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The UCL Summer School is divided into two sessions, each spanning three weeks. Students may choose to attend for one or two sessions and will study one module per session.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • 3.3 overall G.P.A. (3.5 and good background in major area of study)
  • Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Program of study statement
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with supporting documents

API students will participate in one of the following excursions per term (students in both terms will do two of the following excursions). These excursions are designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API London programs. Students participating in multiple program sessions will select 1-3 excursions determined by their length of program. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • British Seaside

    Escape the heat of London and join us for a day at the British Seaside! Depending on the weather, activities could include water sports like surfing or kayaking or a traditional lunch of fish and chips. Students will also have some free time to explore the coastline, sun themselves on the beach, play games on the pier, or go shopping in town.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • British Seaside

    Escape the heat of London and join us for a day at the British Seaside! Depending on the weather, activities could include water sports like surfing or kayaking or a traditional lunch of fish and chips. Students will also have some free time to explore the coastline, sun themselves on the beach, play games on the pier, or go shopping in town.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • British Seaside

    Escape the heat of London and join us for a day at the British Seaside! Depending on the weather, activities could include water sports like surfing or kayaking or a traditional lunch of fish and chips. Students will also have some free time to explore the coastline, sun themselves on the beach, play games on the pier, or go shopping in town.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 4 credits per session (up to 8 total)

Students looking for a prestigious university to study abroad in London this summer need look no further than University College London (UCL). UCL is a modern, outward-looking institution, committed to engaging with the major issues of the day. It is ranked as one of the top 10 universities in the world, and only admits the highest caliber of students. More than 25 alumni hold Nobel Prizes, and the university has been named the top research university in the U.K. Over 29,000 students from more than 150 countries call UCL home, and UCL has the highest number of professors of any university in the U.K. UCL was the first university in England to admit students of all races, religions, and classes and the first to give female students equal standing to their male counterparts. UCL was also a pioneer in study abroad, admitting Japanese students as early as 1863!

The UCL Summer School is divided into two sessions, each spanning three weeks. Students may choose to attend for one or two sessions and will study one module per session.

Students will be taught by UCL academics in interactive small groups and many modules incorporate class visits and guest speakers to further enhance their learning. UCL Summer School students will have full-time student status and a UCL ID card which entitles you to full borrowing rights in the UCL libraries.

With 18 specialist libraries and five permanent collections on campus, and all of London’s museums, galleries and monuments within easy reach, students will have a wealth of resources to support their studies.

All UCL Summer School modules aim to incorporate the latest research in each subject area, and may also make use of London as a unique learning resource, taking the learning experience beyond the classroom through excursions and field trips.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive an official transcript from University College London upon successful completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Kelsey Patton

    Kelsey Patton will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - kelsey.patton@apiabroad.com

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    Heather Lees

    Heather Lees will be your Resident Director in London and a resource for you on-site.

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    Anna McCole

    Anna McCole will be your Student Services Coordinator in England and a resource for you while you are abroad with us!

COURSE OFFERINGS

The UCL Summer School offers over 60 modules from a wide range of subject areas. Many of the modules are introductory, meaning no prior subject knowledge is required, while others have specific entry requirements.

With a wide range of modules on offer from many renowned academic departments, students can choose the subject best suited to their academic or personal interests. available topics include:

  • Anthropology
  • Crime and Security
  • Culture, Literature, and the Arts
  • Economics, Business, and Management
  • Education
  • English Language
  • Geography and the Built Environment
  • Health
  • History and Philosophy
  • Law
  • Medical Sciences
  • Politics and International Relations
  • Psychology and Human Behavior
  • Science and Mathematics

CREDIT INFORMATION

Students at University College London (UCL) take 4 U.S. credits per summer session. Students can earn up to 8 U.S. credits in a summer if they complete 2 summer sessions. A UCL course is equivalent to 15 UCL credits, 7.5 ECTS credits, and 4 U.S. credits.

Understanding and Countering Radicalisation and Terrorism

This module provides students with an introduction to the phenomena of radicalisation and terrorism, including key definitions, causal accounts, empirical trends, past and present manifestations, current groups and tactics. With a rigorous grounding in the empirical reality of terrorism trends and processes, the course then outlines a number of prevalent counter-terrorism practices and asks the question: what works in countering terrorism?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Action! Introduction to Film Studies

This module will introduce students to the discipline of Film Studies by focusing on the main theoretical and technical aspects of filmmaking. Through lectures, seminars, screenings and excursions, students will learn how to approach and discuss films analytically and will acquire an awareness of the history and development of cinema and of the key concepts that can be used to discuss and write about films.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Literary London

This module introduces students to the life and literature of London from the eighteenth century to the present day, from Jonathan Swift to Zadie Smith. As we read some of London’s greatest poems, short stories and novels, we will walk the streets of London, visiting some of the great landmarks and museums, as well as looking into its lesser-known histories.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Sermonis Latini Peritia atque Doctrina (Latin Usage: Idiomatic Proficiency and Teaching]

Modulus impertietur prorsus Latiné. Studiosi ilico animadvertent passivam suam linguæ scientiam permittere sibi ut securi ab initio sequantur prorsus doctrinam, atque ad fidentiorem sensim adducentur activum quoque usum linguæ.

Language of Instruction: Latin    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

The Dark Side of London

This interdisciplinary module aims to examine the representation of London in a variety of cultural outputs from the Victorian to the contemporary period. In particular, it aims to analyse how writers/artists have expressed their perception of the city as a dark site of social tensions, mystery, crime, and detective work. Alongside representative literary texts (from Dickens and Conan Doyle to Ackroyd), the module will make room for a significant amount of visual material such as illustrations (Doré, Cruikshank), films (Hitchcock, Reed), television dramas (Ripper Street, Sherlock) and documentaries (Keiller, Ackroyd). I

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Business Psychology

This module introduces students to the key findings and theories concerning how people think, feel and behave in organizations. The module focuses on topics such as motivation, negotiations, group and network dynamics, social status, influence, and individual personality. The module features interactive lectures, research exercises, and experiential activities, including individual negotiations, group problem-solving, and using data analysis to make strategic business decisions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

The course covers: the new business lifecycle (selecting and testing a moneymaking idea, preparing a business plan, raising finance, the Exit), aspects of new business operation (registering a company, setting up your office, understanding financial statements), and exploiting new eCommerce tools and techniques (doing business electronically, company web sites, online business software and services). Invention and innovation – finding and qualifying new opportunities. Business Model Generation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Governance and Public Management

This course equips students with the requisite foundational knowledge and skills for effective management in such public sector and non-profit contexts. Blending scholarship with real-world case applications, the course introduces students to key public management techniques and provides them with an understanding of how changing governance contexts shape what works in public management.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Trade and Migration

