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The Freie Universität Berlin German Language and European Studies Program (FUBiS) was specifically created by one of Germany’s top universities to offer North American and international students courses in language, culture, fashion, history, international relations, and more that focus on Germany and its role in Europe.

Students in this summer program may elect to take only German language coursework, coursework in English, or a combination.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Transit Pass

Tutoring

Housing (two meals per day and laundry with host family)

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of German speakers
  • Completed API Application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Berlin programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Berlin

    Summer students will receive their introduction to the capital city upon arrival, and will also experience the city through course activities and extracurricular events. Local field-trips comprise an integral component of many of the courses. These often include picnics, concerts, festivals, and/or outings to relevant areas of interest around Berlin.

  • Hamburg

    Hamburg is located on the Elbe River in northern Germany and it is the country’s largest port and commercial center with a population of over 1.7 million people. Top points of interest in Hamburg include the old warehouse district and harbor promenade, and its system of canals reminiscent of Amsterdam. The city is also known for its lakes, parks, and verdant suburbs full of gracious houses; elegant shopping arcades; richly endowed museums; and a vibrant cultural life.

    Hamburg’s historic label, ‘The gateway to the world’, might be a bold claim, but Germany’s second-largest city and its biggest port has never been shy. Hamburg has engaged in business with the world ever since it joined the Hanseatic League back in the Middle Ages. Its role as a center of international trade in the late 19th and early 20th centuries brought it great wealth (and Unesco World Heritage recognition in 2015), a legacy that continues today: it’s one of Germany’s wealthiest cities.

  • Leipzig

    Leipzig is the most populous city in the state of Saxony, Germany, and it is located about 160 kilometers (99 mi) southwest of Berlin. It has become known as one of the most trendy and up-and-coming cities in all of Germany – even rivaling Berlin! The historic central area of Leipzig features a renaissance style ensemble of buildings from the 16th century, including the old city hall in the marketplace. There are also several baroque period trading houses and former residences of rich merchants. The ‘it’ district, Plagwitz, is decked out in industrial chimneys and brick housing combined with rejuvenated, once derelict buildings.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-4 credits

The Freie Universität Berlin German Language and European Studies Program (FUBiS) was specifically created by one of Germany’s top universities to offer North American and international students courses in language, culture, fashion, history, international relations, and more that focus on Germany and its role in Europe.

Students in this summer program may elect to take only German language coursework, coursework in English, or a combination.

FUBiS offers intensive summer programs for dedicated and diligent students. FUBiS German language courses focus on the development of language competence in writing, reading, listening, and speaking, and are taught at European Framework Levels A1 – C1. FUBiS content courses in English give students the opportunity to seriously engage in and further their knowledge of a subject matter.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive their transcript from Freie Universität Berlin (FUBiS) upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Christopher Pepin

    Christopher Pepin will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

  • Claudio

    Claudio Schoeneberger

    Claudio will be your Resident Coordinator in Berlin and a resource for you while you are with us in Germany!

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    Lauren Daniels

    Lauren Daniels will be your Program Manager for this location and will prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - lauren.daniels@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

Students are encouraged to apply early, as courses fill up quickly. Courses are subject to change, and no course is guaranteed.

Please note:

  • Courses are arranged by track for scheduling compatibility.
  • Students may elect to take only a language course OR 2 subject courses, OR 1 subject course and 1 language course. The options have different prices. Check the Dates & Fees page or contact API for more information.
  • An A-Track language course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • An A-Track subject course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • C-Track courses cannot be combined with other courses.

CREDIT INFORMATION

The FUBiS program, hosted at the Freie Universität Berlin, issues credit according to the American system, whereby most courses are worth 3-4 U.S. credits each.

