Germany Berlin 19269106 Small

Students who choose to study abroad in Berlin in the summer language and culture program may choose from a number of challenging courses including art history, German and regional studies, cinema, and more. Instruction is in German, and is generally geared toward intermediate and advanced level students, though there is an option course for high-beginning level students. Most courses spend one half to two-thirds of the time on language instruction and practice, while the remainder of time (generally afternoon lectures) will consist of cultural lectures, site visits, etc.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Transit Pass

Tutoring

Housing (two meals per day and laundry with host family)

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.75 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to high beginner and above level German speakers
  • Completed API Application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with supporting documents

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Berlin programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Berlin

    Summer students will receive their introduction to the capital city upon arrival, and will also experience the city through course activities and extracurricular events. Local field-trips comprise an integral component of many of the courses. These often include picnics, concerts, festivals, and/or outings to relevant areas of interest around Berlin.

  • Hamburg

    Hamburg is located on the Elbe River in northern Germany and it is the country’s largest port and commercial center with a population of over 1.7 million people. Top points of interest in Hamburg include the old warehouse district and harbor promenade, and its system of canals reminiscent of Amsterdam. The city is also known for its lakes, parks, and verdant suburbs full of gracious houses; elegant shopping arcades; richly endowed museums; and a vibrant cultural life.

    Hamburg’s historic label, ‘The gateway to the world’, might be a bold claim, but Germany’s second-largest city and its biggest port has never been shy. Hamburg has engaged in business with the world ever since it joined the Hanseatic League back in the Middle Ages. Its role as a center of international trade in the late 19th and early 20th centuries brought it great wealth (and Unesco World Heritage recognition in 2015), a legacy that continues today: it’s one of Germany’s wealthiest cities.

  • Leipzig

    Leipzig is the most populous city in the state of Saxony, Germany, and it is located about 160 kilometers (99 mi) southwest of Berlin. It has become known as one of the most trendy and up-and-coming cities in all of Germany – even rivaling Berlin! The historic central area of Leipzig features a renaissance style ensemble of buildings from the 16th century, including the old city hall in the marketplace. There are also several baroque period trading houses and former residences of rich merchants. The ‘it’ district, Plagwitz, is decked out in industrial chimneys and brick housing combined with rejuvenated, once derelict buildings.

  • Potsdam

    Potsdam is undoubtedly one of Germany’s most beautiful cities. Nestled in a charming cultural landscape dotted with palaces and historic gardens, which have been on the UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list since 1990, turn the capital of the Federal State of Brandenburg into a great travel destination, suiting all sorts of interests and demands.

    The Sanssouci palace was the summer residence of Frederick the Great. Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff built it above the terraced vineyard from 1745 to 1747 following the King’s ideas and sketches. The palace is considered the major work of Rococo architecture in Germany. Paintings by Watteau, Panini and Pesne are on exhibit in the picture gallery.

  • Berlin

    Summer students will receive their introduction to the capital city upon arrival, and will also experience the city through course activities and extracurricular events. Local field-trips comprise an integral component of many of the courses. These often include picnics, concerts, festivals, and/or outings to relevant areas of interest around Berlin.

  • Hamburg

    Hamburg is located on the Elbe River in northern Germany and it is the country’s largest port and commercial center with a population of over 1.7 million people. Top points of interest in Hamburg include the old warehouse district and harbor promenade, and its system of canals reminiscent of Amsterdam. The city is also known for its lakes, parks, and verdant suburbs full of gracious houses; elegant shopping arcades; richly endowed museums; and a vibrant cultural life.

    Hamburg’s historic label, ‘The gateway to the world’, might be a bold claim, but Germany’s second-largest city and its biggest port has never been shy. Hamburg has engaged in business with the world ever since it joined the Hanseatic League back in the Middle Ages. Its role as a center of international trade in the late 19th and early 20th centuries brought it great wealth (and Unesco World Heritage recognition in 2015), a legacy that continues today: it’s one of Germany’s wealthiest cities.

  • Leipzig

    Leipzig is the most populous city in the state of Saxony, Germany, and it is located about 160 kilometers (99 mi) southwest of Berlin. It has become known as one of the most trendy and up-and-coming cities in all of Germany – even rivaling Berlin! The historic central area of Leipzig features a renaissance style ensemble of buildings from the 16th century, including the old city hall in the marketplace. There are also several baroque period trading houses and former residences of rich merchants. The ‘it’ district, Plagwitz, is decked out in industrial chimneys and brick housing combined with rejuvenated, once derelict buildings.

