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Hungary Budapest Bridge 129730877

API students who choose to study abroad in Budapest complete their classes within the International Study Programs (ISP) department of the Corvinus University of Budapest.

Students can specialize in international business courses such as marketing, finance, and economics, or choose from a variety of humanities courses such as law, political science, psychology, and more. All courses, with the exception of Hungarian, are offered in English.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing 

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Transit Pass

Tutoring

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and API Ambassador Program

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Students must be currently enrolled in a U.S. or foreign university
  • Open to freshmen (2nd semester), sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Hungarian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Resume/C.V.
  • Copy of passport
  • Additional supplemental materials
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with supporting documents (more information provided post-acceptance)
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring Jan 31, 2021 - May 22, 2021 $12,480 Oct 20, 2020 Nov 15, 2020

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Budapest programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Pécs

    The monuments in Pécs reveal a long history of Roman, Ottoman and Habsburg influence. Remnants of the 1543-1686 Turkish occupation are found in the two former mosques and Ottoman architecture. The 11th-century cathedral and ruins of a 4th-century Roman cemetery illustrate the rich history here.

  • Szentendre

    This 12th-century baroque town has inspired artists for centuries. In 1690, when the Turks invaded Belgrade, more than 6,000 Serbian residents fled to Szentendre and settled there. This gave it a unique Balkan feel with its cobblestone roads and red-tiled roofs. Today, the town is famous for its many museums, including the open-air museum showing Hungarians’ way of life in centuries past.

  • Gödöllő

    Gödöllő is a town situated in Pest county, 30 km Northeast of Budapest. Gödöllő lies in a clean, green and panoramic area surrounded by forests.

    Students on this excursion will explore:

    - The legend of Sissi, Queen Elisabeth of the Hungarians, whose charm has prevailed for 150 years – we will visit the Habsburg palace of Gödöllő

    - A bunker from World War II on the Palace grounds

    - The Tree of Life, the World Peace Gong

    - A pilgrimage site for visitors seeking a personal spiritual refuge at the Statue of the Virgin Mary in Máriabesnyő.

  • Krakow

    Poland’s former capital has always been famous for its beauty, charm, and culture. Structurally, Krakow survived WWII virtually untouched with elegant squares, charming castles, a historic Jewish district, and museums. Southwest of Krakow is Oswiecim (Auschwitz). From 1940 until 1945, more than 1.5 million people lost their lives in this Nazi concentration camp. Students will tour the camp and learn about this tragic episode in world history.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-15 credits per semester

API students who choose to study abroad in Budapest complete their classes within the International Study Programs (ISP) department of the Corvinus University of Budapest.

Students can specialize in international business courses such as marketing, finance, and economics, or choose from a variety of humanities courses such as law, political science, psychology, and more. All courses, with the exception of Hungarian, are offered in English.

All students who have not previously studied Hungarian are required to take a Hungarian language course. Students are automatically placed into a beginning level class. Students who have previously studied Hungarian should contact the API office. Language courses are taught in Hungarian and are worth 3 semester credits; all other courses are taught in English and are worth 1.5 to 3 semester credits. The courses are designed for American and other international students. Students who wish to take more than 15 semester credits may do so for an additional fee.

TANDEM PARTNERS PROGRAM AND THE “AMERICAN CORNER”

API students in Budapest have the exciting opportunity to participate in the Tandem Partners Program. Corvinus University’s Tandem Partners Program facilitates intercultural exchange by matching full-time Hungarian students with recently arrived study abroad students. It is a program with mutual benefits! The local Hungarian students are eager to share the Budapest they know so well with their API Tandem Partner, and the API students are encouraged to integrate with local students and learn more about Hungarian life, both inside and out of the university setting.

With help from the U.S. Embassy, Corvinus University has also established an “American Corner” – a center on campus where students can go for academic support, study/computer areas, and American-style entertainment.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

API students interested in assisting in English language classrooms at a local high school can submit a resume and motivation letter to their API Program Coordinator during the post-acceptance process. Participants who volunteer in at least 20 classes (45 minutes each) will receive a certificate of participation. Volunteer hours will take place during the normal school day, between 8am-4:30 pm.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students will receive a transcript from the Corvinus University of Budapest upon completion of their program.