A-Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Beginner

This course is designed for the beginner student with no previous knowledge of German. This course will help students to expand their competencies in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within six weeks. Students will deepen their knowledge of grammar, as well as their knowledge of the German culture

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: A1  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Beginner

This course is designed for beginners with basic knowledge of German. This course will help students to expand their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing within six weeks, deepen your knowledge of grammar as well as their knowledge of the German culture.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: A2  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Intermediate

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Within six weeks, this course will help students to expand their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as strengthen their knowledge of grammar while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, students will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: B1  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Intermediate Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Within six weeks, this course will help students to expand their competencies in speaking and writing while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help students to increase their vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies. In addition, students will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

A Track - Berlin and the Digital Music Era

In many ways, Berlin is a center for contemporary electronic music. This is primarily due to the strong connection between technological and aesthetic developments. Nightclubs, such as the Berghain, have a worldwide reputation for their sound systems, which allow a specific acoustic experience and encourage nightlong dancing and partying. Berlin-based companies such as Ableton and Native Instruments are global leaders in their music software, especially in the context of techno, electronica and electronic dance music. Many DJs and musicians´ market themselves or their tracks via blogs and streaming services. Particularly in the context of sound art, there are fairly strong parallels with media art.

Due to the key 'digital' aspects of such phenomena, we often speak of a 'Digital Age' in which Berlin plays a particular role in the field of music. However, the 'analog' phenomena are constantly growing, so that there is some debate over the beginning of a 'post-digital age'. This corresponds with an increasing focus both on the virtual and haptic dimension. Among other things, software companies have made strong efforts over the past years to develop their own hardware controllers for their computer programs in order to be able to better design musical processes manually.

Based on such phenomena, the course will explore the relationship between aesthetic trends and technological developments with the focus on the cultural and economic conditions in Berlin. Particular emphasis will be made on the past and present of techno, (experimental) electronica and electronic dance music. What makes Berlin a magnet not only for thrill-seeking club-goers, but also for DJs, musicians, producers and developers? How does this relate to the recent past of Berlin since the fall of the Berlin Wall, especially given the gentrification processes? To what extent is Berlin's creative scene at the same time internationally networked and can its conditions only be understood in a global context?

Beyond the Berlin perspective, the course examines the current conditions of production and consumption as well as the performance and distribution of music. How do legal/illegal file sharing and streaming services affect listening to music? What is changing in music culture through sampling, remixing, mashup and approaches to interactive music in video games? What opposing trends are out there?

In addition to the joint discussion of texts and film excerpts, excursions also provide an opportunity for an exchange with proven experts in the course subject areas.

At the end of the course, the participants can elaborate on and present a topic (either alone or in a group) of their choice in the context of the general list of topics on the course.

View Syllabus   

A Track - Semi-Intensive German Language - Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

The course aims to deepen students’ competence in speaking and writing and to expand and refine their vocabulary usage so that they are able to express and discuss ideas, opinions, and information at the academic level. Special attention is given to the consistent use of self-correction. Furthermore, the course helps students to develop effective reading and listening strategies and deepen their knowledge of grammar structures. In addition, students will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: C1  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

A Track - The Interplay of Cultures, Food, Eating and Drinking: the Case of Berlin

This course builds upon concepts in basic nutrition to promote the understanding of how socio-cultural, environmental and psychological factors influence eating habits and health. Implications for health practitioners, health educators and for anyone interested in food and culture will be discussed.

Students will be exposed to long-standing culinary traditions and explore changes occurring in recent years and reasons for these changes, with a focus on Germany and Berlin. The course will familiarize students with the history of Berlin through foods and traditions introduced through the years and their connection to historical events. Further, the course will promote the understanding of Berlin’s immigrant populations through the examination of the diverse range of food options available in the city. Food options will also be examined with regards to refugee populations to promote understanding of the situation of a range of different groups in the city.

A number of experiential learning activities will underline the students understanding of the city’s culinary traditions. These learning activities will include: 1) A tour of Berlin’s breweries to understand the city’s old brewing tradition and the more recent establishment of microbreweries, 2) a visit to the currywurst vendors in the city, as currywurst is known as the most popular street food in Berlin, and 3) a visit to the Kreuzberg district to examine the diverse food options available and reflect on the composition of Berlin’s immigrant community and the place of immigrants in German society. While the experiential activities have a limited focus given time constraints, course discussion will focus on a number of other foods and characteristics of the German diet.

In analyzing the culinary traditions of immigrants in Berlin, there will also be a discussion of the recent influx of refugees and the influence this may have on German society, traditions, and food. The activities planned will expose students to the diversity of food-related practices in Berlin, and course assignments will help them to connect these practices with the history of Germany and the changes that have occurred in the country’s composition and identity.