  • Potsdam

    Potsdam is undoubtedly one of Germany’s most beautiful cities. Nestled in a charming cultural landscape dotted with palaces and historic gardens, which have been on the UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list since 1990, turn the capital of the Federal State of Brandenburg into a great travel destination, suiting all sorts of interests and demands.

    The Sanssouci palace was the summer residence of Frederick the Great. Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff built it above the terraced vineyard from 1745 to 1747 following the King’s ideas and sketches. The palace is considered the major work of Rococo architecture in Germany. Paintings by Watteau, Panini and Pesne are on exhibit in the picture gallery.

  • Dresden

    Dresden is the capital city of the state of Saxony. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe, near the Czech border. The Dresden conurbation is part of the Saxon Triangle metropolitan area with 2.4 million inhabitants.

    Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center.

    A controversial Allied aerial bombing towards the end of World War II killed 25,000 civilians and destroyed the entire city center. The impact of the bombing and 40 years of urban development during the East German communist era have considerably changed the face of the city.

    Some restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Opera and the Dresdner Frauenkirche. Since German reunification in 1990, Dresden has regained importance as one of the cultural, educational, political and economic centers of Germany and Europe.

  • Spreewald

    Settled by the Sorbs and Wends in the sixth century AD, the Spreewald region was a farming region with a problem. The area’s wetlands made agriculture difficult, so the farmers resolved the issue by digging channels (Fließen) to the Spree for irrigation and drainage.

    Lübbenau is a town of 17,897 in the Oberspreewald-Lausitz district of Brandenburg, about 82 km (51 mi) southeast of Berlin. It was first mentioned in a sales document in 1315 but is believed to be much older due to excavations below the castle that show settlement from the 8th or 9th century. From 1364 to 1635, Lübbenau was part of the Kingdom of Bohemia, and then until 1815 part of the Electorate of Saxony. From 1815 to 1918, Lübbenau was governed by the Kingdom of Prussia.

    Lübbenau offers a variety of sights: the marina with its traditional boats, or a castle which is set in a nicely arranged park, including an Orangerie with a cafe and a hotel. There are cycling routes to nearby villages, and boat rides are popular. The city wall’s history dates back to the Middle Ages and the museum next to the city gate offers insights into the architecture as well as the rich history of the region.

  • Berlin

    Summer students will receive their introduction to the capital city upon arrival, and will also experience the city through course activities and extracurricular events. Local field-trips comprise an integral component of many of the courses. These often include picnics, concerts, festivals, and/or outings to relevant areas of interest around Berlin.

  • Potsdam

    Potsdam is undoubtedly one of Germany’s most beautiful cities. Nestled in a charming cultural landscape dotted with palaces and historic gardens, which have been on the UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list since 1990, turn the capital of the Federal State of Brandenburg into a great travel destination, suiting all sorts of interests and demands.

    The Sanssouci palace was the summer residence of Frederick the Great. Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff built it above the terraced vineyard from 1745 to 1747 following the King’s ideas and sketches. The palace is considered the major work of Rococo architecture in Germany. Paintings by Watteau, Panini and Pesne are on exhibit in the picture gallery.

  • Dresden

    Dresden is the capital city of the state of Saxony. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe, near the Czech border. The Dresden conurbation is part of the Saxon Triangle metropolitan area with 2.4 million inhabitants.

    Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center.

    A controversial Allied aerial bombing towards the end of World War II killed 25,000 civilians and destroyed the entire city center. The impact of the bombing and 40 years of urban development during the East German communist era have considerably changed the face of the city.

    Some restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Opera and the Dresdner Frauenkirche. Since German reunification in 1990, Dresden has regained importance as one of the cultural, educational, political and economic centers of Germany and Europe.

  • Spreewald

    Settled by the Sorbs and Wends in the sixth century AD, the Spreewald region was a farming region with a problem. The area’s wetlands made agriculture difficult, so the farmers resolved the issue by digging channels (Fließen) to the Spree for irrigation and drainage.

    Lübbenau is a town of 17,897 in the Oberspreewald-Lausitz district of Brandenburg, about 82 km (51 mi) southeast of Berlin. It was first mentioned in a sales document in 1315 but is believed to be much older due to excavations below the castle that show settlement from the 8th or 9th century. From 1364 to 1635, Lübbenau was part of the Kingdom of Bohemia, and then until 1815 part of the Electorate of Saxony. From 1815 to 1918, Lübbenau was governed by the Kingdom of Prussia.