This module introduces students to the economics of globalization. We will look at reasons why classical economists thought that comparative advantage (or differences between countries) was the basis for international trade, while in the past few decades the bulk of international trade has been between very similar countries

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Microeconomics

["Economic analysis is one of the most useful tools for understanding social phenomena. Principles of Microeconomics introduces students to the basics of economic ways of thinking. Economic theory is explained through the study of methods of analysis, assumptions and theories about how firms and individuals behave and how markets work. The course is useful for students in the applied social sciences, and is a necessary foundation for students wishing to continue the study of economics and business in their academic careers. The course is divided into four parts: The first is an introduction to languages, methods, and modeling used in microeconomics;","the second part focuses on the firm production process and market strategy;","the third analyses consumer theory and the way in which individual behavior is modeled by economists;","and the fourth and last part studies how the competitive and non-competitive market works. We will make extensive use of case studies and policy issues. which will be discussed in class."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Understanding Management

This module introduces students to the practice of management, to what managers do, why they do it, and ways in which they set about doing it. Different management activities and roles are explored from both a practical and theoretical perspective.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Global London: Contemporary Urbanism, Culture and Space

This course will use London to explore how contemporary cities are being theorized, experienced and understood. Consideration will be given to how cities are conceptualised in and through the context of globalisation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Population and Public Health

The module will introduce students to definitions, basic theories and conceptual frameworks on influences having impact on individual as well as population health. Students will be introduced to the history of population health. Finally, it will also introduce basic measurements of outcomes and risk factors used in population and public health

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Darwin and the History of Evolution

We’ll explore episodes as diverse as (a) dinosaurs and deep time, (b) social Darwinism and corporate capitalism, (c) eugenics, (d) the clash in religion between fundamentalism and modernity, and (e) changing views of what it means to be human. We also explore the idea of hero worship and commemoration: for example, why does Darwin receive so much credit, and why is he buried in Westminster Abbey?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Commercial Arbitration

Various cross-border commercial disputes are frequently resolved by arbitration in London. London is home to a wide range of arbitral institutions, and it boasts a wealth of talented arbitration professionals. This module concerns the contractual and procedural elements of international commercial arbitration both from comparative and practical perspectives, focusing particularly on the English Arbitration Act 1996, the UNCITRAL Model Law and the New York Convention

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Law, Lawyers, and Social Justice

This module will consider the role that law plays in society, with a particular focus on the ways in which lawyers can achieve social change. The module is rooted broadly in law and social sciences and will be richly interdisciplinary in its approach. It will introduce students to conceptions of social justice and to the lawyerclient relationship

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Nanotechnology in Medicine

Through hands-on laboratory sessions, workshops and lectures by world-leading researchers and active clinicians, this module offers both an insight into these emerging technologies and a fundamental understanding of why size matters and how nanoscale technologies interact with biological environments. We will visit the nanoscale quantum universe, and see how nanoscale objects can be tuned for disease targeting. Students will see how this small scale technology offers huge leaps in diagnostics and therapeutics, enabling us to break the boundary from macroscale anatomy to nanoscale biologics.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Politics of Human Rights

This module will introduce students to the idea of what human rights are and different explanations about where rights come from. From there we will briefly examine how human rights have changed and become imbedded in international law since World War II. Next we will ask why governments repress the rights of their citizens. In particular we will try to understand the political advantage governments seek through violating human rights.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

How the Brain Works and What Can Go Wrong

This module will look at what we know about healthy brains - how the brain is structured, the different types of brain cells, localisation of function and neurochemistry of different brain areas, communication within the brain and how we investigate the brain in week 1. In weeks 2 and 3 the module will look at dysfunction in relation to vison, hearing, movement, memory, thinking, emotion and behaviour.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Psychology in Action

Our aim is to develop students’ psychological literacy through the cycle of enquiry and evidence. Students will be introduced to key conceptual issues, methodological approaches and significant findings in scientific psychology, their historical background, and the kinds of empirical evidence on which these findings are based.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Astrophysics and Cosmology

The course in its scope, aims to offer exposure to the fundamental principles of special and general relativity and their significance to the evolution of the Cosmos. Topics such as stellar interiors, classification and evolution along with galaxy dynamics will be discussed in some detail. The course will culminate with descriptions of current cosmological models and touch up on recent developments of the much discussed dark matter and dark energy mysteries and what they entail to the evolution of the Universe.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Climate and Energy

What is the evidence for anthropogenic climate change? How can we generate low-carbon electricity from nuclear and renewable sources, and how can we make our transport infrastructure greener? If we fail to reduce greenhouse gas emissions sufficiently rapidly, will we need to intervene directly in the climate system through so-called “geoengineering”

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Computational Systems Biology

In this module you will have the opportunity to develop and investigate mathematical models of biological systems. You will learn techniques to construct, implement and analyse interaction networks using the Python programming language.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Science Journalism

This module considers key aspects of news writing and offers participants the possibility to experiment practically with the production of different genres of journalistic output: News story, feature article, blog post, and podcast.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Modern and Contemporary Art in London

This course focuses on art works exhibited in London collections and temporary exhibitions, discussing and theorising the evolution of the modern art object from the nineteenth-century to present. Through a series of seminar- and gallery-based classes, the module will closely scrutinise a broad range of art objects, including painting, sculpture, photography, and video, to consider how the development of visual technologies, materials and techniques are negotiated by artists and have impacted on the critical methodologies developed by art historians

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

The Birth of Feminism: UCL, Bloomsbury and Fin-de-Siècle Radicalism

This module explores the rise of feminism in England from the publication of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman to World War I, when London was a hot house of radical thinking and the temporary or definitive home of a variety of brilliant cosmopolitan thinkers and writers who converged here attracted by the infinite opportunities for debate on the most varied ‘isms’: positivism, liberalism, socialism, trade-unionism, Ibsenism, Freudianism, vegetarianism, pacifism, secularism and, last but not least, evolutionism.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Energy and Future Cities

Advancements in the field of electrochemical engineering and the infrastructure that will subsequently facilitate such changes are essential in order to reduce dependencies upon traditional carbon-intensive technologies. For instance, battery technology for use in automotive applications will require a robust charging network in order to prevent energy shortages and power blackouts. This course will provide insight into each stage of this process, from the chemistry and manufacture of new materials to the organisation of the grid and the redesigning of our metropolitan infrastructure. These stages will subsequently shape and dictate the future of our cities.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Urban Environmental Politics

As the planet’s land use and human population become increasingly urban, environmental problems and politics of cities are evermore critical for improving socio-environmental relationships and outcomes. Thus, this module will explore the urban political conflicts of environmental issues like climate change, air pollution, water quality/quantity, resource and energy use, waste disposal, and more. Using a range of case studies from around the world and beginning with some of the contested material flows of resources that both transform and comprise cities, the module then will move to address politicized ideas of nature, conservation, and habitats in the city while concluding with discussions of human agency and responses to the uneven social impacts of urban environmental problems.

