Hungary Budapest Bridge 129730877

API students who choose to study abroad in Budapest complete their classes within the International Study Programs (ISP) department of the Corvinus University of Budapest.

Students can specialize in international business courses such as marketing, finance, and economics, or choose from a variety of humanities courses such as law, political science, psychology, and more. All courses, with the exception of Hungarian, are offered in English.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing 

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Transit Pass

Tutoring

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Students must be currently enrolled in a U.S. or foreign university
  • Open to freshmen (2nd semester), sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Hungarian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Resume/C.V.
  • Copy of passport
  • Additional supplemental materials
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with supporting documents (more information provided post-acceptance)

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Budapest programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Pécs

    The monuments in Pécs reveal a long history of Roman, Ottoman and Habsburg influence. Remnants of the 1543-1686 Turkish occupation are found in the two former mosques and Ottoman architecture. The 11th-century cathedral and ruins of a 4th-century Roman cemetery illustrate the rich history here.

  • Szentendre

    This 12th-century baroque town has inspired artists for centuries. In 1690, when the Turks invaded Belgrade, more than 6,000 Serbian residents fled to Szentendre and settled there. This gave it a unique Balkan feel with its cobblestone roads and red-tiled roofs. Today, the town is famous for its many museums, including the open-air museum showing Hungarians’ way of life in centuries past.

  • Gödöllő

    Gödöllő is a town situated in Pest county, 30 km Northeast of Budapest. Gödöllő lies in a clean, green and panoramic area surrounded by forests.

    Students on this excursion will explore:

    • the legend of Sissi, Queen Elisabeth of the Hungarians, whose charm has prevailed for 150 years – we will visit the Habsburg palace of Gödöllő

    • A bunker from World War II on the Palace grounds

    • The Tree of Life, the World Peace Gong

    • a pilgrimage site for visitors seeking a personal spiritual refuge at the Statue of the Virgin Mary in Máriabesnyő.

  • Krakow

    Poland’s former capital has always been famous for its beauty, charm, and culture. Structurally, Krakow survived WWII virtually untouched with elegant squares, charming castles, a historic Jewish district, and museums. Southwest of Krakow is Oswiecim (Auschwitz). From 1940 until 1945, more than 1.5 million people lost their lives in this Nazi concentration camp. Students will tour the camp and learn about this tragic episode in world history.

  • Danube Bend (Esztergom and Visegrád)

    Esztergom was once the medieval capital of Hungary. Today, the main attractions are the palace on Castle Hill and domed Basilica – the nation’s largest church. In the 14th century, Visegrád was the capital of Hungary, and its castle was made into a royal palace that was once described as a “paradise on Earth.” Although history has taken a toll on the village, the ruins can still provide interesting insight into Hungary’s past.

  • Transylvania

    In Transylvania students discover one of the less frequently traveled parts of the Eastern Bloc. Kolozsvár (Cluj), the unofficial capital of Transylvania, is renowned for its amazing historical legacy and culture. The Torda gorge and the village of Torockó are well-known for their beautiful scenery and unique hiking trails. This part of Romania is one of those rare parts of Europe where time seems to have stood still and many people live as their ancestors did centuries ago.

  • Szeged and Ópusztaszer National Park

    Szeged is the cultural and economic center of South-Eastern Hungary and a thriving university town. Szeged is sometimes called the City of Sunshine as there is an average of 2,000 hours of sunshine annually. The city is not only a county seat but an informal economic and cultural center of a larger region reaching across the neighboring Yugoslavian and Romanian borders. Local industry is reputed for food production, especially salami and paprika!!

    During this trip students will explore the beautiful Neoclassical and Art Nouveau architecture of the city as well as the paprika, salami, and fish that Szeged is famous for.

    On the second day, the group will visit the Ópusztaszer National Heritage Park, a 136-acre park dedicated to the history of Hungary and the culture and lifestyle of the Hungarian people since their arrival to the area around 896 A.D. Highlights of the park include the Feszty panorama, the largest panorama painting in Europe, traditional horse shows, and an Open Air Folklore Museum introducing village living in Hungary.

  • Danube Bend (Esztergom and Visegrád)

    Esztergom was once the medieval capital of Hungary. Today, the main attractions are the palace on Castle Hill and domed Basilica – the nation’s largest church. In the 14th century, Visegrád was the capital of Hungary, and its castle was made into a royal palace that was once described as a “paradise on Earth.” Although history has taken a toll on the village, the ruins can still provide interesting insight into Hungary’s past.