    Lübbenau offers a variety of sights: the marina with its traditional boats, or a castle which is set in a nicely arranged park, including an Orangerie with a cafe and a hotel. There are cycling routes to nearby villages, and boat rides are popular. The city wall’s history dates back to the Middle Ages and the museum next to the city gate offers insights into the architecture as well as the rich history of the region.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-4 credits per session (up to 8 total)

Students who choose to study abroad in Berlin in the summer language and culture program may choose from a number of challenging courses including art history, German and regional studies, cinema, and more. Instruction is in German and is generally geared toward intermediate and advanced level students, though there is an optional course for high-beginning level students. Most courses spend one half to two-thirds of the time on language instruction and practice, while the remainder of time (generally afternoon lectures) will consist of cultural lectures, site visits, etc.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive their transcript from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

  • Bfkuojytrbnre8Tz1Xhh

    Christopher Pepin

    Christopher Pepin will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

  • Claudio

    Claudio Schoeneberger

    Claudio will be your Resident Coordinator in Berlin and a resource for you while you are with us in Germany!

  • 20190822 105419

    Gabi Perches

    Gabi Perches will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - gabriela.perches@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

In each course, students participate in approximately 80 hours of language instruction and review (in the mornings), followed by 20 hours of specialized cultural instruction and visits (over the course of the afternoons).

Courses with German credit equivalencies listed below (consult with your school on transfer credit policies).

Students select one of the modules below (please note that certain courses are only taught in summer 1 or summer 2).

Students may also choose to take a language course during the summer 1 session, and continue that language course or advance in the second session, OR take a culturally-focused course during the second session.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin operates on the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). In addition to the ECTS credits listed, Humboldt also provides the number of contact hours on the transcript. It is generally accepted that in order to convert from ECTS to U.S. credits, one should divide the ECTS total by 2. Operating on this assumption, we recommend 3-4 U.S. credits per course at Humboldt. However, given that both units of measurement are provided by Humboldt, we leave it up to the home university’s discretion as to which one they choose to use.

Summer in Berlin – International Language Course (Level A1.2)

Get to know Berlin, its art, culture, and people directly on the streets of Berlin and see what makes Berlin so special. In communicative situations, students move through the city and practice their German at the same time. On the street, students discover Berlin's alternative and creative side through graffiti and street performances.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Summer in Berlin - International Language Course (Level A2)

During comprehensive German classes, students will improve their language skills and expand their vocabulary quickly. The lessons include interactive sessions about Berlin and its culture and once a week an excursion will be offered (Berlin Wall memorial, museum, cinema).

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Summer in Berlin - International Language Course (Level B1)

In this course, the class will plunge into the turbulent past of the city of Berlin, learning how migration has had a lasting effect on the development of the German capital and experiencing the diverse cultural influences first hand through excursions in the Berlin neighborhoods.The class will visit true-to-life locations and hear stories from Berliners in order to get an idea of the changes in daily life and the peculiarities of the city.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

NANU, die Deutschen! – International Language Course (Level C1-C2)

This module is designed for participants who are interested in a supplementary German Cultural Studies program along with the morning language course. The afternoon program consists of lectures focusing on recent history and society and guided tours in Berlin. This program intends to highlight the relationship between German language and culture. Through this combination of culture and leisure program participants have the opportunity to apply cultural and societal theory, as well as test their German skills in everyday life situations.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Zoom On Berlin – International Language Course (Level B2)

["What makes Berlin so unique, fascinating, and attracts bohemians, students and many others from all over the world? In \u201cZoom on Berlin\u201d, the class tries to look at selected aspects of this phenomenon very closely. Through the many excursions and introductory seminars, the class will experience Berlin exactly where life happens","exploring places that wrote and are still writing history, visiting popular concerts and world-famous theaters, taking part in interesting studio and museum tours and experiencing Berlin through individual excursions, all while obtaining the necessary background knowledge to discover the city."]

