processes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

European Union

The course is designed to introduce students to the history, the political institutions and the political economy of the European Unión. Whenever possible, we shall compare the Union's institutional arrangements and its political economy to that of the United States. Topics will include the theory of economic integration, fiscal federalism, contemporary decision making in the Union and assessment of democratic institutions in Europe.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Geopolitics

The term “geopolitics” and its cognates emerged at the very end of the nineteenth century in connection to new forms of nationalism and inter-imperialist competition in Europe and the world. Emphasizing the mutually constitutive relationship among power, place, and knowledge, geopolitics has most often been associated with a “realist” and state- centric approach to international relations. This third-year course is both a theoretical and conceptual history of geopolitics as the term has been defined and applied over the past hundred years, and will start with broad emphasis on medieval geopolitics. The unit of analysis will be the medieval sovereign state as well as medieval church state. Within this context a phenomenon of war will be considered first as an ontological category and second as one of the key means and resources in global geopolitical context. A history of geopolitics will also be considered. Classical text in geopolitical thought will be presented to students. Finally, contemporary geopolitics will be considered from the structure and agency approach.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Thesis I

This third-year course prepares students for independent searches into databases of domestic and international scientific journals, proper research and quotation of used literature, development a healthy relationship with the mentor and the time they have at their disposal. The course prepares students to work in accordance with their scientific tasks and directs them towards running a successful and time-limited project of writing the final work

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Croatian Language

**Course subject to cancellation if minimum enrollment is not met. The Croatian Language course explores the Croatian alphabet and basic words and phrases that students can use during their stay in Dubrovnik. Usually, students meet in the morning to discover not only the language but the cultural differences and history that this location offers.

Language of Instruction: English Croatian    Language Level Required: Beginner  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

The Economics of Development

Why are some nations rich and others are poor? This third-year course dives into globalization through readings, videos, cases, and simulations that identify the bigger picture for how societies function. This course will analyze what is a “modern” nation with the emphasis of providing students with the tools to understand what is going on around them by doing rather than just listening.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

The Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia

The key aim of the second-year course is to help the students form a non-biased understanding of the key discourses concerning the rise and fall of Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia was and remains a site of competing narratives and interpretations, presented in various forms both locally and internationally, with often unpredictable moral and political effects. Hence, the course is designed so as to reflect a multitude of often dissonant voices that underpinned the state’s origins, preserved the state for a while in social-political imagination and practice, and finally contributed to its rapid, but not inevitable, dissolution in the 1990s. The course is of an interdisciplinary character, presented in a multi-media form; and it draws on ideas, reflections, and theories from different disciplines including political theory, international relations, legal theory, history, cultural studies, and critical discourse analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

World Political History

This course explores the most important political issues since 1945 with special emphasis on political processes which had large influences on current international issues.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

The Theory and Practice of Diplomacy

The course Theory and Practice of Diplomacy examines the nature of diplomacy, and its different types and their basic characteristics. Lectures will familiarize students with the activities of diplomats, and what they contribute to the conduct of international relations, within a wider historical and theoretical context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Microeconomics

This second-year course presents the core ideas in economics and the basic tools that are employed in order to carry out our investigation. It describes how the market system works and the advantages of that system. Microeconomics explains how scarce resources are allocated by the price system and how the allocation of resources can be changed through the introduction of restrictions on the operation of a free market and on a competitive system of prices. This course further explores the benefits of the operation of free markets and free trade and also explores some situations in which it might be necessary for society to forsake a competitive solution and instead seek to reach a collective decision regarding the allocation and production of resources. Additionally, it will examine different types of market structure and the implications of market structure for the operation of the market and for the allocation of resources.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Comparative Religions

The purpose of this course is to get students acquainted with the different views, ideas and practices of the major world religions with an emphasis on their role in shaping the systems of values and thought of the cultures where these religions are dominant. In addition to giving students an historical and general overview, this course will also allow them to explore some of the social and political issues related to these world religions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to Statistics

["This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of statistics. Topics include: the description of data;","simple probability;","binominal and normal distribution;","confidence interval estimation;","hypothesis testing;","simple regression and chi-squared distribution. \u000bNote: This course in not open to STEM students who should take MAT 280 Statistics for Science Majors."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Political Concepts and Ideologies

This course helps students participate in political life and debates about current and eternal political questions. It will also help students to better understand and use political concepts, to discern between different ideologies and parties, to understand political structures, institutions, rules, and processes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Economics

["This course introduces students to the basic principles of economics and economic\ntheory. The course will cover topics including supply and demand as the basic elements\nof the market","analysis of the behavior of economic subjects such as individuals and\nbusinesses and explanation of their market interactions","basic theories of production\nand expenses","and the functioning of concurrent markets."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Writing Skills