  • Pécs

    The monuments in Pécs reveal a long history of Roman, Ottoman and Habsburg influence. Remnants of the 1543-1686 Turkish occupation are found in the two former mosques and Ottoman architecture. The 11th-century cathedral and ruins of a 4th-century Roman cemetery illustrate the rich history here.

  • Krakow

    Poland’s former capital has always been famous for its beauty, charm, and culture. Structurally, Krakow survived WWII virtually untouched with elegant squares, charming castles, a historic Jewish district, and museums. Southwest of Krakow is Oswiecim (Auschwitz). From 1940 until 1945, more than 1.5 million people lost their lives in this Nazi concentration camp. Students will tour the camp and learn about this tragic episode in world history.

  • Szentendre

    This 12th-century baroque town has inspired artists for centuries. In 1690, when the Turks invaded Belgrade, more than 6,000 Serbian residents fled to Szentendre and settled there. This gave it a unique Balkan feel with its cobblestone roads and red-tiled roofs. Today, the town is famous for its many museums, including the open-air museum showing Hungarians’ way of life in centuries past.

  • Transylvania

    In Transylvania students discover one of the less frequently traveled parts of the Eastern Bloc. Kolozsvár (Cluj), the unofficial capital of Transylvania, is renowned for its amazing historical legacy and culture. The Torda gorge and the village of Torockó are well-known for their beautiful scenery and unique hiking trails. This part of Romania is one of those rare parts of Europe where time seems to have stood still and many people live as their ancestors did centuries ago.

  • Gödöllő

    Gödöllő is a town situated in Pest county, 30 km Northeast of Budapest. Gödöllő lies in a clean, green and panoramic area surrounded by forests.

    Students on this excursion will explore:

    • the legend of Sissi, Queen Elisabeth of the Hungarians, whose charm has prevailed for 150 years – we will visit the Habsburg palace of Gödöllő

    • A bunker from World War II on the Palace grounds

    • The Tree of Life, the World Peace Gong

    • a pilgrimage site for visitors seeking a personal spiritual refuge at the Statue of the Virgin Mary in Máriabesnyő.

  • Szeged and Ópusztaszer National Park

    Szeged is the cultural and economic center of South-Eastern Hungary and a thriving university town. Szeged is sometimes called the City of Sunshine as there is an average of 2,000 hours of sunshine annually. The city is not only a county seat but an informal economic and cultural center of a larger region reaching across the neighboring Yugoslavian and Romanian borders. Local industry is reputed for food production, especially salami and paprika!!

    During this trip students will explore the beautiful Neoclassical and Art Nouveau architecture of the city as well as the paprika, salami, and fish that Szeged is famous for.

    On the second day, the group will visit the Ópusztaszer National Heritage Park, a 136-acre park dedicated to the history of Hungary and the culture and lifestyle of the Hungarian people since their arrival to the area around 896 A.D. Highlights of the park include the Feszty panorama, the largest panorama painting in Europe, traditional horse shows, and an Open Air Folklore Museum introducing village living in Hungary.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-15 credits per semester

API students who choose to study abroad in Budapest complete their classes within the International Study Programs (ISP) department of the Corvinus University of Budapest.

Students can specialize in international business courses such as marketing, finance, and economics, or choose from a variety of humanities courses such as law, political science, psychology, and more. All courses, with the exception of Hungarian, are offered in English.

All students who have not previously studied Hungarian are required to take a Hungarian language course. Students are automatically placed into a beginning level class. Students who have previously studied Hungarian should contact the API office. Language courses are taught in Hungarian and are worth 3 semester credits; all other courses are taught in English and are worth 1.5 to 3 semester credits. The courses are designed for American and other international students. Students who wish to take more than 15 semester credits may do so for an additional fee.

TANDEM PARTNERS PROGRAM AND THE “AMERICAN CORNER”

API students in Budapest have the exciting opportunity to participate in the Tandem Partners Program. Corvinus University’s Tandem Partners Program facilitates intercultural exchange by matching full-time Hungarian students with recently arrived study abroad students. It is a program with mutual benefits! The local Hungarian students are eager to share the Budapest they know so well with their API Tandem Partner, and the API students are encouraged to integrate with local students and learn more about Hungarian life, both inside and out of the university setting.

With help from the U.S. Embassy, Corvinus University has also established an “American Corner” – a center on campus where students can go for academic support, study/computer areas, and American-style entertainment.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

API students interested in assisting in English language classrooms at a local high school can submit a resume and motivation letter to their API Program Coordinator during the post-acceptance process. Participants who volunteer in at least 20 classes (45 minutes each) will receive a certificate of participation. Volunteer hours will take place during the normal school day, between 8am-4:30 pm.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students will receive a transcript from the Corvinus University of Budapest upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Kelsey Patton

    Kelsey Patton will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - kelsey.patton@apiabroad.com

  • Gitta Budapest RD

    Gitta Pestalits

    Gitta will be your Resident Director in Budapest and a resource for you while you are in Hungary!