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

German Culture and Area Studies (Level B1-B2)

This course provides lectures and seminars with different perspectives on German culture, everyday life, and history. At first, students will have the opportunity to get familiar with the city of Berlin and its inhabitants on the basis of district stories. Furthermore, the class will explore Germany’s recent history. Besides discovering the historical background of the construction of the Berlin wall, students will get an insight the everyday life in the GDR. In the third part of the course, students will trace Jewish life in Germany by looking at both the history of Judaism in Germany and the life of young Jews in Berlin. Finally, the class will focus on film as a medium to transport feelings, knowledge, and culture. Students will get an insight into the current German film scene and work on various film formats such as feature films, short films, and advertising films, as well as music videos. During excursions to historical sights and museum visits, the class will experience the vivid culture, everyday, life and history of Germany and its capital.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

Summer in Berlin – International Language Course (Level A1.2)

Get to know Berlin, its art, culture, and people directly on the streets of Berlin and see what makes Berlin so special. In communicative situations, students move through the city and practice their German at the same time. On the street, students discover Berlin's alternative and creative side through graffiti and street performances.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

NANU, die Deutschen! – International Language Course (Level C1-C2)

This module is designed for participants who are interested in a supplementary German Cultural Studies program along with the morning language course. The afternoon program consists of lectures focusing on recent history and society and guided tours in Berlin. This program intends to highlight the relationship between German language and culture. Through this combination of culture and leisure program participants have the opportunity to apply cultural and societal theory, as well as test their German skills in everyday life situations.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Zoom On Berlin – International Language Course (Level B2)

["What makes Berlin so unique, fascinating, and attracts bohemians, students and many others from all over the world? In \u201cZoom on Berlin\u201d, the class tries to look at selected aspects of this phenomenon very closely. Through the many excursions and introductory seminars, the class will experience Berlin exactly where life happens","exploring places that wrote and are still writing history, visiting popular concerts and world-famous theaters, taking part in interesting studio and museum tours and experiencing Berlin through individual excursions, all while obtaining the necessary background knowledge to discover the city."]

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

German Culture and Area Studies (Level B1-B2)

This course provides lectures and seminars with different perspectives on German culture, everyday life, and history. At first, students will have the opportunity to get familiar with the city of Berlin and its inhabitants on the basis of district stories. Furthermore, the class will explore Germany’s recent history. Besides discovering the historical background of the construction of the Berlin wall, students will get an insight the everyday life in the GDR. In the third part of the course, students will trace Jewish life in Germany by looking at both the history of Judaism in Germany and the life of young Jews in Berlin. Finally, the class will focus on film as a medium to transport feelings, knowledge, and culture. Students will get an insight into the current German film scene and work on various film formats such as feature films, short films, and advertising films, as well as music videos. During excursions to historical sights and museum visits, the class will experience the vivid culture, everyday, life and history of Germany and its capital.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

Summer in Berlin - International Language Course (Level A2)

During comprehensive German classes, students will improve their language skills and expand their vocabulary quickly. The lessons include interactive sessions about Berlin and its culture and once a week an excursion will be offered (Berlin Wall memorial, museum, cinema).

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Summer in Berlin - International Language Course (Level B1)

In this course, the class will plunge into the turbulent past of the city of Berlin, learning how migration has had a lasting effect on the development of the German capital and experiencing the diverse cultural influences first hand through excursions in the Berlin neighborhoods.The class will visit true-to-life locations and hear stories from Berliners in order to get an idea of the changes in daily life and the peculiarities of the city.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Summer in Berlin - International Language Course (Level C1)

This course is an invitation to explore Berlin as a “creative city” for advanced learners of German. Through seminars and excursions, students will familiarize themselves with Berlin as a center of cultural and artistic creativity.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

NANU, die Deutschen! – International Language Course (focus on literature) (Level C1-C2)

The course is an invitation to time travel through Germany’s cultural history as advanced learners. Through seminars and excursions, you will experience something as personal as it is exciting, traveling through stages of German history. Reflect on Germany’s cultural history through the mirror of selected literature, music, and films: From Goethe about Leni Riefenstahl, from Christa Wolf to Samy Deluxe. Nanu, die Deutschen!

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

AHA! Berlin – Perspectives (Level B1)

["Come and join our artistic journey in Berlin! The aim of this course is to inspire student interest and let students express themselves artistically in public spaces and an atelier in central Berlin. The course will explore the \u201catmosphere\u201d and specific character of the city and pose many questions, such as: Does Berlin have its individual, typical forms, colors, faces, signs, sounds \u2026?\n\nEach student\u2019s work will be supported and accompanied by the artist and teacher Joachim Seifert and his team of young artists and students. Students will choose their medium, techniques and topic. The expression is completely up to each student","but remember \u2013 as the old saying goes: \u201cIt is the journey that counts, not the destination.\u201d"]

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

Germany in Moving Pictures (Level B2-C1)