This course aims to prepare students to express their thoughts and ideas in English within the conventions of academic writing. The course provides students with strategies to use when writing essays in a variety of situations related to their academic disciplines. Its approach emphasises process, training and practice in writing and critical reading.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to Law

This second-year course introduces students to the basic principles of Law. Generally, to distinct legal systems and legal institutions and subjects. This course will mostly cover topics and key issues of the international law; analysis international law subjects such as states, international governmental organizations, entities, and some individuals and their role in the international community.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Theories of International Relations

This second-year course introduces students to the mainstream theories/perspectives (realism, idealism, constructivism, (neo)marxism) and issues (modernization and development, gender and globalization) in international relations. The goal of the course is to explain the above-mentioned theories and issues and show how they apply to world events and processes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

European Union

The course is designed to introduce students to the history, the political institutions and the political economy of the European Unión. Whenever possible, we shall compare the Union's institutional arrangements and its political economy to that of the United States. Topics will include the theory of economic integration, fiscal federalism, contemporary decision making in the Union and assessment of democratic institutions in Europe.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Geopolitics

The term “geopolitics” and its cognates emerged at the very end of the nineteenth century in connection to new forms of nationalism and inter-imperialist competition in Europe and the world. Emphasizing the mutually constitutive relationship among power, place, and knowledge, geopolitics has most often been associated with a “realist” and state- centric approach to international relations. This third-year course is both a theoretical and conceptual history of geopolitics as the term has been defined and applied over the past hundred years, and will start with broad emphasis on medieval geopolitics. The unit of analysis will be the medieval sovereign state as well as medieval church state. Within this context a phenomenon of war will be considered first as an ontological category and second as one of the key means and resources in global geopolitical context. A history of geopolitics will also be considered. Classical text in geopolitical thought will be presented to students. Finally, contemporary geopolitics will be considered from the structure and agency approach.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Thesis I

This third-year course prepares students for independent searches into databases of domestic and international scientific journals, proper research and quotation of used literature, development a healthy relationship with the mentor and the time they have at their disposal. The course prepares students to work in accordance with their scientific tasks and directs them towards running a successful and time-limited project of writing the final work

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Communication Skills

The students will become familiar with the basic principles of communication, models, strategies of international communication, the importance of cultural context, the basics of verbal and non-verbal communication, barriers in communication, diplomatic and international correspondence, preparation and performing presentations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

History of Diplomacy

The course covers the entire cross section of diplomatic activities, from classic international conflicts, through preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, to the redefinition of threats to collective security and the fight against modern terrorism and the resolution of modern economic inequality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to the History of Civilizations

["The course will explore the evolution of six major civilizations","Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan\/Roman, Hindu and\nChinese. The goal of the course is\nto provide students with critical understanding of the history of\ncivilizations\u2019 tradition, and what this tradition means today in the\nage of globalization."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to International Relations

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to international relations as a basis of their academic professional profile. It shows an overview of the world of international relations in an era of globalization. Students will understand the complexity of politics and political patterns of interaction in the world and not only between states and will learn the different dynamics, processes and issues facing the contemporary international system. The introduction to the discipline of international relations its main approaches, concepts and instruments of analysis will enable students to analyse and think how the interrelated parts of the international system connect, interrelate and interact.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Introduction to Social Research Methods

This first-year course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to understand, explain, interpret and conduct basic research in the social sciences with emphasis on political science. They will be introduced to the principles of social scientific research, learn how to formulate, prove and disprove hypotheses, learn how to interpret measurements, and design their own research projects.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Comparative Political Systems

This course provides an introduction to comparative politics through the study of various case studies, theories, and readings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Organizations

["The Course will explore the historical idea of International Organization that emerged in\nEurope in the 18th century","its development in the 19th century","and finally its rise in the 20th\ncentury, to become the major factor in international life of states."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Qualitative vs. Quantitative: Methods of Social Research

The course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to understand, explain, interpret and conduct basic research in the social sciences with emphasis on political science. They will be introduced into the principles of social scientific research, learn how to formulate, prove and disprove hypotheses, learn how to interpret measurements, and design their own research projects. Additionally, they will learn how to approach their own thesis work with honesty and thoroughness.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Diplomacy

The overall aim of the third-year course will be to introduce students to the art of diplomacy in the Western Tradition, with an emphasis on modern diplomacy, starting in the 19th century and continuing to present-day. In particular, the course will stress the evolution of the ambassador’s role over time and how the impact of such factors as technology, communications, and ideology have affected the efficacy of the diplomatic process.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Ethics in International Relations

In this course we will analyze the role of ethics in international relations. International ethics is one of the prerequisites of global human society. Through critical analysis of various theories of international relations and through the study of various cases, we will engage students in further discussions and obtain a broader understanding of the subject.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Croatian Language

**Course subject to cancellation if minimum enrollment is not met. The Croatian Language course explores the Croatian alphabet and basic words and phrases that students can use during their stay in Dubrovnik. Usually, students meet in the morning to discover not only the language but the cultural differences and history that this location offers.

