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The UCL Summer School is divided into two sessions, each spanning three weeks. Students may choose to attend for one or two sessions and will study one module per session.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • 3.3 overall G.P.A. (3.5 and good background in major area of study)
  • Open to juniors and seniors
  • Completed API application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Program of study statement
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with supporting documents

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 4 credits per session (up to 8 total)

Students looking for a prestigious university to study abroad in London this summer need look no further than University College London (UCL). UCL is a modern, outward-looking institution, committed to engaging with the major issues of the day. It is ranked as one of the top 10 universities in the world, and only admits the highest caliber of students. More than 25 alumni hold Nobel Prizes, and the university has been named the top research university in the U.K. Over 29,000 students from more than 150 countries call UCL home, and UCL has the highest number of professors of any university in the U.K. UCL was the first university in England to admit students of all races, religions, and classes and the first to give female students equal standing to their male counterparts. UCL was also a pioneer in study abroad, admitting Japanese students as early as 1863!

The UCL Summer School is divided into two sessions, each spanning three weeks. Students may choose to attend for one or two sessions and will study one module per session.

Students will be taught by UCL academics in interactive small groups and many modules incorporate class visits and guest speakers to further enhance their learning. UCL Summer School students will have full-time student status and a UCL ID card which entitles you to full borrowing rights in the UCL libraries.

With 18 specialist libraries and five permanent collections on campus, and all of London’s museums, galleries and monuments within easy reach, students will have a wealth of resources to support their studies.

All UCL Summer School modules aim to incorporate the latest research in each subject area, and may also make use of London as a unique learning resource, taking the learning experience beyond the classroom through excursions and field trips.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive an official transcript from University College London upon successful completion of their program.

Courses

COURSE OFFERINGS

The UCL Summer School offers over 60 modules from a wide range of subject areas. Many of the modules are introductory, meaning no prior subject knowledge is required, while others have specific entry requirements.

With a wide range of modules on offer from many renowned academic departments, students can choose the subject best suited to their academic or personal interests. available topics include:

  • Anthropology
  • Crime and Security
  • Culture, Literature, and the Arts
  • Economics, Business, and Management
  • Education
  • English Language
  • Geography and the Built Environment
  • Health
  • History and Philosophy
  • Law
  • Medical Sciences
  • Politics and International Relations
  • Psychology and Human Behavior
  • Science and Mathematics

CREDIT INFORMATION

Students at University College London (UCL) take 4 U.S. credits per summer session. Students can earn up to 8 U.S. credits in a summer if they complete 2 summer sessions. A UCL course is equivalent to 15 UCL credits, 7.5 ECTS credits, and 4 U.S. credits.

Understanding and Countering Radicalization and Terrorism

This module will provide an introduction to the phenomena of radicalization and terrorism; including key definitions, causal accounts, empirical trends, past and present manifestations, current groups, and tactics.

Through successive case studies, students will familiarise themselves with the following five approaches to prevention and disruption: Efforts to anticipate and prevent terrorist acts through situational measures; enforcement measures used to disrupt, disable or suppress the activities of terrorist networks; interventions aimed at the individual actor, their risk factors, belief systems and pathways out of terrorism involvement; removal of the economic basis for terrorist activities by attacking organised crime; and strategies which focus on the "root causes" of terrorism and radicalisation.

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Action! Introduction to Film Studies

This module will introduce students to the discipline of film studies, by focusing on the main theoretical and technical aspects of filmmaking.

Through lectures, seminars, screenings, and excursions, students will learn how to approach and discuss films analytically and will acquire an awareness of the history and development of cinema and of the key concepts that can be used to discuss and write about films. During the module, students will familiarise themselves with those elements that are at the basis of film analysis, while developing an appropriate technical vocabulary to be used in class discussions and in their written assessments. They will focus on the features of the main cinematographic genres (horror, documentary, drama, etc.) and on the history, development, and impact of important movements such as German Expressionism, Soviet cinema, Italian Neorealism, and American independent cinema.

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Literary London

This module offers a literary journey through the streets of London, beginning in the 18th century with Jonathan Swift and John Gay, and ending in contemporary London, with Zadie Smith.

Students will inhabit the pages of some of literature’s greatest poems, short stories, novels and paintings about London; and will walk the streets of London, visiting some of the great landmarks and museums, whilst also uncovering many of the dark secrets lurking in the shadows. It is in the crowds, crime, and grime of late-19th and early-20th century London literature, students will linger longest, looking in detail at the London of: Oliver Twist (Charles Dickens); The Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde); The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson); Sherlock Holmes (Arthur Conan Doyle); and From Hell (Eddie Campbell and Alan Moore).

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Sermonis Latini Peritia atque Doctrina [Latin Usage: Idiomatic Proficiency and Teaching]

Latin is a perennial language with a native and learned production spanning almost three millennia. Its vigorous roots are in the classical standards of Terence (colloquial speech), Cicero (elaborate prose), and Virgil (superlative poetry). A written composition in Latin endures at the best British universities as the most efficient means to master these standards, and spoken engagement is a nimbler enhancement of that same active pursuit.

This module delves into the theoretical issues regarding classical Latin usage and idiom in the light of the latest scholarship (Dickey & Chahoud). It offers instruction in oral and written production after such parameters, through academic discussion of the classical sources (Terence, Cicero, Virgil) alongside their various Latin commentators (Donatus, Macrobius, Servius). It further provides Latin teacher training in the direct method (Ørberg) with a communicative approach (Harmer). All teaching, coursework, and assessment will be in Latin. Students will be progressively coached into confident usage.

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The Dark Side of London

This module focuses on the visual representation of London from the Victorian to the contemporary period. In particular, it aims to analyze how artists and filmmakers have expressed their perception of the city as a dark site of social tensions, vice, mystery, crime and detective work. The module will introduce the city through illustrations (Doré, Cruickshank) and documentaries (Keiller, Ackroyd), and then will concentrate on key works of crime cinema set in London (Dassin, Hitchcock, Ritchie). It will consist of lectures on historical and theoretical subjects, seminars, screenings, and it will be supplemented by visits to UCL Collections and other London Museums.

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Business Psychology

This module introduces students to the key findings and theories concerning how people think, feel and behave in organizations. It is equally relevant to students wishing to gain an understanding of business psychology at the university level as it is to students keen on developing hands-on skills that can be applied in organizational settings. The module focuses on topics such as motivation, negotiations, group and network dynamics, social status, influence, and individual personality. The module features interactive lectures, research exercises, and experiential activities, including individual negotiations, group problem-solving, and using data analysis to make strategic business decisions.

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Digital Business Innovation

This module introduces students to major digital technologies which foster business innovation in contemporary economies. Developing the concepts of digital infrastructures and digital platforms, the module explains how they are related to the emergence of new business models and new products and services.

The module balances a level of theoretical knowledge, exploring theories on innovation and digital technologies, and industry examples of successful corporate strategies of using digital technologies to get a sustainable competitive advantage, through academic and industry and consultancy papers. The module explores the frontier of knowledge on digital technologies applied to support collaboration and innovation, introducing students to the concepts of digital social technologies and machine learning in an organizational environment.

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Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

This module is designed for students who wish to develop the skills and techniques to develop and test a new business idea.

It covers methods for analyzing, specifying, designing and launching new ventures, along with strategies for the assessment of business opportunities and techniques for effective business planning in order to secure the necessary resources (including finance). The module introduces frameworks to assess and to mitigate key risks to new ventures, including those relating to personnel, markets, and technologies. It draws on case studies that illustrate the challenges of creating high potential enterprises, but will also explicitly focus on the testing and validation of new venture concepts generated by students.

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Governance and Public Management (Level 2)

Many central and local governments around the world are under stress. Austerity has cut into their budgets, and citizens distrust governments, yet demand an increasing array of services from them. Governments thus need to do more with less, putting a premium on effective management. Yet, public management is uniquely challenging. For example, how do you set strategy and performance targets without a clear for-profit bottom line as in private businesses? Or how do you motivate staff if you cannot pay performance bonuses?

This module equips students with the requisite foundational knowledge and skills for effective management in such public sector and non-profit contexts. Blending scholarship with real-world case applications, the module introduces students to key public management techniques and provides them with an understanding of how changing governance contexts shape what works in public management. It is suitable for anyone aspiring to work in or currently working in public or non-profit organizations.

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International Trade and Migration

This module introduces students to the economics of globalization.

The module explores reasons why classical economists thought comparative advantage (or differences between countries) was the basis for international trade when in the past few decades the bulk of international trade has been between very similar countries. The effects of the growing importance of international trade will be studied, with a focus on recent trade agreements and their projected consequences. The second part of the module considers one of the hottest topics in any country – immigration. The causes and effects of migration will be studied and data and policy analysis will be conducted to investigate the immigration regimes of some popular migrant destinations.

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Principles of Microeconomics

This module provides an introduction to the concepts that underlie modern economic analysis.

Students will begin with the concept of opportunity cost, proceeding to optimal decision-making at the level of an individual consumer. Similar analysis will describe the behavior of an individual firm, distinguishing competitive and non-competitive market structures. The theoretical coverage will be supplemented with real-life examples. At the end of the module, students will go on an excursion to the Bank of England and nearby historical sites.

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Understanding Management

This module will introduce students to the practice of management, including what managers do, why they do it, and ways in which they set about doing it.

The module will explore different management activities and roles from both a practical and theoretical perspective. Key management responsibilities such as strategic thinking, analyzing the business environment, marketing, and motivating self and others, will be explored alongside a real-life case study. This will provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to an actual business case. The aim of the module is to not only introduce students to the essence of management and the tools managers use but importantly, it will provide real insight into the role of the manager, managing in today’s dynamic and exciting business environment.

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Civic Design

Civic engagement is now considered to be a key process in urban design and planning practice. This module aims to provide students with learning outcomes that prepare them to work in collaboration with communities for delivering urban initiatives, to work collaboratively with their peers, and to develop tools that facilitate civic engagement. This module presents ‘Civic Design’ as an emergent field that brings together a wide diversity of disciplines: urban design, planning, service design, architecture, geography, UX design and others. Students, with the guidance of their tutors, will work with community groups both in mapping and in co-designing collaborative processes.

The module is delivered in collaboration with Civicwise (http://civicwise.org), an international community of professionals working on tools and projects for civic engagement. This collaboration will allow students to use Civicwise’s digital forum for peer to peer collaboration. Through this platform, students will engage with a hybrid digital and physical learning environment, in which they can share their projects with a wide community of professionals currently working on Civic Labs, receive feedback, and work collaboratively with their peers.

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Global London: Contemporary Urbanism, Culture and Space

London is truly a global city. An international center of culture and art, business and finance, education and research and tourism: the city is also home to people from all over the world who help shape and characterize its diversity. Despite its status as a global city, London must also be understood as an ordinary city; one of the hundreds of large cities around the world where people negotiate their daily routines of living, working, traveling and sharing space with others. This course will use London as a springboard to explore ways that contemporary cities are being theorized, experienced and understood.

A mixture of seminars and fieldwork will introduce you to a range of interdisciplinary themes within urban studies and provide you with the opportunity to encounter and learn from what the city of London has to offer as well as the contradictions it produces. Giving you the opportunity to think critically about and through your temporary stay in London, the course aims to challenge you to consider your own relations to, and place within, an increasingly urbanized world.

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Urban Environmental Politics

As the planet’s land use and human population become increasingly urban, environmental problems and politics of cities are ever more critical for improving socio-environmental relationships and outcomes. Thus, this module will explore the urban political conflicts of environmental issues like climate change, air pollution, water quality/quantity, resource and energy use, waste disposal, and more. Using a range of case studies from around the world and beginning with some of the contested material flows of resources that both transform and comprise cities, the module then will move to address politicized ideas of nature, conservation, and habitats in the city while concluding with discussions of human agency and responses to the uneven social impacts of urban environmental problems.

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Population and Public Health

This module will provide an introduction to definitions used in population and public health, basic theories, and conceptual frameworks linking major determinants of health with a range of individual and population health outcomes.

It will provide an introduction to the history of population health. The role of London in public health research will be explored and the basic measurements of outcomes and risk factors used in public health, and data sources used in population health, will be introduced.

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Contemporary British Politics

Bringing together political science and history, this module will examine British politics since 1945. It is not narrowly about politicians and political intrigue, though: it's about ideas and ideologies, social and cultural change, spin-doctors and think-tanks. We will start by examining the structure and institutions of British political life. We’ll examine the construction of the welfare state and postwar social democratic settlement, before looking at the big turning point in the 1970s as politics shifted towards a ‘neoliberal’ governing paradigm. We'll ask what 'neoliberalism' really means. We’ll think about how the Second World War, social change, the end of empire and the development of Europe transformed politics in the postwar period.