  • Gitta Budapest RD

    Gitta Pestalits

    Gitta will be your Resident Director in Budapest and a resource for you while you are in Hungary!

  • Rebecca Cott Head Shot

    Rebecca Cott

    Rebecca Cott will be your Program Manager and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - rebecca.cott@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

THE COURSE NUMBERS CORRESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING LEVELS:

  • 100-299 BEGINNING FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES
  • 300-399 INTERMEDIATE SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS
  • 400-499 SPECIALIZED JUNIORS AND SENIORS
  • 500-699 ADVANCED SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS
  • 700-799 ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

The course numbering system is intended to help students select courses that are appropriate for their level of experience. Students may take courses at a level or two above or below their current classification. If a student and their advisor feel that the student meets the requirements for a particular class, the student is encouraged to apply. With proper background, students may also mix and match lower- and upper-level or graduate-level coursework. The sooner students apply, the better the chance at enrolling in their preferred classes.

Corvinus is now offering an intensive course option in which students can sign up to take one 3-credit (6 ECTS) course within a one-week intensive period in the middle of the semester. This option will be available to you during course registration later in the post-acceptance process. The intensive course will count towards the 12-15 credits you are required to take. NOTE: The course selection is subject to change and enrollment in specific courses can only be guaranteed upon formal registration at the university. Some courses may require a minimum enrollment, and not all courses are offered each semester. Some courses may have prerequisites. In these cases, equivalent coursework and/or experience may be considered. API recommends that students obtain pre-approval for all of their course selections and alternates prior to departure.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Corvinus University of Budapest summer program operates on the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), wherein the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. credits, divide the ECTS hours available by 2.

HUNGARIAN LANGUAGE COURSES

The Hungarian for Beginners course is required for all students who have not previously studied Hungarian. Students may then choose three or four of the spring or fall courses listed on the following pages. A sixth course may be added for an extra fee.

Hungarian for Beginners

This course is offered for students who want to acquire a basic command of the Hungarian language which would help them to obtain simple information and to express their requests and/or messages in a simple form. The course is also recommended for students who need only so-called "survival Hungarian".

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Hungarian for Intermediate Students

This course is offered for students who have a basic mastery of the Hungarian language and are at the intermediate level. The course is typically offered for 1.5 credits, but can be offered for 3 on a case-by-case basis.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 1.5   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Film and History

Three historical patterns, three regions have developed in Europe. Comparing the different development of the regions, this course reveals the distinctiveness of Central European history from both Eastern and Western patterns. By the outbreak of the First World War and the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, East-Central-Europe became the region of a number of small states. Have they been destined to become the satellites of the Great Powers? How did the region become the hotbed of such ideologies and dictatorships as fascism and bolshevism? What options were open to the nations of the region and especially to Hungarian society? These and other issues are highlighted through the examination of the main conflicts of the 20th century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Introduction to Legal Studies

The course deals with the legal system as the set of principles and standards of conduct, as Well as the law as a ruling system governing the society and having general application for it. Main topics of the course are the basic problems of legal reasoning as the characteristics of Law. During the course we will examine the law as a system of norms, accompanied by state sanctions, the process of lawmaking, the legal sources, legal norms, legal relationships, the court system, the institutional court, the hierarchy of norms, the role of the constitution. The Contract Law part includes explication of the offer and the acceptance", "the consideration", "the parties to the Contract and the major contractual rights and obligations. The Corporation Law part covers the business organization types, formation and management questions. Labour Law issues shall be dealt with in the course for all management issues. This will include: employment contract and management liability.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Debate (Model United Nations)

The objective of this course is to teach students the tenants of formal debate in a government setting, in such forums as the United Nations, African Union, Arab League, North Atlantic Treaty Organization or European Union. Students will become familiar with world events, and more importantly, will be able to argue about them from points of view that are not their own with regards to each issue.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Relations: 1945 to Present

This course gives a broad overview of international relations since 1945 with a regional focus on Europe. It traces the major political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved from the end of World War II to the present day. The first three sessions of the course will give an overview of international history in the twentieth century. Moving on, roughly two thirds of the course will be dedicated to case studies, partly based on student presentations. We will start with the concepts of international order and of the nation-state. In terms of world politics we will deal with the emergence of the two superpowers post 1945, the Cold War, and its end.