Course learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and analyze the complex interconnections between socio-cultural, environmental and psychological factors and eating habits and health.
  • Students will be able to explain how his/her food cultural biases can affect his/her ability to interact and understand individuals from another culture.
  • As a result of critically analyzing articles and text linking food and culture, students will be able to identify the historical events that shaped German food culture and describe the complexity of German food culture today.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

A Track - Creating a Solo Performance: Berlin Cabaret/Kabarett

This course is an acting course that introduces the student to the research, writing and performance techniques of cabaret performers.

Kabarett is the German word for “Cabaret” but has two different meanings. The first meaning is the same as in English; describing a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theater (often the word “Cabaret” is used in German for this as well to distinguish this form). The latter describes a kind of political satire. Unlike comedians who make fun of all kind of things, Kabarett artists (German: Kabarettisten) pride themselves as dedicated almost completely to political and social topics of more serious nature which they criticize using techniques like cynicism, sarcasm, and irony.

Peter Jelavich stated in his book “Berlin Cabaret (Studies in Cultural History)” that every Metropolis tends to generate an urban mythology and Berlin is no exception. One of the more enduring fables associated with the city is that it was a hotbed for Cabaret.

Students will be seeking to assay that tale by examining Cabaret in Europe and specifically in Berlin from 1901-1944 while creating their own solo performance based on research of sources as such diaries, letters, memoirs, and autobiographies that relate Berlin Kabarett. Subjects can be figures such as Gisela May, Trude Hestberg, Anita Berber, Claire Waldoff, Erwin Piscator, Hugo Ball, Blandine Ebinger, Kurt Weill and are of particular interest to the student.

While studying and analyzing the techniques of a wide variety of cabaret performers through its inception, students will explore aspects of writing monologues and implement those techniques with the ultimate goal of creating and performing their own material - a sense of truth- with the courage necessary to stand-alone on stage.

There will be field trips to notable Cabaret/Kabarett shows and venues in the city, which will inspire us visually. In addition to history-related readings assignments, the course will incorporate Lisa Appignanesi’s “The Cabaret” book for an overall understanding of the forms of artistic cabaret which were to emerge as a meeting place for artists where performance or improvisation takes place among peers, and cabaret as an intimate, small-scale, but intellectually ambitious review.

The class meets twice a week for three 90-minute segments each day.

The two segments of each class typically involve short lectures on historical and theatrical topics as well as seminar-style discussions of the assigned readings. Some class days devote time to in-depth acting exercises, analyzing the solo performance/cabaret vocabulary and technique. Some class days we will use the afternoon segment for film screenings, excursions to sites in the city or be working on your final presentation.

In addition to the regular class meetings and excursions, the Course Schedule includes a list of optionally recommended cabaret shows, plays, theatrical performances.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

View Syllabus   

B Track - History of European Art: Centers, Protagonists, and Cultural Identities

This course explores European art and architecture from the 15th to the 20th century with a particular focus on urban centers like Florence, Rome, Venice, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Paris, London, and Berlin. The aim is to analyze how the visual arts contributed through the centuries to shape local identities as well as European cultural traditions common to different countries.

The course will present iconic moments of the history of the arts in Europe by drawing a special attention to episodes of cultural exchanges and hybridization that arose from travelling artworks as well as from artists’ travels. From the role of artists like Raphael and Michelangelo in 16th-century papal Rome to the rise of genre painting in the Flanders and the Dutch Republic of the Golden Age, from the ‘painters of modern life’ in 19th-century Paris to the German Avant-garde of the 1920s, we will analyze the artworks and their authors in relation to the different historical contexts and the places of their creation. Recurrent will be the focus on the complex interplay between artists and patrons, between local traditions, individual creativity and the broader social, political and cultural contexts in which artworks and buildings were produced.