At a moment when Britain has just voted to leave the EU, thinking about the role of Europe in the development of British politics is more important than ever. We’ll think about the practice of politics, the role of ideas and idea-producers like think-tanks, campaigning, and the media. There will be a strong focus on linking history and contemporary politics, and we’ll hear from people in the thick of current politics as well as visiting key sites in Westminster and Whitehall including the Houses of Parliament and where the civil service is based. We will also visit Chartwell, Winston Churchill’s home, now a National Trust property and one of Britain’s most interesting country houses.

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Darwin and the History of Evolution (Level 2)

Evolution is an idea at the heart of modern science and society. Everything evolves. This module explores the history of evolution as an idea, covering topics from the eighteenth century to the present. Yes, we will explore science: evolutionary biology has evolved and we’ll follow some of those changes. But there is so much more. London has been a key center in the development of evolutionary studies. Darwin developed key ideas here. So did his predecessors, and many successors. We’ll visit locations such as Down House (Darwin’s family home), The Grant Museum of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, The Linnean Society and Oxford Museum of Natural History. We’ll explore episodes as diverse as (a) dinosaurs and deep time, (b) social Darwinism and corporate capitalism, (c) eugenics, (d) the clash in religion between fundamentalism and modernity, and (e) changing views of what it means to be human.

We also explore the idea of hero worship and commemoration: for example, why does Darwin receive so much credit, and why is he buried in Westminster Abbey? There are no prerequisites: the science will be accessible to liberal arts students; the history will be accessible to science students. Please note that additional fee of £80 is payable for this on this module to cover the costs of the field trips and excursions.

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International Commercial Arbitration

This module concerns the contractual and procedural elements of international commercial arbitration both from comparative and practical perspectives, focusing particularly on the English Arbitration Act 1996, the UNCITRAL Model Law and the New York Convention.

Various cross-border commercial disputes are frequently resolved by arbitration in London. London is home to a wide range of arbitral institutions, and it boasts a wealth of talented arbitration professionals. Arbitration agreements frequently refer to a specified set of arbitration rules to govern the arbitral procedure. As this is the case, arbitration is usually carried out in accordance with the rules of an administering arbitral institution (such as the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA), London Maritime Arbitrators Association (LMAA) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)). In trade and commodity arbitration, parties generally refer to the arbitration rules of some particular trade associations (such as GAFTA {The Grain and Feed Trade Association} rules and FOSFA {The Federation of Oils, Seeds and Fats Associations} rules).

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Introduction to Law

This module is designed to give students an introduction to International Law, to European Union Law and to English Common Law.

Week 1 will concentrate on International Law, week 2 will focus on European Union Law as an example for a regional law regime in an international context and week 3 will give an overview of the development and the basic structures of the English Legal System. The connection between International Law, EU Law and domestic law (both English and the students’ home jurisdiction) will be explored around current issues such as the refugee crisis and climate change. The module will be an interactive one where students will be encouraged to discuss the law and critically analyze decisions and current legal problems.

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Law, Lawyers, and Social Justice

This module will consider the role that law plays in society, with a particular focus on the ways in which lawyers can achieve social change.

The module is rooted broadly in law and social sciences and will be richly interdisciplinary in its approach. It will introduce students to conceptions of social justice and to the lawyer-client relationship. Thereafter, students will consider the role of charities and NGOs in advocating and campaigning on social welfare and human rights. They will critically reflect on practical scenarios and real-life campaigns and will be challenged to think about the law, and its limitations, in responding to social need. By the end of the module students will be able to question their assumptions about the ways in which the law is constructed and understood in society, as well as the ways in which lawyers achieve, or might fail to achieve, social justice.

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Nanotechnology in Medicine (Level 2)

The use of nanotechnology in medicine is an emerging field that can revolutionize the treatment and detection of disease. Through hands-on laboratory sessions, workshops and lectures by world-leading researchers and active clinicians, this module offers both an insight into these emerging technologies and a fundamental understanding of why size matters and how nanoscale technologies interact with biological environments.

We will visit the nanoscale quantum universe, and see how nanoscale objects can be tuned for disease targeting. Students will see how this small-scale technology offers huge leaps in diagnostics and therapeutics, enabling us to break the boundary from macroscale anatomy to nanoscale biologics.Please note there will be a £100 bench fee for the use of labs and consumable materials.

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International Politics of Human Rights

The module will explore what human rights are and the different explanations of where rights come from. How human rights have changed and become embedded in international law since World War II will be explored. An understanding of the political advantage governments seek through violating human rights will be sought and the economic and social consequences of repression examined. Whether previous cycles of repression - like slavery, for example - make countries more likely to use violence today, will be considered. Real-world examples will be used to test and illustrate the arguments made in the literature - the conflicts in Syria and Iraq, and the former conflicts in Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland are a few examples. By the end of the module, students will be able to critically assess and apply theories of repression to real-world cases and will have sufficient knowledge of the literature to begin carrying out their own research in this area.

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How the Brain Works and What Can Go Wrong

The brain is an amazing object which controls human lives – it is a complex interconnection of neurons which store our memories and knowledge and has a complex brain chemistry. However, our brains can sometimes go wrong- either because there is something wrong with our genetics or brain chemistry or due to some injury to the brain and central nervous system at some at some point in our life. Brain dysfunction can have a major impact on an individual’s ability to live and interact with their environment, depending on where the injury or dysfunction occurs. The brain is also affected by the environment and many genetic vulnerabilities in individuals do not necessarily result in dysfunction unless there is a maladaptive or threatening environment e.g. such as in schizophrenia.

This module will look at what we know about healthy brains - how the brain is structured, the different types of brain cells, localization of function and neurochemistry of different brain areas, communication within the brain and how we investigate the brain in week 1. In weeks 2 and 3 the module will look at the dysfunction in relation to vision, hearing, movement, memory, thinking, emotion and behavior. UCL is ranked as second in the world for neuroscience and students will get to hear about the amazing world-class research that takes place within the Faculty of Brain Sciences and its constituent parts: the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, the Division of Psychiatry, the Institutes of Ophthalmology and Neurology and the Ear Institute.

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Language and the Mind - An Introduction to Psycholinguistics

This module is an introduction to Psycholinguistics, an interdisciplinary field of study which aims to understand how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. It will begin by asking what it means to know a language and explore the nature of our linguistic competence. Students will examine core properties of mental representations and processes involved in acquiring and understanding language, and how linguistic processes unfold in real time. Finally, students will explore issues in perception, production, and acquisition in three core domains: speech sounds, words, and sentences.

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Psychology in Action

This module aims to develop students’ psychological literacy, through the cycle of inquiry and evidence.

Students will be encouraged to think critically and evaluate their own behavior through in-lecture experiments. A scientific approach will be developed through an appreciation of how empirical data can be used to test competing theories and simple questions will be dissected and examined. Experiencing this cycle of inquiry and evidence will give students the psychological literacy to integrate knowledge across psychology and apply it to the world around them.

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Astrophysics and Cosmology

Astrophysics and Cosmology provide the most fascinating and far-reaching endeavors of human intellect. As the title suggest this intensive module is to provide a sound introduction to the main concepts and body of evidence that underlie our current understanding of the origin, structure, and evolution of the Universe.

The module in its scope aims to offer exposure to the fundamental principles of special and general relativity and their significance to the evolution of the Cosmos. Topics such as stellar interiors, classification, and evolution along with galaxy dynamics will be discussed in some detail. The module will culminate with descriptions of current cosmological models and touch up on recent developments of the much-discussed dark matter and dark energy mysteries and what they entail to the evolution of the Universe.

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Climate and Energy

What is the evidence for anthropogenic climate change? How can we generate low-carbon electricity from nuclear and renewable sources, and how can we make our transport infrastructure greener? If we fail to reduce greenhouse gas emissions sufficiently rapidly, will we need to intervene directly in the climate system through so-called “geoengineering”? This module will cover all of these topics, with a strong emphasis on the underlying physical principles and deriving simple estimates of the potential contribution of various low-carbon energy sources. In addition to attending lectures, students research one particular aspect of climate & energy in depth and present their findings in an essay and associated short presentation.

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Computational Systems Biology

All biological interactions, whether they take place on a molecular, organism or ecosystem scale, are part of complex dynamical systems. Understanding the behavior of these systems lies at the heart of many key challenges in biological research. In this module, you will have the opportunity to develop and investigate mathematical models of biological systems. You will learn techniques to construct, implement and analyze interaction networks using the Python programming language.

Research in the field of Systems Biology is highly interdisciplinary. It often involves biologists working with colleagues from the fields of physics, engineering, mathematics and computer science. Consequently, this module encourages participation from any interested science or engineering student.

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Quantitative Finance: Maths in Investment Banking (Level 2)

Quantitative Finance remains one of the fastest growing areas in modern finance. Alternative names are Financial Engineering, Mathematical Finance or Financial Mathematics. This is an application based course on the mathematical and computational aspects of derivative pricing. It lies at the heart of mathematics, computing, finance, and economics. Both theory and numerical techniques will be presented, with computer simulations performed on MS Excel. If you are interested in technical finance and have wondered what Brownian Motion is, or how Monte Carlo methods are used to price options; then this module is precisely what you are looking for – covering Itô Calculus, Black-Scholes world and Monte Carlo simulations. This is not a theorem-proof based course, but all results will be derived.

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Science Journalism (Level 2)

Science and innovation are playing a central part in developed societies, with scientists being increasingly seen as key economic actors. Informed science journalism is more necessary than ever if our societies are to develop as sustainable democracies. This module considers key aspects of news writing and offers participants the possibility to experiment practically with the production of different genres of journalistic output: News story, feature article, blog post, and podcast. For the latter, students will have access to the radio studio installed in the Science and Technology Studies department. The module’s practical approach invites students to reflect on the role of science journalists in today’s society. By the end of the module, participants will have produced contents that will be featured on a dedicated webpage

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Statistics with R and RStudio

We are exposed to statistical data on a daily basis in the form of opinion polls, economic forecasts, reports on the effect of diet and lifestyle on life expectancy and disease risk, a debate over the evidence for climate change, among others. This module introduces statistics and the free software R/RStudio to students with no previous knowledge of mathematics beyond high school level. The module also assesses the uses, misuses, and limitations of statistical methods. Topics range from basic descriptive statistics to more advanced topics including multivariate analysis, logistic regression, and model optimization. As additional skills, students are introduced to professional-standard plotting resources, basic programming functions in R, and the user-friendly RStudio interface.

Successful completion of this module meets the pre-requisite for the Session Two module Data Science and Big Data Analytics.

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The Chemistry of Harry Potter

Chemistry does not always have a reputation as an exciting subject and is often remembered from school days as a smelly, isolated and difficult discipline. This module aims to change this and bring the subject to life by placing aspects of chemistry such as origins of colored flames, acid-base interactions, redox reactions and material sciences into the mysterious world of Harry Potter’s magical adventures. The module then expands to place chemistry in the real world and illustrates how this amazing discipline contributes to everyday life and human culture.

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Modern and Contemporary Art in London

This course focuses on artworks exhibited in London collections and temporary exhibitions, discussing and theorizing the evolution of the modern art object from the nineteenth century to the present. Through a series of the seminar- and gallery-based classes, the module will closely scrutinize a broad range of art objects, including painting, sculpture, photography, and video, to consider how the development of visual technologies, materials, and techniques are negotiated by artists and have impacted on the critical methodologies developed by art historians. Each week will take a different thematic category to foreground discussion, helping to address changing cultural, social, and historical contexts in the making of visual art and its relationship to current sites of exhibition and mechanism of display.

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Modern London: Art, Society and the City

The module will explore the landscape, art, and history of London from the Crystal Palace international exhibition and the formation of large national museums (V&A, National Gallery, etc.) through to the emergence of London as a cosmopolitan city of global capital by the late twentieth century. It will demonstrate the tensions between modernity and tradition in its urban and artistic milieus, with subject matter ranging from the architecture of empire and world fairs, labouring London and immigrations to the East End, modernist architecture and art (painting and sculpture), wartime London, and artistic experiments, migration and social counter-movements during the swinging sixties. Module content will signpost the social and political histories that underlie the innovations in urban, architectural and artistic practices. Students will engage with a range of material, sources and techniques to sustain creative work and cultivate skills ranging from academic writing to portfolio presentation, including visits to archives, museums and galleries, and independent research.

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The Birth of Feminism: UCL, Bloomsbury and Fin-de-Siècle Radicalism

This module explores the rise of feminism in England from the publication of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman to World War I, when London was a hothouse of radical thinking and the temporary or definitive home of a variety of brilliant cosmopolitan thinkers and writers who converged here attracted by the infinite opportunities for debate on the most varied ‘isms’: positivism, liberalism, socialism, trade-unionism, Ibsenism, Freudianism, vegetarianism, pacifism, secularism and, last but not least, evolutionism. Darwin’s theories of natural and sexual selection and his views of the place of woman in the evolution of the human species had a wide and deep impact on the debate on the Woman Question. They were received and appropriated in different ways by New Woman writers, but none of them escaped their influence.

