England London Fashion Student 72308287

University of the Arts London is a collegiate university comprising 6 international renowned colleges: Central Saint Martins, London College of Communication, Chelsea College of Arts, Camberwell College of Arts, Wimbledon College of Arts, and London College of Fashion. These colleges specialize in art, design, communications, fashion, and the performing arts, and is the largest provider of higher level education in the arts in Europe. All the colleges are located in London and each college is at the heart of their respective communities. Drawing on and contributing to the local culture, they foster closely-knit and welcoming environments in which to study, supported by all the resources of the larger University and the wider arts community. The University's 1,228 teaching staff; as active professional artists, practitioners, designers, critics, and theorists, lead the way in creative and experimental practice alongside historical and theoretical analysis. The combination of a varied student group, cutting-edge research, and highly-experienced staff creates a unique, multifaceted learning experience for students at UAL.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.75 G.P.A.
  • CSM courses are generally for students who have one year’s experience in the subject of choice.
  • Freshman may be admitted as long as they have some background in the subject to which they are applying
  • Completed API application
  • One official transcript
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Program of study statement
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry Requirement: Valid passport and supporting documents

API students will participate in one of the following excursions per term (students in both terms will do two of the following excursions). These excursions are designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API London programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Harlaxton Manor

    UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE API EVENT!
    Escaping to the countryside, students will experience what life is like at a stately Manor House. They will spend an afternoon at Harlaxton Manor, where they will take a tour of the manor and learn more about the history of the buildings. In addition to this, students will be treated to Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory and enjoy a very English lawn sport, Croquet in the grounds of the manor. This is an exclusive excursion just for API as Harlaxton Manor is usually closed to the public.
  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Harlaxton Manor

    UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE API EVENT!
    Escaping to the countryside, students will experience what life is like at a stately Manor House. They will spend an afternoon at Harlaxton Manor, where they will take a tour of the manor and learn more about the history of the buildings. In addition to this, students will be treated to Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory and enjoy a very English lawn sport, Croquet in the grounds of the manor. This is an exclusive excursion just for API as Harlaxton Manor is usually closed to the public.
  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Harlaxton Manor

    UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE API EVENT!
    Escaping to the countryside, students will experience what life is like at a stately Manor House. They will spend an afternoon at Harlaxton Manor, where they will take a tour of the manor and learn more about the history of the buildings. In addition to this, students will be treated to Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory and enjoy a very English lawn sport, Croquet in the grounds of the manor. This is an exclusive excursion just for API as Harlaxton Manor is usually closed to the public.
  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

  • Brighton

    Brighton is England’s most popular coastal resort on the English Channel. In the early 19th century, George IV made Brighton his personal “playground” when he built his summer home, the Royal Pavilion, with each room lavishly and sometimes outrageously decorated in the Oriental Style. Brighton’s most well-known attraction is Palace Pier, a collection of rides, arcade games, and other amusements. Known as a place where almost anything goes, Brighton attracts artists, musicians, jet-setters, organic farmers, hipsters, and hippies side by side.

  • Harlaxton Manor

    UNIQUE, EXCLUSIVE API EVENT!
    Escaping to the countryside, students will experience what life is like at a stately Manor House. They will spend an afternoon at Harlaxton Manor, where they will take a tour of the manor and learn more about the history of the buildings. In addition to this, students will be treated to Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory and enjoy a very English lawn sport, Croquet in the grounds of the manor. This is an exclusive excursion just for API as Harlaxton Manor is usually closed to the public.
  • Windsor/Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. Currently, more than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle. The Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is now often used for state banquets and to entertain guests on official visits.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 6 semester credits per session

University of the Arts London is a collegiate university comprising 6 international renowned colleges: Central Saint Martins, London College of Communication, Chelsea College of Arts, Camberwell College of Arts, Wimbledon College of Arts, and London College of Fashion. These colleges specialize in art, design, communications, fashion, and the performing arts, and is the largest provider of higher level education in the arts in Europe. All the colleges are located in London and each college is at the heart of their respective communities. Drawing on and contributing to the local culture, they foster closely-knit and welcoming environments in which to study, supported by all the resources of the larger University and the wider arts community. The University's 1,228 teaching staff; as active professional artists, practitioners, designers, critics, and theorists, lead the way in creative and experimental practice alongside historical and theoretical analysis. The combination of a varied student group, cutting-edge research, and highly-experienced staff creates a unique, multifaceted learning experience for students at UAL.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive an official transcript from the University of the Arts London upon completion of the program. Students are assessed on the basis of project work, preparatory materials, the log and written assignments.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Kelsey Patton

    Kelsey Patton will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - kelsey.patton@apiabroad.com

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    Heather Lees

    Heather Lees will be your Resident Director in London and a resource for you on-site.

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    Anna McCole

    Anna McCole will be your Student Services Coordinator in England and a resource for you while you are abroad with us!

COURSE OFFERINGS

The following courses are offered from several of the constituent UAL colleges, including:

  • CSM – Central Saint Martins
  • CHELSEA – Chelsea College of Arts
  • LCC – London College of Communication.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Summer students earn 90 contact hours per summer term. API recommends that students obtain pre-approval from their home university for courses and credits that they plan to take abroad.

The colleges that make up the University of the Arts, London - or UAL - (including Camberwell College of Arts, Central Saint Martins, Chelsea College of Arts, London College of Communication, London College of Fashion, and Wimbledon College of Arts) has offered recommendations for converting its alpha grades to American grades. Students who have enrolled full-time receive 40 credits at UAL each term. API awards 3 U.S. semester credits for every 10 UAL credit hours (e.g., a course representing 20 UAL credits would be awarded 6 US credits on the API translation.)

CSM - Acting Shakespeare with Drama Center London

This three-week course explores the different subject areas of acting Shakespeare through a range of disciplines, turning students from drama students into drama thinkers. At the heart of Acting Shakespeare at Drama Centre London is performance, a complex process of decision making and problem-solving that calls for an interaction between conscious and unconscious activity, intuition and skill. Students will tackle acting, voice, body focussed lessons and learn singing, dance and stage fighting skills, all the time working with actual tutors from Drama Centre London at Central Saint Martins.NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Architecture

This course is for students who are looking to explore the architecture and urban planning of London through learning about its history as well as by designing an architectural intervention in the city. The course assists students in understanding the key phases of London’s architectural, economic and social development through a series of informal seminars as well as guided site visits. This research will provide a stimulating background leading into their individual design project work. Students will explore their ideas in context to a particular site in London and develop a design proposal for an urban intervention in group work through model making, drawing, and photography. Fabricating, testing and documenting their intervention on site will allow students to participate in London’s rich contemporary design culture and provide them with first-hand experience of the particularities of the city. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study architecture, history of architecture, art and design. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary architectural practice as well as a sound introduction to appreciating architecture in context to history.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Art History, Criticism, and Communication

This course is for students who are looking to enhance their engagement with an understanding of contemporary visual practice and theory. The course assists students in contextualizing and developing their ideas about art through an array of visual and critical lenses, from modernist art history to contemporary cultural theory and conceptual practice. A series of informal seminars and one-to-one tutorials will help students focus their research. The group will engage with a stimulating array of activities to trigger creative links with London’s rich contemporary visual and material culture, from gallery, museum and special archive visits to sessions working alongside professional artists, curators, writers, and publishers. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study Art History, Curating, and Communications in the Arts. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary artistic practice, with confidence as well as a key network of cultural resources and connections. This course is suitable for beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Contemporary Fine Art Practice

This course provides an innovative and experimental approach to the making and development of each student’s work. Students have the option of realizing their ideas through a wide range of media, such as; painting, drawing, mixed media, installation, sculpture, photography and video. Integral to the course is a strong commitment and an inquisitive approach to contemporary practice. The course assists students in developing those practical, critical and conceptual skills necessary to encourage their own development as an artist. Students also receive an introduction to London’s contemporary art scene via gallery trips and talks at major galleries and museums, while smaller commercial and artist-run venues will complement and contextualize students’ work. Students should have previous experience in this subject. This course is suitable for students with an open mind! It encourages experimentation and as such is not suited for students wishing to learn very basic drawing/painting skills. Students will need to provide the following: a sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; paint brushes; craft knife/scissors; USB stick; photographs of recent work; digital or SLR camera. A video recorder and laptop are also useful.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Experimental Fashion Knitwear

This course will suit students with a very creative design aesthetic in fashion and those who wish to develop and specialize in knit and other related fabrics. It offers a “taster” of the BA Fashion with Knit. Students are shown how to initiate ideas via their sketchbooks and how to explore their research and develop fashion and fabric designs as a result thereof. With a series of workshops covering techniques such as machine and hand knitting, crochet, embroidery, and smocking, and are encouraged to design and produce a range of fashion and fabric ideas. Students will learn how to edit their work and where to concentrate their technical abilities. Students are supported by professional technicians and pattern cutters. The first two weeks are experimenting and developing technical expertise. At this point via tutorials students will choose one fashion look or silhouette to produce a presentation on the final day. Throughout the 3 weeks, students are expected to visit London’s museums, markets, cafes and clubs to inform their design development. Design solutions must be contemporary and relevant. Students receive peer and individual assessment and develop a strong and successful design project. Students must have prior experience in knitwear.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Communication

This course will take a look at how different media communicate fashion, and specifically how journalism, photography, and styling sell fashion ideas. Student final projects will be a theoretical editorial magazine shoot or a look-book for a fashion brand. This course is open to all students who have an interest in fashion.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design

Central Saint Martins fashion alumni like John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, and Stella McCartney have changed the way that the world looks at fashion. At the heart of the Central Saint Martins approach is the way that individual students’ own ideas provide the focus for design development. In this course, students use London, its streets, museums, and people as the starting point for design research. The class goes on to develop their research ideas into designs. Students explore a range of different illustration techniques to present their ideas to finished portfolio standard. Students are expected to push their ideas to expand and explore what is possible through the design process. During the class students also visit specialist fabric shops and the costume collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The class ends with a final critique in which students present their ideas to the group. Assessment is based on research in a sketchbook or other form, including sourced inspirational research, fabrics, sketches and rough design ideas. Designs developed from these ideas are presented as illustrations to portfolio standard, including working drawings. This course is open to all students, from ambitious beginners to those with more experience. Students will be provided with a sketchbook and layout pad but will need to provide for themselves the following: sketching pens; black pen; coloring pencils; others as needed per syllabi.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design - Menswear

The course covers the full experience of a working menswear designer – covering research, subject knowledge, and context, to design development. It then goes on to teach the basics of garments construction, based on a vintage piece. The focus is looking at menswear as a “product’ rather than high-end fashion. In order to achieve a three-dimensional final outcome, together with 2D portfolio work, students are expected to be focused, self-sufficient and very hard working. Students are encouraged to take initiatives, to work independently, and to be willing to learn fast. A basic ‘block’ shape/pattern will be followed by the whole class, but there will be plenty of scope for individual students to personalize their own garment. Garment construction help will be provided and students expected to work independently to follow the design brief of the module. Tutors and technicians from BA Fashion Design Menswear plus relevant visits and industry guest lecturers will provide an authentic and intensive experience of Fashion Design Menswear at Central Saint Martins.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Graphic Design

This course explores the different subject areas of contemporary graphic design through a series of studio projects, turning the participant from a design student into a design thinker. The emphasis is on idea-based problem solving as well as exploring ‘What is graphic design?’ Students tackle typographic and design projects and explore image-making through illustration and photography. The first week is a dynamic introduction to the visual context of London as a source of inspiration. The practical sessions are combined with the opportunity to explore London’s public space and museums. There are critiques and discussions about the work-in-progress designed to give students confidence and increase their design vocabulary. During the second week, students explore a longer project based around them as practitioners. The main project is supplemented by a few experimental one-day pieces and students have some tutorial time before the final group presentation and discussion. Students leave the course inspired and knowledgeable about this dynamic and ever-changing area of art and design as it appears in a London context. Students will need to provide the following: a recent piece of work; sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; USB stick; laptop.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Interior Design

This highly structured course begins by visiting and analyzing existing interiors, hotels, retail spaces, restaurants and bars in London. Students learn how to ‘read’ an interior. After the design project brief is given, the course involves a mix of creative exercises and workshops. This leads students through the basics of interior design, as well as the fundamentals of the design process, to completing a finished project. Further visits to places of design interest such as galleries, exhibitions, model-making shops, and museums are also part of the course. The course provides the student with a structure where creative ideas, drawing techniques (both technical skills and sketch visualization) and model making enable them to be confident when presenting their ideas. The course provides students with high quality two and three-dimensional work which may be used in their portfolio, as well as demonstrating good practice in research through the production of a dynamic sketchbook. Students can expect an intense and challenging studio experience with fellow students from a broad social and cultural background. This course is suitable for all levels of designers, from ambitious beginners little interior design background to more established designers and architects. Students will need to provide the following: tape measure (metal); set square; metal ruler; scale ruler; compass; erasers; different grades of pencils; sketching pens; masking tape; scissors; scalpels; glue stick.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Textile Design

This course takes students from 2D design to 3D construction of textiles for fashion. Studio and workshop sessions are complemented by visits to places of interest, such as galleries and textile retailers. Week 1 concentrates on building design and research skills and understanding the role of the fashion textile designer. Attention is paid to developing drawing and painting skills toward creating a substantial portfolio of designs on paper. Week 2 is based in the workshop creating handmade textiles using techniques such as felting, knitting and hand painting and printing. Week 3 takes the design work from Week 1 and the technical skills learned in Week 2 to create a sample collection of fashion textiles. Skills such as pleating, embossing, lamination, and burn-out will add to a final collection. This course is suitable for students at all levels, including beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Animation

Do you want to explore one of the most dynamic design areas in a city famous for pushing the boundaries of animation? This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative learning experience while students develop their animation portfolio. Taught by expert staff with tons of industry experience, students will be based in LCC’s extensive digital studios. At the end of the three weeks, students will have created new work that they can include in a portfolio for work or study.