We will then deal with three cases in more detail: 1 former Yugoslavia, 2 contemporary Russia and the post-Soviet space, and 3 the Arab-Israeli conflict and the contemporary Middle East. All three cases are exemplary on the way how international politics is conducted in the 21st century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

European Union Politics

This course gives a broad overview of European integration since 1945. We will cover the history and theories of integration, major institutions, policy areas, and issues of debate. The historic part will place European integration into the global context of superpower domination and Europe searching for a new role since 1990. The part covering theories of integration confronts us with concepts and visions for Europe. They span from the concept of a “Europe of fatherlands” (Charles de Gaulle) to a full-fledged federal vision of a “United States of Europe” (Jean Monnet).

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

PSY 311 Personality Types and Team Dynamics

This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to group dynamics and teamwork in the organizational context. Course content draws from a large body of group dynamics research in psychology, applied social science, and management. The modern professional team environment emphasizes the value of diversity and the strengths of its members. More than ever, today’s leaders must gain insight into individual differences in order to maximize talents, reframe potential sources of misunderstanding, and facilitate collaboration. This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to processes and issues that teams face: team development, social dilemma, communication, conflict, power, decision-making, leadership, problem solving, creativity, diversity, virtual teamwork, culture, reward systems, and training. This course emphasizes self-discovery and is highly interactive. In addition to providing academic content, the aim of this course is to facilitate student's self-awareness and self-reflexivity. Students will be equipped as practitioners of Psychological Type Theory, one of the most widely used frameworks for personality assessment and team development in the business world today. Students synthesize course content in a final service-learning group project involving a professional team interview, content-based team analysis and submission of a team development plan.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Business Enterprise: Start-Ups

The course gives a practice oriented, case-based introduction to the conditions as well as the means of venture creation and operation of startups. Students will learn how to avoid mistakes and pitfalls as well as how to take advantage of the largest benefit of a small and agile organization: the gift of flexibility, autonomous decision making and bias for action. The main goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to discover, select, process, interpret and use the necessary data to take decisions in an uncertain world and, then, to exploit market opportunities. The class is designed to provide students with the tools, methods and approaches - all through practical cases - which startups need to master in order to start and manage a successful new business venture. By the end of the course students will be able to identify opportunities, conduct customer development, develop business models and value proposition and test their hypothesis in a matter of hours/days. As a part of the class students are required to form teams and come up with ideas for their startup.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

SME Marketing

Students will be expected to study and understand marketing theory and practice, and more importantly learn how to apply their marketing knowledge and skills to real life problem solving situations by creating marketing action plans for SME organisations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Business Policy and Strategy

Strategic management can be defined as the art and science of formulating, implementing, and evaluating cross-functional decisions that enable an organization to achieve its objectives. As this definition implies, strategic management focuses on integrating management, marketing, finance/accounting, production/operations, research and development, and computer information systems to achieve organizational success.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Business Case Studies

The International Business course is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity required to work within a global environment. The course addresses issues in the strategy, organization marketing, and management of companies operating in the global market. In addition, the course will integrate the sciences of geography and history along with individual country flags and on-going current events.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Business Ethics

This course explores the ethical challenges facing business today, and how individuals and firms can address those challenges. The course aims to enhance the skills and expertise of participants in through combining examination of ethical and managerial theory with discussion of common ethical problems in context. It aims also to sensitize students with ethical aspects of business decisions. The theory and the practice of business ethics will be discussed during the course. Course material includes individual moral theory, the development of ethical organizational culture, the development of ethical management systems designed to respond to ethical challenges, and wide-ranging discussion regarding major trends, challenges, and opportunities in the field of ethical business.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Strategic Management

Weighing the ins and outs of crafting, implementing, and executing company strategies forces a total enterprise perspective, demands that many internal and external situational considerations be dealt with at once, and calls for judgments about how all the relevant factors add up. This trait is what makes strategic management an integrative course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success.