UCL had a prominent place in these exciting debates also because of its deep connection to Darwinism through figures such as Francis Galton, Edward Grant, Edwin Ray Lankester, and Karl Pearson, so this is the right place to explore Darwinism’s fundamental ontological implications for the cultural and literary discourse of the fin-de siècle.

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Business Planning for Societal Challenges (Level 2)

Humanity and the planet face escalating social, environmental, and economic challenges. Entrepreneurs are perceived to hold a particular role in innovating and bringing about societal change and many also believe that business has a pivotal role to play in shifting society towards a more sustainable future (Hall et al., 2010; Baumann-Pauly et al., 2013). In consideration of UCL’s Grand Challenges, especially cross-disciplinary working for Sustainable Cities, Human Wellbeing and Transformative Technology, the module will engage participants to address societal and humanity’s challenges while planning businesses for a more sustainable future.

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Energy and Future Cities

Depletion of traditional fuel stores has been accompanied by increasing pollution levels. Consequently, motivations to lower carbon-emissions have elevated. To ensure change is achieved on a global scale a multinational agreement was confirmed in 2015 at the Paris climate conference whereby 195 countries agreed a legally binding global climate deal, the first of its kind. Advancements in the field of electrochemical engineering and the infrastructure that will subsequently facilitate such changes are essential in order to reduce dependencies upon traditional carbon-intensive technologies. For instance, battery technology for use in automotive applications will require a robust charging network in order to prevent energy shortages and power blackouts. This course will provide insight into each stage of this process, from the chemistry and manufacture of new materials to the organization of the grid and the redesigning of our metropolitan infrastructure. These stages will subsequently shape and dictate the future of our cities.

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Urban Environmental Politics

As the planet’s land use and human population become increasingly urban, environmental problems and politics of cities are evermore critical for improving socio-environmental relationships and outcomes. Thus, this module will explore the urban political conflicts of environmental issues like climate change, air pollution, water quality/quantity, resource and energy use, waste disposal, and more. Using a range of case studies from around the world and beginning with some of the contested material flows of resources that both transform and comprise cities, the module then will move to address politicized ideas of nature, conservation, and habitats in the city while concluding with discussions of human agency and responses to the uneven social impacts of urban environmental problems.

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Anglo-American Business Law (Level 2)

This module introduces students to key areas of business law from a UK-US and international perspective while honing their analytical, communication, and team problem-solving skills. Students will become familiar with the basic structure of the legal system and key elements of contract law, product liability, intellectual property law, the insider trading prohibition, and the law governing partnerships and corporations, including cross-border mergers and acquisitions. In order to deepen students’ understanding of business law, the module will also explore multi-dimensional aspects relating to social, political, ethical and technological considerations.

These themes are developed in reference to readings drawn from judicial decisions, statutes, recent news reports, and multimedia. Students will also undertake independent research and complete written assignments in which they assume a hypothetical role such as a legislative assistant, advocate or judicial clerk. Furthermore, a highlight of the module is the Supreme Court debate, where students work in teams on pending Supreme Court cases, culminating in an in-class mock trial during which teams represent one of the parties or act as Supreme Court justices.

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Brexit: Political Tensions, Economic Challenges

The UK’s departure from the EU is a historical event, with global political and economic implications. This course will give students a comprehensive understanding of the causes and consequences of Brexit: Why did British people come to this unexpected decision? Will the British economy survive the shock of leaving the EU? Could this be the beginning of the end for the European Union? In the process, students will learn about UK and EU politics, economics and political economy. The module will include teamwork on multimedia projects, such as a hypothetical campaign for the next country that considers leaving the EU. The module will also include visits to the European Commission’s Representation to the UK and the headquarters of the pro-EU campaign, as well as talks by representatives of organizations on both sides of the Brexit campaign, such as the European Movement and Change Britain.

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Bioscience and Society: Public Engagement, Policy and Funding

The purpose of this module is to explore the relationship between science and society in both a historical and contemporary context. Since the days of Christopher Columbus, right down to the Apollo Space programme and more recently the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, it is has become clear that ambitious scientific endeavor requires public confidence, communication, and funding in order to get from the original idea to something which has an impact in society. These considerations are just as valid in biology and medicine as they are in the physical sciences.

This course will draw on the unique range of museums, learned societies, and organizations based in London to enable students to experience and appreciate the relationship between science and society and the need for scientists to engage and communicate with the wider world.

Principles of Organic Chemistry

This module is designed to introduce students to the foundations of organic chemistry by focusing on the structures, properties and chemical reactivity of the various carbon-based compounds. This course will also cover different aspects of isomerism observed in organic molecules as well as the reactions’ mechanisms (substitution, elimination, and addition) in terms of the electrons flow. Various analytical techniques (MS, NMR, and IR) will be introduced as a tool to determine organic structures.

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Quantitative Modelling Techniques for Finance and Actuarial Sciences (Level 3)

The implementation of sound quantitative actuarial models is a vital task to assess risk in insurance, finance, and other industries and professions. This course provides a self-contained introduction to both theoretical and practical implementation of various quantitative modeling techniques applicable to finance and insurance. We combine diverse quantitative disciplines, from probability to statistics, from actuarial science to quantitative finance. Students will be able to apply the acquired knowledge to evaluate various insurance products.

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Understanding and Countering Radicalization and Terrorism

This module will provide an introduction to the phenomena of radicalization and terrorism; including key definitions, causal accounts, empirical trends, past and present manifestations, current groups, and tactics.

Through successive case studies, students will familiarise themselves with the following five approaches to prevention and disruption: Efforts to anticipate and prevent terrorist acts through situational measures; enforcement measures used to disrupt, disable or suppress the activities of terrorist networks; interventions aimed at the individual actor, their risk factors, belief systems and pathways out of terrorism involvement; removal of the economic basis for terrorist activities by attacking organised crime; and strategies which focus on the "root causes" of terrorism and radicalisation.

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Understanding and Preventing Crime

This module introduces students to the study of crime and its prevention.

It begins by considering the challenges with how we define and measure crime, and the implications these have for interpreting key crime trends. Special attention will be devoted to how crime patterns manifest in space and time and how they can be analyzed. Next, the key sociological, psychological and ecological theories relating to criminal behavior are critically examined. Lastly, the formal structures and machinery in place to respond to crime and security problems are outlined. This includes the role and functions of the police, courts, and corrections as the chief components of the criminal justice system, as well as the role of government in setting crime policy. Students will be encouraged to critically assess the strength of different theoretical approaches throughout the module.

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Action! Introduction to Film Studies

This module will introduce students to the discipline of film studies, by focusing on the main theoretical and technical aspects of filmmaking.

Through lectures, seminars, screenings, and excursions, students will learn how to approach and discuss films analytically and will acquire an awareness of the history and development of cinema and of the key concepts that can be used to discuss and write about films. During the module, students will familiarise themselves with those elements that are at the basis of film analysis, while developing an appropriate technical vocabulary to be used in class discussions and in their written assessments. They will focus on the features of the main cinematographic genres (horror, documentary, drama, etc.) and on the history, development, and impact of important movements such as German Expressionism, Soviet cinema, Italian Neorealism, and American independent cinema.

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Literary London

This module offers a literary journey through the streets of London, beginning in the 18th century with Jonathan Swift and John Gay, and ending in contemporary London, with Zadie Smith.

Students will inhabit the pages of some of literature’s greatest poems, short stories, novels and paintings about London; and will walk the streets of London, visiting some of the great landmarks and museums, whilst also uncovering many of the dark secrets lurking in the shadows. It is in the crowds, crime, and grime of late-19th and early-20th century London literature, students will linger longest, looking in detail at the London of: Oliver Twist (Charles Dickens); The Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde); The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson); Sherlock Holmes (Arthur Conan Doyle); and From Hell (Eddie Campbell and Alan Moore).

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Sermonis Latini Peritia atque Doctrina [Latin Usage: Idiomatic Proficiency and Teaching]

Latin is a perennial language with a native and learned production spanning almost three millennia. Its vigorous roots are in the classical standards of Terence (colloquial speech), Cicero (elaborate prose), and Virgil (superlative poetry). A written composition in Latin endures at the best British universities as the most efficient means to master these standards, and spoken engagement is a nimbler enhancement of that same active pursuit.

This module delves into the theoretical issues regarding classical Latin usage and idiom in the light of the latest scholarship (Dickey & Chahoud). It offers instruction in oral and written production after such parameters, through academic discussion of the classical sources (Terence, Cicero, Virgil) alongside their various Latin commentators (Donatus, Macrobius, Servius). It further provides Latin teacher training in the direct method (Ørberg) with a communicative approach (Harmer). All teaching, coursework, and assessment will be in Latin. Students will be progressively coached into confident usage.

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The Dark Side of London

This module focuses on the visual representation of London from the Victorian to the contemporary period. In particular, it aims to analyze how artists and filmmakers have expressed their perception of the city as a dark site of social tensions, vice, mystery, crime and detective work. The module will introduce the city through illustrations (Doré, Cruickshank) and documentaries (Keiller, Ackroyd), and then will concentrate on key works of crime cinema set in London (Dassin, Hitchcock, Ritchie). It will consist of lectures on historical and theoretical subjects, seminars, screenings, and it will be supplemented by visits to UCL Collections and other London Museums.

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De Europææ Britanniæ Litteris Latinis [The Latin Literature of European Britain]

Britain has produced one of the richest and fully autochthonous treasures of Latin literature in the whole of Europe: ranging from the legends of King Arthur and Merlin to the constitutional landmark of the Magna Carta, and from the philosophical explorations of More's Utopia to Bacon's Novum Organum or the scientific mainstay of Newton's Principia Mathematica, alongside a wealth of engaging letters constantly exchanged with continental Europe.

This module comprises an academic introduction to the British production in Latin, with an overview of its periods and genres (Ijsewijn, Lapidge, Rigg). It dwells on detailed commentary and discussion of specific key texts (Monmouth, More, Francis Bacon). It further explores the rich connections the use of Latin allowed with the rest of Europe, mostly in the form of epistolary correspondence (e.g. between More and Erasmus). All teaching, coursework, and assessment will be in Latin. Students will be progressively coached into confident usage.

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Fairy Tales and their Retellings

Why are fairy tales so popular? Why are the original fairy tales darker than the ones we know? This module will give an introduction to different forms of storytelling, exploring the origins and evolution of fairy tales with a focus on contemporary retellings. A variety of fairy tales will be examined, ranging from ancient myths and medieval storytelling tradition to Disney’s adaptations and TV series such as Once Upon a Time and Grimm.

The module will introduce students to different literary genres, such as children’s literature (by looking into how children’s novels such as Alice in Wonderland and The Adventures of Pinocchio have been retold) and graphic novel studies. They will learn different approaches to literary analysis, such as comparative criticism and psychoanalysis. The module will include excursions to relevant exhibitions and interactive workshops on storytelling.

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London on Film

This module introduces students to important and distinctive aspects of London as a center of film-making, since 1895.

The module focuses on three key topics: London-based studio-production, with examples from pioneer R.W. Paul and from the Ealing Studios, post WW2; the gangster film as city-centred genre, with examples from the 1980s onwards; and London-made cinema as document of the changing city, with examples from across the history of film-making in London. Through the close analysis of London-made films and the study of their context, students will come to understand the significance of London for the history of cinema and will be encouraged to think about place in general as key to the appreciation of cinema as art and as spectacle.

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London Style: Visual Culture/ Counter-Culture

This module will demonstrate that present-day icons of “London Style” from fashion, film, and music are indebted to narratives of counter-culture, comedy, satire and dandyism, from Shakespeare to Punk. It aims to link our current terms of reference to complex social, political and conceptual histories.

It will consider Shakespeare’s comedies; the cultures of the English Revolution and Restoration; the satire of Hogarth, Gillray, and Rowlandson; and the radicalism of Thomas Paine, William Blake and Lord Byron. Representations of underworlds in the 19th-century novel and the persistence of satirical and Dickensian influences in Punk will be themes of the latter part of the module. It will conclude by identifying the presence of older “anti-establishment” narratives in the work of contemporary British artists Grayson Perry and Jeremy Deller and the fashion design of Vivienne Westwood and Alexander McQueen. The importance of street art in the contemporary British art scene will also be linked to the module content. In addition to signposting the rich histories that underlie contemporary perceptions of “London Style,” the module will encourage students to use archives and museums to independently produce their own creative work.

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Business Psychology

This module introduces students to the key findings and theories concerning how people think, feel and behave in organizations. It is equally relevant to students wishing to gain an understanding of business psychology at the university level as it is to students keen on developing hands-on skills that can be applied in organizational settings. The module focuses on topics such as motivation, negotiations, group and network dynamics, social status, influence, and individual personality. The module features interactive lectures, research exercises, and experiential activities, including individual negotiations, group problem-solving, and using data analysis to make strategic business decisions.