Students will gain understanding of the main art movements and relevant artists from the Renaissance to the postwar period as well as the basic concepts and terminology of art history. Visits to the outstanding collections of Berlin museums will allow the participants to study original artifacts and to learn how to look closely at works of art.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

View Syllabus   

B Track - Seduction and Terror: Hitler's Germany

The ‘thousand year Reich’ that Hitler promised when he became Chancellor of Germany in January 1933 lasted but 12 years. During this time, Hitler and his Nazi Party came to dominate Europe, terrorizing vast numbers of Germans, launching a devastating war, and orchestrating the murder of more than five million Jews. In spite of the terror and vast destruction, Hitler and the Nazi Party gained the active support and involvement of most Germans. How was this possible? What roles did seduction and terror play?

This class focuses on Hitler’s Germany and it begins with the 19th century background. Central to this session will be a discussion of the broad political currents, the agitators and petty demagogues who fueled the dissatisfaction and spread it widely. We will also examine the popular literature that Hitler and many of his supporters read and absorbed.

Crucial to understanding the lure of Hitler and the Nazi Party was Germany’s experience in the First World War, a conflict that decimated a generation and destroyed Europe, as it was known. It left in its wake a shattered, humiliated, and deeply torn Germany. In this climate of uncertainty and despair, Hitler and the Nazi Party grew from a small group on the fringe of radical politics in Munich to a national force. This development is of central importance to this session. Those traits of Hitler crucial to his success, particularly his charisma, will be defined and analyzed within the broader political context of Weimar political and cultural life.

In late January 1933, Hitler gained the long desired but elusive goal: he became chancellor of Germany, the leader of a coalition government. The political intrigues leading to his appointment will be discussed. Much attention will be paid in this session to how Hitler, his cabinet, and supporters were able to consolidate the control over the state and society within a matter of months. This came at the cost of political liberties, through the growing use of terror, oppression, and intimidation. Yet, Hitler gained supporters as he seemingly offered economic stability and a new unity to the German people. How did the regime solidify its control over society and political life?

A key element of Hitler’s rule was the concentration camp system, what came to be a vast network of prisons, centers of oppression and death. How this developed from the dozens of small concentration camps set up across Germany immediately following Hitler’s takeover of power in 1933 to the well-organized and highly centralized system in 1939 will be the focus of this session. During the war, the concentration camp system spread across Germany and occupied Europe.

Hitler’s ambitions, the conquest of ‘living space’ in Eastern Europe, the ruthless exploitation of these territories, and the annihilation of the Jews, motivated his foreign ambitions and led directly to World War II, the most destructive conflict in human history. We will also discuss the measures taken against the handicapped, homosexuals, Sinti and Roma.

In Germany and in occupied Europe opposition and resistance emerged and challenged Nazi rule. Opponents were motivated by a variety of reasons, some personal, some political. These too will be discussed.

Lastly, the class will examine the end of the war, the so-called ‘zero hour’, the destruction and collapse of Germany.

We will also be visiting local museums, historical sites and locations that reveal the operations of Nazi rule. These visits to sites in and near Berlin are a key element of the class and the experience of studying here.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

View Syllabus   

B Track - Law, Society and Politics in Comparative Perspective

This course explores theoretical and historical perspectives on the intersection of law, society and politics, and aims to foster discussion of contemporary issues among students from different cultures and disciplines. After an introduction to comparative law and legal culture, we read some classical social theorists (Durkheim, Weber, and Marx), and consider their relevance to contemporary debates about morality, (dis)obedience, and conflict. Next, we investigate the role and operation of law in totalitarian settings such as Nazi and Communist Germany, then consider the challenges that such legacies pose for democracy, the rule of law, and the economy in post-totalitarian societies. In this context, we examine the challenges posed by freedom of speech, the need for ‘transitional justice’, and the relationship between law and the market. Finally, we examine the role of law, lawyers, and courts in social change.

Overall, the course aims to develop skills at using theory and history to inform debates on contemporary challenges, such as multiculturalism, punishment, (illegal) downloading/streaming/file-sharing, ‘illiberal democracy’ and authoritarianism, economic development, and social movements. In addition to gaining substantive expertise in various socio- and politico-legal fields, students develop communicative competence through participatory exercises, and intercultural competence through discussion with other students.