Throughout the course, the spotlight will be trained on the foremost issue in running a business enterprise: “What must managers do, and do well, to make the company a winner in the game of business?” The answer that emerges, and which becomes the theme of the course, is that good strategy-making and good strategy execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good management. The mission of the course is to explore why good strategic management leads to good business performance, to present the basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis, and to drill you in the methods of crafting a well-conceived strategy and executing it competently. Videos and case studies in order to develop students’ capacity to think strategically about a company, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the caliber of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining sustainable competitive advantage.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Macroeconomics

The course gives a practice oriented and systematic introduction to economy and economics in a macroscale. It is based on the professor’s practical experience in business management, investment, in running of own business, supporting young entrepreneurs and SMEs and in participation in the variety of the EU projects. The professor will also use her theoretical knowledge gained during doctoral studies completed in economics in the area of management.

Consequently, the main goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to discover, select, process, interpret and use the necessary data to be able to take economic decisions in an uncertain world and,then, to exploit market opportunities.

Since the main factors affecting economic skills and abilities are:

1. Personal characteristics such as alertness, hard-working attitude, ability to connect facts, creativity, teamwork and respect to others,

2. Knowledge acquired through the formal education and by means of on-the-job experience and learning-by-doing, the class is designed to provide future business & administration practitioners with the tools they need to master the most important issues involved in starting a professional carrier.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Globalization (Economic Theory)

Economy and Social Interaction among the various persons in our interconnected society. That activity and exchange necessarily take place among and between persons, and therefore have an ethical dimension. But the complexity of Politics, Economy and Social Interaction in the global agenda environment, as well as the rapid changes in different settings and practices caused by global changes. Technological and cultural changes often make it very difficult for us to perceive ethical issues in Cultural Globalization and to know how to deal with them.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Economics and the European Union

The course will commence with a historical overview of the initial post-war stages of formation, along with the reasons for arriving at a decision to link states in a common economic policy setting. From there, students will examine the theory and practice of economic integration, followed by monetary integration and monetary union.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Transition and Post-Transition Challenges in Hungary

The course is built around three sub-subjects, all related to the concept of change. One is socio-economic transformation or ‘regime change’ of Central and Eastern Europe. The second, and main, part deals with Hungary, in particular. This part covers a wide range of economic issues such as privatization, structural changes, fiscal and monetary regimes as well as topics related to geopolitical issues. The third part investigates recent developments and the particular challenges that Hungary faces within the Western alliance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Basic Finance

This course provides students with an intuitive and conceptual understanding

of finance. It aims to introduce students to the logic that drives finance so that

they will appreciate the interrelationships of interest rates, risk and return, and

their influence on corporate financial decisions. Utilising the theory and

analytical tools presented in the course, students should thus be able to

understand and evaluate events in the financial world.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Corporate Finance I

The aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and techniques of Corporate Finance and applying them to the main decisions faced by the financial manager. The concepts are immediately applicable to all firms, both large or small, privately run or publicly traded and involved in any industry – whether manufacturing, retail or service.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Corporate Finance II

This course is structured as a sequel to FIN 351 Corporate Finance I where students will gain greater ground in their understanding of corporate finance. Students will be introduced to the principles of Capital Structure, Dividend Policy and Working Capital management, Ratio\nAnalysis and Leasing understand the real world considerations that financial managers face.Students will be introduced to the other cornerstone of Corporate Financial decision-making:\nCapital Structure and the proportions of debt and equity financing that companies should adopt.\nWe will begin our study with the famous theoretical propositions of Modigliani and Miller and analyze its applications to real world scenarios. The course will dwell in much detail to the discussion of how companies evaluate between the choices of internal and external financing","how they plan and manage working capital and short term financing","the basis of share repurchase and dividend policies, ratio analysis and benchmarking, as well as identification of relevant cash flows in the lease decisions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Investment Analysis