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Digital Business Innovation

This module introduces students to major digital technologies which foster business innovation in contemporary economies. Developing the concepts of digital infrastructures and digital platforms, the module explains how they are related to the emergence of new business models and new products and services.

The module balances a level of theoretical knowledge, exploring theories on innovation and digital technologies, and industry examples of successful corporate strategies of using digital technologies to get a sustainable competitive advantage, through academic and industry and consultancy papers. The module explores the frontier of knowledge on digital technologies applied to support collaboration and innovation, introducing students to the concepts of digital social technologies and machine learning in an organizational environment.

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Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

This module is designed for students who wish to develop the skills and techniques to develop and test a new business idea.

It covers methods for analyzing, specifying, designing and launching new ventures, along with strategies for the assessment of business opportunities and techniques for effective business planning in order to secure the necessary resources (including finance). The module introduces frameworks to assess and to mitigate key risks to new ventures, including those relating to personnel, markets, and technologies. It draws on case studies that illustrate the challenges of creating high potential enterprises, but will also explicitly focus on the testing and validation of new venture concepts generated by students.

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Governance and Public Management (Level 2)

Many central and local governments around the world are under stress. Austerity has cut into their budgets, and citizens distrust governments, yet demand an increasing array of services from them. Governments thus need to do more with less, putting a premium on effective management. Yet, public management is uniquely challenging. For example, how do you set strategy and performance targets without a clear for-profit bottom line as in private businesses? Or how do you motivate staff if you cannot pay performance bonuses?

This module equips students with the requisite foundational knowledge and skills for effective management in such public sector and non-profit contexts. Blending scholarship with real-world case applications, the module introduces students to key public management techniques and provides them with an understanding of how changing governance contexts shape what works in public management. It is suitable for anyone aspiring to work in or currently working in public or non-profit organizations.

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International Trade and Migration

This module introduces students to the economics of globalization.

The module explores reasons why classical economists thought comparative advantage (or differences between countries) was the basis for international trade when in the past few decades the bulk of international trade has been between very similar countries. The effects of the growing importance of international trade will be studied, with a focus on recent trade agreements and their projected consequences. The second part of the module considers one of the hottest topics in any country – immigration. The causes and effects of migration will be studied and data and policy analysis will be conducted to investigate the immigration regimes of some popular migrant destinations.

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Principles of Microeconomics

This module provides an introduction to the concepts that underlie modern economic analysis.

Students will begin with the concept of opportunity cost, proceeding to optimal decision-making at the level of an individual consumer. Similar analysis will describe the behavior of an individual firm, distinguishing competitive and non-competitive market structures. The theoretical coverage will be supplemented with real-life examples. At the end of the module, students will go on an excursion to the Bank of England and nearby historical sites.

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Understanding Management

This module will introduce students to the practice of management, including what managers do, why they do it, and ways in which they set about doing it.

The module will explore different management activities and roles from both a practical and theoretical perspective. Key management responsibilities such as strategic thinking, analyzing the business environment, marketing, and motivating self and others, will be explored alongside a real-life case study. This will provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to an actual business case. The aim of the module is to not only introduce students to the essence of management and the tools managers use but importantly, it will provide real insight into the role of the manager, managing in today’s dynamic and exciting business environment.

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International Trade and Maritime Law

The selling and purchasing of goods across territorial borders is an ancient yet sophisticated commercial activity. International trade involves interlocking contracts, including letters of credit and contracts of sale, carriage and insurance, all of which concern the minds of traders whilst performing this activity for profit. In pursuit of certainty and predictability in their affairs, traders around the world typically refer to English law in their sale contracts as the governing law. London has an unrivalled reputation as a global centre for dispute resolution, and it has always been the heart of international trade and maritime disputes.

Carriage of goods by sea has been the backbone of international trade since ancient times. This age-old yet sophisticated commercial activity remains to this day of importance to traders selling and purchasing goods across territorial borders for profit. English law enjoys a long-standing predominance in the international shipping market, as it is frequently chosen by the parties to govern their contracts of carriage. A vast amount of goods is carried around the world under contracts of carriage governed by English law.

This module covers all facets of CIF and FOB sales, ranging from contract formation to remedies, focusing on the problems when the interlocking contracts are not back-to-back. It also covers the main principles of the law of carriage of good by sea, offering an essential study of the two main forms of contract of carriage, namely charterparties and bills of lading.

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Politics of Global Development

This module will provide an introduction to, and an overview of, the politics of global development.

The module will take a case-based approach – using grounded, empirical cases – to illustrate the role of politics in development; allowing students to unpack the theory, concepts, and history of international development. It will emphasize the links between theory and practice, and students will be provided with the opportunity to hear from guest speakers working for various development organizations. The module is divided into three parts: part 1 will look at the politics of developing countries, including sessions on institutions; leaders and coalitions; bureaucracy and civil society; and contestation, power, gender, and conflict. Part 2 will look at global processes, including sessions on trade, aid, finance and investment; migration; and global governance. Part 3 will focus on development organizations and will look at how donor agencies, International Organisations, and NGOs operate on a day-to-day basis and the reality of the current challenges they face.

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Principles of Macroeconomics

This module will introduce students to the structure and workings of modern economic activity, focusing on models of production, use, organization, and distribution.

Students will identify influences in national economies, as well as the international economy, and consider the role of government policy. Students will learn different perspectives in macroeconomics and the value of models in interpretation and prediction. Problems will be discussed in groups to enable participatory learning and students will apply macroeconomic theory to debate issues in the real world.

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Understanding Management

This module will introduce students to the practice of management, including what managers do, why they do it, and ways in which they set about doing it.

The module will explore different management activities and roles from both a practical and theoretical perspective. Key management responsibilities such as strategic thinking, analyzing the business environment, marketing, and motivating self and others, will be explored alongside a real-life case study. This will provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to an actual business case. The aim of the module is to not only introduce students to the essence of management and the tools managers use but importantly, it will provide real insight into the role of the manager, managing in today’s dynamic and exciting business environment.

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What is Education

This module will provide an introduction to what it means to study education at a higher level.

The module will provide students with the opportunity to explore key ideas underpinning education with some of the world’s leading experts in education. Students will attend sessions at the UCL Institute of Education, where a range of experts will present their responses to the question: what is education? These responses will be underpinned by the critical consideration of the following questions: What is an education for, what is its purpose, both here and now and looking to the future?; What should be its fundamental values and ethics?; What do we mean by knowledge and learning (including formal and informal learning)?; What is our concept of education?; What is our image of the learners, educators, learner contexts, and of community/society?; Who is responsible for education, and what does it mean to be responsible? Students will be encouraged to consider and share their responses to these questions, in relation to their own contexts.

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Civic Design

Civic engagement is now considered to be a key process in urban design and planning practice. This module aims to provide students with learning outcomes that prepare them to work in collaboration with communities for delivering urban initiatives, to work collaboratively with their peers, and to develop tools that facilitate civic engagement. This module presents ‘Civic Design’ as an emergent field that brings together a wide diversity of disciplines: urban design, planning, service design, architecture, geography, UX design and others. Students, with the guidance of their tutors, will work with community groups both in mapping and in co-designing collaborative processes.

The module is delivered in collaboration with Civicwise (http://civicwise.org), an international community of professionals working on tools and projects for civic engagement. This collaboration will allow students to use Civicwise’s digital forum for peer to peer collaboration. Through this platform, students will engage with a hybrid digital and physical learning environment, in which they can share their projects with a wide community of professionals currently working on Civic Labs, receive feedback, and work collaboratively with their peers.

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Global London: Contemporary Urbanism, Culture and Space

London is truly a global city. An international center of culture and art, business and finance, education and research and tourism: the city is also home to people from all over the world who help shape and characterize its diversity. Despite its status as a global city, London must also be understood as an ordinary city; one of the hundreds of large cities around the world where people negotiate their daily routines of living, working, traveling and sharing space with others. This course will use London as a springboard to explore ways that contemporary cities are being theorized, experienced and understood.

A mixture of seminars and fieldwork will introduce you to a range of interdisciplinary themes within urban studies and provide you with the opportunity to encounter and learn from what the city of London has to offer as well as the contradictions it produces. Giving you the opportunity to think critically about and through your temporary stay in London, the course aims to challenge you to consider your own relations to, and place within, an increasingly urbanized world.

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Urban Environmental Politics

As the planet’s land use and human population become increasingly urban, environmental problems and politics of cities are ever more critical for improving socio-environmental relationships and outcomes. Thus, this module will explore the urban political conflicts of environmental issues like climate change, air pollution, water quality/quantity, resource and energy use, waste disposal, and more. Using a range of case studies from around the world and beginning with some of the contested material flows of resources that both transform and comprise cities, the module then will move to address politicized ideas of nature, conservation, and habitats in the city while concluding with discussions of human agency and responses to the uneven social impacts of urban environmental problems.

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London's Urban Development: Politics, Policy, and Design

This module will explore how London’s urban form is developing in response to the economic, social, and environmental challenges associated with its role as a ‘global city’.

Capitalising on UCL’s position in the heart of London, the module will combine fieldwork alongside seminars, classes, and workshops. It will introduce students to key frameworks for urban policy and planning decision-making and will examine the processes shaping the urban development within London. Students will engage with current debates over issues such as airport expansion, super-tall buildings, and affordable housing. Perspectives from social science and urban design will be used to critically examine how cities can respond to the challenge of ensuring a sustainable urban future. The insights, knowledge, and skills developed on this module can ultimately be applied to cities around the world.

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Population and Public Health

This module will provide an introduction to definitions used in population and public health, basic theories, and conceptual frameworks linking major determinants of health with a range of individual and population health outcomes.

It will provide an introduction to the history of population health. The role of London in public health research will be explored and the basic measurements of outcomes and risk factors used in public health, and data sources used in population health, will be introduced.

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Global Health: Local and International Perspectives

This module will provide an introduction to the discipline of global health. Each week will be framed around the ‘wicked problems’ facing our world and the ways in which the individual can engage with global issues.

Topics covered include access and availability of healthcare, inequality, poverty, ethics, aid, and the key actors in global health. Each week will begin with a UK case study relating to a core topic and end with an excursion to a local site of significance in the development of the global health discipline. These excursions will link UCL's core value of equality with the rich history of social welfare and public health that began in London in the 1700s.

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Contemporary British Politics

Bringing together political science and history, this module will examine British politics since 1945. It is not narrowly about politicians and political intrigue, though: it's about ideas and ideologies, social and cultural change, spin-doctors and think-tanks. We will start by examining the structure and institutions of British political life. We’ll examine the construction of the welfare state and postwar social democratic settlement, before looking at the big turning point in the 1970s as politics shifted towards a ‘neoliberal’ governing paradigm. We'll ask what 'neoliberalism' really means. We’ll think about how the Second World War, social change, the end of empire and the development of Europe transformed politics in the postwar period.

At a moment when Britain has just voted to leave the EU, thinking about the role of Europe in the development of British politics is more important than ever. We’ll think about the practice of politics, the role of ideas and idea-producers like think-tanks, campaigning, and the media. There will be a strong focus on linking history and contemporary politics, and we’ll hear from people in the thick of current politics as well as visiting key sites in Westminster and Whitehall including the Houses of Parliament and where the civil service is based. We will also visit Chartwell, Winston Churchill’s home, now a National Trust property and one of Britain’s most interesting country houses.

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Darwin and the History of Evolution (Level 2)

Evolution is an idea at the heart of modern science and society. Everything evolves. This module explores the history of evolution as an idea, covering topics from the eighteenth century to the present. Yes, we will explore science: evolutionary biology has evolved and we’ll follow some of those changes. But there is so much more. London has been a key center in the development of evolutionary studies. Darwin developed key ideas here. So did his predecessors, and many successors. We’ll visit locations such as Down House (Darwin’s family home), The Grant Museum of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, The Linnean Society and Oxford Museum of Natural History. We’ll explore episodes as diverse as (a) dinosaurs and deep time, (b) social Darwinism and corporate capitalism, (c) eugenics, (d) the clash in religion between fundamentalism and modernity, and (e) changing views of what it means to be human.

We also explore the idea of hero worship and commemoration: for example, why does Darwin receive so much credit, and why is he buried in Westminster Abbey? There are no prerequisites: the science will be accessible to liberal arts students; the history will be accessible to science students. Please note that additional fee of £80 is payable for this on this module to cover the costs of the field trips and excursions.

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An Archaeologial History of London

This module will provide students with a grounding in the historical geography and chronological development of the city in which they are now living.

It will introduce students to some of the sources used to compile that history, and some of the key surviving sites, buildings, monuments, museums and archaeological collections that can be used to illustrate that development. The module will be delivered through a series of classroom presentations and discussions and supplemented by a series of field trips and museum visits.