Germany in moving pictures – discover Germany’s recent history in film and video: the Roaring Twenties, the years after the Second World War, the Wall, its fall, and the influence of this historical event up to the present day. How did Germany, Berlin, and its people change? What are the differences between north and south, east and west? Experience moving pictures of Germany and its capital Berlin in order to create a script of your own German short film.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

Summer in Berlin – International Language Course (Level A1.2)

Get to know Berlin, its art, culture, and people directly on the streets of Berlin and see what makes Berlin so special. In communicative situations, students move through the city and practice their German at the same time. On the street, students discover Berlin's alternative and creative side through graffiti and street performances.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

NANU, die Deutschen! – International Language Course (focus on literature) (Level C1-C2)

The course is an invitation to time travel through Germany’s cultural history as advanced learners. Through seminars and excursions, you will experience something as personal as it is exciting, traveling through stages of German history. Reflect on Germany’s cultural history through the mirror of selected literature, music, and films: From Goethe about Leni Riefenstahl, from Christa Wolf to Samy Deluxe. Nanu, die Deutschen!

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Zoom On Berlin – International Language Course (Level B2)

["What makes Berlin so unique, fascinating, and attracts bohemians, students and many others from all over the world? In \u201cZoom on Berlin\u201d, the class tries to look at selected aspects of this phenomenon very closely. Through the many excursions and introductory seminars, the class will experience Berlin exactly where life happens","exploring places that wrote and are still writing history, visiting popular concerts and world-famous theaters, taking part in interesting studio and museum tours and experiencing Berlin through individual excursions, all while obtaining the necessary background knowledge to discover the city."]

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

AHA! Berlin – Perspectives (Level B1)

["Come and join our artistic journey in Berlin! The aim of this course is to inspire student interest and let students express themselves artistically in public spaces and an atelier in central Berlin. The course will explore the \u201catmosphere\u201d and specific character of the city and pose many questions, such as: Does Berlin have its individual, typical forms, colors, faces, signs, sounds \u2026?\n\nEach student\u2019s work will be supported and accompanied by the artist and teacher Joachim Seifert and his team of young artists and students. Students will choose their medium, techniques and topic. The expression is completely up to each student","but remember \u2013 as the old saying goes: \u201cIt is the journey that counts, not the destination.\u201d"]

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

Germany in Moving Pictures (Level B2-C1)

Germany in moving pictures – discover Germany’s recent history in film and video: the Roaring Twenties, the years after the Second World War, the Wall, its fall, and the influence of this historical event up to the present day. How did Germany, Berlin, and its people change? What are the differences between north and south, east and west? Experience moving pictures of Germany and its capital Berlin in order to create a script of your own German short film.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

German Culture and Area Studies (Level B1-B2)

This course provides lectures and seminars with different perspectives on German culture, everyday life, and history. At first, students will have the opportunity to get familiar with the city of Berlin and its inhabitants on the basis of district stories. Furthermore, the class will explore Germany’s recent history. Besides discovering the historical background of the construction of the Berlin wall, students will get an insight the everyday life in the GDR. In the third part of the course, students will trace Jewish life in Germany by looking at both the history of Judaism in Germany and the life of young Jews in Berlin. Finally, the class will focus on film as a medium to transport feelings, knowledge, and culture. Students will get an insight into the current German film scene and work on various film formats such as feature films, short films, and advertising films, as well as music videos. During excursions to historical sights and museum visits, the class will experience the vivid culture, everyday, life and history of Germany and its capital.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

Summer in Berlin - International Language Course (Level A2)

During comprehensive German classes, students will improve their language skills and expand their vocabulary quickly. The lessons include interactive sessions about Berlin and its culture and once a week an excursion will be offered (Berlin Wall memorial, museum, cinema).

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Beginner   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Summer in Berlin - International Language Course (Level C1)

This course is an invitation to explore Berlin as a “creative city” for advanced learners of German. Through seminars and excursions, students will familiarize themselves with Berlin as a center of cultural and artistic creativity.

Language of Instruction: German    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 7 Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Highlights
  • Courses in German

API summer students studying at Humboldt may live in apartments or with host families, generally 20-40 minute commute from school via public transportation.

A monthly transit pass is included for all students.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 Jun, 2020 - Jul, 2020 $5,380 Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 1 and 2 Combined Jun, 2020 - Aug, 2020 $9,780 Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 2 Jul, 2020 - Aug, 2020 $5,380 Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 1 Jun 15, 2019 - Jul 13, 2019 $5,280 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined Jun 15, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $9,480 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019
Summer 2 Jul 13, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $5,280 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019