This course takes the viewpoint of you, as an investor, faced with a plethora of investment choices from which you decide your own investment portfolio. The course is divided into 3 sections: the first section will examine the system of financial markets and instruments traded in these markets. The next section will detail the methods and tools of investment analysis used by financial analysts as well as introduce the techniques of portfolio selection and management, which are critical in determining the overall investment performance of your portfolio. Our final section will harness the collective knowledge from the earlier 2 sections and relate the concepts to that of personal finance and wealth management, and investment philosophies and beliefs.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Intelligent Systems

Intelligent systems course provides a comprehensive, up-to-date guide to today 2019s revolutionary management support system technologies, and it demonstrates how they can be used for better decision making. The course takes the perspective of a general manager rather than a computer programmer, systems analyst or a computer scientist. The most important management support systems, such as data warehousing, business analytics, data mining, business performance management systems, knowledge management technologies and artificial intelligence methods are discussed and demonstrated. The course has three major objectives:

- to highlight the theoretical background of the intelligent systems

- to demonstrate students the tools necessary for understanding the features of intelligent systems

- to offer practical experiences about the application of different intelligent systems.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Management Information Systems

The Management Information Systems course provides a good understanding of the role of information technology in the modern organization. It covers more or less all areas where a manager can come across with information systems. The objective of this course is not to create CIOs, it is rather to enable students to understand opportunities and threats that are coming along with IT. They have to sharpen their knowledge about new technologies, get open minded for changes, and discover the effects of changes on organizations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Management

The purpose of the course is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of management, including basic concepts and terminology. Business firms around the world are experimenting with new organizational designs, changing their routines and processes as they seek to improve their current performance and their growth prospects. In the process they change the scope of their business operations, redraw their organization charts, redefine the allocation of decision-making authority and responsibility, and reconsider which activities to conduct in-house and which to outsource.

The course introduces students with powerful conceptual frameworks for analyzing the interrelations between organizational design features, competitive strategy and the business environment. Students will spend a significant portion of their time diagnosing the fit and misfits between various elements on the basis of open system theory. Specifically, it is the intent of this course to blend theory with practice, requiring students to observe the business environment, and actively applying concepts to the “real world”. The course draws on numerous examples of contemporary organizations through the use of case studies and role plays.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Environmental Management

To start, topics of sustainability, and instruments of environmental policy will be explained. We indicate how environmental policy is needed to correct market distortions caused by externalities, and corporate profitability and long-term survival is also influenced by this policy.

Environmental strategies can support business strategy and competitiveness provided they are properly chosen. We analyze the environmental strategy options of firms and selection of environmental tools that exist in the corporate toolbox, together with the circumstances that influence the correct choice among strategies and tools. The greenest is not necessarily the best for all kinds of companies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Tourism Management and Marketing

This course will focus on the management of different types of tourism in a range of environment throughout the world. The development of tourism industry and the issues with tourism management have been growing at an unprecedented rate over the past decade. The industry’s sustainable and ethical management is essential, especially in the light of climate change, economic recessions and political disturbance. Different typologies of tourism will be discussed including cultural tourism, ecotourism and health tourism. The course will also provide an overview of the way in which tourism is managed in various regions and destinations of the world. This will involve the evaluation of new management and modern marketing tools being used in the industry.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Human Resource Management

Students will be provided with the technical background needed to be a knowledgeable consumer of human resource products and services, to manage HR effectively, or to be a successful HR professional. Course will emphasize how managers can more effectively acquire, develop, compensate, and manage the internal and external environment that relates to the management of human resources. Much attention will be given to the strategic use of HR Management and its evolvement across borders and cultures.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Management Skills

The course will consist of lectures and seminars every week. Students will learn the basic concepts from lectures and the compulsory reading, then analyze and use the skills in cases and critically evaluate them in form of group discussions. The sequence of topics is built step by step from the self (please see the schedule) to managing groups, and so are the assignments.