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Rebellion

This course will examine a variety of alternative theoretical explanations for civil conflict. The course begins with an overview of the discipline’s knowledge about the determinants of civil conflict.

The course then proceeds by introducing the student to the different theoretical explanations for civil conflict and the empirical research that has been undertaken to test these different theories. In particular: • Examine the development of the literature and the variety of alternative theoretical explanations for why people rebel against their state. • Examine the importance of international factors on the likelihood of civil conflict • Examine the consequences of civil wars for civilians. The course critically reviews the impact that politics plays on the advent, continuation, and consequences of civil conflict. Students are invited to reflect upon the state of the discipline and areas of fruitful future research.

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International Commercial Arbitration

This module concerns the contractual and procedural elements of international commercial arbitration both from comparative and practical perspectives, focusing particularly on the English Arbitration Act 1996, the UNCITRAL Model Law and the New York Convention.

Various cross-border commercial disputes are frequently resolved by arbitration in London. London is home to a wide range of arbitral institutions, and it boasts a wealth of talented arbitration professionals. Arbitration agreements frequently refer to a specified set of arbitration rules to govern the arbitral procedure. As this is the case, arbitration is usually carried out in accordance with the rules of an administering arbitral institution (such as the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA), London Maritime Arbitrators Association (LMAA) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)). In trade and commodity arbitration, parties generally refer to the arbitration rules of some particular trade associations (such as GAFTA {The Grain and Feed Trade Association} rules and FOSFA {The Federation of Oils, Seeds and Fats Associations} rules).

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Introduction to Law

This module is designed to give students an introduction to International Law, to European Union Law and to English Common Law.

Week 1 will concentrate on International Law, week 2 will focus on European Union Law as an example for a regional law regime in an international context and week 3 will give an overview of the development and the basic structures of the English Legal System. The connection between International Law, EU Law and domestic law (both English and the students’ home jurisdiction) will be explored around current issues such as the refugee crisis and climate change. The module will be an interactive one where students will be encouraged to discuss the law and critically analyze decisions and current legal problems.

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Law, Lawyers, and Social Justice

This module will consider the role that law plays in society, with a particular focus on the ways in which lawyers can achieve social change.

The module is rooted broadly in law and social sciences and will be richly interdisciplinary in its approach. It will introduce students to conceptions of social justice and to the lawyer-client relationship. Thereafter, students will consider the role of charities and NGOs in advocating and campaigning on social welfare and human rights. They will critically reflect on practical scenarios and real-life campaigns and will be challenged to think about the law, and its limitations, in responding to social need. By the end of the module students will be able to question their assumptions about the ways in which the law is constructed and understood in society, as well as the ways in which lawyers achieve, or might fail to achieve, social justice.

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International Commercial Litigation

Course description currently unavailable.

Nanotechnology in Medicine (Level 2)

The use of nanotechnology in medicine is an emerging field that can revolutionize the treatment and detection of disease. Through hands-on laboratory sessions, workshops and lectures by world-leading researchers and active clinicians, this module offers both an insight into these emerging technologies and a fundamental understanding of why size matters and how nanoscale technologies interact with biological environments.

We will visit the nanoscale quantum universe, and see how nanoscale objects can be tuned for disease targeting. Students will see how this small-scale technology offers huge leaps in diagnostics and therapeutics, enabling us to break the boundary from macroscale anatomy to nanoscale biologics.Please note there will be a £100 bench fee for the use of labs and consumable materials.

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Nerve Injury Treatment: Medicine, Science & Engineering

Peripheral Nerve Injury is a field of regenerative medicine which is advancing towards a paradigm shift in available therapeutic options. The ability of medicine to manipulate one of the only organ systems which have the capacity in a human to regrow is at the forefront of fields of surgical science, pharmacology, cellular engineering, bioengineering and assistive technologies.

This module offers the student the capacity to experience all the current therapeutic options for peripheral nerve injury treatment through a collaboration of the only clinical unit in the world to focus purely on nerve injury and UCL; a recognized world leader in neurobiology and engineering. This exposure will be through lectures and exposure in the clinical environment (clinic, rehab and the operating theatre) to all the basic concepts and theories of improving outcomes after nerve injury.

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International Politics of Human Rights

The module will explore what human rights are and the different explanations of where rights come from. How human rights have changed and become embedded in international law since World War II will be explored. An understanding of the political advantage governments seek through violating human rights will be sought and the economic and social consequences of repression examined. Whether previous cycles of repression - like slavery, for example - make countries more likely to use violence today, will be considered. Real-world examples will be used to test and illustrate the arguments made in the literature - the conflicts in Syria and Iraq, and the former conflicts in Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland are a few examples. By the end of the module, students will be able to critically assess and apply theories of repression to real-world cases and will have sufficient knowledge of the literature to begin carrying out their own research in this area.

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International Relations

World politics today is characterized by increasing complexity. Alongside states, a myriad of international and regional organizations, interest groups, civil society organizations and even terrorist networks shape the dynamics of international politics. These interactions and alternative ways of understanding them are at the core of this module that examines the key issues in contemporary international relations.

The module will first offer students an introduction to the discipline of International Relations to understand some of the key questions that scholars and policymakers have focused on, and how the field has been transformed as the world has changed around them. It will then study a series of pressing contemporary issues, including war, security, development, human rights and terrorism. These cases and questions will be analyzed through different theories including realism, liberalism, constructivism, Marxism, and feminism.

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How the Brain Works and What Can Go Wrong

The brain is an amazing object which controls human lives – it is a complex interconnection of neurons which store our memories and knowledge and has a complex brain chemistry. However, our brains can sometimes go wrong- either because there is something wrong with our genetics or brain chemistry or due to some injury to the brain and central nervous system at some at some point in our life. Brain dysfunction can have a major impact on an individual’s ability to live and interact with their environment, depending on where the injury or dysfunction occurs. The brain is also affected by the environment and many genetic vulnerabilities in individuals do not necessarily result in dysfunction unless there is a maladaptive or threatening environment e.g. such as in schizophrenia.

This module will look at what we know about healthy brains - how the brain is structured, the different types of brain cells, localization of function and neurochemistry of different brain areas, communication within the brain and how we investigate the brain in week 1. In weeks 2 and 3 the module will look at the dysfunction in relation to vision, hearing, movement, memory, thinking, emotion and behavior. UCL is ranked as second in the world for neuroscience and students will get to hear about the amazing world-class research that takes place within the Faculty of Brain Sciences and its constituent parts: the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, the Division of Psychiatry, the Institutes of Ophthalmology and Neurology and the Ear Institute.

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Language and the Mind - An Introduction to Psycholinguistics

This module is an introduction to Psycholinguistics, an interdisciplinary field of study which aims to understand how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. It will begin by asking what it means to know a language and explore the nature of our linguistic competence. Students will examine core properties of mental representations and processes involved in acquiring and understanding language, and how linguistic processes unfold in real time. Finally, students will explore issues in perception, production, and acquisition in three core domains: speech sounds, words, and sentences.

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Psychology in Action

This module aims to develop students’ psychological literacy, through the cycle of inquiry and evidence.

Students will be encouraged to think critically and evaluate their own behavior through in-lecture experiments. A scientific approach will be developed through an appreciation of how empirical data can be used to test competing theories and simple questions will be dissected and examined. Experiencing this cycle of inquiry and evidence will give students the psychological literacy to integrate knowledge across psychology and apply it to the world around them.

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Mental Health and the Mind

Mental disorders, e.g. schizophrenia, dementia, depression, are common across all countries and constitute about 14% of the global burden of disease. Many people with a mental disorder - and the majority of those living in low-income countries - still have no access to the treatments they need. This module will offer students from a range of backgrounds, e.g. social sciences, medicine, psychology, an understanding of basic principles of how mental disorders present, the impact on individuals and the advances in treatment and recovery. The module will address general aspects of the etiology of mental disorders, the setting within which such disorders are managed in the UK and globally and finally bring the students in touch with people with lived experience of a mental disorder in order to elucidate aspects of stigma and health and social inequalities. Most importantly, we hope that students will be inspired to further their interest in this field and go on to develop a career in mental health.

For more information on UCL Psychiatry, please visit: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/psychiatry/

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The Sounds of Language: Principles of Phonetics

This module will provide a foundation for further study in linguistics, second language instruction and speech pathology.

The module will provide an overview of vocal tract anatomy. Students will learn, through daily practical exercises, how to produce the consonants and vowels of the world’s languages, and transcribe them using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The first part of the module will focus on English consonants and vowels and the second part will cover speech sounds not found in English (including clicks, implosives, ejectives, tones) and linguistic voice quality. Students will learn about the acoustic properties of speech and the tools used to study these properties.

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Astrophysics and Cosmology

Astrophysics and Cosmology provide the most fascinating and far-reaching endeavors of human intellect. As the title suggest this intensive module is to provide a sound introduction to the main concepts and body of evidence that underlie our current understanding of the origin, structure, and evolution of the Universe.

The module in its scope aims to offer exposure to the fundamental principles of special and general relativity and their significance to the evolution of the Cosmos. Topics such as stellar interiors, classification, and evolution along with galaxy dynamics will be discussed in some detail. The module will culminate with descriptions of current cosmological models and touch up on recent developments of the much-discussed dark matter and dark energy mysteries and what they entail to the evolution of the Universe.

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Climate and Energy

What is the evidence for anthropogenic climate change? How can we generate low-carbon electricity from nuclear and renewable sources, and how can we make our transport infrastructure greener? If we fail to reduce greenhouse gas emissions sufficiently rapidly, will we need to intervene directly in the climate system through so-called “geoengineering”? This module will cover all of these topics, with a strong emphasis on the underlying physical principles and deriving simple estimates of the potential contribution of various low-carbon energy sources. In addition to attending lectures, students research one particular aspect of climate & energy in depth and present their findings in an essay and associated short presentation.

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Computational Systems Biology

All biological interactions, whether they take place on a molecular, organism or ecosystem scale, are part of complex dynamical systems. Understanding the behavior of these systems lies at the heart of many key challenges in biological research. In this module, you will have the opportunity to develop and investigate mathematical models of biological systems. You will learn techniques to construct, implement and analyze interaction networks using the Python programming language.

Research in the field of Systems Biology is highly interdisciplinary. It often involves biologists working with colleagues from the fields of physics, engineering, mathematics and computer science. Consequently, this module encourages participation from any interested science or engineering student.

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Quantitative Finance: Maths in Investment Banking (Level 2)

Quantitative Finance remains one of the fastest growing areas in modern finance. Alternative names are Financial Engineering, Mathematical Finance or Financial Mathematics. This is an application based course on the mathematical and computational aspects of derivative pricing. It lies at the heart of mathematics, computing, finance, and economics. Both theory and numerical techniques will be presented, with computer simulations performed on MS Excel. If you are interested in technical finance and have wondered what Brownian Motion is, or how Monte Carlo methods are used to price options; then this module is precisely what you are looking for – covering Itô Calculus, Black-Scholes world and Monte Carlo simulations. This is not a theorem-proof based course, but all results will be derived.

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Science Journalism (Level 2)

Science and innovation are playing a central part in developed societies, with scientists being increasingly seen as key economic actors. Informed science journalism is more necessary than ever if our societies are to develop as sustainable democracies. This module considers key aspects of news writing and offers participants the possibility to experiment practically with the production of different genres of journalistic output: News story, feature article, blog post, and podcast. For the latter, students will have access to the radio studio installed in the Science and Technology Studies department. The module’s practical approach invites students to reflect on the role of science journalists in today’s society. By the end of the module, participants will have produced contents that will be featured on a dedicated webpage

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Statistics with R and RStudio

We are exposed to statistical data on a daily basis in the form of opinion polls, economic forecasts, reports on the effect of diet and lifestyle on life expectancy and disease risk, a debate over the evidence for climate change, among others. This module introduces statistics and the free software R/RStudio to students with no previous knowledge of mathematics beyond high school level. The module also assesses the uses, misuses, and limitations of statistical methods. Topics range from basic descriptive statistics to more advanced topics including multivariate analysis, logistic regression, and model optimization. As additional skills, students are introduced to professional-standard plotting resources, basic programming functions in R, and the user-friendly RStudio interface.

Successful completion of this module meets the pre-requisite for the Session Two module Data Science and Big Data Analytics.

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Anatomy and Developmental Biology

This module provides an introduction to significant aspects of human anatomy and embryonic development. It aims to prepare students for more advanced studies in these subjects.

The module covers topographical anatomy and embryonic development of the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, and limbs. The first few weeks of human development will be examined, alongside the cellular organization of tissues and organs. An understanding of the key principles of embryonic development will be provided. The module is taught through lectures, a series of seminars covering more specialized topics, a small number of practicals, and a class in the Anatomy Laboratory (Dissecting Room).

