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The Freie Universität Berlin German Language and European Studies Program (FUBiS) was specifically created by one of Germany’s top universities to offer North American and international students courses in language, culture, fashion, history, international relations, and more that focus on Germany and its role in Europe.

Students in this summer program may elect to take only German language coursework, coursework in English, or a combination.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Transit Pass

Tutoring

Housing (two meals per day and laundry with host family)

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of German speakers
  • Completed API Application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer May 28, 2020 - Jul 11, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $9,650

Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020

The different tracks have different pricing structures.

  • Track 1 is an intensive German language track and is reflected in the pricing below.
  • On Track 2, students can choose to take a semi-intensive German course + 1 content course, OR 2 content courses. The Track 2 option incurs an additional $1,000 fee.

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Berlin programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Berlin

    Summer students will receive their introduction to the capital city upon arrival, and will also experience the city through course activities and extracurricular events. Local field-trips comprise an integral component of many of the courses. These often include picnics, concerts, festivals, and/or outings to relevant areas of interest around Berlin.

  • Leipzig

    Leipzig is the most populous city in the state of Saxony, Germany, and it is located about 160 kilometers (99 mi) southwest of Berlin. It has become known as one of the most trendy and up-and-coming cities in all of Germany – even rivaling Berlin! The historic central area of Leipzig features a renaissance style ensemble of buildings from the 16th century, including the old city hall in the marketplace. There are also several baroque period trading houses and former residences of rich merchants. The ‘it’ district, Plagwitz, is decked out in industrial chimneys and brick housing combined with rejuvenated, once derelict buildings.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-4 credits

The Freie Universität Berlin German Language and European Studies Program (FUBiS) was specifically created by one of Germany’s top universities to offer North American and international students courses in language, culture, fashion, history, international relations, and more that focus on Germany and its role in Europe.

Students in this summer program may elect to take only German language coursework, coursework in English, or a combination.

FUBiS offers intensive summer programs for dedicated and diligent students. FUBiS German language courses focus on the development of language competence in writing, reading, listening, and speaking, and are taught at European Framework Levels A1 – C1. FUBiS content courses in English give students the opportunity to seriously engage in and further their knowledge of a subject matter.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive their transcript from Freie Universität Berlin (FUBiS) upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Christopher Pepin

    Christopher Pepin will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

  • Claudio

    Claudio Schoeneberger

    Claudio will be your Resident Coordinator in Berlin and a resource for you while you are with us in Germany!

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    Gabi Perches

    Gabi Perches will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - gabriela.perches@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

Students are encouraged to apply early, as courses fill up quickly. Courses are subject to change, and no course is guaranteed.

Please note:

  • Courses are arranged by track for scheduling compatibility.
  • Students may elect to take only a language course OR 2 subject courses, OR 1 subject course and 1 language course. The options have different prices. Check the Dates & Fees page or contact API for more information.
  • An A-Track language course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • An A-Track subject course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • C-Track courses cannot be combined with other courses.

CREDIT INFORMATION

The FUBiS program, hosted at the Freie Universität Berlin, issues credit according to the American system, whereby most courses are worth 3-4 U.S. credits each.

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Beginner

Within six weeks, this course will help you to develop basic competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as a basic knowledge of the German culture. By the end of the course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German- speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations. You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts. In addition, you will learn to write, revise and proofread short texts in German.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Intermediate

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as strengthen your knowledge of grammar, while emphasizing self-correction. You will also expand your knowledge of the German culture and analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Intermediate Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course will help you to expand your competences in speaking and writing within six weeks, while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help you to increase your vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies. In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German- speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

A Track - Berlin and the Digital Music Era

In many ways, Berlin is a center for contemporary electronic music. This is primarily due to the strong connection between technological and aesthetic developments. Nightclubs, such as the Berghain, have a worldwide reputation for their sound systems, which allow a specific acoustic experience and encourage nightlong dancing and partying. Berlin-based companies such as Ableton and Native Instruments are global leaders in their music software, especially in the context of techno, electronica and electronic dance music. Many DJs and musicians´ market themselves or their tracks via blogs and streaming services. Particularly in the context of sound art, there are fairly strong parallels with media art.

Due to the key 'digital' aspects of such phenomena, we often speak of a 'Digital Age' in which Berlin plays a particular role in the field of music. However, the 'analog' phenomena are constantly growing, so that there is some debate over the beginning of a 'post-digital age'. This corresponds with an increasing focus both on the virtual and haptic dimension. Among other things, software companies have made strong efforts over the past years to develop their own hardware controllers for their computer programs in order to be able to better design musical processes manually.

Based on such phenomena, the course will explore the relationship between aesthetic trends and technological developments with the focus on the cultural and economic conditions in Berlin. Particular emphasis will be made on the past and present of techno, (experimental) electronica and electronic dance music. What makes Berlin a magnet not only for thrill-seeking club-goers, but also for DJs, musicians, producers and developers? How does this relate to the recent past of Berlin since the fall of the Berlin Wall, especially given the gentrification processes? To what extent is Berlin's creative scene at the same time internationally networked and can its conditions only be understood in a global context?

Beyond the Berlin perspective, the course examines the current conditions of production and consumption as well as the performance and distribution of music. How do legal/illegal file sharing and streaming services affect listening to music? What is changing in music culture through sampling, remixing, mashup and approaches to interactive music in video games? What opposing trends are out there?

In addition to the joint discussion of texts and film excerpts, excursions also provide an opportunity for an exchange with proven experts in the course subject areas.

At the end of the course, the participants can elaborate on and present a topic (either alone or in a group) of their choice in the context of the general list of topics on the course.