View Syllabus   

Anglo-American Business Law (Level 2)

This module introduces students to key areas of business law from a UK-US and international perspective, while honing their analytical, communication, and team problem solving skills. Students will become familiar with the basic structure of the legal system and key elements of contract law, product liability, intellectual property law, the insider trading prohibition, and the law governing partnerships and corporations, including cross-border mergers and acquisitions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Brexit: Political Tensions, Economic Challenges

The module will include team work on multimedia projects, such as a hypothetical campaign for the next country that considers leaving the EU. The module will also include visits to the European Commission’s Representation to the UK and the headquarters of the pro-EU campaign, as well as talks by representatives of organisations on both sides of the Brexit campaign, such as the European Movement and Change Britain. The module will be updated to cover the most recent Brexit developments, as of July 2019

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Bioscience and Society: Public Engagement, Policy and Funding

The purpose of this module is to explore the relationship between science and society in both an historical and contemporary context. Since the days of Christopher Columbus, right down to the Apollo Space programme and more recently the large Hadron collider at CERN, it is has become clear that ambitious scientific endeavour requires public confidence, communication and funding in order to get from the original idea to something which has an impact in society.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Organic Chemistry

This module is designed to introduce students to the foundations of organic chemistry by focusing on the structures, properties and chemical reactivity of the various carbon based compounds. This module will also cover different aspects of isomerism observed in organic molecules as well as the reactions’ mechanisms (substitution, elimination, and addition) in terms of the electrons flow

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Quantitative Modelling Techniques for Finance and Actuarial Sciences

This course provides a self-contained introduction to both theoretical and practical implementation of various quantitative modelling techniques applicable to finance and insurance. We combine diverse quantitative disciplines, from probability to statistics, from actuarial science to quantitative finance. Students will be able to apply the acquired knowledge to evaluate various insurance products.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Nanotechnology in Medicine (Level 2)

The use of nanotechnology in medicine is an emerging field that can revolutionise the treatment and detection of disease. Through hands-on laboratory sessions, workshops and lectures by world-leading researchers and active clinicians, this module offers both an insight into these emerging technologies and a fundamental understanding of why size matters and how nanoscale technologies interact with biological environments.

We will visit the nanoscale quantum universe, and see how nanoscale objects can be tuned for disease targeting. Students will see how this small scale technology offers huge leaps in diagnostics and therapeutics, enabling us to break the boundary from macroscale anatomy to nanoscale biologics.

Please note there will be a £100 bench fee for the use of labs and consumable materials.

Language of Instruction: English   

View Syllabus   

Understanding and Preventing Crime

This module introduces students to the study of crime and its prevention. It begins by considering the challenges with how we define and measure crime, and the implications these have for interpreting key crime trends. Special attention will be devoted to how crime patterns manifest in space and time and how they can be analysed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

International Relations

This module explores contemporary issues and debates that shape world politics today. It starts by introducing International Relations (IR) theory before turning to two broad themes that dominate IR: conflict and peace. We will apply these themes to a case study of the Northern Ireland conflict exploring the key political developments and the transition to a post conflict settlement. This module will also include a workshop that examines the use of wall murals to articulate conflict/post-conflict identity in Northern Ireland.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Data Science and Big Data Analytics

Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming. One of the main challenges for businesses and policy makers when using big data is to find people with the appropriate skills. Students taking this module will be introduced to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques, and learn how to use specialised software to analyse real-world data and answer policy-relevant questions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Greek Myth and Epic

The Greek myths of gods, heroes and heroines have played a crucial role in the history of Western art, literature and music. This module aims to familiarise students with the major figures in Greek myth, the stories associated with them, and the culture which produced them. It will ask why myths occur in the first place, what social or psychological function(s) or needs they fulfil, and how they manage to influence our modern lives.

Language of Instruction: English   

Understanding and Countering Radicalisation and Terrorism

This module provides students with an introduction to the phenomena of radicalisation and terrorism, including key definitions, causal accounts, empirical trends, past and present manifestations, current groups and tactics. With a rigorous grounding in the empirical reality of terrorism trends and processes, the course then outlines a number of prevalent counter-terrorism practices and asks the question: what works in countering terrorism?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Understanding and Preventing Crime

This module introduces students to the study of crime and its prevention. It begins by considering the challenges with how we define and measure crime, and the implications these have for interpreting key crime trends. Special attention will be devoted to how crime patterns manifest in space and time and how they can be analysed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Action! Introduction to Film Studies

This module will introduce students to the discipline of Film Studies by focusing on the main theoretical and technical aspects of filmmaking. Through lectures, seminars, screenings and excursions, students will learn how to approach and discuss films analytically and will acquire an awareness of the history and development of cinema and of the key concepts that can be used to discuss and write about films.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Literary London

This module introduces students to the life and literature of London from the eighteenth century to the present day, from Jonathan Swift to Zadie Smith. As we read some of London’s greatest poems, short stories and novels, we will walk the streets of London, visiting some of the great landmarks and museums, as well as looking into its lesser-known histories.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Sermonis Latini Peritia atque Doctrina (Latin Usage: Idiomatic Proficiency and Teaching]

Modulus impertietur prorsus Latiné. Studiosi ilico animadvertent passivam suam linguæ scientiam permittere sibi ut securi ab initio sequantur prorsus doctrinam, atque ad fidentiorem sensim adducentur activum quoque usum linguæ.

Language of Instruction: Latin    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

The Dark Side of London

This interdisciplinary module aims to examine the representation of London in a variety of cultural outputs from the Victorian to the contemporary period. In particular, it aims to analyse how writers/artists have expressed their perception of the city as a dark site of social tensions, mystery, crime, and detective work. Alongside representative literary texts (from Dickens and Conan Doyle to Ackroyd), the module will make room for a significant amount of visual material such as illustrations (Doré, Cruikshank), films (Hitchcock, Reed), television dramas (Ripper Street, Sherlock) and documentaries (Keiller, Ackroyd). I

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

De Europææ Britanniæ Litteris Latinis [The Latin Literature of European Britain]

Latina lingua nativa et docta monumenta condidit perennis tria jam feré millennia. Ejusdem nititur vigor in sempiternis ætatis classicæ inventis exemplisque a summis auctoribus tunc temporis positis quales fuerunt Terentius in sermone colloquiali, in elaboratá Cicero prosá, magnificis in carminibusque Vergilius. Horum præstantia durabilem dedit vocem prolixo patrimonio omnís humani ingenî provincias complectenti, a litteris ad philosophiam, historiam, jura, scientias.