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Data Science and Big Data Analytics (Level 2)

This module will provide an introduction to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques and will teach students how to use specialized software to analyze real-world data and answer policy-relevant questions.

Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming. One of the main challenges for businesses and policymakers when using big data is to find people with the appropriate skills. This module will cover classic topics in data analysis (regression, binary models, and panel data) and introduce more specialized techniques, such as classification and decision trees, clustering and pattern recognition, and dimensionality reduction. It will cover data preparation and processing, including working with structured, key-value formatted (JSON), and unstructured data.

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The Chemistry of Harry Potter

Chemistry does not always have a reputation as an exciting subject and is often remembered from school days as a smelly, isolated and difficult discipline. This module aims to change this and bring the subject to life by placing aspects of chemistry such as origins of colored flames, acid-base interactions, redox reactions and material sciences into the mysterious world of Harry Potter’s magical adventures. The module then expands to place chemistry in the real world and illustrates how this amazing discipline contributes to everyday life and human culture.

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Political Psychology (Level 2)

This module on political psychology will introduce students to the empirical study of political decision making through the lens of psychology and neuroscience. It will explore some of the key individual differences (in personality, moral values and cognitive biases, etc.) that are associated with different political views, and explore some of the key psychological mechanisms (cognitive dissonance, confirmation bias, cognitive heuristics etc.) that influence how we vote. The module will also explore the broader cognitive neuroscience of political decision making, including differences in genetics, brain structure and brain activity associated with different patterns of voting. The module will focus on quantitative research, and develop hands on skills in analyzing data using open source software.

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Health Data Science, Artificial Intelligence and Big Data Analytics in Healthcare (Level 2)

Health Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming in the area of healthcare and biomedicine. One of the main challenges for businesses, research institutes, and policymakers when using big health data is to find people with the appropriate skills. Students taking this module will be introduced to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques, and learn how to use specialized software to analyze real-world health data.

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Cybersecurity Risk Management

This module introduces the students to the aspects of how risk management methods are applied to improve cybersecurity. Firstly, it provides an overview of threats from cybercrimes followed by vulnerabilities and situational crime prevention techniques that provide mechanisms for cybersecurity. It then explains the principles of cybersecurity risk management that drives the decision making to protect organizations from cyber-attacks. Lastly, the key aspects of incident response planning and resilience in cyber risk management are outlined. Students will work in teams to identify, assess and prioritize cyber risks for a case study. The students will also get an opportunity to create a cybersecurity risk management plan within the same case study.

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Modern and Contemporary Art in London

This course focuses on artworks exhibited in London collections and temporary exhibitions, discussing and theorizing the evolution of the modern art object from the nineteenth century to the present. Through a series of the seminar- and gallery-based classes, the module will closely scrutinize a broad range of art objects, including painting, sculpture, photography, and video, to consider how the development of visual technologies, materials, and techniques are negotiated by artists and have impacted on the critical methodologies developed by art historians. Each week will take a different thematic category to foreground discussion, helping to address changing cultural, social, and historical contexts in the making of visual art and its relationship to current sites of exhibition and mechanism of display.

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Modern London: Art, Society and the City

The module will explore the landscape, art, and history of London from the Crystal Palace international exhibition and the formation of large national museums (V&A, National Gallery, etc.) through to the emergence of London as a cosmopolitan city of global capital by the late twentieth century. It will demonstrate the tensions between modernity and tradition in its urban and artistic milieus, with subject matter ranging from the architecture of empire and world fairs, labouring London and immigrations to the East End, modernist architecture and art (painting and sculpture), wartime London, and artistic experiments, migration and social counter-movements during the swinging sixties. Module content will signpost the social and political histories that underlie the innovations in urban, architectural and artistic practices. Students will engage with a range of material, sources and techniques to sustain creative work and cultivate skills ranging from academic writing to portfolio presentation, including visits to archives, museums and galleries, and independent research.

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The Birth of Feminism: UCL, Bloomsbury and Fin-de-Siècle Radicalism

This module explores the rise of feminism in England from the publication of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman to World War I, when London was a hothouse of radical thinking and the temporary or definitive home of a variety of brilliant cosmopolitan thinkers and writers who converged here attracted by the infinite opportunities for debate on the most varied ‘isms’: positivism, liberalism, socialism, trade-unionism, Ibsenism, Freudianism, vegetarianism, pacifism, secularism and, last but not least, evolutionism. Darwin’s theories of natural and sexual selection and his views of the place of woman in the evolution of the human species had a wide and deep impact on the debate on the Woman Question. They were received and appropriated in different ways by New Woman writers, but none of them escaped their influence.

UCL had a prominent place in these exciting debates also because of its deep connection to Darwinism through figures such as Francis Galton, Edward Grant, Edwin Ray Lankester, and Karl Pearson, so this is the right place to explore Darwinism’s fundamental ontological implications for the cultural and literary discourse of the fin-de siècle.

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Public Art in London: Creativity, Criminality and Capital in the City


London is one of the world’s major art capitals, famous in particular for its diverse and distinguished public art. From the low-brow independence of street art and graffiti to the high-brow dominance of commissioned art in public space, the city is filled with a visual and material culture that works not just to beautify, but to both transform and reaffirm cultural norms, to empower and immobilize its associated public.

Exploring London’s public art in order to understand the past, present, and future of the city itself, Public Art in London will examine this site as a place of communication and contestation, transmission and transformation, investigating the social, political and economic debates which these artworks implicitly intersect with and overtly investigate: It will thus enable students to critically explore both the city and the street and to discern not only what public art means, but what it does. View Syllabus

Business Planning for Societal Challenges (Level 2)

Humanity and the planet face escalating social, environmental, and economic challenges. Entrepreneurs are perceived to hold a particular role in innovating and bringing about societal change and many also believe that business has a pivotal role to play in shifting society towards a more sustainable future (Hall et al., 2010; Baumann-Pauly et al., 2013). In consideration of UCL’s Grand Challenges, especially cross-disciplinary working for Sustainable Cities, Human Wellbeing and Transformative Technology, the module will engage participants to address societal and humanity’s challenges while planning businesses for a more sustainable future.

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Healthcare Management: a London Perspective (Level 2)

The recent policy reforms in the NHS, and the challenges faced by health systems globally emphasize the need for future doctors and healthcare managers to understand how systems function, how they are financed, and how strategic policies are developed to ensure the provision of care to the highest quality standards. This module will allow students to get an insight into these topics through the vision and eye health sub-sector as an example of a speciality area that is experiencing many of the same pressures that are witnessed in the broader health sector. With people living longer and diseases such as diabetes contributing to vision loss, this part of the health sector is under tremendous pressure to serve a larger segment of patient care. With Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Institute of Ophthalmology staff as facilitators of various sessions, students will engage in informed discussions about how various policies, different strategic approaches and types of financing can affect health systems and how Moorfields is addressing these challenges. It will also foster innovative and critical thinking around these crucial areas. The module is relevant for students with several background.

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Energy and Future Cities

Depletion of traditional fuel stores has been accompanied by increasing pollution levels. Consequently, motivations to lower carbon-emissions have elevated. To ensure change is achieved on a global scale a multinational agreement was confirmed in 2015 at the Paris climate conference whereby 195 countries agreed a legally binding global climate deal, the first of its kind. Advancements in the field of electrochemical engineering and the infrastructure that will subsequently facilitate such changes are essential in order to reduce dependencies upon traditional carbon-intensive technologies. For instance, battery technology for use in automotive applications will require a robust charging network in order to prevent energy shortages and power blackouts. This course will provide insight into each stage of this process, from the chemistry and manufacture of new materials to the organization of the grid and the redesigning of our metropolitan infrastructure. These stages will subsequently shape and dictate the future of our cities.

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Energy and Future Cities: Advanced Energy Systems

Increasing levels of pollution and the diminution of fuels for traditional energy technologies has resulted in multinational agreements being established on a global scale. 2015 saw the production of the Paris climate agreement whereby 195 countries agreed upon a legally binding global climate deal, the first of its kind. In order to meet the targets of such agreements, significant breakthroughs must be made in key technologies such as lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells. Breakthroughs will require multidisciplinary approaches from the work of fundamental scientist in the creation of new chemistries, to the applied work of engineers in materials scale up and fabrication, to the economic and policy regulations and guidance that will be required to facilitate such change.

However, although significant research is being undertaken in both academic and industrial environments education on such devices remains limited. This course will build upon the teachings of the ‘Energy and future cities’ module in term one, exposing the audience to a detailed description of the fundamental mechanisms that drive electrochemical devices and how these devices are fabricated and implemented into real-word products answering questions such as: what is a battery? How is a battery made? Where and how can one implement battery technology?

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Energy and Future Cities: Innovating Architecture

Depletion of traditional fuel stores has been accompanied by increasing pollution levels. Consequently, motivations to lower carbon-emissions have elevated and to ensure this change is achieved on a global scale a multinational agreement was achieved in 2015 at the Paris climate conference whereby 195 countries agreed a legally binding global climate deal. Much of our built environment is dependent on the energy systems that power it. To pave the way for the adoption of novel and advance energy systems, the infrastructure that underpins our cities will need to be reimagined, a fact that can already be seen in the influx of electric car charging points. This module with act both as an extension to ‘Energy and future cities, advanced energy systems’ course, as well as being as a standalone design based module, exploring the potential of our future cities. The symbiotic relationship between cities and the energy systems that drive them will be the key in unlocking the future of our built environment.

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Urban Geoscience: the London Perspective

Urban geoscience encompasses the geological aspects of the built environment in the context of construction materials and, the underlying bedrock that affects the stability of built structures. In London, the relevance of these aspects are evident.

For example, landslips can disrupt rail services and, non-uniform expansion and shrinkage of underlying clay sub-soil results in cracks in buildings. Water resource is another important consideration in the growing urban context. The nature of groundwater contaminants has changed with time with reports of caffeine and nicotine (British Geological Survey, 2007). Fluctuation of groundwater level depends on flow, recharge, and discharge and must be closely monitored. Growing urbanization also implies that the cities are increasingly becoming repositories of valuable materials that should be targeted for recovery by urban mining. These critical aspects of urban geology are evident for London and will be explored, but also relevant to other expanding cities in the world.

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Urban Environmental Politics

As the planet’s land use and human population become increasingly urban, environmental problems and politics of cities are evermore critical for improving socio-environmental relationships and outcomes. Thus, this module will explore the urban political conflicts of environmental issues like climate change, air pollution, water quality/quantity, resource and energy use, waste disposal, and more. Using a range of case studies from around the world and beginning with some of the contested material flows of resources that both transform and comprise cities, the module then will move to address politicized ideas of nature, conservation, and habitats in the city while concluding with discussions of human agency and responses to the uneven social impacts of urban environmental problems.

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Anglo-American Business Law (Level 2)

This module introduces students to key areas of business law from a UK-US and international perspective while honing their analytical, communication, and team problem-solving skills. Students will become familiar with the basic structure of the legal system and key elements of contract law, product liability, intellectual property law, the insider trading prohibition, and the law governing partnerships and corporations, including cross-border mergers and acquisitions. In order to deepen students’ understanding of business law, the module will also explore multi-dimensional aspects relating to social, political, ethical and technological considerations.

These themes are developed in reference to readings drawn from judicial decisions, statutes, recent news reports, and multimedia. Students will also undertake independent research and complete written assignments in which they assume a hypothetical role such as a legislative assistant, advocate or judicial clerk. Furthermore, a highlight of the module is the Supreme Court debate, where students work in teams on pending Supreme Court cases, culminating in an in-class mock trial during which teams represent one of the parties or act as Supreme Court justices.

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Brexit: Political Tensions, Economic Challenges

The UK’s departure from the EU is a historical event, with global political and economic implications. This course will give students a comprehensive understanding of the causes and consequences of Brexit: Why did British people come to this unexpected decision? Will the British economy survive the shock of leaving the EU? Could this be the beginning of the end for the European Union? In the process, students will learn about UK and EU politics, economics and political economy. The module will include teamwork on multimedia projects, such as a hypothetical campaign for the next country that considers leaving the EU. The module will also include visits to the European Commission’s Representation to the UK and the headquarters of the pro-EU campaign, as well as talks by representatives of organizations on both sides of the Brexit campaign, such as the European Movement and Change Britain.

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Bioscience and Society: Public Engagement, Policy and Funding

The purpose of this module is to explore the relationship between science and society in both a historical and contemporary context. Since the days of Christopher Columbus, right down to the Apollo Space programme and more recently the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, it is has become clear that ambitious scientific endeavor requires public confidence, communication, and funding in order to get from the original idea to something which has an impact in society. These considerations are just as valid in biology and medicine as they are in the physical sciences.

This course will draw on the unique range of museums, learned societies, and organizations based in London to enable students to experience and appreciate the relationship between science and society and the need for scientists to engage and communicate with the wider world.