The course aims at developing the student on three levels: knowledge, attitude and skill. The classes will include parts where readings are discussed and presentations given about recent findings about a skill with the aim of enriching students' knowledge. By analyzing cases and showing the enhanced performance and better results, an attitude towards conscious use of skills will be developed. On the knowledge gained, and the positive attitude developed, the skill level will be built by practicing in class and outside of it.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Global Business Stategy

The aim of the course is to provide a basis for international strategy analyses and formulation in global context. The most relevant concepts and topics will be discussed and illustrated by case studies. Some of them are the following: international strategy, reasons for foreign market entry and its main modes, multinational and global industries, configurations of multinational enterprises (MNEs), selection of host country, subsidiaries and their roles in MNEs, across border governance and ethical challenges and dilemmas.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Organization Behavior and Design

In order to create good working climates and successful organizations companies need to have a clear purpose of existence together with outstanding leadership fitting their complex societal, economic and technological environments. During this course we will expand our knowledge about the hard aspects of management and organisation, strategy, structure and organisational design and investigate in detail the soft aspects of organisational and work life, most importantly personality, character development, motivation, teams, learning, culture and leadership.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Human Resource Management

This course is an introductory course to graduate students, who plan to work in a multinational environment in the future. The purpose of the course is to learn international aspects of the main functions of HRM and the place and role of the HR function within organizations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Marketing

The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization 2019s resources to satisfy customers 2019 wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. We will examine how marketers: understand consumers 2019 needs and wants, develop products and services that provide superior value, and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Services Marketing

The service sector of the world economy is huge and still growing, the complexity and diversity of services have been increasing over the past 50 years. All of the developed economies now have large service sectors and many service firms operate internationally. The course will highlight the fundamental differences between goods and services focusing on the managerial implications. An overview will be provided on service operations including service-related issues on innovation, communication, pricing, managing demand and managing people.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Advertising Management

This is an advertising management, especially practice-oriented course.

The overall aim is to create a deep understanding of marketing communication

planning and evaluation in general and to make participants of the course able

to efficiently translate local specialties into international communication

programs with respect to cultural differences

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Decision Techniques

Problem structuring, modeling, decision making and its techniques will be considered, with specific emphasis on their practical aspects. The course will explore the rational, emotional and group dynamic background of decisions and examine how decision theory, originally developed as a theory for individual decision making, can be applied to organizational decision making processes. This course is intended for students in various management disciplines. It relies on related economics and political science.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Operations Management

This course focuses on topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. These include quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Project Management

Owing to the turbulent environment, one of the most salient features of an organisation, especially one of a business related in nature, is change. Change in order to avoid disadvantageous impacts and/or to utilise the positive ones. Direction of change is set by the organisational strategy while the means of execution of the strategy are projects and project management. Thus, projects are building blocks in the organisational strategy. The course (bearing in mind the case of single projects) encompasses the profession of project management from the point of view of the three aspects of competency, such as: knowledge, i.e. familiarity with the project management toolkit, skill, i.e. the ability of applying the knowledge, and attitude, i.e. the approach toward projects and managing projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Digital Disruption

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand what digital disruption is and how it is affecting all of our lives in an accelerating and profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Foundations of Psychology

Why are some people more reliable than others? Is intelligence heritable? Does violence on TV make children more aggressive? Why do some people believe in superstitions? Why do we remember some events in our life but forget others? Can media messages change people’s attitudes to smoking? What makes somebody practice the banjo for six hours a day? Why do some people report having been abducted by space aliens?