Language of Instruction: Foreign Languages    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Fairy Tales and their Retellings

The module will introduce students to different literary genres, such as children’s literature (by looking into how children’s novels such as Alice in Wonderland and The Adventures of Pinocchio have been retold) and graphic novel studies. They will learn different approaches of literary analysis, such as comparative criticism and psychoanalysis. The course will include excursions to relevant exhibitions and interactive workshops on storytelling.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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London on Film

["An introduction to filmmaking in London since 1895. Three key topics: studio-production c.1905 (R.W. Paul) and c. 1950 (Ealing Studios)","London gangster films, 1980-2010","London as documented by fiction cinema, with a specific focus on the 1960s."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Business Psychology

This module introduces students to the key findings and theories concerning how people think, feel and behave in organizations. The module focuses on topics such as motivation, negotiations, group and network dynamics, social status, influence, and individual personality. The module features interactive lectures, research exercises, and experiential activities, including individual negotiations, group problem-solving, and using data analysis to make strategic business decisions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

The course covers: the new business lifecycle (selecting and testing a moneymaking idea, preparing a business plan, raising finance, the Exit), aspects of new business operation (registering a company, setting up your office, understanding financial statements), and exploiting new eCommerce tools and techniques (doing business electronically, company web sites, online business software and services). Invention and innovation – finding and qualifying new opportunities. Business Model Generation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Governance and Public Management

This course equips students with the requisite foundational knowledge and skills for effective management in such public sector and non-profit contexts. Blending scholarship with real-world case applications, the course introduces students to key public management techniques and provides them with an understanding of how changing governance contexts shape what works in public management.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Trade and Migration

This module introduces students to the economics of globalization. We will look at reasons why classical economists thought that comparative advantage (or differences between countries) was the basis for international trade, while in the past few decades the bulk of international trade has been between very similar countries

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Principles of Microeconomics

["Economic analysis is one of the most useful tools for understanding social phenomena. Principles of Microeconomics introduces students to the basics of economic ways of thinking. Economic theory is explained through the study of methods of analysis, assumptions and theories about how firms and individuals behave and how markets work. The course is useful for students in the applied social sciences, and is a necessary foundation for students wishing to continue the study of economics and business in their academic careers. The course is divided into four parts: The first is an introduction to languages, methods, and modeling used in microeconomics;","the second part focuses on the firm production process and market strategy;","the third analyses consumer theory and the way in which individual behavior is modeled by economists;","and the fourth and last part studies how the competitive and non-competitive market works. We will make extensive use of case studies and policy issues. which will be discussed in class."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Understanding Management

This module introduces students to the practice of management, to what managers do, why they do it, and ways in which they set about doing it. Different management activities and roles are explored from both a practical and theoretical perspective.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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International Trade and Maritime Law

This module covers all facets of CIF and FOB sales, ranging from contract formation to remedies, focusing on the problems when the interlocking contracts are not back-to-back. It also covers the main principles of the law of carriage of good by sea

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Politics of Global Development

This module will introduce students to the basic theory, institutional architecture and practice of international development. The module aims to provide an overview of some of the major contemporary analytical and policy debates regarding the politics of development.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Macroeconomics

Economics is the study of choice under conditions of scarcity: The resources needed to produce goods and services are limited compared to human desires. Economics is divided into two major areas. Microeconomics studies the choices of consumers, firms, and governments, and describes the working of markets. Macroeconomics studies the behavior of the entire economy. It explains phenomena such as growth, business cycle, inflation, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to economics. The basic principles of economics will be presented and applied in order to explain some features of the modern economy.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

What is Education

During the module, students will attend sessions at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) where a range of experts will present their responses to the question: what is education?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Global London: Contemporary Urbanism, Culture and Space

This course will use London to explore how contemporary cities are being theorized, experienced and understood. Consideration will be given to how cities are conceptualised in and through the context of globalisation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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London's Urban Development: Politics, Policy, and Design

This module explores the processes shaping urban development in contemporary London and the challenges facing its role as a ‘global city’ is the face of economic, social, political and environmental challenges. Drawing on ideas, perspectives and approaches from social science and urban design, the module will critically examine how London is responding to these urban development challenges through a sequence of related topics

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Population and Public Health

The module will introduce students to definitions, basic theories and conceptual frameworks on influences having impact on individual as well as population health. Students will be introduced to the history of population health. Finally, it will also introduce basic measurements of outcomes and risk factors used in population and public health

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Global Health: Local and International Perspectives

This module serves as an introduction to core concepts in Global Health. Through a multidisciplinary approach students learn about the way in which the health of the individual is shaped by socio-political forces. Each week students evaluate a major cause of ill health in developed and developing countries and the role of key actors that influence health.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Darwin and the History of Evolution

We’ll explore episodes as diverse as (a) dinosaurs and deep time, (b) social Darwinism and corporate capitalism, (c) eugenics, (d) the clash in religion between fundamentalism and modernity, and (e) changing views of what it means to be human. We also explore the idea of hero worship and commemoration: for example, why does Darwin receive so much credit, and why is he buried in Westminster Abbey?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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An Archaeologial History of London, AD 50-1700

The course reviews the turbulent development of London from the Roman period (c AD 47) to the rebuilding of the City after the Great Fire of 1666, integrating archaeological, architectural and documentary sources. It considers the non-linear trajectory its development, noting the serious setbacks such (rebellions, foreign invasions, conflagrations, major plague) and the impacts these had on its ultimately successful commercial expansion

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Rebellion

This course will examine a variety of alternative theoretical explanations for civil conflict. The course begins with an overview of the disciplines knowledge about the determinants of civil conflict.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Commercial Arbitration

Various cross-border commercial disputes are frequently resolved by arbitration in London. London is home to a wide range of arbitral institutions, and it boasts a wealth of talented arbitration professionals. This module concerns the contractual and procedural elements of international commercial arbitration both from comparative and practical perspectives, focusing particularly on the English Arbitration Act 1996, the UNCITRAL Model Law and the New York Convention

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Law, Lawyers, and Social Justice

This module will consider the role that law plays in society, with a particular focus on the ways in which lawyers can achieve social change. The module is rooted broadly in law and social sciences and will be richly interdisciplinary in its approach. It will introduce students to conceptions of social justice and to the lawyerclient relationship

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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International Commercial Litigation

This module introduces students to the legal regulation of commercial relationships having strong connections with more than one legal system. Although the focus is on litigation before English courts, an international perspective will be adopted.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Nanotechnology in Medicine

Through hands-on laboratory sessions, workshops and lectures by world-leading researchers and active clinicians, this module offers both an insight into these emerging technologies and a fundamental understanding of why size matters and how nanoscale technologies interact with biological environments. We will visit the nanoscale quantum universe, and see how nanoscale objects can be tuned for disease targeting. Students will see how this small scale technology offers huge leaps in diagnostics and therapeutics, enabling us to break the boundary from macroscale anatomy to nanoscale biologics.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Nerve Injury Treatment: Medicine, Science & Engineering