Principles of Organic Chemistry

This module is designed to introduce students to the foundations of organic chemistry by focusing on the structures, properties and chemical reactivity of the various carbon-based compounds. This course will also cover different aspects of isomerism observed in organic molecules as well as the reactions’ mechanisms (substitution, elimination, and addition) in terms of the electrons flow. Various analytical techniques (MS, NMR, and IR) will be introduced as a tool to determine organic structures.

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Quantitative Modelling Techniques for Finance and Actuarial Sciences (Level 3)

The implementation of sound quantitative actuarial models is a vital task to assess risk in insurance, finance, and other industries and professions. This course provides a self-contained introduction to both theoretical and practical implementation of various quantitative modeling techniques applicable to finance and insurance. We combine diverse quantitative disciplines, from probability to statistics, from actuarial science to quantitative finance. Students will be able to apply the acquired knowledge to evaluate various insurance products.

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Industrial Applications: Modelling Aircraft Icing (Level 2)

This module is in the interdisciplinary field of icing in relation to aircraft. Ultimately, this course will draw from mathematics, physics, chemistry, and engineering to provide attendees with a broad overview of the field of aircraft icing, and how the problem may be approached mathematically. This will involve understanding the problem, discussing the current state of engineering solutions, and study of how mathematics can help to improve, enhance and further this field.

Modeling of this phenomena is a threefold approach. Firstly, the trajectory of particles within the fluid flow concerning an oncoming aircraft is calculated. Secondly, the behavior and mechanics of impinging particles (particles that make contact with the aircraft) needs to be understood. Thirdly, how ice builds up on a surface alongside the possibility of it shedding is important.

This course will serve as an introduction to understanding this field and the analytical modeling of this problem.

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Understanding and Preventing Crime

This module introduces students to the study of crime and its prevention.

It begins by considering the challenges with how we define and measure crime, and the implications these have for interpreting key crime trends. Special attention will be devoted to how crime patterns manifest in space and time and how they can be analyzed. Next, the key sociological, psychological and ecological theories relating to criminal behavior are critically examined. Lastly, the formal structures and machinery in place to respond to crime and security problems are outlined. This includes the role and functions of the police, courts, and corrections as the chief components of the criminal justice system, as well as the role of government in setting crime policy. Students will be encouraged to critically assess the strength of different theoretical approaches throughout the module.

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De Europææ Britanniæ Litteris Latinis [The Latin Literature of European Britain]

Britain has produced one of the richest and fully autochthonous treasures of Latin literature in the whole of Europe: ranging from the legends of King Arthur and Merlin to the constitutional landmark of the Magna Carta, and from the philosophical explorations of More's Utopia to Bacon's Novum Organum or the scientific mainstay of Newton's Principia Mathematica, alongside a wealth of engaging letters constantly exchanged with continental Europe.

This module comprises an academic introduction to the British production in Latin, with an overview of its periods and genres (Ijsewijn, Lapidge, Rigg). It dwells on detailed commentary and discussion of specific key texts (Monmouth, More, Francis Bacon). It further explores the rich connections the use of Latin allowed with the rest of Europe, mostly in the form of epistolary correspondence (e.g. between More and Erasmus). All teaching, coursework, and assessment will be in Latin. Students will be progressively coached into confident usage.

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Fairy Tales and their Retellings

Why are fairy tales so popular? Why are the original fairy tales darker than the ones we know? This module will give an introduction to different forms of storytelling, exploring the origins and evolution of fairy tales with a focus on contemporary retellings. A variety of fairy tales will be examined, ranging from ancient myths and medieval storytelling tradition to Disney’s adaptations and TV series such as Once Upon a Time and Grimm.

The module will introduce students to different literary genres, such as children’s literature (by looking into how children’s novels such as Alice in Wonderland and The Adventures of Pinocchio have been retold) and graphic novel studies. They will learn different approaches to literary analysis, such as comparative criticism and psychoanalysis. The module will include excursions to relevant exhibitions and interactive workshops on storytelling.

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London on Film

This module introduces students to important and distinctive aspects of London as a center of film-making, since 1895.

The module focuses on three key topics: London-based studio-production, with examples from pioneer R.W. Paul and from the Ealing Studios, post WW2; the gangster film as city-centred genre, with examples from the 1980s onwards; and London-made cinema as document of the changing city, with examples from across the history of film-making in London. Through the close analysis of London-made films and the study of their context, students will come to understand the significance of London for the history of cinema and will be encouraged to think about place in general as key to the appreciation of cinema as art and as spectacle.

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London Style: Visual Culture/ Counter-Culture

This module will demonstrate that present-day icons of “London Style” from fashion, film, and music are indebted to narratives of counter-culture, comedy, satire and dandyism, from Shakespeare to Punk. It aims to link our current terms of reference to complex social, political and conceptual histories.

It will consider Shakespeare’s comedies; the cultures of the English Revolution and Restoration; the satire of Hogarth, Gillray, and Rowlandson; and the radicalism of Thomas Paine, William Blake and Lord Byron. Representations of underworlds in the 19th-century novel and the persistence of satirical and Dickensian influences in Punk will be themes of the latter part of the module. It will conclude by identifying the presence of older “anti-establishment” narratives in the work of contemporary British artists Grayson Perry and Jeremy Deller and the fashion design of Vivienne Westwood and Alexander McQueen. The importance of street art in the contemporary British art scene will also be linked to the module content. In addition to signposting the rich histories that underlie contemporary perceptions of “London Style,” the module will encourage students to use archives and museums to independently produce their own creative work.

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International Trade and Maritime Law

The selling and purchasing of goods across territorial borders is an ancient yet sophisticated commercial activity. International trade involves interlocking contracts, including letters of credit and contracts of sale, carriage and insurance, all of which concern the minds of traders whilst performing this activity for profit. In pursuit of certainty and predictability in their affairs, traders around the world typically refer to English law in their sale contracts as the governing law. London has an unrivalled reputation as a global centre for dispute resolution, and it has always been the heart of international trade and maritime disputes.

Carriage of goods by sea has been the backbone of international trade since ancient times. This age-old yet sophisticated commercial activity remains to this day of importance to traders selling and purchasing goods across territorial borders for profit. English law enjoys a long-standing predominance in the international shipping market, as it is frequently chosen by the parties to govern their contracts of carriage. A vast amount of goods is carried around the world under contracts of carriage governed by English law.

This module covers all facets of CIF and FOB sales, ranging from contract formation to remedies, focusing on the problems when the interlocking contracts are not back-to-back. It also covers the main principles of the law of carriage of good by sea, offering an essential study of the two main forms of contract of carriage, namely charterparties and bills of lading.

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Politics of Global Development

This module will provide an introduction to, and an overview of, the politics of global development.

The module will take a case-based approach – using grounded, empirical cases – to illustrate the role of politics in development; allowing students to unpack the theory, concepts, and history of international development. It will emphasize the links between theory and practice, and students will be provided with the opportunity to hear from guest speakers working for various development organizations. The module is divided into three parts: part 1 will look at the politics of developing countries, including sessions on institutions; leaders and coalitions; bureaucracy and civil society; and contestation, power, gender, and conflict. Part 2 will look at global processes, including sessions on trade, aid, finance and investment; migration; and global governance. Part 3 will focus on development organizations and will look at how donor agencies, International Organisations, and NGOs operate on a day-to-day basis and the reality of the current challenges they face.

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Principles of Macroeconomics

This module will introduce students to the structure and workings of modern economic activity, focusing on models of production, use, organization, and distribution.

Students will identify influences in national economies, as well as the international economy, and consider the role of government policy. Students will learn different perspectives in macroeconomics and the value of models in interpretation and prediction. Problems will be discussed in groups to enable participatory learning and students will apply macroeconomic theory to debate issues in the real world.

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Understanding Management

This module will introduce students to the practice of management, including what managers do, why they do it, and ways in which they set about doing it.

The module will explore different management activities and roles from both a practical and theoretical perspective. Key management responsibilities such as strategic thinking, analyzing the business environment, marketing, and motivating self and others, will be explored alongside a real-life case study. This will provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to an actual business case. The aim of the module is to not only introduce students to the essence of management and the tools managers use but importantly, it will provide real insight into the role of the manager, managing in today’s dynamic and exciting business environment.

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What is Education

This module will provide an introduction to what it means to study education at a higher level.

The module will provide students with the opportunity to explore key ideas underpinning education with some of the world’s leading experts in education. Students will attend sessions at the UCL Institute of Education, where a range of experts will present their responses to the question: what is education? These responses will be underpinned by the critical consideration of the following questions: What is an education for, what is its purpose, both here and now and looking to the future?; What should be its fundamental values and ethics?; What do we mean by knowledge and learning (including formal and informal learning)?; What is our concept of education?; What is our image of the learners, educators, learner contexts, and of community/society?; Who is responsible for education, and what does it mean to be responsible? Students will be encouraged to consider and share their responses to these questions, in relation to their own contexts.

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London's Urban Development: Politics, Policy, and Design

This module will explore how London’s urban form is developing in response to the economic, social, and environmental challenges associated with its role as a ‘global city’.

Capitalising on UCL’s position in the heart of London, the module will combine fieldwork alongside seminars, classes, and workshops. It will introduce students to key frameworks for urban policy and planning decision-making and will examine the processes shaping the urban development within London. Students will engage with current debates over issues such as airport expansion, super-tall buildings, and affordable housing. Perspectives from social science and urban design will be used to critically examine how cities can respond to the challenge of ensuring a sustainable urban future. The insights, knowledge, and skills developed on this module can ultimately be applied to cities around the world.

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Global Health: Local and International Perspectives

This module will provide an introduction to the discipline of global health. Each week will be framed around the ‘wicked problems’ facing our world and the ways in which the individual can engage with global issues.

Topics covered include access and availability of healthcare, inequality, poverty, ethics, aid, and the key actors in global health. Each week will begin with a UK case study relating to a core topic and end with an excursion to a local site of significance in the development of the global health discipline. These excursions will link UCL's core value of equality with the rich history of social welfare and public health that began in London in the 1700s.

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An Archaeologial History of London

This module will provide students with a grounding in the historical geography and chronological development of the city in which they are now living.

It will introduce students to some of the sources used to compile that history, and some of the key surviving sites, buildings, monuments, museums and archaeological collections that can be used to illustrate that development. The module will be delivered through a series of classroom presentations and discussions and supplemented by a series of field trips and museum visits.

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Rebellion

This course will examine a variety of alternative theoretical explanations for civil conflict. The course begins with an overview of the discipline’s knowledge about the determinants of civil conflict.

The course then proceeds by introducing the student to the different theoretical explanations for civil conflict and the empirical research that has been undertaken to test these different theories. In particular: • Examine the development of the literature and the variety of alternative theoretical explanations for why people rebel against their state. • Examine the importance of international factors on the likelihood of civil conflict • Examine the consequences of civil wars for civilians. The course critically reviews the impact that politics plays on the advent, continuation, and consequences of civil conflict. Students are invited to reflect upon the state of the discipline and areas of fruitful future research.

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International Commercial Litigation

Course description currently unavailable.

Nerve Injury Treatment: Medicine, Science & Engineering

Peripheral Nerve Injury is a field of regenerative medicine which is advancing towards a paradigm shift in available therapeutic options. The ability of medicine to manipulate one of the only organ systems which have the capacity in a human to regrow is at the forefront of fields of surgical science, pharmacology, cellular engineering, bioengineering and assistive technologies.

This module offers the student the capacity to experience all the current therapeutic options for peripheral nerve injury treatment through a collaboration of the only clinical unit in the world to focus purely on nerve injury and UCL; a recognized world leader in neurobiology and engineering. This exposure will be through lectures and exposure in the clinical environment (clinic, rehab and the operating theatre) to all the basic concepts and theories of improving outcomes after nerve injury.

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International Relations

World politics today is characterized by increasing complexity. Alongside states, a myriad of international and regional organizations, interest groups, civil society organizations and even terrorist networks shape the dynamics of international politics. These interactions and alternative ways of understanding them are at the core of this module that examines the key issues in contemporary international relations.

The module will first offer students an introduction to the discipline of International Relations to understand some of the key questions that scholars and policymakers have focused on, and how the field has been transformed as the world has changed around them. It will then study a series of pressing contemporary issues, including war, security, development, human rights and terrorism. These cases and questions will be analyzed through different theories including realism, liberalism, constructivism, Marxism, and feminism.

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Mental Health and the Mind

Mental disorders, e.g. schizophrenia, dementia, depression, are common across all countries and constitute about 14% of the global burden of disease. Many people with a mental disorder - and the majority of those living in low-income countries - still have no access to the treatments they need. This module will offer students from a range of backgrounds, e.g. social sciences, medicine, psychology, an understanding of basic principles of how mental disorders present, the impact on individuals and the advances in treatment and recovery. The module will address general aspects of the etiology of mental disorders, the setting within which such disorders are managed in the UK and globally and finally bring the students in touch with people with lived experience of a mental disorder in order to elucidate aspects of stigma and health and social inequalities. Most importantly, we hope that students will be inspired to further their interest in this field and go on to develop a career in mental health.

