France Paris Students At Tour Eiffel 2

Designed for students who wish to study abroad in Paris and take their courses with French students, this program allows students to select their courses from those offered at the Université Paris Diderot. Students with the appropriate language level may complete a course for API students, taught in French by a local professor at the API Paris Center. Interested students may also choose to complete a teaching internship for an additional fee.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Monthly Transit Pass

Tutoring

Housing (including meals and laundry with some options)

Language and Culture Tools

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.75 G.P.A.
  • Open to juniors and seniors
  • Open to advanced/superior French speakers
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa
  • Submit API application, one letter of recommendation, statement of purpose, and one official transcript to API
  • 2 passport I.D. photos
  • Online placement exam and interview with UMASS Amherst program coordinator
  • Supplemental application requirements are solicited upon receipt of API application
  • UMASS SYSTEM STUDENTS ONLY - Apply directly through the UMASS Amherst International Programs Office (IPO)

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-15 credits per semester

Designed for students who wish to study abroad in Paris and take their courses with French students, this program allows students to select their courses from those offered at the Université Paris Diderot. Students with the appropriate language level may complete a course for API students, taught in French by a local professor at the API Paris Center. Interested students may also choose to complete a teaching internship for an additional fee.

UNIVERSITÉ PARIS DIDEROT

Located within the 13th arrondissement of Paris that is known by Parisians as the Rive Gauche, Paris Diderot is an ideal university to study and immerse oneself in the local culture. Students can select from courses in the French language, the humanities, and social sciences. All courses are taken with French students and taught in French. To prepare for the immersion experience, students complete preparatory program or “stage” aimed at introducing visiting students to the French academic system and the campus.

TRANSCRIPTS

Transcripts are issued by the University of Massachusetts Amherst upon completion of the program.

Courses

COURSE OFFERINGS

Students choose from the following subject areas taught in French:

  • Études Anglophones
  • Études Cinématographiques
  • Français langue Étrangère
  • Géographie
  • Histoire
  • Histoire de l’art
  • Langues Étrangères Appliqués
  • Lettres et Sciences: Transmissions des Connaissances
  • Linguistique
  • Littérature
  • Psychologie
  • Sciences de la Ville
  • Sociologie
  • Sports
  • Théâtre

CREDIT INFORMATION

Most API partner universities in France operate on the contact hour system, wherein the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. credits, divide the contact hours available by 15.

French Civilization - API-Only

This course is offered every spring semester.

The post-WWII era was a time of deep transformations in the French way of living, the political structure of the French society, and through cultural and social representations and is strongly represented through the Parisian architecture and the design of the main avenues and boulevards. This course examines French society chronologically from 1945 to today by highlighting the main events of this era and examining the city itself through daily life, buildings, movies, paintings, and theoretical developments.

A French Experience: Paris Teaching Internship

All students with 4 semesters of college-level French (equivalent to the intermediate level) or more are able to participate in the teaching internship for an additional 3 credits. Beginning and intermediate-level students can also do the internship, but are not eligible to earn credit or a grade for the experience. Spaces are limited and are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. An additional fee is charged for the internship.

Students teach English in a French school. This is a unique experience for API students in Paris to get to know Parisians and Parisian life from the inside, not only through the teenagers in the classes students teach, but also from the teachers that students assist.

Students teach English two to three hours a week in a Parisian school. The regular professor asks the student what is to be taught and helps students prepare for class. Students are asked to keep a journal where all course plans and weekly evaluations are registered (one page per class, per course taught). Students also have to write a final internship report (in French) analyzing the French teaching system and their perception of French society through their own teaching experience. Upon successful completion, students earn 3 semester credits.

Art History II

This elective course is taught by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester. This course traces the artistic contribution to modernity in 19th -century and the first decades of 20th-century French art, its utopian dimension, its different achievements, and its decline. Since the French Revolution, some major works of art, art critics and theories, and the artists themselves contributed to change drastically the artist’s role and the role of the arts. In the newly established bourgeois, industrialized and modernized society in France, the coexistence of opposite art practices and ideologies as well as the quickly following changes and innovations in successive art-movements, such as neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, postimpressionism, will be analyzed with regard to their respective claim for modernity.

Diderot Course Information

Students enroll directly in courses at the Université Paris Diderot. Registration occurs upon arrival in Paris. Because students do not have a confirmed class schedule before departing for France, it is highly recommended to obtain pre-approval for areas of study, rather than for specific courses.