["This module offers students the capacity to experience all the current therapeutic options for peripheral nerve injury treatment through a collaboration of the only clinical unit in the world to focus purely on nerve injury and UCL","a recognised world leader in neurobiology and engineering. This exposure will be through lectures and exposure in the clinical environment (clinic, rehabilitation and the operating theatre) to all the basic concepts and theories of improving outcomes after nerve injury"]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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International Politics of Human Rights

This module will introduce students to the idea of what human rights are and different explanations about where rights come from. From there we will briefly examine how human rights have changed and become imbedded in international law since World War II. Next we will ask why governments repress the rights of their citizens. In particular we will try to understand the political advantage governments seek through violating human rights.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Relations

This module explores contemporary issues and debates that shape world politics today. It starts by introducing International Relations (IR) theory before turning to two broad themes that dominate IR: conflict and peace. We will apply these themes to a case study of the Northern Ireland conflict exploring the key political developments and the transition to a post conflict settlement. This module will also include a workshop that examines the use of wall murals to articulate conflict/post-conflict identity in Northern Ireland.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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How the Brain Works and What Can Go Wrong

This module will look at what we know about healthy brains - how the brain is structured, the different types of brain cells, localisation of function and neurochemistry of different brain areas, communication within the brain and how we investigate the brain in week 1. In weeks 2 and 3 the module will look at dysfunction in relation to vison, hearing, movement, memory, thinking, emotion and behaviour.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Language and the Mind - An Introduction to Psycholinguistics

This module is an introduction to Psycholinguistics, an interdisciplinary field of study which aims to understand how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. It will begin by asking what it means to know a language and explore the nature of our linguistic competence. Students will examine core properties of mental representations and processes involved in acquiring and understanding language, and how linguistic processes unfold in real time.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Psychology in Action

Our aim is to develop students’ psychological literacy through the cycle of enquiry and evidence. Students will be introduced to key conceptual issues, methodological approaches and significant findings in scientific psychology, their historical background, and the kinds of empirical evidence on which these findings are based.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Mental Health and the Mind

This module will offer students from a range of backgrounds such as social sciences, medicine, psychology, an understanding of basic principles of how mental disorders present themselves, the impact on individuals and the possibilities for recovery and treatment advances. It will address general aspects of the aetiology and treatment of mental disorders, the setting within which such disorders are managed in the UK and globally and finally bring the students in touch with people with lived experience of a mental disorder in order to elucidate aspects of stigma and health and social inequalities.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Astrophysics and Cosmology

The course in its scope, aims to offer exposure to the fundamental principles of special and general relativity and their significance to the evolution of the Cosmos. Topics such as stellar interiors, classification and evolution along with galaxy dynamics will be discussed in some detail. The course will culminate with descriptions of current cosmological models and touch up on recent developments of the much discussed dark matter and dark energy mysteries and what they entail to the evolution of the Universe.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Climate and Energy

What is the evidence for anthropogenic climate change? How can we generate low-carbon electricity from nuclear and renewable sources, and how can we make our transport infrastructure greener? If we fail to reduce greenhouse gas emissions sufficiently rapidly, will we need to intervene directly in the climate system through so-called “geoengineering”

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Computational Systems Biology

In this module you will have the opportunity to develop and investigate mathematical models of biological systems. You will learn techniques to construct, implement and analyse interaction networks using the Python programming language.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Quantitative Finance: Maths in Investment Banking

This is an application based course on the mathematical and computational aspects of derivative pricing. It lies at the heart of mathematics, computing, finance and economics. Both theory and numerical techniques will be presented, with computer simulations performed on MS Excel.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Science Journalism

This module considers key aspects of news writing and offers participants the possibility to experiment practically with the production of different genres of journalistic output: News story, feature article, blog post, and podcast.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Statistics with R and RStudio

This module introduces statistics and the free software R/RStudio to students with no previous knowledge of mathematics beyond high school level. The module also assesses the uses, misuses and limitations of statistical methods. Topics range from basic descriptive statistics to more advanced topics including multivariate analysis, logistic regression, and model optimisation. As additional skills, students are introduced to professional-standard plotting

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Anatomy and Developmental Biology

This module provides an introduction to significant aspects of human anatomy and embryonic developmental. It aims to prepare students for more advanced studies in in these subjects. The module will cover topographical anatomy and embryonic development of the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, and limbs.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Data Science and Big Data Analytics

Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming. One of the main challenges for businesses and policy makers when using big data is to find people with the appropriate skills. Students taking this module will be introduced to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques, and learn how to use specialised software to analyse real-world data and answer policy-relevant questions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Political Psychology

This module on political psychology will introduce students to the empirical study of political decision making through the lens of psychology and neuroscience. It will explore some of the key individual differences that are associated with different political views, and explore some of the key psychological mechanisms (cognitive dissonance, confirmation bias, cognitive heuristics etc.) that influence how we vote. The module will also explore the broader cognitive neuroscience of political decision making, including differences in genetics, brain structure and brain activity associated with different patterns of voting.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Health Data Science and Data Analytics in Healthcare

Health Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming in the area of healthcare and biomedicine. One of the main challenges for businesses, research institutes, and policy makers when using big health data is to find people with the appropriate skills. Students taking this module will be introduced to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques, and learn how to use specialised software to analyse real-world health data.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Cybersecurity Risk Management

This module introduces the students to the aspects of how risk management methods are applied to improve cyber security. Firstly, it provides an overview of threats from cybercrimes followed by vulnerabilities and situational crime prevention techniques that provide mechanisms for cyber security. It then explains the principles of cyber security risk management that drives the decision making to protect organisations from cyber-attacks. Lastly, the key aspects of incident response planning and resilience in cyber risk management are outlined

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Modern and Contemporary Art in London

This course focuses on art works exhibited in London collections and temporary exhibitions, discussing and theorising the evolution of the modern art object from the nineteenth-century to present. Through a series of seminar- and gallery-based classes, the module will closely scrutinise a broad range of art objects, including painting, sculpture, photography, and video, to consider how the development of visual technologies, materials and techniques are negotiated by artists and have impacted on the critical methodologies developed by art historians

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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The Birth of Feminism: UCL, Bloomsbury and Fin-de-Siècle Radicalism

This module explores the rise of feminism in England from the publication of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman to World War I, when London was a hot house of radical thinking and the temporary or definitive home of a variety of brilliant cosmopolitan thinkers and writers who converged here attracted by the infinite opportunities for debate on the most varied ‘isms’: positivism, liberalism, socialism, trade-unionism, Ibsenism, Freudianism, vegetarianism, pacifism, secularism and, last but not least, evolutionism.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Healthcare Management: a London Perspective

With Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Institute of Ophthalmology staff as facilitators of various sessions, students will engage in informed discussions about how various policies, different strategic approaches and types of financing can affect health systems and how Moorfields is addressing these challenges. It will also foster innovative and critical thinking around these crucial areas. The module is relevant for students with several backgrounds, as the various stakeholders in a health system will also be discussed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Energy and Future Cities

Advancements in the field of electrochemical engineering and the infrastructure that will subsequently facilitate such changes are essential in order to reduce dependencies upon traditional carbon-intensive technologies. For instance, battery technology for use in automotive applications will require a robust charging network in order to prevent energy shortages and power blackouts. This course will provide insight into each stage of this process, from the chemistry and manufacture of new materials to the organisation of the grid and the redesigning of our metropolitan infrastructure. These stages will subsequently shape and dictate the future of our cities.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Energy and Future Cities: Advanced Energy Systems

This course will build upon the teachings of the ‘Energy and future cities’ module in term one, exposing the audience to a detailed description of the fundamental mechanisms that drive electrochemical devices and how these devices are fabricated and implemented into real-word products answering questions such as: what is a battery? How is a battery made? Where and how can one implement battery technology?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Energy and Future Cities: Innovating Architecture

This module with act both as an extension to ‘Energy and future cities, advanced energy systems’ course, as well as being as a standalone design based module, exploring the potential of our future cities. The symbiotic relationship between cities and the energy systems that drive them will be the key in unlocking the future of our built environment.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Urban Geoscience: the London Perspective

Critical aspects of urban geology are evident for London and will be explored, but also relevant to other expanding cities in the world.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Urban Environmental Politics

As the planet’s land use and human population become increasingly urban, environmental problems and politics of cities are evermore critical for improving socio-environmental relationships and outcomes. Thus, this module will explore the urban political conflicts of environmental issues like climate change, air pollution, water quality/quantity, resource and energy use, waste disposal, and more. Using a range of case studies from around the world and beginning with some of the contested material flows of resources that both transform and comprise cities, the module then will move to address politicized ideas of nature, conservation, and habitats in the city while concluding with discussions of human agency and responses to the uneven social impacts of urban environmental problems.

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Anglo-American Business Law (Level 2)

This module introduces students to key areas of business law from a UK-US and international perspective, while honing their analytical, communication, and team problem solving skills. Students will become familiar with the basic structure of the legal system and key elements of contract law, product liability, intellectual property law, the insider trading prohibition, and the law governing partnerships and corporations, including cross-border mergers and acquisitions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Brexit: Political Tensions, Economic Challenges

The module will include team work on multimedia projects, such as a hypothetical campaign for the next country that considers leaving the EU. The module will also include visits to the European Commission’s Representation to the UK and the headquarters of the pro-EU campaign, as well as talks by representatives of organisations on both sides of the Brexit campaign, such as the European Movement and Change Britain. The module will be updated to cover the most recent Brexit developments, as of July 2019

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Bioscience and Society: Public Engagement, Policy and Funding

The purpose of this module is to explore the relationship between science and society in both an historical and contemporary context. Since the days of Christopher Columbus, right down to the Apollo Space programme and more recently the large Hadron collider at CERN, it is has become clear that ambitious scientific endeavour requires public confidence, communication and funding in order to get from the original idea to something which has an impact in society.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Principles of Organic Chemistry

This module is designed to introduce students to the foundations of organic chemistry by focusing on the structures, properties and chemical reactivity of the various carbon based compounds. This module will also cover different aspects of isomerism observed in organic molecules as well as the reactions’ mechanisms (substitution, elimination, and addition) in terms of the electrons flow

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Quantitative Modelling Techniques for Finance and Actuarial Sciences

This course provides a self-contained introduction to both theoretical and practical implementation of various quantitative modelling techniques applicable to finance and insurance. We combine diverse quantitative disciplines, from probability to statistics, from actuarial science to quantitative finance. Students will be able to apply the acquired knowledge to evaluate various insurance products.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Industrial Applications: Modelling Aircraft Icing

This module is in the interdisciplinary field of icing in relation to aircraft. Ultimately, this course will draw from mathematics, physics, chemistry and engineering to provide students with a broad overview of the field of aircraft icing, and how the problem may be approached mathematically. This will involve understanding the problem, discussing the current state of engineering solutions, and study of how mathematics can help to improve, enhance and further this field.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Nanotechnology in Medicine (Level 2)

The use of nanotechnology in medicine is an emerging field that can revolutionise the treatment and detection of disease. Through hands-on laboratory sessions, workshops and lectures by world-leading researchers and active clinicians, this module offers both an insight into these emerging technologies and a fundamental understanding of why size matters and how nanoscale technologies interact with biological environments.

We will visit the nanoscale quantum universe, and see how nanoscale objects can be tuned for disease targeting. Students will see how this small scale technology offers huge leaps in diagnostics and therapeutics, enabling us to break the boundary from macroscale anatomy to nanoscale biologics.

Please note there will be a £100 bench fee for the use of labs and consumable materials.

Language of Instruction: English   

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International Commercial Litigation

Does the court have the power to hear and decide a dispute arising out of an international commercial transaction? Will that power be exercised? Which law will be applied to resolve an international contractual, tortious or property dispute? Once the court gives a judgment, will that judgment have any effect outside the territory of the court?

This module introduces students to the legal regulation of commercial relationships having strong connections with more than one legal system. Although the focus is on litigation before English courts, an international perspective will be adopted. The traditional English principles and rules concerning international commercial litigation form the basis of the law in many, primarily common law, jurisdictions. Since much of the law in this field in England has now been Europeanised, special emphasis will be placed on the relevant principles and rules of European Union law applicable before the courts across Europe.

Language of Instruction: English   

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Greek Myth and Epic

The Greek myths of gods, heroes and heroines have played a crucial role in the history of Western art, literature and music. This module aims to familiarise students with the major figures in Greek myth, the stories associated with them, and the culture which produced them. It will ask why myths occur in the first place, what social or psychological function(s) or needs they fulfil, and how they manage to influence our modern lives.

Language of Instruction: English   

British Literature and the Birth of Mass Media: Victorian

One of the first forms of mass media, the power of the periodical was tremendous. It shaped readerships, politics, morality, and some of our best-loved works of fiction. With a focus on literary magazines, this module allows students to engage with literature in its original published form and to work with original artefacts. In the first week, students will be given the intellectual and practical tools needed to handle and interpret physical and digitised periodicals through a series of seminars and workshops. Students will then have two weeks of seminars, workshops and excursions based around Victorian and Modernist periodicals, discovering familiar names in new contexts.