COURSE OFFERINGS

THE COURSE NUMBERS CORRESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING LEVELS:

  • 100-299 BEGINNING FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES
  • 300-399 INTERMEDIATE SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS
  • 400-499 SPECIALIZED JUNIORS AND SENIORS
  • 500-699 ADVANCED SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS
  • 700-799 ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

The course numbering system is intended to help students select courses that are appropriate for their level of experience. Students may take courses at a level or two above or below their current classification. If a student and their advisor feel that the student meets the requirements for a particular class, the student is encouraged to apply. With proper background, students may also mix and match lower- and upper-level or graduate-level coursework. The sooner students apply, the better the chance at enrolling in their preferred classes.

Corvinus is now offering an intensive course option in which students can sign up to take one 3-credit (6 ECTS) course within a one-week intensive period in the middle of the semester. This option will be available to you during course registration later in the post-acceptance process. The intensive course will count towards the 12-15 credits you are required to take. NOTE: The course selection is subject to change and enrollment in specific courses can only be guaranteed upon formal registration at the university. Some courses may require a minimum enrollment, and not all courses are offered each semester. Some courses may have prerequisites. In these cases, equivalent coursework and/or experience may be considered. API recommends that students obtain pre-approval for all of their course selections and alternates prior to departure.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Corvinus University of Budapest summer program operates on the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), wherein the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. credits, divide the ECTS hours available by 2.

HUNGARIAN LANGUAGE COURSES

The Hungarian for Beginners course is required for all students who have not previously studied Hungarian. Students may then choose three or four of the spring or fall courses listed on the following pages. A sixth course may be added for an extra fee.

Hungarian for Beginners

This course is offered for students who want to acquire a basic command of the Hungarian language which would help them to obtain simple information and to express their requests and/or messages in a simple form. The course is also recommended for students who need only so-called "survival Hungarian".

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Fields and Scenes: Reading the Arts, Culture and Design

The course provides an overview of how cultural fields are shaped and constructed from the perspective of the classics of scholarship on cultural production and art, taking stock of the current trends and interpretations of how cultural organizations, the art markets, and culture beyond markets work. Field visits (an independent radio station, cultural and community centers, and an ‘underground plaza’) are planned during the course

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Budapest: Explorations of the Urban Space

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, artistic etc. discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects and to gain first-hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Film and History

Three historical patterns, three regions have developed in Europe. Comparing the different development of the regions, this course reveals the distinctiveness of Central European history from both Eastern and Western patterns. By the outbreak of the First World War and the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, East-Central-Europe became the region of a number of small states. Have they been destined to become the satellites of the Great Powers? How did the region become the hotbed of such ideologies and dictatorships as fascism and bolshevism? What options were open to the nations of the region and especially to Hungarian society? These and other issues are highlighted through the examination of the main conflicts of the 20th century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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History of Modern Europe

This course will provide an overview of the history of twentieth century Europe. A focus will be laid on Central Europe, in particular Hungary, and on how major West European states (France, Great Britain, Germany) and the superpowers (USA, former Soviet Union) influenced and shaped political and economic developments in Central and East Central Europe.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introduction to Legal Studies

The course deals with the legal system as the set of principles and standards of conduct, as Well as the law as a ruling system governing the society and having general application for it. Main topics of the course are the basic problems of legal reasoning as the characteristics of Law. During the course we will examine the law as a system of norms, accompanied by state sanctions, the process of lawmaking, the legal sources, legal norms, legal relationships, the court system, the institutional court, the hierarchy of norms, the role of the constitution. The Contract Law part includes explication of the offer and the acceptance", "the consideration", "the parties to the Contract and the major contractual rights and obligations. The Corporation Law part covers the business organization types, formation and management questions. Labour Law issues shall be dealt with in the course for all management issues. This will include: employment contract and management liability.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Debate (Model United Nations)

The objective of this course is to teach students the tenants of formal debate in a government setting, in such forums as the United Nations, African Union, Arab League, North Atlantic Treaty Organization or European Union. Students will become familiar with world events, and more importantly, will be able to argue about them from points of view that are not their own with regards to each issue.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Relations: 1945 to Present

This course gives a broad overview of international relations since 1945 with a regional focus on Europe. It traces the major political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved from the end of World War II to the present day. The first three sessions of the course will give an overview of international history in the twentieth century. Moving on, roughly two thirds of the course will be dedicated to case studies, partly based on student presentations. We will start with the concepts of international order and of the nation-state. In terms of world politics we will deal with the emergence of the two superpowers post 1945, the Cold War, and its end.