Students may choose from a number of subject areas, in addition to a required language course and required API-taught course. There is also the option to participate in a teaching internship.

PREPARATORY LANGUAGE COURSE

Each semester will begin with a required 40-hour intensive French language and culture session (non-credit-bearing).

REQUIRED PROGRAM COURSE

In addition to the courses offered through Diderot University, students in this program will be required to take a specialized API course taught at the 300 French level. This course will focus on French culture and history and is equivalent to 3 U.S. semester credits.

History of Fashion

This elective course is taught by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester. This course focuses on the development of costume and fashion in France from the late 17th Century to the present. Topics covered include: the influence of the state in organizing luxury industries (with Louis XIV, Napoleon); the Restoration and the Romantic Era; “Fin de Siècle” and Belle Epoque fashion; the Roaring Twenties; Wartime fashion; Haute couture and “Prêt à Porter”. Class time may be separated into lecture hours and site visits (museum, exhibitions, etc.) where students can see the original documents and/or appreciate the object of study in the wider cultural context of its time.

History of French Cuisine - API-Only

This course is offered every Fall semester.

Who has never dreamt of chocolate mousse, foie gras, or fondue? Why is France so attached to its cuisine and culinary traditions? How did they develop and what role do they play within daily life as well as national identity? How could the French indulge themselves in fastuous and lengthy meals and joyfully continue to speak about food while eating? What does eating mean? This course is designed to understand the role and place of French Cuisine within its society from a historical, ethnological, and sociological point of view, and to put into practice this “savoir vivre français” by cooking some traditional dishes and sharing them together. This is a reading and research class, with a cooking and tasting component.

A French Experience: Paris Teaching Internship

All students with 4 semesters of college-level French (equivalent to the intermediate level) or more are able to participate in the teaching internship for an additional 3 credits. Beginning and intermediate-level students can also do the internship, but are not eligible to earn credit or a grade for the experience. Spaces are limited and are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. An additional fee is charged for the internship.

Students teach English in a French school. This is a unique experience for API students in Paris to get to know Parisians and Parisian life from the inside, not only through the teenagers in the classes students teach, but also from the teachers that students assist.

Students teach English two to three hours a week in a Parisian school. The regular professor asks the student what is to be taught and helps students prepare for class. Students are asked to keep a journal where all course plans and weekly evaluations are registered (one page per class, per course taught). Students also have to write a final internship report (in French) analyzing the French teaching system and their perception of French society through their own teaching experience. Upon successful completion, students earn 3 semester credits.

Fashion in France – 18th to 21st Century

This course focuses on the development of costume and fashion in France from the late 17th Century to the present. Topics covered include: the influence of the state in organizing luxury industries (with Louis XIV, Napoleon); the Restoration and the Romantic Era; “Fin de Siècle” and Belle Epoque fashion; the Roaring Twenties; Wartime fashion; Haute couture and “Prêt à Porter”. Class time may be separated into lecture hours and site visits (museum, exhibitions, etc.) where students can see the original documents and/or appreciate the object of study in the wider cultural context of its time.

Cultural History: Post-War France (1944-45) to Today

This elective course is taught in English by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester.

If Paris has been known as the "capital city of the nineteenth century (regarding its architecture or the design of the main avenues and boulevards, for example), the post-WWII era was a time of deep transformation in the way of life, in the political structure of French society, and in cultural and social representations as well. Based on a chronological presentation of the main events, focusing on the city of Paris, on daily life, buildings, movies, paintings, and theoretical developments, we will try to delineate the main aspects of this era.

Human Rights: Being International

This elective course is taught in English by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester.

This course offers an introduction to international Human Rights Law. Each class will be structured around a lecture and a case study with a focus on important human rights issues in France. Students will become acquainted with the fundamentals of human rights and will become aware of specific human rights issues that arise in France.

Diderot Course Information

Students enroll directly in courses at the Université Paris Diderot. Registration occurs upon arrival in Paris. Because students do not have a confirmed class schedule before departing for France, it is highly recommended to obtain pre-approval for areas of study, rather than for specific courses.

Students may choose from a number of subject areas, in addition to a required language course and required API-taught course. There is also the option to participate in a teaching internship.

PREPARATORY LANGUAGE COURSE

Each semester will begin with a required 40-hour intensive French language and culture session (non-credit-bearing).

REQUIRED PROGRAM COURSE

In addition to the courses offered through Diderot University, students in this program will be required to take a specialized API course taught at the 300 French level. This course will focus on French culture and history and is equivalent to 3 U.S. semester credits.