This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative experience whilst developing their animation portfolio and knowledge. The course focuses on Principles of Animation and Visual Narrative via a set of fast-paced workshops and a short project. Students will develop different ways of working, collaborating, visit exhibitions, researching and gathering materials, test their ideas and put them into practice.

Students will learn to create movement on the screen, by studying the fundamental principles of animation. Students will then go on to learn about narrative development and produce their own short animated project.

Technical workshops will focus on drawing for animation, storyboarding and animatics development, creating animation and digital assets using design and animation software. In the second and third week, students will develop their own short animated film or sequence based on the theme, skills, and techniques learned in the first week.

At the end of the course, students will present their work at an exhibition alongside photography, graphics and film students.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Communication for PR and Advertising

Communication is central to the contemporary promotional industries such as Public Relations and Advertising. On this summer school, students will learn some of the theories that support contemporary communication processes, and the tools that help all organizations whether they are in the private, public or charity sector to build understanding, influence behavior and to adapt to changes in the environment. Students will look at Public Relations and Advertising strategically from an organizational perspective, learning about, for example, crisis management and online reputation, as well as, the promotion of products, brands, and services. As part of this broad-based course, students will engage with issues relating to Public Relations and Advertising in social media and digital communication.

In the final week of the course, students will work in a team on a “Brand Aid” brief – bringing back new life to a product that has gone out of fashion. Previous campaigns have re-branded Tamagotchi and the iPod classic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Contemporary Photography Practice

This summer course is practice-based and emphasizes the research and development of a personal project. There will be workshops on different aspects of photography production as well as a critical consideration of themes in contemporary photography practice. These include color and black & white darkroom development, flashguns, large format digital printing and retouching with Wacom tablets. LCC Photography has an international reputation for exciting and innovative photography ranging from fine art to photojournalism to commercial practice, with numerous successful and high profile alumni across the arts and media sectors.

Students will be shown how to research and develop a project conceptually as well as practically, and how to present and promote to an outside audience. The course will be taught through a mix of workshops, seminars, tutorials, and critiques. Students will have the opportunity to work in one of our industry standard studios or out on location.

Students will take advantage of the wonderful array of exhibitions in London in a programme of gallery visits followed by a discussion of exhibitions and of where their own work fits into the contemporary panorama of photography practice.

Students will be assessed on the selection and installation of their work in one of the galleries at LCC. On the final day of the course, the class will host a private view and students will be encouraged to invite friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Creative Industries London

This three-week course is designed to give students a solid foundation in theory and an introduction to disruptive design, media and screen practices. Students will take workshops in blogging, photography, and video whilst learning in seminars about the networks of cultural power.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Digital Photography Portfolio

In this course, students will develop a portfolio of photographic work, gain new skills in digital photography and grow their existing knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of photography.

In week one students will have three assignments focused on street portraiture, studio portraiture, and the urban landscape. For these assignments, students will be given introductory lectures by photographers who have created work specialized in these areas who have worked in fashion, editorial, advertising and fine-art photography. The assignments will enhance the students’ creative camera control as well as develop their conceptual awareness. Students can work individually, or with their peers, to produce visual responses to the brief, coming together at the end of the week to share their results with their tutor and the rest of the class, receiving feedback on their photographs.

Week two will begin with lectures on building their audience and on professional practice in photography. Students will be taken on a city walk looking at urban landscape by photographer and writer Lewis Bush who will also give a lecture on contemporary documentary photography. Students will be taken to document events in London by documentary photographer Edward Thompson who will help them to research techniques of storytelling and narrative in photography with their either completing a photojournalistic essay or a contemporary photo-series. In week two students will also be given location lighting workshops by fine art and advertising photographer Lottie Davies. There will be technical workshops on digital workflow: editing, sequencing, and post-production techniques within editorial photography.

In week three, with what students have learned from the first two weeks, they will now focus on building their portfolio. Students will have 1 to 1 tutorials helping to galvanize their ideas in how to create a body of work that is at the core of who they are and how they want to work in future. Students will have technical workshops editing their work for print, producing their own zines and making their own website. In this week students will also visit professional photo-labs and photography supply stores where they can also start to construct a physical photography portfolio.

Students will take advantage of the diversity and richness of London’s galleries and museums, and engage in discussions about the practice of photography. By the end of the summer school, students will have generated enough photographic material to create a hard copy portfolio, which will be assessed by their tutors, alongside a photographic industry professional. Their portfolio can then be presented to their friends and family, in a mini-exhibition alongside work by students from Contemporary Photography Practice, Graphic Media Design and Filmmaking summer school students.

During the three-week course students will develop enhanced skills in creative camera control; digital workflow; digital retouching skills; shooting in a studio and lighting on location; digital printing skills; an introduction to designing a website; portfolio development; and presentational skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Filmmaking

Students will learn how to produce their own short film, shot here in London. Students will go from the basics of filmmaking to producing and editing on an intensive, hands-on course. It is suitable for those who want to learn either dramatic or documentary filmmaking.

Students will study in intensive workshops, with their own tutor and they will work in teams to make their films. Students will assume a variety of roles: writer, producer, director, editor and performer In each area they will be supported and taught by experts. This is an intensive course and students will be expected to work with their team in the evenings and at the weekends.

Students will have access to a kit-room stocked with Canon XA10 camcorders, booms and lighting rigs. Once students have finished filming, they can edit their films in our edit suites installed with industry-standard editing software: Avid, Apple Final Cut Pro and Logic, Adobe Creative Cloud Premiere and After Effects.

Most of all the film will be fun. Students will come together with like-minded people, sharing the adventure of filmmaking with all its challenges and thrills and they will leave us with a fully-produced short film.

NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Games Design

An intensive, immersive course that will introduce students to the creative possibilities of game production. Students will be taught by tutors with loads of experience in the theory and practice of games, and they will have the chance to work in our purpose-built games studios. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of the rules and logic of games and how these can be developed through programming into engaging games.

During the course, students will work on individual and group projects, take part in discussions and visits a range of exciting digital exhibitions and studios in London. It is a hands-on course that will give students the skills and knowledge they need to begin thinking like a games designer.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Graphic Media Design

On this three-week course, students will explore the relationships between graphic design, communication systems, and media processes through studio-based technical workshops, discussions and other activities.

With an emphasis on visual research and exploration, we will examine the function of typography, layout and basic design principles, letterpress, screen printing, risograph printing, digital filmmaking and the relationship between print and digital media.

There will be the opportunity to visit museums and galleries in London to see the latest design techniques and get some inspiration. Previous students have visited the Imperial War Museum and Carsten Holler: Decision exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre.

A key part of the course will be recording the process of design and students will set-up a blog to record their design journey in words, images, and video.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Journalism

This course is intended to develop a student’s skills as a journalist, providing a rewarding insight into how to apply these core abilities to create accurate and compelling content across media platforms. In lecture and workshop settings, students will study writing in a range of genres including news, features, reviews and comment pieces. Working closely with social media and online blogging tools, students will explore the modern digital landscape, and apply this knowledge and practical skills to a personal, bespoke web project. This course is ideal for students who are thinking about a career in content creation or journalism or are heading for further study in this area.

This summer school is based on classes from BA Journalism programme at London College of Communication. If students need and supporting documentation to convert this into credit for teir home university we can provide that for them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Media, Culture, and Communication

This summer school introduces students to key concepts for studying media, communications and cultural institutions and practices. Through a series of detailed case studies, the course explores the relationship between technological, social, economic and political factors in the evolution of mediated communication and culture. These developments will be mapped alongside major debates about the social and cultural impact of media and communication technologies, digitization, and new media cultures. The summer school also explores the cultural systems of contemporary ‘media-saturated’ societies looking closely at social media and personal/cultural identity, cultures of globalization, gender and culture, and cultural value and judgment.

Students will have the opportunity to visit world-class exhibitions, in previous years we have been to Carsten Holler: Decision at the Hayward Gallery and Digital Revolution at the Barbican Gallery. Students will go on a psychogeography walk around Brick Lane and explore the London Gothic culture of Abney Park Cemetery, from the Victorian era through to Amy Winehouse.

At the beginning of the course, students will learn how to create an engaging blog with images and video. Throughout the course, students will add to this and it will form part a larger The London Project which will form part of their assessment. In addition, the blog will be a great way for students to record share their experiences with friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Fine Art Studio

Practice and contemporary theory are unified throughout the programme, enabling students to establish and extend the contexts within which they operate as a practitioner.The Fine Art Studio programme is distinguished by three developmental stages and projects:

  • STAGE 1 – Developing a Research-Based Practice: ‘A Frame in the Façade’ guides students through a series of intensive one-day workshops, where experimental links will be established between diverse materials and processes.
  • STAGE 2 – Context: ‘Remapping the Fold’ challenges students to locate the key ideas, themes and working methodologies that have arisen in their practical explorations during Stage 1, and develop a self-propelled practical and contextual inquiry over the next four days.
  • STAGE 3 – Consolidation: ‘The Space Undone’ encourages students to reflect upon their developments in Stage 2, and realize a nuanced body of work that extends the potentialities of their practice, with an emphasis on ideas of ‘space’ and ‘display’.
Students will play an active role in a series of lectures, artist seminar sessions, group critiques, one-to-one tutorials, gallery visits and gallery workshops, as well as collaborating with MA Fine Art and MA Curating and Collection students to curate and install an exhibition of work made during Stage 3 of the programme.Fine Art practice is an extended field of inquiry, and no longer can be considered as demarcated modes of expression. Rather, they are ‘zones of contagion’, constantly expanding and ‘widening their scope’. This open and concept-led programme will encourage students to work with a wide range of mediums and processes to enable them to locate, develop, contextualize and rigorously analyze their developments as a creative practitioner.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Interior and Spatial Design

In this course, students will be guided through the stages and conventions of a typical BAISD project to design an augmented retail interior installation in relation to research, which will question the ways in which a canteen works and is used as a retail environment and propose a new method in which that might happen. During this process students will learn by going through the following steps:

  • Sketch a site freehand;
  • Measure and survey a site to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D by hand to scale;
  • Draw a site in 3D by hand to scale;
  • Model a site physically to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D digitally to scale;
  • Model a site in 3D digitally to scale;
  • Develop a concept in response to a research process;
  • Develop a generation of initial ideas in response to a concept;
  • Propose a final idea in response to a generation of initial ideas;
  • Present the final proposal visually and verbally using the methods learnt in stages 1-8.

Students will be guided through each of the stages of a typical BAISD project in a series of group exercises where they will receive support from their peers during group work as well as through an induction to the studio tutorial and review system in which they will receive clear, constructive feedback from their course tutor.

The course will be delivered in a series of enthusing and supportive workshops, lectures, seminars and site visits to locations of interest where students will be positively encouraged to engage in the process and ask questions. The sessions will also provide students with an opportunity to ask a range of questions that they may have pertaining to their future career as an interior and spatial designer, an interior designer or an architect and how to chart unknown territories.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Digital Textile Design

This study abroad course will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital textile design.

Practical studio and workshop sessions will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital design through the use of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator from initial drawing to the translation of their designs. This course will give students a unique insight into contemporary textile design for fashion and interiors.

Students will be taught new drawing approaches and experiment with a variety of techniques. Sessions will be complemented by lectures and external visits to places of interest within London, including museums, galleries, and retailers.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CAMBERWELL - Illustration

Graphic Design Communication students at Chelsea are stimulated by a passion for generating high-octane ideas and work to develop the digital and technical skills needed to create innovative, directional concepts.

Students will be encouraged to take on this level of design thinking as they study contemporary typographic design, developing a critical and creative approach, through the study of theoretical, practical and contextual concerns.

Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine the demands of typography in its contemporary cultural context, looking at modes of communication and how typography and typographic design is generated, utilized and translated by the user.

Students will be provided with a variety of study methods to enhance their learning, including group lectures, visits to solo projects and self-directed study.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Advanced Fashion Design

This course is designed to give students an authentic Central Saint Martins Fashion Design experience, using experimental research and design development pathways that are original and innovative. Central Saint Martins Fashion Design philosophy is that individual students’ personal concepts provide the focus for their original design development. In this course, students will explore their ideas by gathering inspiration from a variety of sources as the starting point for creative design research. Students will then go on to develop and interpret their research ideas into garment designs, prints, and embroideries. A series of workshops led by industry professionals will cover pattern-making and fashion illustration. Students will explore a range of different techniques to present their ideas to an advanced portfolio standard. The course will be taught through a series of research projects, visits, design and illustration sessions, and individual and group tutorials. Students will be expected to be ambitious and really push their ideas to explore what it possible to achieve through the design process. It will end with a final critique in which students will present their ideas to the group. This course is suitable for students or graduates of Fashion Design at the university level and also for professionals with fashion design experience. This is not a course for beginners. NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Visual Merchandising

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

CSM - Product and Industrial Design

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

WIMBLEDON - London Theatre: Behind the Scenes

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

WIMBLEDON - Theatre and Screen Design

Through practical workshops, visits, backstage tours, discussion groups, this course offers you the opportunity to engage with Designing for performance through an intensive three-week programme.

You will be based at Wimbledon College of Arts, a specialist art college with Theatre and Film as its key subject areas. Responding to a brief, you will develop a short story and visually communicate this. You will learn about the technical and creative processes involved in Design for Performance including costume, set design and lighting.