Psychology studies the processes taking place in the human mind and the factors that determine how people behave. As the science of mind and behaviour, psychology has found answers to many questions like the ones above, and produced new questions still open to inquiry. This course is an introduction to psychological science providing students with an overview of the key topics in contemporary research. The lectures cover the following major areas of psychology: (1) cognitive psychology, (2) developmental psychology, (3) social psychology, (4) personality and intelligence, (5) psychopathology and (6) consciousness.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Press Photography, Documentary, and Campaign Filmmaking

This course takes on a hands-on, practical approach to help students to better understand
visual language, to be able to distinguish between quality photographs from random shots. In a
world full of visual images that surround us and communicates with it is not only useful but also
necessary to understand their nature. This course will introduce students to the anatomy of
photo- and video camera. Helps to develop a story and how to tell it visually. Finally, to
experience the magic and creative force of editing.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Retailing Management

The course covers the structural and strategic issues of international retail activities. Moreover, we discuss the tasks related to retail strategy (merchandise, retail pricing, communication, services, location, store layout), and financial performance measurement of retail companies. Exercises, case studies, project works are based on the examples of leading international retailers.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Regional Studies

The aim of the course is to portray the non-European Regions from a complex perspective. The main idea behind the course is to analyse the main regions of the World from a political and economic perspective. The aim of the course is to enlarge our knowledge on the non-European world territories using the interdisciplinary tools of IR. It is a continuation of the Comparative History of Civilizations from a more contemporary perspective. The course leader invited experts on the different Areas. We focus on mainly foreign policy issues using a comprehensive approach and focusing on mainly the post-1989 developments of world regions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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History of Modern Europe

This course will provide an overview of the history of twentieth century Europe. A focus will be laid on Central Europe, in particular Hungary, and on how major West European states (France, Great Britain, Germany) and the superpowers (USA, former Soviet Union) influenced and shaped political and economic developments in Central and East Central Europe.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Social and Demographic Problems

The aim of the course is to make students acquainted with some social problems especially widespread or discussed in Hungary. Out of obtaining theoretical and statistical knowledge on different problems, students will visit also some institution where different social problems are treated or managed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Budapest in the 20th Century: Historical Layers and Cultural Practice

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, cultural discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects, and to gain first hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours and strolls in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, music, architectural heritage, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city, as they are articulated, shaped and preserved in the contemporary urban space.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Budapest: Explorations of the Urban Space

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, artistic etc. discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects and to gain first-hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Communism in East-Central Europe

During the semester, we will investigate the Sovietization of Hungary after the end of the Second World War, the Stalinist political and social system, the phase of state socialism, everyday life during communism and the period of the transition to democracy. We will also analyze the communist dictatorships and the 1989-1990 revolutions in other countries of the region, such as Poland, East-Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Yugoslavia. The students will watch two feature films connected with the course’s topic and have an opportunity to visit the House of Terror Museum.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Consumer Behavior: Millenials and Generation Z

According to Goldman Sachs, millennials were born between the years 1980 and 2000. In the U.S, millennials are now the biggest generation in its history, even bigger than the Baby Boomers.

Generation Z (Gen Z) is defined as those born between 2000 onwards. It is estimated that the size of the Gen Z population in India is an incredible 356 million people. In the U.S. by 2020, Gen Z will account for almost 40% of consumers and will soon overtake millennials as the largest generation.

While millennials and Gen Z share some similarities, they are also noticeable differences. Since technology is now evolving more rapidly than ever, both millennials and Gen Z are not only being affected by technology, their behavior is actually shaping its future. This course will provide a deep dive into the consumer behavior of both millennials and Gen Z and explore how effectively brands utilize messaging and emerging technologies to grab the attention of those who have short attention spans.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Cross Cultural Communication and Marketing

In the first part of the semester (until the midterm) the focus of the course will be on discussing cultures, different theories of culture, country images, stereotypes, analyzing specific countries from different points of view. In the second part of the semester - based on the concepts learnt in the first part - we will practice how to use this knowledge in evaluating companies’ international marketing activities and formulating intercultural marketing strategies.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Entrepreneurs, Intrapreneurs, and Innovation

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand how evolving technologies are affecting all of our lives in a profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Innovation Management

The course is designed to introduce students to the main theories and concepts of innovation and provides basic understanding of how innovative activities are managed. Among other things it deals with the concepts of open innovation, disruptive innovation, social innovation and “frugal” innovation.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Human Resource Management