We will then deal with three cases in more detail: 1 former Yugoslavia, 2 contemporary Russia and the post-Soviet space, and 3 the Arab-Israeli conflict and the contemporary Middle East. All three cases are exemplary on the way how international politics is conducted in the 21st century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

European Union Politics

This course gives a broad overview of European integration since 1945. We will cover the history and theories of integration, major institutions, policy areas, and issues of debate. The historic part will place European integration into the global context of superpower domination and Europe searching for a new role since 1990. The part covering theories of integration confronts us with concepts and visions for Europe. They span from the concept of a “Europe of fatherlands” (Charles de Gaulle) to a full-fledged federal vision of a “United States of Europe” (Jean Monnet).

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

PSY 311 Personality Types and Team Dynamics

This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to group dynamics and teamwork in the organizational context. Course content draws from a large body of group dynamics research in psychology, applied social science, and management. The modern professional team environment emphasizes the value of diversity and the strengths of its members. More than ever, today’s leaders must gain insight into individual differences in order to maximize talents, reframe potential sources of misunderstanding, and facilitate collaboration. This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to processes and issues that teams face: team development, social dilemma, communication, conflict, power, decision-making, leadership, problem solving, creativity, diversity, virtual teamwork, culture, reward systems, and training. This course emphasizes self-discovery and is highly interactive. In addition to providing academic content, the aim of this course is to facilitate student's self-awareness and self-reflexivity. Students will be equipped as practitioners of Psychological Type Theory, one of the most widely used frameworks for personality assessment and team development in the business world today. Students synthesize course content in a final service-learning group project involving a professional team interview, content-based team analysis and submission of a team development plan.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Business Enterprise: Start-Ups

The course gives a practice oriented, case-based introduction to the conditions as well as the means of venture creation and operation of startups. Students will learn how to avoid mistakes and pitfalls as well as how to take advantage of the largest benefit of a small and agile organization: the gift of flexibility, autonomous decision making and bias for action. The main goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to discover, select, process, interpret and use the necessary data to take decisions in an uncertain world and, then, to exploit market opportunities. The class is designed to provide students with the tools, methods and approaches - all through practical cases - which startups need to master in order to start and manage a successful new business venture. By the end of the course students will be able to identify opportunities, conduct customer development, develop business models and value proposition and test their hypothesis in a matter of hours/days. As a part of the class students are required to form teams and come up with ideas for their startup.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

SME Marketing

Students will be expected to study and understand marketing theory and practice, and more importantly learn how to apply their marketing knowledge and skills to real life problem solving situations by creating marketing action plans for SME organisations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Policy and Strategy

Strategic management can be defined as the art and science of formulating, implementing, and evaluating cross-functional decisions that enable an organization to achieve its objectives. As this definition implies, strategic management focuses on integrating management, marketing, finance/accounting, production/operations, research and development, and computer information systems to achieve organizational success.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Business Case Studies

The International Business course is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity required to work within a global environment. The course addresses issues in the strategy, organization marketing, and management of companies operating in the global market. In addition, the course will integrate the sciences of geography and history along with individual country flags and on-going current events.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Ethics

This course explores the ethical challenges facing business today, and how individuals and firms can address those challenges. The course aims to enhance the skills and expertise of participants in through combining examination of ethical and managerial theory with discussion of common ethical problems in context. It aims also to sensitize students with ethical aspects of business decisions. The theory and the practice of business ethics will be discussed during the course. Course material includes individual moral theory, the development of ethical organizational culture, the development of ethical management systems designed to respond to ethical challenges, and wide-ranging discussion regarding major trends, challenges, and opportunities in the field of ethical business.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Entrepreneurship

The aim of this course is to provide a meaty and creative environment for teasing ideas on the controversies and complexity of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Social Entrepreneurship plus other trendy and sensual buzzwords of this field.

Students learn about the diverse background of CSR (corporate philanthropy, business ethics, strategic management, etc.), the various existing – and often competing – approaches to this management concept by looking at best and worst business examples. By listening to guest speakers and seeing the results of most recent research we understand the trends and nature of the “industry” around CSR. Students practice the preparation and evaluation of CSR actions and tools. The course also provides and the opportunity to meet real-life professionals of CSR.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Strategic Management

Weighing the ins and outs of crafting, implementing, and executing company strategies forces a total enterprise perspective, demands that many internal and external situational considerations be dealt with at once, and calls for judgments about how all the relevant factors add up. This trait is what makes strategic management an integrative course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success.