This course will provide you with:

  • A ‘hands on’ introduction to various creative design processes – such as model making, costume design and 3D making techniques.
  • An insight into the wide range of cultural and performance offerings London provides.
  • An opportunity to participate in group discussion and be able to articulate your views on your visits and experiences. You will also offer questions and responses in the discussion of the opinions of other group members.
  • An opportunity to Design your own scale model of Theatre of Film Production (Scaled model of your Set and / or Costume Designs which will feature in an end of course exhibition.

On completing the course you should be able to:

  • Have a good understanding of a wide range of performances and the theatrical offerings of London.
  • Creating Characters and expressing them in many artistic forms.
  • Have learnt new technical skills, working to scale and experimented with specialist materials.
  • Completed a mini project which may be suitable for inclusion in your portfolio.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

CSM - Fashion Communication

This course will take a look at how different media communicate fashion, and specifically how journalism, photography, and styling sell fashion ideas. Student final projects will be a theoretical editorial magazine shoot or a look-book for a fashion brand. This course is open to all students who have an interest in fashion.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design

Central Saint Martins fashion alumni like John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, and Stella McCartney have changed the way that the world looks at fashion. At the heart of the Central Saint Martins approach is the way that individual students’ own ideas provide the focus for design development. In this course, students use London, its streets, museums, and people as the starting point for design research. The class goes on to develop their research ideas into designs. Students explore a range of different illustration techniques to present their ideas to finished portfolio standard. Students are expected to push their ideas to expand and explore what is possible through the design process. During the class students also visit specialist fabric shops and the costume collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The class ends with a final critique in which students present their ideas to the group. Assessment is based on research in a sketchbook or other form, including sourced inspirational research, fabrics, sketches and rough design ideas. Designs developed from these ideas are presented as illustrations to portfolio standard, including working drawings. This course is open to all students, from ambitious beginners to those with more experience. Students will be provided with a sketchbook and layout pad but will need to provide for themselves the following: sketching pens; black pen; coloring pencils; others as needed per syllabi.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Visual Merchandising

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

CSM - Product and Industrial Design

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

CSM - Acting Shakespeare with Drama Center London

This three-week course explores the different subject areas of acting Shakespeare through a range of disciplines, turning students from drama students into drama thinkers. At the heart of Acting Shakespeare at Drama Centre London is performance, a complex process of decision making and problem-solving that calls for an interaction between conscious and unconscious activity, intuition and skill. Students will tackle acting, voice, body focussed lessons and learn singing, dance and stage fighting skills, all the time working with actual tutors from Drama Centre London at Central Saint Martins.NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Architecture

This course is for students who are looking to explore the architecture and urban planning of London through learning about its history as well as by designing an architectural intervention in the city. The course assists students in understanding the key phases of London’s architectural, economic and social development through a series of informal seminars as well as guided site visits. This research will provide a stimulating background leading into their individual design project work. Students will explore their ideas in context to a particular site in London and develop a design proposal for an urban intervention in group work through model making, drawing, and photography. Fabricating, testing and documenting their intervention on site will allow students to participate in London’s rich contemporary design culture and provide them with first-hand experience of the particularities of the city. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study architecture, history of architecture, art and design. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary architectural practice as well as a sound introduction to appreciating architecture in context to history.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Art History, Criticism, and Communication

This course is for students who are looking to enhance their engagement with an understanding of contemporary visual practice and theory. The course assists students in contextualizing and developing their ideas about art through an array of visual and critical lenses, from modernist art history to contemporary cultural theory and conceptual practice. A series of informal seminars and one-to-one tutorials will help students focus their research. The group will engage with a stimulating array of activities to trigger creative links with London’s rich contemporary visual and material culture, from gallery, museum and special archive visits to sessions working alongside professional artists, curators, writers, and publishers. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study Art History, Curating, and Communications in the Arts. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary artistic practice, with confidence as well as a key network of cultural resources and connections. This course is suitable for beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Contemporary Fine Art Practice

This course provides an innovative and experimental approach to the making and development of each student’s work. Students have the option of realizing their ideas through a wide range of media, such as; painting, drawing, mixed media, installation, sculpture, photography and video. Integral to the course is a strong commitment and an inquisitive approach to contemporary practice. The course assists students in developing those practical, critical and conceptual skills necessary to encourage their own development as an artist. Students also receive an introduction to London’s contemporary art scene via gallery trips and talks at major galleries and museums, while smaller commercial and artist-run venues will complement and contextualize students’ work. Students should have previous experience in this subject. This course is suitable for students with an open mind! It encourages experimentation and as such is not suited for students wishing to learn very basic drawing/painting skills. Students will need to provide the following: a sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; paint brushes; craft knife/scissors; USB stick; photographs of recent work; digital or SLR camera. A video recorder and laptop are also useful.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Experimental Fashion Knitwear

This course will suit students with a very creative design aesthetic in fashion and those who wish to develop and specialize in knit and other related fabrics. It offers a “taster” of the BA Fashion with Knit. Students are shown how to initiate ideas via their sketchbooks and how to explore their research and develop fashion and fabric designs as a result thereof. With a series of workshops covering techniques such as machine and hand knitting, crochet, embroidery, and smocking, and are encouraged to design and produce a range of fashion and fabric ideas. Students will learn how to edit their work and where to concentrate their technical abilities. Students are supported by professional technicians and pattern cutters. The first two weeks are experimenting and developing technical expertise. At this point via tutorials students will choose one fashion look or silhouette to produce a presentation on the final day. Throughout the 3 weeks, students are expected to visit London’s museums, markets, cafes and clubs to inform their design development. Design solutions must be contemporary and relevant. Students receive peer and individual assessment and develop a strong and successful design project. Students must have prior experience in knitwear.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Communication

This course will take a look at how different media communicate fashion, and specifically how journalism, photography, and styling sell fashion ideas. Student final projects will be a theoretical editorial magazine shoot or a look-book for a fashion brand. This course is open to all students who have an interest in fashion.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design

Central Saint Martins fashion alumni like John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, and Stella McCartney have changed the way that the world looks at fashion. At the heart of the Central Saint Martins approach is the way that individual students’ own ideas provide the focus for design development. In this course, students use London, its streets, museums, and people as the starting point for design research. The class goes on to develop their research ideas into designs. Students explore a range of different illustration techniques to present their ideas to finished portfolio standard. Students are expected to push their ideas to expand and explore what is possible through the design process. During the class students also visit specialist fabric shops and the costume collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The class ends with a final critique in which students present their ideas to the group. Assessment is based on research in a sketchbook or other form, including sourced inspirational research, fabrics, sketches and rough design ideas. Designs developed from these ideas are presented as illustrations to portfolio standard, including working drawings. This course is open to all students, from ambitious beginners to those with more experience. Students will be provided with a sketchbook and layout pad but will need to provide for themselves the following: sketching pens; black pen; coloring pencils; others as needed per syllabi.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design - Menswear

The course covers the full experience of a working menswear designer – covering research, subject knowledge, and context, to design development. It then goes on to teach the basics of garments construction, based on a vintage piece. The focus is looking at menswear as a “product’ rather than high-end fashion. In order to achieve a three-dimensional final outcome, together with 2D portfolio work, students are expected to be focused, self-sufficient and very hard working. Students are encouraged to take initiatives, to work independently, and to be willing to learn fast. A basic ‘block’ shape/pattern will be followed by the whole class, but there will be plenty of scope for individual students to personalize their own garment. Garment construction help will be provided and students expected to work independently to follow the design brief of the module. Tutors and technicians from BA Fashion Design Menswear plus relevant visits and industry guest lecturers will provide an authentic and intensive experience of Fashion Design Menswear at Central Saint Martins.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Graphic Design

This course explores the different subject areas of contemporary graphic design through a series of studio projects, turning the participant from a design student into a design thinker. The emphasis is on idea-based problem solving as well as exploring ‘What is graphic design?’ Students tackle typographic and design projects and explore image-making through illustration and photography. The first week is a dynamic introduction to the visual context of London as a source of inspiration. The practical sessions are combined with the opportunity to explore London’s public space and museums. There are critiques and discussions about the work-in-progress designed to give students confidence and increase their design vocabulary. During the second week, students explore a longer project based around them as practitioners. The main project is supplemented by a few experimental one-day pieces and students have some tutorial time before the final group presentation and discussion. Students leave the course inspired and knowledgeable about this dynamic and ever-changing area of art and design as it appears in a London context. Students will need to provide the following: a recent piece of work; sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; USB stick; laptop.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Interior Design

This highly structured course begins by visiting and analyzing existing interiors, hotels, retail spaces, restaurants and bars in London. Students learn how to ‘read’ an interior. After the design project brief is given, the course involves a mix of creative exercises and workshops. This leads students through the basics of interior design, as well as the fundamentals of the design process, to completing a finished project. Further visits to places of design interest such as galleries, exhibitions, model-making shops, and museums are also part of the course. The course provides the student with a structure where creative ideas, drawing techniques (both technical skills and sketch visualization) and model making enable them to be confident when presenting their ideas. The course provides students with high quality two and three-dimensional work which may be used in their portfolio, as well as demonstrating good practice in research through the production of a dynamic sketchbook. Students can expect an intense and challenging studio experience with fellow students from a broad social and cultural background. This course is suitable for all levels of designers, from ambitious beginners little interior design background to more established designers and architects. Students will need to provide the following: tape measure (metal); set square; metal ruler; scale ruler; compass; erasers; different grades of pencils; sketching pens; masking tape; scissors; scalpels; glue stick.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Textile Design

This course takes students from 2D design to 3D construction of textiles for fashion. Studio and workshop sessions are complemented by visits to places of interest, such as galleries and textile retailers. Week 1 concentrates on building design and research skills and understanding the role of the fashion textile designer. Attention is paid to developing drawing and painting skills toward creating a substantial portfolio of designs on paper. Week 2 is based in the workshop creating handmade textiles using techniques such as felting, knitting and hand painting and printing. Week 3 takes the design work from Week 1 and the technical skills learned in Week 2 to create a sample collection of fashion textiles. Skills such as pleating, embossing, lamination, and burn-out will add to a final collection. This course is suitable for students at all levels, including beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Animation

Do you want to explore one of the most dynamic design areas in a city famous for pushing the boundaries of animation? This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative learning experience while students develop their animation portfolio. Taught by expert staff with tons of industry experience, students will be based in LCC’s extensive digital studios. At the end of the three weeks, students will have created new work that they can include in a portfolio for work or study.

This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative experience whilst developing their animation portfolio and knowledge. The course focuses on Principles of Animation and Visual Narrative via a set of fast-paced workshops and a short project. Students will develop different ways of working, collaborating, visit exhibitions, researching and gathering materials, test their ideas and put them into practice.

Students will learn to create movement on the screen, by studying the fundamental principles of animation. Students will then go on to learn about narrative development and produce their own short animated project.

Technical workshops will focus on drawing for animation, storyboarding and animatics development, creating animation and digital assets using design and animation software. In the second and third week, students will develop their own short animated film or sequence based on the theme, skills, and techniques learned in the first week.

At the end of the course, students will present their work at an exhibition alongside photography, graphics and film students.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Communication for PR and Advertising

Communication is central to the contemporary promotional industries such as Public Relations and Advertising. On this summer school, students will learn some of the theories that support contemporary communication processes, and the tools that help all organizations whether they are in the private, public or charity sector to build understanding, influence behavior and to adapt to changes in the environment. Students will look at Public Relations and Advertising strategically from an organizational perspective, learning about, for example, crisis management and online reputation, as well as, the promotion of products, brands, and services. As part of this broad-based course, students will engage with issues relating to Public Relations and Advertising in social media and digital communication.

In the final week of the course, students will work in a team on a “Brand Aid” brief – bringing back new life to a product that has gone out of fashion. Previous campaigns have re-branded Tamagotchi and the iPod classic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Contemporary Photography Practice

This summer course is practice-based and emphasizes the research and development of a personal project. There will be workshops on different aspects of photography production as well as a critical consideration of themes in contemporary photography practice. These include color and black & white darkroom development, flashguns, large format digital printing and retouching with Wacom tablets. LCC Photography has an international reputation for exciting and innovative photography ranging from fine art to photojournalism to commercial practice, with numerous successful and high profile alumni across the arts and media sectors.

Students will be shown how to research and develop a project conceptually as well as practically, and how to present and promote to an outside audience. The course will be taught through a mix of workshops, seminars, tutorials, and critiques. Students will have the opportunity to work in one of our industry standard studios or out on location.

Students will take advantage of the wonderful array of exhibitions in London in a programme of gallery visits followed by a discussion of exhibitions and of where their own work fits into the contemporary panorama of photography practice.

Students will be assessed on the selection and installation of their work in one of the galleries at LCC. On the final day of the course, the class will host a private view and students will be encouraged to invite friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Creative Industries London

This three-week course is designed to give students a solid foundation in theory and an introduction to disruptive design, media and screen practices. Students will take workshops in blogging, photography, and video whilst learning in seminars about the networks of cultural power.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Digital Photography Portfolio

In this course, students will develop a portfolio of photographic work, gain new skills in digital photography and grow their existing knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of photography.

In week one students will have three assignments focused on street portraiture, studio portraiture, and the urban landscape. For these assignments, students will be given introductory lectures by photographers who have created work specialized in these areas who have worked in fashion, editorial, advertising and fine-art photography. The assignments will enhance the students’ creative camera control as well as develop their conceptual awareness. Students can work individually, or with their peers, to produce visual responses to the brief, coming together at the end of the week to share their results with their tutor and the rest of the class, receiving feedback on their photographs.

Week two will begin with lectures on building their audience and on professional practice in photography. Students will be taken on a city walk looking at urban landscape by photographer and writer Lewis Bush who will also give a lecture on contemporary documentary photography. Students will be taken to document events in London by documentary photographer Edward Thompson who will help them to research techniques of storytelling and narrative in photography with their either completing a photojournalistic essay or a contemporary photo-series. In week two students will also be given location lighting workshops by fine art and advertising photographer Lottie Davies. There will be technical workshops on digital workflow: editing, sequencing, and post-production techniques within editorial photography.