Language of Instruction: English   

De Europææ Britanniæ Litteris Latinis [The Latin Literature of European Britain]

Latina lingua nativa et docta monumenta condidit perennis tria jam feré millennia. Ejusdem nititur vigor in sempiternis ætatis classicæ inventis exemplisque a summis auctoribus tunc temporis positis quales fuerunt Terentius in sermone colloquiali, in elaboratá Cicero prosá, magnificis in carminibusque Vergilius. Horum præstantia durabilem dedit vocem prolixo patrimonio omnís humani ingenî provincias complectenti, a litteris ad philosophiam, historiam, jura, scientias.

Language of Instruction: Foreign Languages    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Fairy Tales and their Retellings

The module will introduce students to different literary genres, such as children’s literature (by looking into how children’s novels such as Alice in Wonderland and The Adventures of Pinocchio have been retold) and graphic novel studies. They will learn different approaches of literary analysis, such as comparative criticism and psychoanalysis. The course will include excursions to relevant exhibitions and interactive workshops on storytelling.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

London on Film

["An introduction to filmmaking in London since 1895. Three key topics: studio-production c.1905 (R.W. Paul) and c. 1950 (Ealing Studios)","London gangster films, 1980-2010","London as documented by fiction cinema, with a specific focus on the 1960s."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

International Trade and Maritime Law

This module covers all facets of CIF and FOB sales, ranging from contract formation to remedies, focusing on the problems when the interlocking contracts are not back-to-back. It also covers the main principles of the law of carriage of good by sea

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Politics of Global Development

This module will introduce students to the basic theory, institutional architecture and practice of international development. The module aims to provide an overview of some of the major contemporary analytical and policy debates regarding the politics of development.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Macroeconomics

Economics is the study of choice under conditions of scarcity: The resources needed to produce goods and services are limited compared to human desires. Economics is divided into two major areas. Microeconomics studies the choices of consumers, firms, and governments, and describes the working of markets. Macroeconomics studies the behavior of the entire economy. It explains phenomena such as growth, business cycle, inflation, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to economics. The basic principles of economics will be presented and applied in order to explain some features of the modern economy.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

What is Education

During the module, students will attend sessions at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) where a range of experts will present their responses to the question: what is education?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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London's Urban Development: Politics, Policy, and Design

This module explores the processes shaping urban development in contemporary London and the challenges facing its role as a ‘global city’ is the face of economic, social, political and environmental challenges. Drawing on ideas, perspectives and approaches from social science and urban design, the module will critically examine how London is responding to these urban development challenges through a sequence of related topics

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Global Health: Local and International Perspectives

This module serves as an introduction to core concepts in Global Health. Through a multidisciplinary approach students learn about the way in which the health of the individual is shaped by socio-political forces. Each week students evaluate a major cause of ill health in developed and developing countries and the role of key actors that influence health.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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An Archaeologial History of London, AD 50-1700

The course reviews the turbulent development of London from the Roman period (c AD 47) to the rebuilding of the City after the Great Fire of 1666, integrating archaeological, architectural and documentary sources. It considers the non-linear trajectory its development, noting the serious setbacks such (rebellions, foreign invasions, conflagrations, major plague) and the impacts these had on its ultimately successful commercial expansion

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Rebellion

This course will examine a variety of alternative theoretical explanations for civil conflict. The course begins with an overview of the disciplines knowledge about the determinants of civil conflict.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Commercial Litigation

This module introduces students to the legal regulation of commercial relationships having strong connections with more than one legal system. Although the focus is on litigation before English courts, an international perspective will be adopted.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Nerve Injury Treatment: Medicine, Science & Engineering

["This module offers students the capacity to experience all the current therapeutic options for peripheral nerve injury treatment through a collaboration of the only clinical unit in the world to focus purely on nerve injury and UCL","a recognised world leader in neurobiology and engineering. This exposure will be through lectures and exposure in the clinical environment (clinic, rehabilitation and the operating theatre) to all the basic concepts and theories of improving outcomes after nerve injury"]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Mental Health and the Mind

This module will offer students from a range of backgrounds such as social sciences, medicine, psychology, an understanding of basic principles of how mental disorders present themselves, the impact on individuals and the possibilities for recovery and treatment advances. It will address general aspects of the aetiology and treatment of mental disorders, the setting within which such disorders are managed in the UK and globally and finally bring the students in touch with people with lived experience of a mental disorder in order to elucidate aspects of stigma and health and social inequalities.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Anatomy and Developmental Biology

This module provides an introduction to significant aspects of human anatomy and embryonic developmental. It aims to prepare students for more advanced studies in in these subjects. The module will cover topographical anatomy and embryonic development of the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, and limbs.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Data Science and Big Data Analytics

Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming. One of the main challenges for businesses and policy makers when using big data is to find people with the appropriate skills. Students taking this module will be introduced to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques, and learn how to use specialised software to analyse real-world data and answer policy-relevant questions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Health Data Science and Data Analytics in Healthcare

Health Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming in the area of healthcare and biomedicine. One of the main challenges for businesses, research institutes, and policy makers when using big health data is to find people with the appropriate skills. Students taking this module will be introduced to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques, and learn how to use specialised software to analyse real-world health data.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Cybersecurity Risk Management

This module introduces the students to the aspects of how risk management methods are applied to improve cyber security. Firstly, it provides an overview of threats from cybercrimes followed by vulnerabilities and situational crime prevention techniques that provide mechanisms for cyber security. It then explains the principles of cyber security risk management that drives the decision making to protect organisations from cyber-attacks. Lastly, the key aspects of incident response planning and resilience in cyber risk management are outlined

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Healthcare Management: a London Perspective

With Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Institute of Ophthalmology staff as facilitators of various sessions, students will engage in informed discussions about how various policies, different strategic approaches and types of financing can affect health systems and how Moorfields is addressing these challenges. It will also foster innovative and critical thinking around these crucial areas. The module is relevant for students with several backgrounds, as the various stakeholders in a health system will also be discussed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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Energy and Future Cities: Advanced Energy Systems

This course will build upon the teachings of the ‘Energy and future cities’ module in term one, exposing the audience to a detailed description of the fundamental mechanisms that drive electrochemical devices and how these devices are fabricated and implemented into real-word products answering questions such as: what is a battery? How is a battery made? Where and how can one implement battery technology?

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Energy and Future Cities: Innovating Architecture

This module with act both as an extension to ‘Energy and future cities, advanced energy systems’ course, as well as being as a standalone design based module, exploring the potential of our future cities. The symbiotic relationship between cities and the energy systems that drive them will be the key in unlocking the future of our built environment.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Urban Geoscience: the London Perspective

Critical aspects of urban geology are evident for London and will be explored, but also relevant to other expanding cities in the world.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

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Industrial Applications: Modelling Aircraft Icing

This module is in the interdisciplinary field of icing in relation to aircraft. Ultimately, this course will draw from mathematics, physics, chemistry and engineering to provide students with a broad overview of the field of aircraft icing, and how the problem may be approached mathematically. This will involve understanding the problem, discussing the current state of engineering solutions, and study of how mathematics can help to improve, enhance and further this field.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Commercial Litigation

Does the court have the power to hear and decide a dispute arising out of an international commercial transaction? Will that power be exercised? Which law will be applied to resolve an international contractual, tortious or property dispute? Once the court gives a judgment, will that judgment have any effect outside the territory of the court?