Modernity in 19th Century French Art

This elective course is taught by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester. This course traces the artistic contribution to modernity in 19th -century and the first decades of 20th-century French art, its utopian dimension, its different achievements, and its decline. Since the French Revolution, some major works of art, art critics and theories, and the artists themselves contributed to change drastically the artist’s role and the role of the arts. In the newly established bourgeois, industrialized and modernized society in France, the co-existence of opposite art practices and ideologies as well as the quickly following changes and innovations in successive art-movements, such as neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, post-impressionism, will be analyzed with regard to their respective claim for modernity.

History of French Cuisine - API-Only

This course is offered every Fall semester.

Who has never dreamt of chocolate mousse, foie gras, or fondue? Why is France so attached to its cuisine and culinary traditions? How did they develop and what role do they play within daily life as well as national identity? How could the French indulge themselves in fastuous and lengthy meals and joyfully continue to speak about food while eating? What does eating mean? This course is designed to understand the role and place of French Cuisine within its society from a historical, ethnological, and sociological point of view, and to put into practice this “savoir vivre français” by cooking some traditional dishes and sharing them together. This is a reading and research class, with a cooking and tasting component.

French Civilization - API-Only

This course is offered every spring semester.

The post-WWII era was a time of deep transformations in the French way of living, the political structure of the French society, and through cultural and social representations and is strongly represented through the Parisian architecture and the design of the main avenues and boulevards. This course examines French society chronologically from 1945 to today by highlighting the main events of this era and examining the city itself through daily life, buildings, movies, paintings, and theoretical developments.

A French Experience: Paris Teaching Internship

All students with 4 semesters of college-level French (equivalent to the intermediate level) or more are able to participate in the teaching internship for an additional 3 credits. Beginning and intermediate-level students can also do the internship, but are not eligible to earn credit or a grade for the experience. Spaces are limited and are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. An additional fee is charged for the internship.

Students teach English in a French school. This is a unique experience for API students in Paris to get to know Parisians and Parisian life from the inside, not only through the teenagers in the classes students teach, but also from the teachers that students assist.

Students teach English two to three hours a week in a Parisian school. The regular professor asks the student what is to be taught and helps students prepare for class. Students are asked to keep a journal where all course plans and weekly evaluations are registered (one page per class, per course taught). Students also have to write a final internship report (in French) analyzing the French teaching system and their perception of French society through their own teaching experience. Upon successful completion, students earn 3 semester credits.

Fashion in France – 18th to 21st Century

This course focuses on the development of costume and fashion in France from the late 17th Century to the present. Topics covered include: the influence of the state in organizing luxury industries (with Louis XIV, Napoleon); the Restoration and the Romantic Era; “Fin de Siècle” and Belle Epoque fashion; the Roaring Twenties; Wartime fashion; Haute couture and “Prêt à Porter”. Class time may be separated into lecture hours and site visits (museum, exhibitions, etc.) where students can see the original documents and/or appreciate the object of study in the wider cultural context of its time.

Cultural History: Post-War France (1944-45) to Today

This elective course is taught in English by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester.

If Paris has been known as the "capital city of the nineteenth century (regarding its architecture or the design of the main avenues and boulevards, for example), the post-WWII era was a time of deep transformation in the way of life, in the political structure of French society, and in cultural and social representations as well. Based on a chronological presentation of the main events, focusing on the city of Paris, on daily life, buildings, movies, paintings, and theoretical developments, we will try to delineate the main aspects of this era.

Human Rights: Being International

This elective course is taught in English by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester.

This course offers an introduction to international Human Rights Law. Each class will be structured around a lecture and a case study with a focus on important human rights issues in France. Students will become acquainted with the fundamentals of human rights and will become aware of specific human rights issues that arise in France.

Diderot Course Information

Students enroll directly in courses at the Université Paris Diderot. Registration occurs upon arrival in Paris. Because students do not have a confirmed class schedule before departing for France, it is highly recommended to obtain pre-approval for areas of study, rather than for specific courses.

Students may choose from a number of subject areas, in addition to a required language course and required API-taught course. There is also the option to participate in a teaching internship.

PREPARATORY LANGUAGE COURSE

Each semester will begin with a required 40-hour intensive French language and culture session (non-credit-bearing).

REQUIRED PROGRAM COURSE

In addition to the courses offered through Diderot University, students in this program will be required to take a specialized API course taught at the 300 French level. This course will focus on French culture and history and is equivalent to 3 U.S. semester credits.