During the course important topics of human resource management and their international dimensions will be discussed, such as international career, special issues of expatriation, international recruitment and selection, training and development, international aspects of performance appraisal and compensation.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

The course is a combination of lectures and seminars. In some cases the two will be combined. It provides the participants with the understanding of how to design, implement and control companies’ international marketing activity as well as of how to elaborate an international marketing plan. The students will learn to assess the global market with respect to the cultural dynamics, the business customs and practices, the political and the geographical environment.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Managerial Accounting

Management accounting systems accumulate, classify, summarize and report information that will assist employees within an organization in their decision-making, planning, control and performance measurement activities. The course material will be presented from the perspective of both the provider and user of cost information.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Managing the Multinational Enterprise

This course aims to achieve a double objective: First, to develop students’ emotional intelligence and skills that are required to be able to work and collaborate with others within the context of a Multinational Corporation. Second, to help every student to gain insights about the role that most naturally suits he/she in his/her professional career. In order to achieve these goals, the course is designed to be as practice-oriented and as hands-on as possible with a micro view on management. Students will have the opportunity to listen guest lectures invited from multinational corporations, who will share their insights and personal experiences; as well as provide examples to common challenges and potential solutions.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Online and Digital Marketing

Online and digital marketing is an exciting area of marketing practice. In this course, we will cover the what, why, where, to whom and how of major current online and digital marketing approaches. The course will cover the different areas of marketing, and so include the marketing mix elements from consumer behaviour, digital products, technology aspects, innovation acceptance, online pricing, online distribution, online and digital communication.

We will put special focus on selected specific areas of online presence, content creation and communication interactions as search engine marketing, social media channels and participation in audience interactions.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Public Relations

In this course the students have the opportunity to prepare for effective and ethical public communication. They will acquire knowledge about the history and different theories of effective public relations and related skills,e.g. practical arts of market/audience analysis, campaign development, crisis management, media relations and communication ethics.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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The Economics and Ethics of Globalization

Learning the practices and consequences of managing ethically in the changing cultural, economic, political, technological, in a global environment.

This course examines the norms or principles that establish and justify societies and determine the rights and responsibilities of a society in a globalized world. Furthermore, we will analyze, what is the responsibility of individuals in relation to each other and to society as a whole, and of a society in relation to other societies. The course will consider the application of these principles to such issues as justice, ethics, political, and social institutions, in a world community.

The class is, first and foremost, a course about ethics and economics in a globalized world. It is also a class designed with a heavy emphasis on reading, writing, and class participation.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Corporate Finance in Excel

While working in Excel on both smaller and more complex cases we review key problems of Corporate Finance decision making. We will review how to chose projects to invest in, how to analyse financial statements and predict financial performance. We will shortly review DCF-2 based business valuation techniques and focus on financing and dividend decisions. Students are expected to read theoretical materials in advance of the course (flipped-classroom concept) so we may concentrate on applying those for solving real-life-based cases during the classes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Highlights
  • Classes taught in English except for Hungarian language classes
    • Tandem partner program
      • Volunteer opportunities
        • International excursion

    Semester students in Budapest live in furnished student apartments with other API participants. All apartments are within a 20-30 minute commute from the university via public transportation. Most apartments have two double rooms and one single room, a shared bathroom, kitchen, and living areas. Students are responsible for providing their own meals as these are not included in the program fee.

    Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included.

    Eotvos Living Room 2 32506452050 O
    Eotvos View 2 32762965961 O
    Hollo Utca Bedroom 2 3 32845947966 O
    Hollo Utca Bedroom 3 3 32044100214 O
    Hollo Utca Bedroom 3 4 32044099464 O
    Hollo Utca Kitchen 2 2 32044098604 O
    Hollo Utca Kitchen 2 4 32044097514 O
    Oktober 6 Double Bedroom 2 32506488140 O
    Oktober 6 Kitchen 1 32072077573 O
    Podmaniczky Bedroom 2 1 32506450320 O