In week three, with what students have learned from the first two weeks, they will now focus on building their portfolio. Students will have 1 to 1 tutorials helping to galvanize their ideas in how to create a body of work that is at the core of who they are and how they want to work in future. Students will have technical workshops editing their work for print, producing their own zines and making their own website. In this week students will also visit professional photo-labs and photography supply stores where they can also start to construct a physical photography portfolio.

Students will take advantage of the diversity and richness of London’s galleries and museums, and engage in discussions about the practice of photography. By the end of the summer school, students will have generated enough photographic material to create a hard copy portfolio, which will be assessed by their tutors, alongside a photographic industry professional. Their portfolio can then be presented to their friends and family, in a mini-exhibition alongside work by students from Contemporary Photography Practice, Graphic Media Design and Filmmaking summer school students.

During the three-week course students will develop enhanced skills in creative camera control; digital workflow; digital retouching skills; shooting in a studio and lighting on location; digital printing skills; an introduction to designing a website; portfolio development; and presentational skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Filmmaking

Students will learn how to produce their own short film, shot here in London. Students will go from the basics of filmmaking to producing and editing on an intensive, hands-on course. It is suitable for those who want to learn either dramatic or documentary filmmaking.

Students will study in intensive workshops, with their own tutor and they will work in teams to make their films. Students will assume a variety of roles: writer, producer, director, editor and performer In each area they will be supported and taught by experts. This is an intensive course and students will be expected to work with their team in the evenings and at the weekends.

Students will have access to a kit-room stocked with Canon XA10 camcorders, booms and lighting rigs. Once students have finished filming, they can edit their films in our edit suites installed with industry-standard editing software: Avid, Apple Final Cut Pro and Logic, Adobe Creative Cloud Premiere and After Effects.

Most of all the film will be fun. Students will come together with like-minded people, sharing the adventure of filmmaking with all its challenges and thrills and they will leave us with a fully-produced short film.

NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Games Design

An intensive, immersive course that will introduce students to the creative possibilities of game production. Students will be taught by tutors with loads of experience in the theory and practice of games, and they will have the chance to work in our purpose-built games studios. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of the rules and logic of games and how these can be developed through programming into engaging games.

During the course, students will work on individual and group projects, take part in discussions and visits a range of exciting digital exhibitions and studios in London. It is a hands-on course that will give students the skills and knowledge they need to begin thinking like a games designer.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Graphic Media Design

On this three-week course, students will explore the relationships between graphic design, communication systems, and media processes through studio-based technical workshops, discussions and other activities.

With an emphasis on visual research and exploration, we will examine the function of typography, layout and basic design principles, letterpress, screen printing, risograph printing, digital filmmaking and the relationship between print and digital media.

There will be the opportunity to visit museums and galleries in London to see the latest design techniques and get some inspiration. Previous students have visited the Imperial War Museum and Carsten Holler: Decision exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre.

A key part of the course will be recording the process of design and students will set-up a blog to record their design journey in words, images, and video.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Journalism

This course is intended to develop a student’s skills as a journalist, providing a rewarding insight into how to apply these core abilities to create accurate and compelling content across media platforms. In lecture and workshop settings, students will study writing in a range of genres including news, features, reviews and comment pieces. Working closely with social media and online blogging tools, students will explore the modern digital landscape, and apply this knowledge and practical skills to a personal, bespoke web project. This course is ideal for students who are thinking about a career in content creation or journalism or are heading for further study in this area.

This summer school is based on classes from BA Journalism programme at London College of Communication. If students need and supporting documentation to convert this into credit for teir home university we can provide that for them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Media, Culture, and Communication

This summer school introduces students to key concepts for studying media, communications and cultural institutions and practices. Through a series of detailed case studies, the course explores the relationship between technological, social, economic and political factors in the evolution of mediated communication and culture. These developments will be mapped alongside major debates about the social and cultural impact of media and communication technologies, digitization, and new media cultures. The summer school also explores the cultural systems of contemporary ‘media-saturated’ societies looking closely at social media and personal/cultural identity, cultures of globalization, gender and culture, and cultural value and judgment.

Students will have the opportunity to visit world-class exhibitions, in previous years we have been to Carsten Holler: Decision at the Hayward Gallery and Digital Revolution at the Barbican Gallery. Students will go on a psychogeography walk around Brick Lane and explore the London Gothic culture of Abney Park Cemetery, from the Victorian era through to Amy Winehouse.

At the beginning of the course, students will learn how to create an engaging blog with images and video. Throughout the course, students will add to this and it will form part a larger The London Project which will form part of their assessment. In addition, the blog will be a great way for students to record share their experiences with friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Fine Art Studio

Practice and contemporary theory are unified throughout the programme, enabling students to establish and extend the contexts within which they operate as a practitioner.The Fine Art Studio programme is distinguished by three developmental stages and projects:

  • STAGE 1 – Developing a Research-Based Practice: ‘A Frame in the Façade’ guides students through a series of intensive one-day workshops, where experimental links will be established between diverse materials and processes.
  • STAGE 2 – Context: ‘Remapping the Fold’ challenges students to locate the key ideas, themes and working methodologies that have arisen in their practical explorations during Stage 1, and develop a self-propelled practical and contextual inquiry over the next four days.
  • STAGE 3 – Consolidation: ‘The Space Undone’ encourages students to reflect upon their developments in Stage 2, and realize a nuanced body of work that extends the potentialities of their practice, with an emphasis on ideas of ‘space’ and ‘display’.
Students will play an active role in a series of lectures, artist seminar sessions, group critiques, one-to-one tutorials, gallery visits and gallery workshops, as well as collaborating with MA Fine Art and MA Curating and Collection students to curate and install an exhibition of work made during Stage 3 of the programme.Fine Art practice is an extended field of inquiry, and no longer can be considered as demarcated modes of expression. Rather, they are ‘zones of contagion’, constantly expanding and ‘widening their scope’. This open and concept-led programme will encourage students to work with a wide range of mediums and processes to enable them to locate, develop, contextualize and rigorously analyze their developments as a creative practitioner.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Interior and Spatial Design

In this course, students will be guided through the stages and conventions of a typical BAISD project to design an augmented retail interior installation in relation to research, which will question the ways in which a canteen works and is used as a retail environment and propose a new method in which that might happen. During this process students will learn by going through the following steps:

  • Sketch a site freehand;
  • Measure and survey a site to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D by hand to scale;
  • Draw a site in 3D by hand to scale;
  • Model a site physically to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D digitally to scale;
  • Model a site in 3D digitally to scale;
  • Develop a concept in response to a research process;
  • Develop a generation of initial ideas in response to a concept;
  • Propose a final idea in response to a generation of initial ideas;
  • Present the final proposal visually and verbally using the methods learnt in stages 1-8.

Students will be guided through each of the stages of a typical BAISD project in a series of group exercises where they will receive support from their peers during group work as well as through an induction to the studio tutorial and review system in which they will receive clear, constructive feedback from their course tutor.

The course will be delivered in a series of enthusing and supportive workshops, lectures, seminars and site visits to locations of interest where students will be positively encouraged to engage in the process and ask questions. The sessions will also provide students with an opportunity to ask a range of questions that they may have pertaining to their future career as an interior and spatial designer, an interior designer or an architect and how to chart unknown territories.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Digital Textile Design

This study abroad course will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital textile design.

Practical studio and workshop sessions will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital design through the use of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator from initial drawing to the translation of their designs. This course will give students a unique insight into contemporary textile design for fashion and interiors.

Students will be taught new drawing approaches and experiment with a variety of techniques. Sessions will be complemented by lectures and external visits to places of interest within London, including museums, galleries, and retailers.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CAMBERWELL - Illustration

Graphic Design Communication students at Chelsea are stimulated by a passion for generating high-octane ideas and work to develop the digital and technical skills needed to create innovative, directional concepts.

Students will be encouraged to take on this level of design thinking as they study contemporary typographic design, developing a critical and creative approach, through the study of theoretical, practical and contextual concerns.

Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine the demands of typography in its contemporary cultural context, looking at modes of communication and how typography and typographic design is generated, utilized and translated by the user.

Students will be provided with a variety of study methods to enhance their learning, including group lectures, visits to solo projects and self-directed study.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Advanced Fashion Design

This course is designed to give students an authentic Central Saint Martins Fashion Design experience, using experimental research and design development pathways that are original and innovative. Central Saint Martins Fashion Design philosophy is that individual students’ personal concepts provide the focus for their original design development. In this course, students will explore their ideas by gathering inspiration from a variety of sources as the starting point for creative design research. Students will then go on to develop and interpret their research ideas into garment designs, prints, and embroideries. A series of workshops led by industry professionals will cover pattern-making and fashion illustration. Students will explore a range of different techniques to present their ideas to an advanced portfolio standard. The course will be taught through a series of research projects, visits, design and illustration sessions, and individual and group tutorials. Students will be expected to be ambitious and really push their ideas to explore what it possible to achieve through the design process. It will end with a final critique in which students will present their ideas to the group. This course is suitable for students or graduates of Fashion Design at the university level and also for professionals with fashion design experience. This is not a course for beginners. NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Visual Merchandising

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

CSM - Product and Industrial Design

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

WIMBLEDON - Theatre and Screen Design

Through practical workshops, visits, backstage tours, discussion groups, this course offers you the opportunity to engage with Designing for performance through an intensive three-week programme.

You will be based at Wimbledon College of Arts, a specialist art college with Theatre and Film as its key subject areas. Responding to a brief, you will develop a short story and visually communicate this. You will learn about the technical and creative processes involved in Design for Performance including costume, set design and lighting.

This course will provide you with:

  • A ‘hands on’ introduction to various creative design processes – such as model making, costume design and 3D making techniques.
  • An insight into the wide range of cultural and performance offerings London provides.
  • An opportunity to participate in group discussion and be able to articulate your views on your visits and experiences. You will also offer questions and responses in the discussion of the opinions of other group members.
  • An opportunity to Design your own scale model of Theatre of Film Production (Scaled model of your Set and / or Costume Designs which will feature in an end of course exhibition.

On completing the course you should be able to:

  • Have a good understanding of a wide range of performances and the theatrical offerings of London.
  • Creating Characters and expressing them in many artistic forms.
  • Have learnt new technical skills, working to scale and experimented with specialist materials.
  • Completed a mini project which may be suitable for inclusion in your portfolio.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

CSM - Acting Shakespeare with Drama Center London

This three-week course explores the different subject areas of acting Shakespeare through a range of disciplines, turning students from drama students into drama thinkers. At the heart of Acting Shakespeare at Drama Centre London is performance, a complex process of decision making and problem-solving that calls for an interaction between conscious and unconscious activity, intuition and skill. Students will tackle acting, voice, body focussed lessons and learn singing, dance and stage fighting skills, all the time working with actual tutors from Drama Centre London at Central Saint Martins.NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Architecture

This course is for students who are looking to explore the architecture and urban planning of London through learning about its history as well as by designing an architectural intervention in the city. The course assists students in understanding the key phases of London’s architectural, economic and social development through a series of informal seminars as well as guided site visits. This research will provide a stimulating background leading into their individual design project work. Students will explore their ideas in context to a particular site in London and develop a design proposal for an urban intervention in group work through model making, drawing, and photography. Fabricating, testing and documenting their intervention on site will allow students to participate in London’s rich contemporary design culture and provide them with first-hand experience of the particularities of the city. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study architecture, history of architecture, art and design. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary architectural practice as well as a sound introduction to appreciating architecture in context to history.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Art History, Criticism, and Communication

This course is for students who are looking to enhance their engagement with an understanding of contemporary visual practice and theory. The course assists students in contextualizing and developing their ideas about art through an array of visual and critical lenses, from modernist art history to contemporary cultural theory and conceptual practice. A series of informal seminars and one-to-one tutorials will help students focus their research. The group will engage with a stimulating array of activities to trigger creative links with London’s rich contemporary visual and material culture, from gallery, museum and special archive visits to sessions working alongside professional artists, curators, writers, and publishers. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study Art History, Curating, and Communications in the Arts. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary artistic practice, with confidence as well as a key network of cultural resources and connections. This course is suitable for beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Contemporary Fine Art Practice

This course provides an innovative and experimental approach to the making and development of each student’s work. Students have the option of realizing their ideas through a wide range of media, such as; painting, drawing, mixed media, installation, sculpture, photography and video. Integral to the course is a strong commitment and an inquisitive approach to contemporary practice. The course assists students in developing those practical, critical and conceptual skills necessary to encourage their own development as an artist. Students also receive an introduction to London’s contemporary art scene via gallery trips and talks at major galleries and museums, while smaller commercial and artist-run venues will complement and contextualize students’ work. Students should have previous experience in this subject. This course is suitable for students with an open mind! It encourages experimentation and as such is not suited for students wishing to learn very basic drawing/painting skills. Students will need to provide the following: a sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; paint brushes; craft knife/scissors; USB stick; photographs of recent work; digital or SLR camera. A video recorder and laptop are also useful.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Experimental Fashion Knitwear

This course will suit students with a very creative design aesthetic in fashion and those who wish to develop and specialize in knit and other related fabrics. It offers a “taster” of the BA Fashion with Knit. Students are shown how to initiate ideas via their sketchbooks and how to explore their research and develop fashion and fabric designs as a result thereof. With a series of workshops covering techniques such as machine and hand knitting, crochet, embroidery, and smocking, and are encouraged to design and produce a range of fashion and fabric ideas. Students will learn how to edit their work and where to concentrate their technical abilities. Students are supported by professional technicians and pattern cutters. The first two weeks are experimenting and developing technical expertise. At this point via tutorials students will choose one fashion look or silhouette to produce a presentation on the final day. Throughout the 3 weeks, students are expected to visit London’s museums, markets, cafes and clubs to inform their design development. Design solutions must be contemporary and relevant. Students receive peer and individual assessment and develop a strong and successful design project. Students must have prior experience in knitwear.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Communication