Language of Instruction: English Croatian    Language Level Required: Beginner  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

The Economics of Development

Why are some nations rich and others are poor? This third-year course dives into globalization through readings, videos, cases, and simulations that identify the bigger picture for how societies function. This course will analyze what is a “modern” nation with the emphasis of providing students with the tools to understand what is going on around them by doing rather than just listening.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

The Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia

The key aim of the second-year course is to help the students form a non-biased understanding of the key discourses concerning the rise and fall of Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia was and remains a site of competing narratives and interpretations, presented in various forms both locally and internationally, with often unpredictable moral and political effects. Hence, the course is designed so as to reflect a multitude of often dissonant voices that underpinned the state’s origins, preserved the state for a while in social-political imagination and practice, and finally contributed to its rapid, but not inevitable, dissolution in the 1990s. The course is of an interdisciplinary character, presented in a multi-media form; and it draws on ideas, reflections, and theories from different disciplines including political theory, international relations, legal theory, history, cultural studies, and critical discourse analysis.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

World Political History

This course explores the most important political issues since 1945 with special emphasis on political processes which had large influences on current international issues.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

The Theory and Practice of Diplomacy

The course Theory and Practice of Diplomacy examines the nature of diplomacy, and its different types and their basic characteristics. Lectures will familiarize students with the activities of diplomats, and what they contribute to the conduct of international relations, within a wider historical and theoretical context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Microeconomics

This second-year course presents the core ideas in economics and the basic tools that are employed in order to carry out our investigation. It describes how the market system works and the advantages of that system. Microeconomics explains how scarce resources are allocated by the price system and how the allocation of resources can be changed through the introduction of restrictions on the operation of a free market and on a competitive system of prices. This course further explores the benefits of the operation of free markets and free trade and also explores some situations in which it might be necessary for society to forsake a competitive solution and instead seek to reach a collective decision regarding the allocation and production of resources. Additionally, it will examine different types of market structure and the implications of market structure for the operation of the market and for the allocation of resources.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Business

In this course, students will apply theories, tools, and insights found in the field of international management to common real world scenarios mainly through the use of case studies (specially from the Harvard Business Publishing). Students will demonstrate an understanding of the similarities and differences among the peoples of the world and how they affect business management. The course will discuss how various legal, political, economic, and cultural systems affect business attitudes and behavior, exploring the managerial issues related to strategic planning, human resource management, motivation, and leadership that may arise in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Current Issues in International Affairs

["Couse Objectives: 1. To be familiar with the major\ninternational and national issues","2. To be able to gather information\nregarding these issues, to summarize\ntheir essential features, to formulate an\neducated opinion about them and,\nfinally, to present and defend such\nopinion orally or in a written form","3. To develop and practice\ncommunication skills including critical\nthinking."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

["This course introduces students to the fields of negotiation\nand conflict resolution from a historical, analytical, and\npsychological perspective. Topics will include an overview of the history of conflict resolution","an analysis of modern-day conflicts and their resolutions, including case-studies such as Bosnia, Northern Ireland, and the Israeli-Palestine conflict","theories of causes and preventions of violent conflict","and ways to successfully resolve conflicts."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Highlights
  • Courses in English and Croatian
  • International excursions

Typically student apartments are located in one of the best-known areas of Dubrovnik, called “Ploče” which is a very safe, central, residential area near University (5 minutes walking distance). As much as it’s in a great area, it’s also known as the area with the most steps! Keep in mind that as a historical, European town Dubrovnik is built up in the coastal hills, therefore, you can’t walk anywhere without going up some steps. Apartments offer double bedrooms with bed linens, a living area, fully-stocked kitchen, and many have air conditioning and washing machines as well.

Miho010 43876357384 O
Miho015 43876357734 O
Miho021 43876357154 O
Miho030 43876357444 O
Miho036 44595128541 O

*Please note the application deadline has been extended for the Spring session. Additional fees may apply.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring Jan 31, 2020 - May 23, 2020 $13,980 Oct 15, 2019 Nov 1, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Fall Sep, 2020 - Dec, 2020 $13,880 Jun 10, 2020 Jul 1, 2020
Academic Year Sep, 2020 - May, 2021 $25,780 Jun 10, 2020 Jul 1, 2020
Spring Feb 1, 2019 - Jun 1, 2019 $13,880 Oct 15, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Fall Sep 6, 2019 - Dec 21, 2109 $13,880 Jun 10, 2019 Jul 1, 2019
Academic Year Sep 6, 2019 - May 23, 2020 $25,780 Jun 10, 2019 Jul 1, 2019