Art History II

This elective course is taught by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester. This course traces the artistic contribution to modernity in 19th -century and the first decades of 20th-century French art, its utopian dimension, its different achievements, and its decline. Since the French Revolution, some major works of art, art critics and theories, and the artists themselves contributed to change drastically the artist’s role and the role of the arts. In the newly established bourgeois, industrialized and modernized society in France, the coexistence of opposite art practices and ideologies as well as the quickly following changes and innovations in successive art-movements, such as neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, postimpressionism, will be analyzed with regard to their respective claim for modernity.

History of Fashion

This elective course is taught by faculty from the University of Connecticut. Offerings may vary per semester. This course focuses on the development of costume and fashion in France from the late 17th Century to the present. Topics covered include: the influence of the state in organizing luxury industries (with Louis XIV, Napoleon); the Restoration and the Romantic Era; “Fin de Siècle” and Belle Epoque fashion; the Roaring Twenties; Wartime fashion; Haute couture and “Prêt à Porter”. Class time may be separated into lecture hours and site visits (museum, exhibitions, etc.) where students can see the original documents and/or appreciate the object of study in the wider cultural context of its time.

Highlights
  • Enroll in classes with French students
  • Classes taught in French
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
  • Teaching internships available (for credit)
  • International excursion during some semesters

Faculty

  • Qlvzmizrpwezs92Ddufh

    Francine Bost-Millischer

    Francine Bost-Millischer will be one of your Resident Directors in Paris and a resource for you on-site.

  • Rebecca Cott Head Shot

    Rebecca Cott

    Rebecca Cott will be your Program Manager and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - rebecca.cott@apiabroad.com

  • Laure Bettencourt Photo Api A5D49F114013F8Ca431C12Bfa59A8F7E 74Ba58Fb65E82F65A0Eb1E59747Abd85

    Laure Bettencourt

    Laure Bettencourt will be your Student Life Coordinator in Paris and will assist you in adjusting to life in France!

  • France Paris Ad Violaine Peladan Photo 2015 11 1Bef500F0E5990038Eee1054334B48A9 E51B712014B05A47E8Cfcd92081A1B5A

    Violaine Peladan

    Violaine will be your Academic Coordinator in Paris and will assist you in achieving your educational goals with us in France!

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Paris programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Bordeaux

    Bordeaux is one of the largest cities in France and is located in the South West of the country, not far from the Atlantic Ocean.

    The center of a legendary winegrowing region, this vibrant and sophisticated city is a top gourmet and cultural destination. Synonymous with fine wines, Bordeaux is one of France’s most beautiful and elegant cities - indeed, half the city is Unesco-listed, making it the largest urban World Heritage site. Visitors appreciate both the monumental stone architecture and attractive nooks and crannies of this city, with its fascinating historical and cultural heritage around every corner. Also, it is now fastly connected to Paris with a new TGV line connecting both cities in just over two hours.

  • French Château

    Students will have the unique opportunity to explore an authentic French château and its surroundings in the Ile de France (Paris countryside). Possible visits may include Champs sur Marne, Chantilly, Rambouillet, Vau le Vicomte, or Versailles.
  • Normandy, Mont Sant-Michel, Saint Malo

    Capital of Lower Normandy, Caen was bombarded during the liberation of France by the Allied troops’ landing on the coast of Normandy. Today, a World War II memorial and museum explaining D-Day mark this event. Students visit Omaha Beach and then spend the afternoon and night inside the 17th-century walls of Saint-Malo which is considered by many to be the most attractive channel port in France.

  • Aix-En-Provence/Avignon

    Avignon is one of the most fascinating towns in southern France and known for its music festival, splendid houses and museums with rich works of art, mosaics and Romanesque and Gothic Sculptures. Students will visit the famous Pope’s Palace that was home to seven Popes from 1305 to 1378 before the papacy moved back to the Vatican. Near the palace is the famous half bridge Pont St. Bénezet, in which a popular children’s song was written describing folk dancing on the bridge.

  • French Château

    Students will have the unique opportunity to explore an authentic French château and its surroundings in the Ile de France (Paris countryside). Possible visits may include Champs sur Marne, Chantilly, Rambouillet, Vau le Vicomte, or Versailles.
  • Bruges

    Bruges, also called the “Venice of the North,” is an outstanding example of a medieval historic settlement. Picturesque cobbled lanes and dreamy canals link exceptionally photogenic market squares lined with soaring towers, historic churches, and old whitewashed almshouses. Flemish Belgium inspired some of the most famous Flemish Baroque painters such as Rubens.