This course will take a look at how different media communicate fashion, and specifically how journalism, photography, and styling sell fashion ideas. Student final projects will be a theoretical editorial magazine shoot or a look-book for a fashion brand. This course is open to all students who have an interest in fashion.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design

Central Saint Martins fashion alumni like John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, and Stella McCartney have changed the way that the world looks at fashion. At the heart of the Central Saint Martins approach is the way that individual students’ own ideas provide the focus for design development. In this course, students use London, its streets, museums, and people as the starting point for design research. The class goes on to develop their research ideas into designs. Students explore a range of different illustration techniques to present their ideas to finished portfolio standard. Students are expected to push their ideas to expand and explore what is possible through the design process. During the class students also visit specialist fabric shops and the costume collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The class ends with a final critique in which students present their ideas to the group. Assessment is based on research in a sketchbook or other form, including sourced inspirational research, fabrics, sketches and rough design ideas. Designs developed from these ideas are presented as illustrations to portfolio standard, including working drawings. This course is open to all students, from ambitious beginners to those with more experience. Students will be provided with a sketchbook and layout pad but will need to provide for themselves the following: sketching pens; black pen; coloring pencils; others as needed per syllabi.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design - Menswear

The course covers the full experience of a working menswear designer – covering research, subject knowledge, and context, to design development. It then goes on to teach the basics of garments construction, based on a vintage piece. The focus is looking at menswear as a “product’ rather than high-end fashion. In order to achieve a three-dimensional final outcome, together with 2D portfolio work, students are expected to be focused, self-sufficient and very hard working. Students are encouraged to take initiatives, to work independently, and to be willing to learn fast. A basic ‘block’ shape/pattern will be followed by the whole class, but there will be plenty of scope for individual students to personalize their own garment. Garment construction help will be provided and students expected to work independently to follow the design brief of the module. Tutors and technicians from BA Fashion Design Menswear plus relevant visits and industry guest lecturers will provide an authentic and intensive experience of Fashion Design Menswear at Central Saint Martins.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Graphic Design

This course explores the different subject areas of contemporary graphic design through a series of studio projects, turning the participant from a design student into a design thinker. The emphasis is on idea-based problem solving as well as exploring ‘What is graphic design?’ Students tackle typographic and design projects and explore image-making through illustration and photography. The first week is a dynamic introduction to the visual context of London as a source of inspiration. The practical sessions are combined with the opportunity to explore London’s public space and museums. There are critiques and discussions about the work-in-progress designed to give students confidence and increase their design vocabulary. During the second week, students explore a longer project based around them as practitioners. The main project is supplemented by a few experimental one-day pieces and students have some tutorial time before the final group presentation and discussion. Students leave the course inspired and knowledgeable about this dynamic and ever-changing area of art and design as it appears in a London context. Students will need to provide the following: a recent piece of work; sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; USB stick; laptop.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Interior Design

This highly structured course begins by visiting and analyzing existing interiors, hotels, retail spaces, restaurants and bars in London. Students learn how to ‘read’ an interior. After the design project brief is given, the course involves a mix of creative exercises and workshops. This leads students through the basics of interior design, as well as the fundamentals of the design process, to completing a finished project. Further visits to places of design interest such as galleries, exhibitions, model-making shops, and museums are also part of the course. The course provides the student with a structure where creative ideas, drawing techniques (both technical skills and sketch visualization) and model making enable them to be confident when presenting their ideas. The course provides students with high quality two and three-dimensional work which may be used in their portfolio, as well as demonstrating good practice in research through the production of a dynamic sketchbook. Students can expect an intense and challenging studio experience with fellow students from a broad social and cultural background. This course is suitable for all levels of designers, from ambitious beginners little interior design background to more established designers and architects. Students will need to provide the following: tape measure (metal); set square; metal ruler; scale ruler; compass; erasers; different grades of pencils; sketching pens; masking tape; scissors; scalpels; glue stick.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Textile Design

This course takes students from 2D design to 3D construction of textiles for fashion. Studio and workshop sessions are complemented by visits to places of interest, such as galleries and textile retailers. Week 1 concentrates on building design and research skills and understanding the role of the fashion textile designer. Attention is paid to developing drawing and painting skills toward creating a substantial portfolio of designs on paper. Week 2 is based in the workshop creating handmade textiles using techniques such as felting, knitting and hand painting and printing. Week 3 takes the design work from Week 1 and the technical skills learned in Week 2 to create a sample collection of fashion textiles. Skills such as pleating, embossing, lamination, and burn-out will add to a final collection. This course is suitable for students at all levels, including beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Animation

Do you want to explore one of the most dynamic design areas in a city famous for pushing the boundaries of animation? This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative learning experience while students develop their animation portfolio. Taught by expert staff with tons of industry experience, students will be based in LCC’s extensive digital studios. At the end of the three weeks, students will have created new work that they can include in a portfolio for work or study.

This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative experience whilst developing their animation portfolio and knowledge. The course focuses on Principles of Animation and Visual Narrative via a set of fast-paced workshops and a short project. Students will develop different ways of working, collaborating, visit exhibitions, researching and gathering materials, test their ideas and put them into practice.

Students will learn to create movement on the screen, by studying the fundamental principles of animation. Students will then go on to learn about narrative development and produce their own short animated project.

Technical workshops will focus on drawing for animation, storyboarding and animatics development, creating animation and digital assets using design and animation software. In the second and third week, students will develop their own short animated film or sequence based on the theme, skills, and techniques learned in the first week.

At the end of the course, students will present their work at an exhibition alongside photography, graphics and film students.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Communication for PR and Advertising

Communication is central to the contemporary promotional industries such as Public Relations and Advertising. On this summer school, students will learn some of the theories that support contemporary communication processes, and the tools that help all organizations whether they are in the private, public or charity sector to build understanding, influence behavior and to adapt to changes in the environment. Students will look at Public Relations and Advertising strategically from an organizational perspective, learning about, for example, crisis management and online reputation, as well as, the promotion of products, brands, and services. As part of this broad-based course, students will engage with issues relating to Public Relations and Advertising in social media and digital communication.

In the final week of the course, students will work in a team on a “Brand Aid” brief – bringing back new life to a product that has gone out of fashion. Previous campaigns have re-branded Tamagotchi and the iPod classic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Contemporary Photography Practice

This summer course is practice-based and emphasizes the research and development of a personal project. There will be workshops on different aspects of photography production as well as a critical consideration of themes in contemporary photography practice. These include color and black & white darkroom development, flashguns, large format digital printing and retouching with Wacom tablets. LCC Photography has an international reputation for exciting and innovative photography ranging from fine art to photojournalism to commercial practice, with numerous successful and high profile alumni across the arts and media sectors.

Students will be shown how to research and develop a project conceptually as well as practically, and how to present and promote to an outside audience. The course will be taught through a mix of workshops, seminars, tutorials, and critiques. Students will have the opportunity to work in one of our industry standard studios or out on location.

Students will take advantage of the wonderful array of exhibitions in London in a programme of gallery visits followed by a discussion of exhibitions and of where their own work fits into the contemporary panorama of photography practice.

Students will be assessed on the selection and installation of their work in one of the galleries at LCC. On the final day of the course, the class will host a private view and students will be encouraged to invite friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Creative Industries London

This three-week course is designed to give students a solid foundation in theory and an introduction to disruptive design, media and screen practices. Students will take workshops in blogging, photography, and video whilst learning in seminars about the networks of cultural power.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Digital Photography Portfolio

In this course, students will develop a portfolio of photographic work, gain new skills in digital photography and grow their existing knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of photography.

In week one students will have three assignments focused on street portraiture, studio portraiture, and the urban landscape. For these assignments, students will be given introductory lectures by photographers who have created work specialized in these areas who have worked in fashion, editorial, advertising and fine-art photography. The assignments will enhance the students’ creative camera control as well as develop their conceptual awareness. Students can work individually, or with their peers, to produce visual responses to the brief, coming together at the end of the week to share their results with their tutor and the rest of the class, receiving feedback on their photographs.

Week two will begin with lectures on building their audience and on professional practice in photography. Students will be taken on a city walk looking at urban landscape by photographer and writer Lewis Bush who will also give a lecture on contemporary documentary photography. Students will be taken to document events in London by documentary photographer Edward Thompson who will help them to research techniques of storytelling and narrative in photography with their either completing a photojournalistic essay or a contemporary photo-series. In week two students will also be given location lighting workshops by fine art and advertising photographer Lottie Davies. There will be technical workshops on digital workflow: editing, sequencing, and post-production techniques within editorial photography.

In week three, with what students have learned from the first two weeks, they will now focus on building their portfolio. Students will have 1 to 1 tutorials helping to galvanize their ideas in how to create a body of work that is at the core of who they are and how they want to work in future. Students will have technical workshops editing their work for print, producing their own zines and making their own website. In this week students will also visit professional photo-labs and photography supply stores where they can also start to construct a physical photography portfolio.

Students will take advantage of the diversity and richness of London’s galleries and museums, and engage in discussions about the practice of photography. By the end of the summer school, students will have generated enough photographic material to create a hard copy portfolio, which will be assessed by their tutors, alongside a photographic industry professional. Their portfolio can then be presented to their friends and family, in a mini-exhibition alongside work by students from Contemporary Photography Practice, Graphic Media Design and Filmmaking summer school students.

During the three-week course students will develop enhanced skills in creative camera control; digital workflow; digital retouching skills; shooting in a studio and lighting on location; digital printing skills; an introduction to designing a website; portfolio development; and presentational skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Filmmaking

Students will learn how to produce their own short film, shot here in London. Students will go from the basics of filmmaking to producing and editing on an intensive, hands-on course. It is suitable for those who want to learn either dramatic or documentary filmmaking.

Students will study in intensive workshops, with their own tutor and they will work in teams to make their films. Students will assume a variety of roles: writer, producer, director, editor and performer In each area they will be supported and taught by experts. This is an intensive course and students will be expected to work with their team in the evenings and at the weekends.

Students will have access to a kit-room stocked with Canon XA10 camcorders, booms and lighting rigs. Once students have finished filming, they can edit their films in our edit suites installed with industry-standard editing software: Avid, Apple Final Cut Pro and Logic, Adobe Creative Cloud Premiere and After Effects.

Most of all the film will be fun. Students will come together with like-minded people, sharing the adventure of filmmaking with all its challenges and thrills and they will leave us with a fully-produced short film.

NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Games Design

An intensive, immersive course that will introduce students to the creative possibilities of game production. Students will be taught by tutors with loads of experience in the theory and practice of games, and they will have the chance to work in our purpose-built games studios. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of the rules and logic of games and how these can be developed through programming into engaging games.

During the course, students will work on individual and group projects, take part in discussions and visits a range of exciting digital exhibitions and studios in London. It is a hands-on course that will give students the skills and knowledge they need to begin thinking like a games designer.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Graphic Media Design

On this three-week course, students will explore the relationships between graphic design, communication systems, and media processes through studio-based technical workshops, discussions and other activities.

With an emphasis on visual research and exploration, we will examine the function of typography, layout and basic design principles, letterpress, screen printing, risograph printing, digital filmmaking and the relationship between print and digital media.

There will be the opportunity to visit museums and galleries in London to see the latest design techniques and get some inspiration. Previous students have visited the Imperial War Museum and Carsten Holler: Decision exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre.

A key part of the course will be recording the process of design and students will set-up a blog to record their design journey in words, images, and video.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Journalism

This course is intended to develop a student’s skills as a journalist, providing a rewarding insight into how to apply these core abilities to create accurate and compelling content across media platforms. In lecture and workshop settings, students will study writing in a range of genres including news, features, reviews and comment pieces. Working closely with social media and online blogging tools, students will explore the modern digital landscape, and apply this knowledge and practical skills to a personal, bespoke web project. This course is ideal for students who are thinking about a career in content creation or journalism or are heading for further study in this area.

This summer school is based on classes from BA Journalism programme at London College of Communication. If students need and supporting documentation to convert this into credit for teir home university we can provide that for them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Media, Culture, and Communication

This summer school introduces students to key concepts for studying media, communications and cultural institutions and practices. Through a series of detailed case studies, the course explores the relationship between technological, social, economic and political factors in the evolution of mediated communication and culture. These developments will be mapped alongside major debates about the social and cultural impact of media and communication technologies, digitization, and new media cultures. The summer school also explores the cultural systems of contemporary ‘media-saturated’ societies looking closely at social media and personal/cultural identity, cultures of globalization, gender and culture, and cultural value and judgment.

Students will have the opportunity to visit world-class exhibitions, in previous years we have been to Carsten Holler: Decision at the Hayward Gallery and Digital Revolution at the Barbican Gallery. Students will go on a psychogeography walk around Brick Lane and explore the London Gothic culture of Abney Park Cemetery, from the Victorian era through to Amy Winehouse.