This module introduces students to the legal regulation of commercial relationships having strong connections with more than one legal system. Although the focus is on litigation before English courts, an international perspective will be adopted. The traditional English principles and rules concerning international commercial litigation form the basis of the law in many, primarily common law, jurisdictions. Since much of the law in this field in England has now been Europeanised, special emphasis will be placed on the relevant principles and rules of European Union law applicable before the courts across Europe.

Language of Instruction: English   

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Language and the Mind - An Introduction to Psycholinguistics

This module is an introduction to Psycholinguistics, an interdisciplinary field of study which aims to understand how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. It will begin by asking what it means to know a language and explore the nature of our linguistic competence. Students will examine core properties of mental representations and processes involved in acquiring and understanding language, and how linguistic processes unfold in real time.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Quantitative Finance: Maths in Investment Banking

This is an application based course on the mathematical and computational aspects of derivative pricing. It lies at the heart of mathematics, computing, finance and economics. Both theory and numerical techniques will be presented, with computer simulations performed on MS Excel.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Statistics with R and RStudio

This module introduces statistics and the free software R/RStudio to students with no previous knowledge of mathematics beyond high school level. The module also assesses the uses, misuses and limitations of statistical methods. Topics range from basic descriptive statistics to more advanced topics including multivariate analysis, logistic regression, and model optimisation. As additional skills, students are introduced to professional-standard plotting

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Political Psychology

This module on political psychology will introduce students to the empirical study of political decision making through the lens of psychology and neuroscience. It will explore some of the key individual differences that are associated with different political views, and explore some of the key psychological mechanisms (cognitive dissonance, confirmation bias, cognitive heuristics etc.) that influence how we vote. The module will also explore the broader cognitive neuroscience of political decision making, including differences in genetics, brain structure and brain activity associated with different patterns of voting.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Course Level: Upper Division  

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British Literature and the Birth of Mass Media: Victorian

One of the first forms of mass media, the power of the periodical was tremendous. It shaped readerships, politics, morality, and some of our best-loved works of fiction. With a focus on literary magazines, this module allows students to engage with literature in its original published form and to work with original artefacts. In the first week, students will be given the intellectual and practical tools needed to handle and interpret physical and digitised periodicals through a series of seminars and workshops. Students will then have two weeks of seminars, workshops and excursions based around Victorian and Modernist periodicals, discovering familiar names in new contexts.

Language of Instruction: English   

Highlights
  • Ranked #4 in the U.K. (#16 in the world); 5th in Arts & Humanities (Slade School) - Times Higher Education Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in the world for Education; top 5 for Archaeology, Architecture/Built Environment, Anatomy & Physiology; top 10 for Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy & Pharmacology, Psychology, Geography, Anthropology - QS World Rankings
  • Founding member of elite Russell Group of universities

London is a large city, so all students can expect to use public transportation (i.e. tube or bus) to move around the city on a daily basis, both getting to school and for social/cultural activities. It is a part of life in London. Generally, it will take students 20-45 minutes to get to school from their housing. All housing will be located in Zones 1 and 2 on the tube map.

Students will be housed in privately owned student accommodations, that include quality furnishings and areas for socializing. The kitchens are equipped with ovens, stoves, microwaves, and refrigerators. Wireless Internet is provided in all flats. A weekly cleaning service is provided to the communal kitchen/living areas in all API London accommodations.

We are unable to take housing requests. Students will be placed in one of the following three options based on availability and their API program:

Lady Margaret – Kentish Town

The accommodation building is a 4-story, 8-bedroom period townhouse shared among 16 students in double rooms with two single beds in each room. All bedrooms have private bathrooms. The kitchen is a large, shared space with a seating area and TV. Cooking utensils and crockery are provided. Bed linens are also provided but towels are not. There is a free washer and dryer in the building. Students are responsible for cleaning their own bedrooms and bathrooms.

Lady Margaret is located on a quiet residential street within Kentish Town where there are numerous cafes, shops, restaurants, and pubs. All the benefits of the bustling, vibrant area of Camden Town are a short walk away, as are the delights of the large ancient park of Hampstead Heath. The accommodations are a 5-minute walk from the Kentish Town tube stop, where students are able to take the Northern Line into Central London. The travel time from Lady Margaret to the API office is 20-25 minutes, and the travel time to the Westminster Regent campus, Central Saint Martins, and London College of Fashion is 20-30 minutes. Past students have been pleased with this location, as it offers both a quiet neighborhood and easy access to Central London.

Acorn – Bloomsbury

The accommodation buildings are Georgian 18th-century townhouses and are laid out in flats, with 3-11 students within each flat. Standard rooms will be doubles or triples within a co-ed flat or on a co-ed floor. Single bedrooms are extremely limited and cannot be guaranteed. Each flat will have a fully equipped kitchen, including crockery and utensils. Bed linens and towels are provided and there are free laundry facilities in all buildings.

Acorn housing is situated on the Duke of Bedford’s Estate, between Russell Square and Bloomsbury Square and within walking distance of the many attractions of London’s West End including just a 3-minute walk to the British Museum and the API office. The travel time from Acorn to the API office, as well as FSU, is a 10-minute walk, and the travel time to the Westminster Harrow campus is a 45-50 minute tube ride.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included. Meals are not included in these housing options.

Acorn Housing 36609042992 O
Acorn Housing 36609043502 O
Acorn Housing 36639893941 O
Acorn Housing 36731887036 O
Api London Housing 7773304354 O
Api London Housing Examples 8538549425 O
Lady Margaret Kentish Town 36640097931 O
Lady Margaret Kentish Town 36640100611 O
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 Jun 26, 2020 - Jul 18, 2020 $6,150 Apr 10, 2020 Apr 25, 2020
Summer 1 and 2 Combined Jun 26, 2020 - Aug 8, 2020 $9,280 Apr 10, 2020 Apr 25, 2020
Summer 2 Jul 17, 2020 - Aug 8, 2020 $6,150 Apr 30, 2020 May 15, 2020
Summer 1 Jun 29, 2019 - Jul 20, 2019 $5,980 May 1, 2019 May 15, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined Jun 29, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $9,880 May 1, 2019 May 15, 2019
Summer 2 Jul 20, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $5,980 May 1, 2019 May 15, 2019