  • Strasbourg

    The capital of the Alsace region, Strasbourg has one of Europe’s largest medieval quarters. In the Grand Île and Petite France, cobbled streets weave between creaking timber-framed houses that have survived for hundreds of years.


  • Burgundy

    Burgundy is one of France’s most famous wine-producing regions. Students on this excursion will have the chance to visit the renowned city and ancient capital of the region – Dijon – known overseas for its famous mustard, as well as Beaune. Beaune is one of the best-preserved medieval cities in the district, also known the world over for its wine auctions.
  • Bordeaux

    Bordeaux is one of the largest cities in France and is located in the South West of the country, not far from the Atlantic Ocean.

    The center of a legendary winegrowing region, this vibrant and sophisticated city is a top gourmet and cultural destination. Synonymous with fine wines, Bordeaux is one of France’s most beautiful and elegant cities - indeed, half the city is Unesco-listed, making it the largest urban World Heritage site. Visitors appreciate both the monumental stone architecture and attractive nooks and crannies of this city, with its fascinating historical and cultural heritage around every corner. Also, it is now fastly connected to Paris with a new TGV line connecting both cities in just over two hours.

  • French Château

    Students will have the unique opportunity to explore an authentic French château and its surroundings in the Ile de France (Paris countryside). Possible visits may include Champs sur Marne, Chantilly, Rambouillet, Vau le Vicomte, or Versailles.
  • Bruges

    Bruges, also called the “Venice of the North,” is an outstanding example of a medieval historic settlement. Picturesque cobbled lanes and dreamy canals link exceptionally photogenic market squares lined with soaring towers, historic churches, and old whitewashed almshouses. Flemish Belgium inspired some of the most famous Flemish Baroque painters such as Rubens.

  • Strasbourg

    The capital of the Alsace region, Strasbourg has one of Europe’s largest medieval quarters. In the Grand Île and Petite France, cobbled streets weave between creaking timber-framed houses that have survived for hundreds of years.


  • Normandy, Mont Sant-Michel, Saint Malo

    Capital of Lower Normandy, Caen was bombarded during the liberation of France by the Allied troops’ landing on the coast of Normandy. Today, a World War II memorial and museum explaining D-Day mark this event. Students visit Omaha Beach and then spend the afternoon and night inside the 17th-century walls of Saint-Malo which is considered by many to be the most attractive channel port in France.

  • Aix-En-Provence/Avignon

    Avignon is one of the most fascinating towns in southern France and known for its music festival, splendid houses and museums with rich works of art, mosaics and Romanesque and Gothic Sculptures. Students will visit the famous Pope’s Palace that was home to seven Popes from 1305 to 1378 before the papacy moved back to the Vatican. Near the palace is the famous half bridge Pont St. Bénezet, in which a popular children’s song was written describing folk dancing on the bridge.

  • Burgundy

    Burgundy is one of France’s most famous wine-producing regions. Students on this excursion will have the chance to visit the renowned city and ancient capital of the region – Dijon – known overseas for its famous mustard, as well as Beaune. Beaune is one of the best-preserved medieval cities in the district, also known the world over for its wine auctions.

Students who choose to live with families are provided with five breakfast meals and two dinner meals per week with the family, along with a grocery stipend card to offset the cost of meals. Host families serve as a unique introduction into French culture and may be made up of a married couple with children, retirement-age couples, or a divorced or widowed woman with or without children. Most families live in apartments with 2-4 bedrooms, a bathroom, a kitchen, and a living/dining area. In some cases, there may be another API or international student in the same apartment. While most family placements offer a single room, some students share a double room.

Students also have the option of living in shared apartments that are located throughout Paris. Most are designed to house 4 students in double-occupancy bedrooms, though some may be larger. Meals are not provided, however, apartments are equipped with kitchen appliances, and students receive a grocery stipend card to offset the cost of meals.

Students in the dorm generally live in single rooms. Some rooms may be equipped with a sink, though students share bathroom and kitchen facilities. Most of the other students in the dorm are American. Students who select the dorm option are responsible for their own meals, though they will receive a grocery stipend card to offset the cost of meals.

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Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Fall Aug, 2019 - Jan, 2020 $16,880 Apr 1, 2019 Jun 1, 2019
Academic Year Aug, 2019 - Jun, 2020 $27,980 Apr 1, 2019 Jun 1, 2019
Spring Jan 4, 2019 - May 19, 2019 $16,680 Oct 1, 2018 Nov 10, 2018