At the beginning of the course, students will learn how to create an engaging blog with images and video. Throughout the course, students will add to this and it will form part a larger The London Project which will form part of their assessment. In addition, the blog will be a great way for students to record share their experiences with friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Fine Art Studio

Practice and contemporary theory are unified throughout the programme, enabling students to establish and extend the contexts within which they operate as a practitioner.The Fine Art Studio programme is distinguished by three developmental stages and projects:

  • STAGE 1 – Developing a Research-Based Practice: ‘A Frame in the Façade’ guides students through a series of intensive one-day workshops, where experimental links will be established between diverse materials and processes.
  • STAGE 2 – Context: ‘Remapping the Fold’ challenges students to locate the key ideas, themes and working methodologies that have arisen in their practical explorations during Stage 1, and develop a self-propelled practical and contextual inquiry over the next four days.
  • STAGE 3 – Consolidation: ‘The Space Undone’ encourages students to reflect upon their developments in Stage 2, and realize a nuanced body of work that extends the potentialities of their practice, with an emphasis on ideas of ‘space’ and ‘display’.
Students will play an active role in a series of lectures, artist seminar sessions, group critiques, one-to-one tutorials, gallery visits and gallery workshops, as well as collaborating with MA Fine Art and MA Curating and Collection students to curate and install an exhibition of work made during Stage 3 of the programme.Fine Art practice is an extended field of inquiry, and no longer can be considered as demarcated modes of expression. Rather, they are ‘zones of contagion’, constantly expanding and ‘widening their scope’. This open and concept-led programme will encourage students to work with a wide range of mediums and processes to enable them to locate, develop, contextualize and rigorously analyze their developments as a creative practitioner.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Interior and Spatial Design

In this course, students will be guided through the stages and conventions of a typical BAISD project to design an augmented retail interior installation in relation to research, which will question the ways in which a canteen works and is used as a retail environment and propose a new method in which that might happen. During this process students will learn by going through the following steps:

  • Sketch a site freehand;
  • Measure and survey a site to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D by hand to scale;
  • Draw a site in 3D by hand to scale;
  • Model a site physically to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D digitally to scale;
  • Model a site in 3D digitally to scale;
  • Develop a concept in response to a research process;
  • Develop a generation of initial ideas in response to a concept;
  • Propose a final idea in response to a generation of initial ideas;
  • Present the final proposal visually and verbally using the methods learnt in stages 1-8.

Students will be guided through each of the stages of a typical BAISD project in a series of group exercises where they will receive support from their peers during group work as well as through an induction to the studio tutorial and review system in which they will receive clear, constructive feedback from their course tutor.

The course will be delivered in a series of enthusing and supportive workshops, lectures, seminars and site visits to locations of interest where students will be positively encouraged to engage in the process and ask questions. The sessions will also provide students with an opportunity to ask a range of questions that they may have pertaining to their future career as an interior and spatial designer, an interior designer or an architect and how to chart unknown territories.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Digital Textile Design

This study abroad course will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital textile design.

Practical studio and workshop sessions will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital design through the use of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator from initial drawing to the translation of their designs. This course will give students a unique insight into contemporary textile design for fashion and interiors.

Students will be taught new drawing approaches and experiment with a variety of techniques. Sessions will be complemented by lectures and external visits to places of interest within London, including museums, galleries, and retailers.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CAMBERWELL - Illustration

Graphic Design Communication students at Chelsea are stimulated by a passion for generating high-octane ideas and work to develop the digital and technical skills needed to create innovative, directional concepts.

Students will be encouraged to take on this level of design thinking as they study contemporary typographic design, developing a critical and creative approach, through the study of theoretical, practical and contextual concerns.

Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine the demands of typography in its contemporary cultural context, looking at modes of communication and how typography and typographic design is generated, utilized and translated by the user.

Students will be provided with a variety of study methods to enhance their learning, including group lectures, visits to solo projects and self-directed study.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Digital Photography Portfolio

Develop a portfolio of photographic work, gain new skills in digital photography and grow an existing knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of photography.

In week one, students will have three assignments focused on street portraiture, studio portraiture, and the urban landscape. For these assignments, students will be given introductory lectures by photographers who have created work specialized in these areas who have worked in fashion, editorial, advertising and fine-art photography. The assignments will enhance students' creative camera control as well as develop their conceptual awareness. Students can work individually, or with their fellow students, to produce visual responses to the brief, coming together at the end of the week to share their results with their tutor and the rest of the class, receiving feedback on their photographs.

Week two will begin with lectures on building an audience and on professional practice in photography. Students will be taken on a city walk looking at urban landscape by photographer and writer Lewis Bush who will also give a lecture on contemporary documentary photography. Students will be taken to document events in London by documentary photographer Edward Thompson who will help them to research techniques of storytelling and narrative in photography with students either completing a photojournalistic essay or a contemporary photo-series. In week two students will also be given location lighting workshops by fine art and advertising photographer Lottie Davies. There will be technical workshops on digital workflow: editing, sequencing, and post-production techniques within editorial photography.

In week three, with what students have learned from the first two weeks, students will now focus on building a portfolio. Students will have 1 to 1 tutorials helping to galvanize their ideas in how to create a body of work that is at the core of who they are and how they want to work in future. Students will have technical workshops editing their work for print, producing their own zines and making their own website. In this week students will also visit professional photo-labs and photography supply stores where they can also start to construct a physical photography portfolio.

Students will take advantage of the diversity and richness of London’s galleries and museums, and engage in discussions about the practice of photography. By the end of the summer school, students will have generated enough photographic material to create a hard copy portfolio, which will be assessed by their tutors, alongside a photographic industry professional. The portfolio can then be presented to the students' friends and family, in a mini-exhibition alongside work by students from Contemporary Photography Practice, Graphic Media Design and Filmmaking summer school students.

During the three-week course students will develop enhanced skills in creative camera control; digital workflow; digital retouching skills; shooting in a studio and lighting on location; digital printing skills; an introduction to designing a website; portfolio development; and presentational skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

WIMBLEDON - Theatre and Screen Design

Through practical workshops, visits, backstage tours, discussion groups, this course offers you the opportunity to engage with Designing for performance through an intensive three-week programme.

You will be based at Wimbledon College of Arts, a specialist art college with Theatre and Film as its key subject areas. Responding to a brief, you will develop a short story and visually communicate this. You will learn about the technical and creative processes involved in Design for Performance including costume, set design and lighting.

This course will provide you with:

  • A ‘hands on’ introduction to various creative design processes – such as model making, costume design and 3D making techniques.
  • An insight into the wide range of cultural and performance offerings London provides.
  • An opportunity to participate in group discussion and be able to articulate your views on your visits and experiences. You will also offer questions and responses in the discussion of the opinions of other group members.
  • An opportunity to Design your own scale model of Theatre of Film Production (Scaled model of your Set and / or Costume Designs which will feature in an end of course exhibition.

On completing the course you should be able to:

  • Have a good understanding of a wide range of performances and the theatrical offerings of London.
  • Creating Characters and expressing them in many artistic forms.
  • Have learnt new technical skills, working to scale and experimented with specialist materials.
  • Completed a mini project which may be suitable for inclusion in your portfolio.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

CSM - Acting Shakespeare with Drama Center London

This three-week course explores the different subject areas of acting Shakespeare through a range of disciplines, turning students from drama students into drama thinkers. At the heart of Acting Shakespeare at Drama Centre London is performance, a complex process of decision making and problem-solving that calls for an interaction between conscious and unconscious activity, intuition and skill. Students will tackle acting, voice, body focussed lessons and learn singing, dance and stage fighting skills, all the time working with actual tutors from Drama Centre London at Central Saint Martins.NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Architecture

This course is for students who are looking to explore the architecture and urban planning of London through learning about its history as well as by designing an architectural intervention in the city. The course assists students in understanding the key phases of London’s architectural, economic and social development through a series of informal seminars as well as guided site visits. This research will provide a stimulating background leading into their individual design project work. Students will explore their ideas in context to a particular site in London and develop a design proposal for an urban intervention in group work through model making, drawing, and photography. Fabricating, testing and documenting their intervention on site will allow students to participate in London’s rich contemporary design culture and provide them with first-hand experience of the particularities of the city. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study architecture, history of architecture, art and design. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary architectural practice as well as a sound introduction to appreciating architecture in context to history.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Art History, Criticism, and Communication

This course is for students who are looking to enhance their engagement with an understanding of contemporary visual practice and theory. The course assists students in contextualizing and developing their ideas about art through an array of visual and critical lenses, from modernist art history to contemporary cultural theory and conceptual practice. A series of informal seminars and one-to-one tutorials will help students focus their research. The group will engage with a stimulating array of activities to trigger creative links with London’s rich contemporary visual and material culture, from gallery, museum and special archive visits to sessions working alongside professional artists, curators, writers, and publishers. The course is open to students with varying experience and will help those looking to study Art History, Curating, and Communications in the Arts. Students will build a deeper understanding and working knowledge of contemporary artistic practice, with confidence as well as a key network of cultural resources and connections. This course is suitable for beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Contemporary Fine Art Practice

This course provides an innovative and experimental approach to the making and development of each student’s work. Students have the option of realizing their ideas through a wide range of media, such as; painting, drawing, mixed media, installation, sculpture, photography and video. Integral to the course is a strong commitment and an inquisitive approach to contemporary practice. The course assists students in developing those practical, critical and conceptual skills necessary to encourage their own development as an artist. Students also receive an introduction to London’s contemporary art scene via gallery trips and talks at major galleries and museums, while smaller commercial and artist-run venues will complement and contextualize students’ work. Students should have previous experience in this subject. This course is suitable for students with an open mind! It encourages experimentation and as such is not suited for students wishing to learn very basic drawing/painting skills. Students will need to provide the following: a sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; paint brushes; craft knife/scissors; USB stick; photographs of recent work; digital or SLR camera. A video recorder and laptop are also useful.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Experimental Fashion Knitwear

This course will suit students with a very creative design aesthetic in fashion and those who wish to develop and specialize in knit and other related fabrics. It offers a “taster” of the BA Fashion with Knit. Students are shown how to initiate ideas via their sketchbooks and how to explore their research and develop fashion and fabric designs as a result thereof. With a series of workshops covering techniques such as machine and hand knitting, crochet, embroidery, and smocking, and are encouraged to design and produce a range of fashion and fabric ideas. Students will learn how to edit their work and where to concentrate their technical abilities. Students are supported by professional technicians and pattern cutters. The first two weeks are experimenting and developing technical expertise. At this point via tutorials students will choose one fashion look or silhouette to produce a presentation on the final day. Throughout the 3 weeks, students are expected to visit London’s museums, markets, cafes and clubs to inform their design development. Design solutions must be contemporary and relevant. Students receive peer and individual assessment and develop a strong and successful design project. Students must have prior experience in knitwear.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Communication

This course will take a look at how different media communicate fashion, and specifically how journalism, photography, and styling sell fashion ideas. Student final projects will be a theoretical editorial magazine shoot or a look-book for a fashion brand. This course is open to all students who have an interest in fashion.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design

Central Saint Martins fashion alumni like John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, and Stella McCartney have changed the way that the world looks at fashion. At the heart of the Central Saint Martins approach is the way that individual students’ own ideas provide the focus for design development. In this course, students use London, its streets, museums, and people as the starting point for design research. The class goes on to develop their research ideas into designs. Students explore a range of different illustration techniques to present their ideas to finished portfolio standard. Students are expected to push their ideas to expand and explore what is possible through the design process. During the class students also visit specialist fabric shops and the costume collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The class ends with a final critique in which students present their ideas to the group. Assessment is based on research in a sketchbook or other form, including sourced inspirational research, fabrics, sketches and rough design ideas. Designs developed from these ideas are presented as illustrations to portfolio standard, including working drawings. This course is open to all students, from ambitious beginners to those with more experience. Students will be provided with a sketchbook and layout pad but will need to provide for themselves the following: sketching pens; black pen; coloring pencils; others as needed per syllabi.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design - Menswear

The course covers the full experience of a working menswear designer – covering research, subject knowledge, and context, to design development. It then goes on to teach the basics of garments construction, based on a vintage piece. The focus is looking at menswear as a “product’ rather than high-end fashion. In order to achieve a three-dimensional final outcome, together with 2D portfolio work, students are expected to be focused, self-sufficient and very hard working. Students are encouraged to take initiatives, to work independently, and to be willing to learn fast. A basic ‘block’ shape/pattern will be followed by the whole class, but there will be plenty of scope for individual students to personalize their own garment. Garment construction help will be provided and students expected to work independently to follow the design brief of the module. Tutors and technicians from BA Fashion Design Menswear plus relevant visits and industry guest lecturers will provide an authentic and intensive experience of Fashion Design Menswear at Central Saint Martins.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Graphic Design

This course explores the different subject areas of contemporary graphic design through a series of studio projects, turning the participant from a design student into a design thinker. The emphasis is on idea-based problem solving as well as exploring ‘What is graphic design?’ Students tackle typographic and design projects and explore image-making through illustration and photography. The first week is a dynamic introduction to the visual context of London as a source of inspiration. The practical sessions are combined with the opportunity to explore London’s public space and museums. There are critiques and discussions about the work-in-progress designed to give students confidence and increase their design vocabulary. During the second week, students explore a longer project based around them as practitioners. The main project is supplemented by a few experimental one-day pieces and students have some tutorial time before the final group presentation and discussion. Students leave the course inspired and knowledgeable about this dynamic and ever-changing area of art and design as it appears in a London context. Students will need to provide the following: a recent piece of work; sketchbook; a selection of pens and pencils; USB stick; laptop.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Interior Design

This highly structured course begins by visiting and analyzing existing interiors, hotels, retail spaces, restaurants and bars in London. Students learn how to ‘read’ an interior. After the design project brief is given, the course involves a mix of creative exercises and workshops. This leads students through the basics of interior design, as well as the fundamentals of the design process, to completing a finished project. Further visits to places of design interest such as galleries, exhibitions, model-making shops, and museums are also part of the course. The course provides the student with a structure where creative ideas, drawing techniques (both technical skills and sketch visualization) and model making enable them to be confident when presenting their ideas. The course provides students with high quality two and three-dimensional work which may be used in their portfolio, as well as demonstrating good practice in research through the production of a dynamic sketchbook. Students can expect an intense and challenging studio experience with fellow students from a broad social and cultural background. This course is suitable for all levels of designers, from ambitious beginners little interior design background to more established designers and architects. Students will need to provide the following: tape measure (metal); set square; metal ruler; scale ruler; compass; erasers; different grades of pencils; sketching pens; masking tape; scissors; scalpels; glue stick.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Textile Design

This course takes students from 2D design to 3D construction of textiles for fashion. Studio and workshop sessions are complemented by visits to places of interest, such as galleries and textile retailers. Week 1 concentrates on building design and research skills and understanding the role of the fashion textile designer. Attention is paid to developing drawing and painting skills toward creating a substantial portfolio of designs on paper. Week 2 is based in the workshop creating handmade textiles using techniques such as felting, knitting and hand painting and printing. Week 3 takes the design work from Week 1 and the technical skills learned in Week 2 to create a sample collection of fashion textiles. Skills such as pleating, embossing, lamination, and burn-out will add to a final collection. This course is suitable for students at all levels, including beginners.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Animation

Do you want to explore one of the most dynamic design areas in a city famous for pushing the boundaries of animation? This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative learning experience while students develop their animation portfolio. Taught by expert staff with tons of industry experience, students will be based in LCC’s extensive digital studios. At the end of the three weeks, students will have created new work that they can include in a portfolio for work or study.