For more information on UCL Psychiatry, please visit: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/psychiatry/

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The Sounds of Language: Principles of Phonetics

This module will provide a foundation for further study in linguistics, second language instruction and speech pathology.

The module will provide an overview of vocal tract anatomy. Students will learn, through daily practical exercises, how to produce the consonants and vowels of the world’s languages, and transcribe them using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The first part of the module will focus on English consonants and vowels and the second part will cover speech sounds not found in English (including clicks, implosives, ejectives, tones) and linguistic voice quality. Students will learn about the acoustic properties of speech and the tools used to study these properties.

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Anatomy and Developmental Biology

This module provides an introduction to significant aspects of human anatomy and embryonic development. It aims to prepare students for more advanced studies in these subjects.

The module covers topographical anatomy and embryonic development of the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, and limbs. The first few weeks of human development will be examined, alongside the cellular organization of tissues and organs. An understanding of the key principles of embryonic development will be provided. The module is taught through lectures, a series of seminars covering more specialized topics, a small number of practicals, and a class in the Anatomy Laboratory (Dissecting Room).

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Data Science and Big Data Analytics (Level 2)

This module will provide an introduction to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques and will teach students how to use specialized software to analyze real-world data and answer policy-relevant questions.

Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming. One of the main challenges for businesses and policymakers when using big data is to find people with the appropriate skills. This module will cover classic topics in data analysis (regression, binary models, and panel data) and introduce more specialized techniques, such as classification and decision trees, clustering and pattern recognition, and dimensionality reduction. It will cover data preparation and processing, including working with structured, key-value formatted (JSON), and unstructured data.

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Health Data Science, Artificial Intelligence and Big Data Analytics in Healthcare (Level 2)

Health Data Science is an exciting new area that combines scientific inquiry, statistical knowledge, substantive expertise, and computer programming in the area of healthcare and biomedicine. One of the main challenges for businesses, research institutes, and policymakers when using big health data is to find people with the appropriate skills. Students taking this module will be introduced to the most fundamental data analytic tools and techniques, and learn how to use specialized software to analyze real-world health data.

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Cybersecurity Risk Management

This module introduces the students to the aspects of how risk management methods are applied to improve cybersecurity. Firstly, it provides an overview of threats from cybercrimes followed by vulnerabilities and situational crime prevention techniques that provide mechanisms for cybersecurity. It then explains the principles of cybersecurity risk management that drives the decision making to protect organizations from cyber-attacks. Lastly, the key aspects of incident response planning and resilience in cyber risk management are outlined. Students will work in teams to identify, assess and prioritize cyber risks for a case study. The students will also get an opportunity to create a cybersecurity risk management plan within the same case study.

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Public Art in London: Creativity, Criminality and Capital in the City


London is one of the world’s major art capitals, famous in particular for its diverse and distinguished public art. From the low-brow independence of street art and graffiti to the high-brow dominance of commissioned art in public space, the city is filled with a visual and material culture that works not just to beautify, but to both transform and reaffirm cultural norms, to empower and immobilize its associated public.

Exploring London’s public art in order to understand the past, present, and future of the city itself, Public Art in London will examine this site as a place of communication and contestation, transmission and transformation, investigating the social, political and economic debates which these artworks implicitly intersect with and overtly investigate: It will thus enable students to critically explore both the city and the street and to discern not only what public art means, but what it does. View Syllabus

Healthcare Management: a London Perspective (Level 2)

The recent policy reforms in the NHS, and the challenges faced by health systems globally emphasize the need for future doctors and healthcare managers to understand how systems function, how they are financed, and how strategic policies are developed to ensure the provision of care to the highest quality standards. This module will allow students to get an insight into these topics through the vision and eye health sub-sector as an example of a speciality area that is experiencing many of the same pressures that are witnessed in the broader health sector. With people living longer and diseases such as diabetes contributing to vision loss, this part of the health sector is under tremendous pressure to serve a larger segment of patient care. With Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Institute of Ophthalmology staff as facilitators of various sessions, students will engage in informed discussions about how various policies, different strategic approaches and types of financing can affect health systems and how Moorfields is addressing these challenges. It will also foster innovative and critical thinking around these crucial areas. The module is relevant for students with several background.

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Energy and Future Cities: Advanced Energy Systems

Increasing levels of pollution and the diminution of fuels for traditional energy technologies has resulted in multinational agreements being established on a global scale. 2015 saw the production of the Paris climate agreement whereby 195 countries agreed upon a legally binding global climate deal, the first of its kind. In order to meet the targets of such agreements, significant breakthroughs must be made in key technologies such as lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells. Breakthroughs will require multidisciplinary approaches from the work of fundamental scientist in the creation of new chemistries, to the applied work of engineers in materials scale up and fabrication, to the economic and policy regulations and guidance that will be required to facilitate such change.

However, although significant research is being undertaken in both academic and industrial environments education on such devices remains limited. This course will build upon the teachings of the ‘Energy and future cities’ module in term one, exposing the audience to a detailed description of the fundamental mechanisms that drive electrochemical devices and how these devices are fabricated and implemented into real-word products answering questions such as: what is a battery? How is a battery made? Where and how can one implement battery technology?

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Energy and Future Cities: Innovating Architecture

Depletion of traditional fuel stores has been accompanied by increasing pollution levels. Consequently, motivations to lower carbon-emissions have elevated and to ensure this change is achieved on a global scale a multinational agreement was achieved in 2015 at the Paris climate conference whereby 195 countries agreed a legally binding global climate deal. Much of our built environment is dependent on the energy systems that power it. To pave the way for the adoption of novel and advance energy systems, the infrastructure that underpins our cities will need to be reimagined, a fact that can already be seen in the influx of electric car charging points. This module with act both as an extension to ‘Energy and future cities, advanced energy systems’ course, as well as being as a standalone design based module, exploring the potential of our future cities. The symbiotic relationship between cities and the energy systems that drive them will be the key in unlocking the future of our built environment.

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Urban Geoscience: the London Perspective

Urban geoscience encompasses the geological aspects of the built environment in the context of construction materials and, the underlying bedrock that affects the stability of built structures. In London, the relevance of these aspects are evident.

For example, landslips can disrupt rail services and, non-uniform expansion and shrinkage of underlying clay sub-soil results in cracks in buildings. Water resource is another important consideration in the growing urban context. The nature of groundwater contaminants has changed with time with reports of caffeine and nicotine (British Geological Survey, 2007). Fluctuation of groundwater level depends on flow, recharge, and discharge and must be closely monitored. Growing urbanization also implies that the cities are increasingly becoming repositories of valuable materials that should be targeted for recovery by urban mining. These critical aspects of urban geology are evident for London and will be explored, but also relevant to other expanding cities in the world.

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Industrial Applications: Modelling Aircraft Icing (Level 2)

This module is in the interdisciplinary field of icing in relation to aircraft. Ultimately, this course will draw from mathematics, physics, chemistry, and engineering to provide attendees with a broad overview of the field of aircraft icing, and how the problem may be approached mathematically. This will involve understanding the problem, discussing the current state of engineering solutions, and study of how mathematics can help to improve, enhance and further this field.

Modeling of this phenomena is a threefold approach. Firstly, the trajectory of particles within the fluid flow concerning an oncoming aircraft is calculated. Secondly, the behavior and mechanics of impinging particles (particles that make contact with the aircraft) needs to be understood. Thirdly, how ice builds up on a surface alongside the possibility of it shedding is important.

This course will serve as an introduction to understanding this field and the analytical modeling of this problem.

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Highlights
  • Ranked #4 in the U.K. (#16 in the world); 5th in Arts & Humanities (Slade School) - Times Higher Education Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in the world for Education; top 5 for Archaeology, Architecture/Built Environment, Anatomy & Physiology; top 10 for Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy & Pharmacology, Psychology, Geography, Anthropology - QS World Rankings
  • Founding member of elite Russell Group of universities

Faculty

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    Kelsey Patton

    Kelsey Patton will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - kelsey.patton@apiabroad.com

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    Heather Lees

    Heather Lees will be your Resident Director in London and a resource for you on-site.

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    Anna McCole

    Anna McCole will be your Student Services Coordinator in England and a resource for you while you are abroad with us!

API students will participate in one of the following excursions per term (students in both terms will do two of the following excursions). These excursions are designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API London programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Harlaxton Manor

    UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE API EVENT!
    Escaping to the countryside, students will experience what life is like at a stately Manor House. They will spend an afternoon at Harlaxton Manor, where they will take a tour of the manor and learn more about the history of the buildings. In addition to this, students will be treated to Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory and enjoy a very English lawn sport, Croquet in the grounds of the manor. This is an exclusive excursion just for API as Harlaxton Manor is usually closed to the public.
  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Harlaxton Manor

    UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE API EVENT!
    Escaping to the countryside, students will experience what life is like at a stately Manor House. They will spend an afternoon at Harlaxton Manor, where they will take a tour of the manor and learn more about the history of the buildings. In addition to this, students will be treated to Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory and enjoy a very English lawn sport, Croquet in the grounds of the manor. This is an exclusive excursion just for API as Harlaxton Manor is usually closed to the public.
  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Harlaxton Manor

    UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE API EVENT!
    Escaping to the countryside, students will experience what life is like at a stately Manor House. They will spend an afternoon at Harlaxton Manor, where they will take a tour of the manor and learn more about the history of the buildings. In addition to this, students will be treated to Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory and enjoy a very English lawn sport, Croquet in the grounds of the manor. This is an exclusive excursion just for API as Harlaxton Manor is usually closed to the public.
  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

London is a large city, so all students can expect to use public transportation (i.e. tube or bus) to move around the city on a daily basis, both getting to school and for social/cultural activities. It is a part of life in London. Generally, it will take students 20-45 minutes to get to school from their housing. All housing will be located in Zones 1 and 2 on the tube map.

Students will be housed in privately owned student accommodations, that include quality furnishings and areas for socializing. The kitchens are equipped with ovens, stoves, microwaves, and refrigerators. Wireless Internet is provided in all flats. A weekly cleaning service is provided to the communal kitchen/living areas in all API London accommodations.

We are unable to take housing requests. Students will be placed in one of the following three options based on availability and their API program:

Lady Margaret – Kentish Town

The accommodation building is a 4-story, 8-bedroom period townhouse shared among 16 students in double rooms with two single beds in each room. All bedrooms have private bathrooms. The kitchen is a large, shared space with a seating area and TV. Cooking utensils and crockery are provided. Bed linens are also provided but towels are not. There is a free washer and dryer in the building. Students are responsible for cleaning their own bedrooms and bathrooms.

Lady Margaret is located on a quiet residential street within Kentish Town where there are numerous cafes, shops, restaurants, and pubs. All the benefits of the bustling, vibrant area of Camden Town are a short walk away, as are the delights of the large ancient park of Hampstead Heath. The accommodations are a 5-minute walk from the Kentish Town tube stop, where students are able to take the Northern Line into Central London. The travel time from Lady Margaret to the API office is 20-25 minutes, and the travel time to the Westminster Regent campus, Central Saint Martins, and London College of Fashion is 20-30 minutes. Past students have been pleased with this location, as it offers both a quiet neighborhood and easy access to Central London.

Acorn – Bloomsbury

The accommodation buildings are Georgian 18th-century townhouses and are laid out in flats, with 3-11 students within each flat. Standard rooms will be doubles or triples within a co-ed flat or on a co-ed floor. Single bedrooms are extremely limited and cannot be guaranteed. Each flat will have a fully equipped kitchen, including crockery and utensils. Bed linens and towels are provided and there are free laundry facilities in all buildings.

Acorn housing is situated on the Duke of Bedford’s Estate, between Russell Square and Bloomsbury Square and within walking distance of the many attractions of London’s West End including just a 3-minute walk to the British Museum and the API office. The travel time from Acorn to the API office, as well as FSU, is a 10-minute walk, and the travel time to the Westminster Harrow campus is a 45-50 minute tube ride.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included. Meals are not included in these housing options.

Acorn Housing 36609042992 O
Acorn Housing 36609043502 O
Acorn Housing 36639893941 O
Acorn Housing 36731887036 O
Api London Housing 7773304354 O
Api London Housing Examples 8538549425 O
Lady Margaret Kentish Town 36640097931 O
Lady Margaret Kentish Town 36640100611 O
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 Jun 29, 2019 - Jul 20, 2019 $5,980 May 1, 2019 May 15, 2019
Summer Combined Jun 29, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $9,880 May 1, 2019 May 15, 2019
Summer 2 Jul 20, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $5,980 May 1, 2019 May 15, 2019