View Syllabus   

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. The course aims to deepen your competence in speaking and writing and to expand and refine your vocabulary usage, so that you are able to express and discuss ideas, opinions and information at the academic level. the course helps you to develop effective reading and listening strategies and deepen your knowledge of grammar structures. In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

A Track - Creating a Solo Performance: Berlin Cabaret/Kabarett

This course is an acting course that introduces the student to the research, writing and performance techniques of cabaret performers. Kabarett is the German word for \"cabaret\" but has two different meanings","the first describing a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theater and the latter describes a kind of political satire. Unlike comedians who make fun of all kind of things, Kabarett artists (German: Kabarettisten) pride themselves as dedicated almost completely to political and social topics of more serious nature which they criticize using techniques like cynicism, sarcasm and irony. While studying and analyzing the techniques of a wide variety of cabaret performers through its inception, students will explore aspects of writing monologues and implementing those techniques with the ultimate goal of creating and performing their own material -sense of\ntruth- with the courage necessary to stand-alone on stage."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

A Track: Sustainable and Social Business

In this course, we introduce the students to sustainable and social entrepreneurial thinking and acting by teaching them state-of-the-art tools and methods applied by companies and startups worldwide, which students could use to turn their own ideas into actual green and social business ventures. The students receive an overview on topics, such as corporate planning, social start-up finance and pitching. Besides examining how to create the more traditional business plan, we will particularly focus on the following tools: Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Value Proposition Canvas and Business Model Canvas. Furthermore, we look into creativity techniques, which can help to generate business ideas and the most relevant tools needed to make use of one’s own research results. The students will apply the newly learned tools and methods by analyzing existing case studies and developing their own business ideas.

Moreover, the students will gain a better understanding of the actual meaning of “sustainability” and learn which aspects and topics they need to focus on in order to develop modern and sustainable business models. During the analysis of existing case studies, the students will also learn about the “social business” approach and compare this with non-social business approaches.

The course offers a mix of theoretical input as well as creative and practical group work, which encourages the participants to think and act like a social and green entrepreneur.

Language of Instruction: English   

View Syllabus   

B Track - History of European Art: Local Traditions and Transnational Networks

This course explores European art and architecture from the 15th to the 20th century with a particular focus on urban centers like Florence, Rome, Venice, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Paris, London, and Berlin. The aim is to analyze how the visual arts contributed through the centuries to shape local identities as well as European cultural traditions common to different countries. The course will present iconic moments of the history of the arts in Europe by drawing a special attention to episodes of cultural exchanges and hybridization that arose from travelling artworks as well as from artists’ travels.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

B Track - Seduction and Terror: Hitler's Germany

This class focuses on Hitler’s Germany and it begins with the 19 th century background. Central to this session will be a discussion of the broad political currents, the agitators and petty demagogues who fueled the dissatisfaction and spread it widely. We will also examine the popular literature that Hitler and many of his supporters read and absorbed. Lastly, the class will examine the end of the war, the so-called ‘zero hour’, the destruction and collapse of Germany

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

B Track - Europe, Migration, Refugees

This course is designed for all students having a personal, professional or political personal interest in a deeper and thus more differentiated understanding of transnational migration. We will encounter migrants’ viewpoints, which reach beyond the usual framings of ‘the poor migrant’ as ‘passive victim’, as a threat or as the ‘(anti-)hero’ of globalization. We will encounter viewpoints on the EU, which will constructively criticize as well as graciously affirm the spirit of the Union. We will encounter viewpoints of hope.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

B Track - Economics of European Integration

What is today’s role of the European Union? After decades towards greater integration, economic relationships have recently become more fragile. Examples of the rise of disintegration include tendencies of secession and the exit of countries from international institutional arrangements. In view of strong interdependencies between economic actors (global supply chains), these disruptions seem to be particularly costly and may require appropriate policy responses.

This course introduces the main economic aspects of the current development of the European Union (EU) and its policies. The basic idea is to discuss general issues in economic integration with a strong emphasis on experiences in Europe. After reviewing the institutional, political and historical background of European integration, the main focus is on the economic analysis of the policies and prospects for the European Union and its economic impacts on individuals, firms and regions.

Some recent developments in the international policy agenda like sovereign debt crises, Brexit and the euro crisis will also be covered.

This course provides an introduction to economic tools and concepts useful for the analysis of European integration. More generally, students learn to apply economic theory to real-world problems.

Language of Instruction: English   

View Syllabus   

C Track - Intensive German Language - Beginner

This course is designed for the beginner student with no previous knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will

take responsibility for their learning. Within six weeks, this course will help you to develop basic competences in listening,

speaking, reading and writing as well as a basic knowledge of the German culture.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

C Track - Intensive German Language - Beginner

This course is designed for beginners with basic knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning. This course will help students to expand their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing within six weeks, deepen their knowledge of grammar as well as their knowledge of the German culture.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9

C Track - Intensive German Language - Intermediate

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning. Within six weeks, this course will help students to expand their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as strengthen their knowledge of grammar while emphasizing self-correction. Students will also expand their knowledge of the German culture and analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

C Track - Intensive German Language - Intermediate Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

This course will help students to expand their competencies in speaking and writing within six weeks while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help them to increase their vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies.

In addition, students will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

C Track - Intensive German Language - Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Highlights
  • Courses in English and German
  • Program designed for international students
  • FORUM on Education Abroad QUIP accreditation

API summer students studying at FUBiS may choose to live in a single-occupancy apartment, or with a local host family.

A monthly transit pass is included for all students.