This exciting three-week animation course is designed to give students a playful, creative experience whilst developing their animation portfolio and knowledge. The course focuses on Principles of Animation and Visual Narrative via a set of fast-paced workshops and a short project. Students will develop different ways of working, collaborating, visit exhibitions, researching and gathering materials, test their ideas and put them into practice.

Students will learn to create movement on the screen, by studying the fundamental principles of animation. Students will then go on to learn about narrative development and produce their own short animated project.

Technical workshops will focus on drawing for animation, storyboarding and animatics development, creating animation and digital assets using design and animation software. In the second and third week, students will develop their own short animated film or sequence based on the theme, skills, and techniques learned in the first week.

At the end of the course, students will present their work at an exhibition alongside photography, graphics and film students.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Communication for PR and Advertising

Communication is central to the contemporary promotional industries such as Public Relations and Advertising. On this summer school, students will learn some of the theories that support contemporary communication processes, and the tools that help all organizations whether they are in the private, public or charity sector to build understanding, influence behavior and to adapt to changes in the environment. Students will look at Public Relations and Advertising strategically from an organizational perspective, learning about, for example, crisis management and online reputation, as well as, the promotion of products, brands, and services. As part of this broad-based course, students will engage with issues relating to Public Relations and Advertising in social media and digital communication.

In the final week of the course, students will work in a team on a “Brand Aid” brief – bringing back new life to a product that has gone out of fashion. Previous campaigns have re-branded Tamagotchi and the iPod classic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Contemporary Photography Practice

This summer course is practice-based and emphasizes the research and development of a personal project. There will be workshops on different aspects of photography production as well as a critical consideration of themes in contemporary photography practice. These include color and black & white darkroom development, flashguns, large format digital printing and retouching with Wacom tablets. LCC Photography has an international reputation for exciting and innovative photography ranging from fine art to photojournalism to commercial practice, with numerous successful and high profile alumni across the arts and media sectors.

Students will be shown how to research and develop a project conceptually as well as practically, and how to present and promote to an outside audience. The course will be taught through a mix of workshops, seminars, tutorials, and critiques. Students will have the opportunity to work in one of our industry standard studios or out on location.

Students will take advantage of the wonderful array of exhibitions in London in a programme of gallery visits followed by a discussion of exhibitions and of where their own work fits into the contemporary panorama of photography practice.

Students will be assessed on the selection and installation of their work in one of the galleries at LCC. On the final day of the course, the class will host a private view and students will be encouraged to invite friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Creative Industries London

This three-week course is designed to give students a solid foundation in theory and an introduction to disruptive design, media and screen practices. Students will take workshops in blogging, photography, and video whilst learning in seminars about the networks of cultural power.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Digital Photography Portfolio

In this course, students will develop a portfolio of photographic work, gain new skills in digital photography and grow their existing knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of photography.

In week one students will have three assignments focused on street portraiture, studio portraiture, and the urban landscape. For these assignments, students will be given introductory lectures by photographers who have created work specialized in these areas who have worked in fashion, editorial, advertising and fine-art photography. The assignments will enhance the students’ creative camera control as well as develop their conceptual awareness. Students can work individually, or with their peers, to produce visual responses to the brief, coming together at the end of the week to share their results with their tutor and the rest of the class, receiving feedback on their photographs.

Week two will begin with lectures on building their audience and on professional practice in photography. Students will be taken on a city walk looking at urban landscape by photographer and writer Lewis Bush who will also give a lecture on contemporary documentary photography. Students will be taken to document events in London by documentary photographer Edward Thompson who will help them to research techniques of storytelling and narrative in photography with their either completing a photojournalistic essay or a contemporary photo-series. In week two students will also be given location lighting workshops by fine art and advertising photographer Lottie Davies. There will be technical workshops on digital workflow: editing, sequencing, and post-production techniques within editorial photography.

In week three, with what students have learned from the first two weeks, they will now focus on building their portfolio. Students will have 1 to 1 tutorials helping to galvanize their ideas in how to create a body of work that is at the core of who they are and how they want to work in future. Students will have technical workshops editing their work for print, producing their own zines and making their own website. In this week students will also visit professional photo-labs and photography supply stores where they can also start to construct a physical photography portfolio.

Students will take advantage of the diversity and richness of London’s galleries and museums, and engage in discussions about the practice of photography. By the end of the summer school, students will have generated enough photographic material to create a hard copy portfolio, which will be assessed by their tutors, alongside a photographic industry professional. Their portfolio can then be presented to their friends and family, in a mini-exhibition alongside work by students from Contemporary Photography Practice, Graphic Media Design and Filmmaking summer school students.

During the three-week course students will develop enhanced skills in creative camera control; digital workflow; digital retouching skills; shooting in a studio and lighting on location; digital printing skills; an introduction to designing a website; portfolio development; and presentational skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Filmmaking

Students will learn how to produce their own short film, shot here in London. Students will go from the basics of filmmaking to producing and editing on an intensive, hands-on course. It is suitable for those who want to learn either dramatic or documentary filmmaking.

Students will study in intensive workshops, with their own tutor and they will work in teams to make their films. Students will assume a variety of roles: writer, producer, director, editor and performer In each area they will be supported and taught by experts. This is an intensive course and students will be expected to work with their team in the evenings and at the weekends.

Students will have access to a kit-room stocked with Canon XA10 camcorders, booms and lighting rigs. Once students have finished filming, they can edit their films in our edit suites installed with industry-standard editing software: Avid, Apple Final Cut Pro and Logic, Adobe Creative Cloud Premiere and After Effects.

Most of all the film will be fun. Students will come together with like-minded people, sharing the adventure of filmmaking with all its challenges and thrills and they will leave us with a fully-produced short film.

NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Games Design

An intensive, immersive course that will introduce students to the creative possibilities of game production. Students will be taught by tutors with loads of experience in the theory and practice of games, and they will have the chance to work in our purpose-built games studios. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of the rules and logic of games and how these can be developed through programming into engaging games.

During the course, students will work on individual and group projects, take part in discussions and visits a range of exciting digital exhibitions and studios in London. It is a hands-on course that will give students the skills and knowledge they need to begin thinking like a games designer.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Graphic Media Design

On this three-week course, students will explore the relationships between graphic design, communication systems, and media processes through studio-based technical workshops, discussions and other activities.

With an emphasis on visual research and exploration, we will examine the function of typography, layout and basic design principles, letterpress, screen printing, risograph printing, digital filmmaking and the relationship between print and digital media.

There will be the opportunity to visit museums and galleries in London to see the latest design techniques and get some inspiration. Previous students have visited the Imperial War Museum and Carsten Holler: Decision exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre.

A key part of the course will be recording the process of design and students will set-up a blog to record their design journey in words, images, and video.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Journalism

This course is intended to develop a student’s skills as a journalist, providing a rewarding insight into how to apply these core abilities to create accurate and compelling content across media platforms. In lecture and workshop settings, students will study writing in a range of genres including news, features, reviews and comment pieces. Working closely with social media and online blogging tools, students will explore the modern digital landscape, and apply this knowledge and practical skills to a personal, bespoke web project. This course is ideal for students who are thinking about a career in content creation or journalism or are heading for further study in this area.

This summer school is based on classes from BA Journalism programme at London College of Communication. If students need and supporting documentation to convert this into credit for teir home university we can provide that for them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Media, Culture, and Communication

This summer school introduces students to key concepts for studying media, communications and cultural institutions and practices. Through a series of detailed case studies, the course explores the relationship between technological, social, economic and political factors in the evolution of mediated communication and culture. These developments will be mapped alongside major debates about the social and cultural impact of media and communication technologies, digitization, and new media cultures. The summer school also explores the cultural systems of contemporary ‘media-saturated’ societies looking closely at social media and personal/cultural identity, cultures of globalization, gender and culture, and cultural value and judgment.

Students will have the opportunity to visit world-class exhibitions, in previous years we have been to Carsten Holler: Decision at the Hayward Gallery and Digital Revolution at the Barbican Gallery. Students will go on a psychogeography walk around Brick Lane and explore the London Gothic culture of Abney Park Cemetery, from the Victorian era through to Amy Winehouse.

At the beginning of the course, students will learn how to create an engaging blog with images and video. Throughout the course, students will add to this and it will form part a larger The London Project which will form part of their assessment. In addition, the blog will be a great way for students to record share their experiences with friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Fine Art Studio

Practice and contemporary theory are unified throughout the programme, enabling students to establish and extend the contexts within which they operate as a practitioner.The Fine Art Studio programme is distinguished by three developmental stages and projects:

  • STAGE 1 – Developing a Research-Based Practice: ‘A Frame in the Façade’ guides students through a series of intensive one-day workshops, where experimental links will be established between diverse materials and processes.
  • STAGE 2 – Context: ‘Remapping the Fold’ challenges students to locate the key ideas, themes and working methodologies that have arisen in their practical explorations during Stage 1, and develop a self-propelled practical and contextual inquiry over the next four days.
  • STAGE 3 – Consolidation: ‘The Space Undone’ encourages students to reflect upon their developments in Stage 2, and realize a nuanced body of work that extends the potentialities of their practice, with an emphasis on ideas of ‘space’ and ‘display’.
Students will play an active role in a series of lectures, artist seminar sessions, group critiques, one-to-one tutorials, gallery visits and gallery workshops, as well as collaborating with MA Fine Art and MA Curating and Collection students to curate and install an exhibition of work made during Stage 3 of the programme.Fine Art practice is an extended field of inquiry, and no longer can be considered as demarcated modes of expression. Rather, they are ‘zones of contagion’, constantly expanding and ‘widening their scope’. This open and concept-led programme will encourage students to work with a wide range of mediums and processes to enable them to locate, develop, contextualize and rigorously analyze their developments as a creative practitioner.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Interior and Spatial Design

In this course, students will be guided through the stages and conventions of a typical BAISD project to design an augmented retail interior installation in relation to research, which will question the ways in which a canteen works and is used as a retail environment and propose a new method in which that might happen. During this process students will learn by going through the following steps:

  • Sketch a site freehand;
  • Measure and survey a site to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D by hand to scale;
  • Draw a site in 3D by hand to scale;
  • Model a site physically to scale;
  • Draw a site in 2D digitally to scale;
  • Model a site in 3D digitally to scale;
  • Develop a concept in response to a research process;
  • Develop a generation of initial ideas in response to a concept;
  • Propose a final idea in response to a generation of initial ideas;
  • Present the final proposal visually and verbally using the methods learnt in stages 1-8.

Students will be guided through each of the stages of a typical BAISD project in a series of group exercises where they will receive support from their peers during group work as well as through an induction to the studio tutorial and review system in which they will receive clear, constructive feedback from their course tutor.

The course will be delivered in a series of enthusing and supportive workshops, lectures, seminars and site visits to locations of interest where students will be positively encouraged to engage in the process and ask questions. The sessions will also provide students with an opportunity to ask a range of questions that they may have pertaining to their future career as an interior and spatial designer, an interior designer or an architect and how to chart unknown territories.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CHELSEA - Digital Textile Design

This study abroad course will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital textile design.

Practical studio and workshop sessions will give students the opportunity to explore the creative possibilities of digital design through the use of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator from initial drawing to the translation of their designs. This course will give students a unique insight into contemporary textile design for fashion and interiors.

Students will be taught new drawing approaches and experiment with a variety of techniques. Sessions will be complemented by lectures and external visits to places of interest within London, including museums, galleries, and retailers.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CAMBERWELL - Illustration

Graphic Design Communication students at Chelsea are stimulated by a passion for generating high-octane ideas and work to develop the digital and technical skills needed to create innovative, directional concepts.

Students will be encouraged to take on this level of design thinking as they study contemporary typographic design, developing a critical and creative approach, through the study of theoretical, practical and contextual concerns.

Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine the demands of typography in its contemporary cultural context, looking at modes of communication and how typography and typographic design is generated, utilized and translated by the user.

Students will be provided with a variety of study methods to enhance their learning, including group lectures, visits to solo projects and self-directed study.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Advanced Fashion Design

This course is designed to give students an authentic Central Saint Martins Fashion Design experience, using experimental research and design development pathways that are original and innovative. Central Saint Martins Fashion Design philosophy is that individual students’ personal concepts provide the focus for their original design development. In this course, students will explore their ideas by gathering inspiration from a variety of sources as the starting point for creative design research. Students will then go on to develop and interpret their research ideas into garment designs, prints, and embroideries. A series of workshops led by industry professionals will cover pattern-making and fashion illustration. Students will explore a range of different techniques to present their ideas to an advanced portfolio standard. The course will be taught through a series of research projects, visits, design and illustration sessions, and individual and group tutorials. Students will be expected to be ambitious and really push their ideas to explore what it possible to achieve through the design process. It will end with a final critique in which students will present their ideas to the group. This course is suitable for students or graduates of Fashion Design at the university level and also for professionals with fashion design experience. This is not a course for beginners. NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Digital Photography Portfolio

Develop a portfolio of photographic work, gain new skills in digital photography and grow an existing knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of photography.