Language of Instruction: German   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

View Syllabus   

B Track - Europe, Migration, Refugees

Regarding transnational migration, the European Union as a supranational community promotes a political reasoning between processes of consolidation and necessary conflict, between sovereignty and shared responsibility, between the right to define and delimit and the duty to negotiate. In ongoing economic crisis and facing unprecedented movements of people, the timeless normalcy of migration is often framed as crisis per se. Populist claims for cultural homogeneity and for closed borders undercut efforts for a common migration policy.

As the visibility of migration increases in various ways, migrants are often represented and imagined as a homogenous mass of ‘the other’. This leads to a problematic understanding of migration as something similar to a natural disaster that requires to be controlled and governed from a strategic top-down perspective. But the respective processes of negotiation on migration policy, within and across the outer borders of the Union, take place not only between the official institutions of nation-states, but on all scales of European populations. They also take place from a bottom-up perspective in the centres and at the margins of societies alike, where the single person contributes to the respective discourses as well: It is here, where either homogenizing images of threat are reproduced or sensible policies of individuality are practised.

Departing from diverse theories of migration (mainstream as well as critical perspectives), we will gain an overview of EU-level migration polity and recent migration- and border-management policies. We will analyse the conflicts, debates and discourses around the last years of increased immigration in Germany. Step by step we will get aware of the notion of identity politics, which can manifest in peaceful diversity, but is time and again prone to provoke social dynamics of disintegration. After analyzing the simplifying languages of exclusion in populist discourse, we will focus on the “legalization-market” of Almería/Spain, to learn about the imbrications of migration and economic calculations on one of the biggest “illegal labor markets” in the EU.

Scaling down perspective on the local level in the fieldtrips, we will engage with local authorities’ and politicians’ perspectives in Berlin. Diving deeper down we will start to change perspective: How do local activists develop and implement their own policies of welcoming migrants? What are the aims of and how do legal assessment organizations for migrants work? We will see, how refugees themselves perceive EU-migration policies and what they make themselves of their public positioning as a ‘problem’ or as a ‘burden’ to European Societies.

We will encounter migrants’ viewpoints, which reach beyond the usual framings of ‘the poor migrant’ as ‘passive victim’, as a threat or as the ‘(anti-)hero’ of globalization. We will encounter viewpoints on the EU, which will constructively criticize as well as graciously affirm the spirit of the Union. We will encounter viewpoints of hope.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

View Syllabus   

C Track - Intensive German Language - Beginner

This course is designed for the beginner student with no previous knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning. Within six weeks, this course will help students to develop basic competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as a basic knowledge of the German culture.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: A1  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9

C Track - Intensive German Language - Beginner

This course is designed for beginners with basic knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning. This course will help students to expand their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing within six weeks, deepen their knowledge of grammar as well as their knowledge of the German culture.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: A2  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9

C Track - Intensive German Language - Intermediate

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning. Within six weeks, this course will help students to expand their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as strengthen their knowledge of grammar while emphasizing self-correction. Students will also expand their knowledge of the German culture and analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: B1  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9

C Track - Intensive German Language - Intermediate Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

This course will help students to expand their competencies in speaking and writing within six weeks while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help them to increase their vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies.

In addition, students will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: B2  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9

C Track - Intensive German Language - Advanced

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

The course aims to deepen students’ competence in speaking and writing and to expand and refine their vocabulary usage so that they are able to express and discuss ideas, opinions, and information at the academic level. Special attention is given to the consistent use of self-correction. Furthermore, the course helps students to develop effective reading and listening strategies and deepen their knowledge of grammar structures.

In addition, students will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural background.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: C1  

Recommended US semester credits: 5   Contact Hours: 9

Highlights
  • Courses in English and German
  • Program designed for international students
  • FORUM on Education Abroad QUIP accreditation

API summer students studying at FUBiS may choose to live in a single-occupancy apartment, or with a local host family.

A monthly transit pass is included for all students.

The different tracks have different pricing structures.

  • Track 1 is an intensive German language track and is reflected in the pricing below.
  • On Track 2, students can choose to take a semi-intensive German course + 1 content course, OR 2 content courses. The Track 2 option incurs an additional $1,000 fee.
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
No upcoming sessions found
Summer May 23, 2019 - Jul 6, 2019 $7,600 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019