In week one, students will have three assignments focused on street portraiture, studio portraiture, and the urban landscape. For these assignments, students will be given introductory lectures by photographers who have created work specialized in these areas who have worked in fashion, editorial, advertising and fine-art photography. The assignments will enhance students' creative camera control as well as develop their conceptual awareness. Students can work individually, or with their fellow students, to produce visual responses to the brief, coming together at the end of the week to share their results with their tutor and the rest of the class, receiving feedback on their photographs.

Week two will begin with lectures on building an audience and on professional practice in photography. Students will be taken on a city walk looking at urban landscape by photographer and writer Lewis Bush who will also give a lecture on contemporary documentary photography. Students will be taken to document events in London by documentary photographer Edward Thompson who will help them to research techniques of storytelling and narrative in photography with students either completing a photojournalistic essay or a contemporary photo-series. In week two students will also be given location lighting workshops by fine art and advertising photographer Lottie Davies. There will be technical workshops on digital workflow: editing, sequencing, and post-production techniques within editorial photography.

In week three, with what students have learned from the first two weeks, students will now focus on building a portfolio. Students will have 1 to 1 tutorials helping to galvanize their ideas in how to create a body of work that is at the core of who they are and how they want to work in future. Students will have technical workshops editing their work for print, producing their own zines and making their own website. In this week students will also visit professional photo-labs and photography supply stores where they can also start to construct a physical photography portfolio.

Students will take advantage of the diversity and richness of London’s galleries and museums, and engage in discussions about the practice of photography. By the end of the summer school, students will have generated enough photographic material to create a hard copy portfolio, which will be assessed by their tutors, alongside a photographic industry professional. The portfolio can then be presented to the students' friends and family, in a mini-exhibition alongside work by students from Contemporary Photography Practice, Graphic Media Design and Filmmaking summer school students.

During the three-week course students will develop enhanced skills in creative camera control; digital workflow; digital retouching skills; shooting in a studio and lighting on location; digital printing skills; an introduction to designing a website; portfolio development; and presentational skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

WIMBLEDON - Theatre and Screen Design

Through practical workshops, visits, backstage tours, discussion groups, this course offers you the opportunity to engage with Designing for performance through an intensive three-week programme.

You will be based at Wimbledon College of Arts, a specialist art college with Theatre and Film as its key subject areas. Responding to a brief, you will develop a short story and visually communicate this. You will learn about the technical and creative processes involved in Design for Performance including costume, set design and lighting.

This course will provide you with:

  • A ‘hands on’ introduction to various creative design processes – such as model making, costume design and 3D making techniques.
  • An insight into the wide range of cultural and performance offerings London provides.
  • An opportunity to participate in group discussion and be able to articulate your views on your visits and experiences. You will also offer questions and responses in the discussion of the opinions of other group members.
  • An opportunity to Design your own scale model of Theatre of Film Production (Scaled model of your Set and / or Costume Designs which will feature in an end of course exhibition.

On completing the course you should be able to:

  • Have a good understanding of a wide range of performances and the theatrical offerings of London.
  • Creating Characters and expressing them in many artistic forms.
  • Have learnt new technical skills, working to scale and experimented with specialist materials.
  • Completed a mini project which may be suitable for inclusion in your portfolio.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

CSM - Fashion Communication

This course will take a look at how different media communicate fashion, and specifically how journalism, photography, and styling sell fashion ideas. Student final projects will be a theoretical editorial magazine shoot or a look-book for a fashion brand. This course is open to all students who have an interest in fashion.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Fashion Design

Central Saint Martins fashion alumni like John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, and Stella McCartney have changed the way that the world looks at fashion. At the heart of the Central Saint Martins approach is the way that individual students’ own ideas provide the focus for design development. In this course, students use London, its streets, museums, and people as the starting point for design research. The class goes on to develop their research ideas into designs. Students explore a range of different illustration techniques to present their ideas to finished portfolio standard. Students are expected to push their ideas to expand and explore what is possible through the design process. During the class students also visit specialist fabric shops and the costume collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The class ends with a final critique in which students present their ideas to the group. Assessment is based on research in a sketchbook or other form, including sourced inspirational research, fabrics, sketches and rough design ideas. Designs developed from these ideas are presented as illustrations to portfolio standard, including working drawings. This course is open to all students, from ambitious beginners to those with more experience. Students will be provided with a sketchbook and layout pad but will need to provide for themselves the following: sketching pens; black pen; coloring pencils; others as needed per syllabi.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Communication for PR and Advertising

Communication is central to the contemporary promotional industries such as Public Relations and Advertising. On this summer school, students will learn some of the theories that support contemporary communication processes, and the tools that help all organizations whether they are in the private, public or charity sector to build understanding, influence behavior and to adapt to changes in the environment. Students will look at Public Relations and Advertising strategically from an organizational perspective, learning about, for example, crisis management and online reputation, as well as, the promotion of products, brands, and services. As part of this broad-based course, students will engage with issues relating to Public Relations and Advertising in social media and digital communication.

In the final week of the course, students will work in a team on a “Brand Aid” brief – bringing back new life to a product that has gone out of fashion. Previous campaigns have re-branded Tamagotchi and the iPod classic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Digital Photography Portfolio

In this course, students will develop a portfolio of photographic work, gain new skills in digital photography and grow their existing knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of photography.

In week one students will have three assignments focused on street portraiture, studio portraiture, and the urban landscape. For these assignments, students will be given introductory lectures by photographers who have created work specialized in these areas who have worked in fashion, editorial, advertising and fine-art photography. The assignments will enhance the students’ creative camera control as well as develop their conceptual awareness. Students can work individually, or with their peers, to produce visual responses to the brief, coming together at the end of the week to share their results with their tutor and the rest of the class, receiving feedback on their photographs.

Week two will begin with lectures on building their audience and on professional practice in photography. Students will be taken on a city walk looking at urban landscape by photographer and writer Lewis Bush who will also give a lecture on contemporary documentary photography. Students will be taken to document events in London by documentary photographer Edward Thompson who will help them to research techniques of storytelling and narrative in photography with their either completing a photojournalistic essay or a contemporary photo-series. In week two students will also be given location lighting workshops by fine art and advertising photographer Lottie Davies. There will be technical workshops on digital workflow: editing, sequencing, and post-production techniques within editorial photography.

In week three, with what students have learned from the first two weeks, they will now focus on building their portfolio. Students will have 1 to 1 tutorials helping to galvanize their ideas in how to create a body of work that is at the core of who they are and how they want to work in future. Students will have technical workshops editing their work for print, producing their own zines and making their own website. In this week students will also visit professional photo-labs and photography supply stores where they can also start to construct a physical photography portfolio.

Students will take advantage of the diversity and richness of London’s galleries and museums, and engage in discussions about the practice of photography. By the end of the summer school, students will have generated enough photographic material to create a hard copy portfolio, which will be assessed by their tutors, alongside a photographic industry professional. Their portfolio can then be presented to their friends and family, in a mini-exhibition alongside work by students from Contemporary Photography Practice, Graphic Media Design and Filmmaking summer school students.

During the three-week course students will develop enhanced skills in creative camera control; digital workflow; digital retouching skills; shooting in a studio and lighting on location; digital printing skills; an introduction to designing a website; portfolio development; and presentational skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Graphic Media Design

On this three-week course, students will explore the relationships between graphic design, communication systems, and media processes through studio-based technical workshops, discussions and other activities.

With an emphasis on visual research and exploration, we will examine the function of typography, layout and basic design principles, letterpress, screen printing, risograph printing, digital filmmaking and the relationship between print and digital media.

There will be the opportunity to visit museums and galleries in London to see the latest design techniques and get some inspiration. Previous students have visited the Imperial War Museum and Carsten Holler: Decision exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre.

A key part of the course will be recording the process of design and students will set-up a blog to record their design journey in words, images, and video.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

LCC - Media, Culture, and Communication

This summer school introduces students to key concepts for studying media, communications and cultural institutions and practices. Through a series of detailed case studies, the course explores the relationship between technological, social, economic and political factors in the evolution of mediated communication and culture. These developments will be mapped alongside major debates about the social and cultural impact of media and communication technologies, digitization, and new media cultures. The summer school also explores the cultural systems of contemporary ‘media-saturated’ societies looking closely at social media and personal/cultural identity, cultures of globalization, gender and culture, and cultural value and judgment.

Students will have the opportunity to visit world-class exhibitions, in previous years we have been to Carsten Holler: Decision at the Hayward Gallery and Digital Revolution at the Barbican Gallery. Students will go on a psychogeography walk around Brick Lane and explore the London Gothic culture of Abney Park Cemetery, from the Victorian era through to Amy Winehouse.

At the beginning of the course, students will learn how to create an engaging blog with images and video. Throughout the course, students will add to this and it will form part a larger The London Project which will form part of their assessment. In addition, the blog will be a great way for students to record share their experiences with friends and family.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

CSM - Advanced Fashion Design

This course is designed to give students an authentic Central Saint Martins Fashion Design experience, using experimental research and design development pathways that are original and innovative. Central Saint Martins Fashion Design philosophy is that individual students’ personal concepts provide the focus for their original design development. In this course, students will explore their ideas by gathering inspiration from a variety of sources as the starting point for creative design research. Students will then go on to develop and interpret their research ideas into garment designs, prints, and embroideries. A series of workshops led by industry professionals will cover pattern-making and fashion illustration. Students will explore a range of different techniques to present their ideas to an advanced portfolio standard. The course will be taught through a series of research projects, visits, design and illustration sessions, and individual and group tutorials. Students will be expected to be ambitious and really push their ideas to explore what it possible to achieve through the design process. It will end with a final critique in which students will present their ideas to the group. This course is suitable for students or graduates of Fashion Design at the university level and also for professionals with fashion design experience. This is not a course for beginners. NOTE: This course carries an additional fee.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 6  

Highlights
  • Creative and diverse arts programs
  • One of Europe's top art schoolsRanked #2 in Art and Design - QS World Rankings
  • Central Saint Martins ranked #1 for undergrad/post-grad courses in Fashion - QS World Rankings
  • 62% of the 'British Designers of the Year' are UAL alumni

London is a large city, so all students can expect to use public transportation (i.e. tube or bus) to move around the city on a daily basis, both getting to school and for social/cultural activities. It is a part of life in London. Generally, it will take students 20-45 minutes to get to school from their housing. All housing will be located in Zones 1 and 2 on the tube map.

Students will be housed in privately owned student accommodations, that include quality furnishings and areas for socializing. The kitchens are equipped with ovens, stoves, microwaves, and refrigerators. Wireless Internet is provided in all flats. A weekly cleaning service is provided to the communal kitchen/living areas in all API London accommodations.

We are unable to take housing requests. Students will be placed in one of the following three options based on availability and their API program:

Lady Margaret – Kentish Town

The accommodation building is a 4-story, 8-bedroom period townhouse shared among 16 students in double rooms with two single beds in each room. All bedrooms have private bathrooms. The kitchen is a large, shared space with a seating area and TV. Cooking utensils and crockery are provided. Bed linens are also provided but towels are not. There is a free washer and dryer in the building. Students are responsible for cleaning their own bedrooms and bathrooms.

Lady Margaret is located on a quiet residential street within Kentish Town where there are numerous cafes, shops, restaurants, and pubs. All the benefits of the bustling, vibrant area of Camden Town are a short walk away, as are the delights of the large ancient park of Hampstead Heath. The accommodations are a 5-minute walk from the Kentish Town tube stop, where students are able to take the Northern Line into Central London. The travel time from Lady Margaret to the API office is 20-25 minutes, and the travel time to the Westminster Regent campus, Central Saint Martins, and London College of Fashion is 20-30 minutes. Past students have been pleased with this location, as it offers both a quiet neighborhood and easy access to Central London.

Acorn – Bloomsbury

The accommodation buildings are Georgian 18th-century townhouses and are laid out in flats, with 3-11 students within each flat. Standard rooms will be doubles or triples within a co-ed flat or on a co-ed floor. Single bedrooms are extremely limited and cannot be guaranteed. Each flat will have a fully equipped kitchen, including crockery and utensils. Bed linens and towels are provided and there are free laundry facilities in all buildings.

Acorn housing is situated on the Duke of Bedford’s Estate, between Russell Square and Bloomsbury Square and within walking distance of the many attractions of London’s West End including just a 3-minute walk to the British Museum and the API office. The travel time from Acorn to the API office, as well as FSU, is a 10-minute walk, and the travel time to the Westminster Harrow campus is a 45-50 minute tube ride.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included. Meals are not included in these housing options.

Acorn Housing 36609042992 O
Acorn Housing 36609043502 O
Acorn Housing 36731887036 O
Api London Housing 7773304354 O
Api London Housing Examples 8538549425 O
Lady Margaret Kentish Town 36640097931 O
Lady Margaret Kentish Town 36640100611 O

Contact the API office regarding any missing price information.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 2 Jun 29, 2019 - Jul 20, 2019 $5,980 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined Jun 29, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $10,960 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 3 Jul 20, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $5,980 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined Jun 7, 2019 - Jul 20, 2019 $10,960 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 1 Jun 7, 2019 - Jun 29, 2019 $5,980 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined Jun 7, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 TBD Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019