Throughout the course, the spotlight will be trained on the foremost issue in running a business enterprise: “What must managers do, and do well, to make the company a winner in the game of business?” The answer that emerges, and which becomes the theme of the course, is that good strategy-making and good strategy execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good management. The mission of the course is to explore why good strategic management leads to good business performance, to present the basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis, and to drill you in the methods of crafting a well-conceived strategy and executing it competently. Videos and case studies in order to develop students’ capacity to think strategically about a company, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the caliber of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining sustainable competitive advantage.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Macroeconomics

The course gives a practice oriented and systematic introduction to economy and economics in a macroscale. It is based on the professor’s practical experience in business management, investment, in running of own business, supporting young entrepreneurs and SMEs and in participation in the variety of the EU projects. The professor will also use her theoretical knowledge gained during doctoral studies completed in economics in the area of management.

Consequently, the main goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to discover, select, process, interpret and use the necessary data to be able to take economic decisions in an uncertain world and,then, to exploit market opportunities.

Since the main factors affecting economic skills and abilities are:

1. Personal characteristics such as alertness, hard-working attitude, ability to connect facts, creativity, teamwork and respect to others,

2. Knowledge acquired through the formal education and by means of on-the-job experience and learning-by-doing, the class is designed to provide future business & administration practitioners with the tools they need to master the most important issues involved in starting a professional carrier.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Globalization (Economic Theory)

Economy and Social Interaction among the various persons in our interconnected society. That activity and exchange necessarily take place among and between persons, and therefore have an ethical dimension. But the complexity of Politics, Economy and Social Interaction in the global agenda environment, as well as the rapid changes in different settings and practices caused by global changes. Technological and cultural changes often make it very difficult for us to perceive ethical issues in Cultural Globalization and to know how to deal with them.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Economics and the European Union

The course will commence with a historical overview of the initial post-war stages of formation, along with the reasons for arriving at a decision to link states in a common economic policy setting. From there, students will examine the theory and practice of economic integration, followed by monetary integration and monetary union.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Transition and Post-Transition Challenges in Hungary

The course is built around three sub-subjects, all related to the concept of change. One is socio-economic transformation or ‘regime change’ of Central and Eastern Europe. The second, and main, part deals with Hungary, in particular. This part covers a wide range of economic issues such as privatization, structural changes, fiscal and monetary regimes as well as topics related to geopolitical issues. The third part investigates recent developments and the particular challenges that Hungary faces within the Western alliance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Basic Finance

This course provides students with an intuitive and conceptual understanding

of finance. It aims to introduce students to the logic that drives finance so that

they will appreciate the interrelationships of interest rates, risk and return, and

their influence on corporate financial decisions. Utilising the theory and

analytical tools presented in the course, students should thus be able to

understand and evaluate events in the financial world.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Corporate Finance I

The aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and techniques of Corporate Finance and applying them to the main decisions faced by the financial manager. The concepts are immediately applicable to all firms, both large or small, privately run or publicly traded and involved in any industry – whether manufacturing, retail or service.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Corporate Finance II

This course is structured as a sequel to FIN 351 Corporate Finance I where students will gain greater ground in their understanding of corporate finance. Students will be introduced to the principles of Capital Structure, Dividend Policy and Working Capital management, Ratio\nAnalysis and Leasing understand the real world considerations that financial managers face.Students will be introduced to the other cornerstone of Corporate Financial decision-making:\nCapital Structure and the proportions of debt and equity financing that companies should adopt.\nWe will begin our study with the famous theoretical propositions of Modigliani and Miller and analyze its applications to real world scenarios. The course will dwell in much detail to the discussion of how companies evaluate between the choices of internal and external financing","how they plan and manage working capital and short term financing","the basis of share repurchase and dividend policies, ratio analysis and benchmarking, as well as identification of relevant cash flows in the lease decisions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Investment Analysis

This course takes the viewpoint of you, as an investor, faced with a plethora of investment choices from which you decide your own investment portfolio. The course is divided into 3 sections: the first section will examine the system of financial markets and instruments traded in these markets. The next section will detail the methods and tools of investment analysis used by financial analysts as well as introduce the techniques of portfolio selection and management, which are critical in determining the overall investment performance of your portfolio. Our final section will harness the collective knowledge from the earlier 2 sections and relate the concepts to that of personal finance and wealth management, and investment philosophies and beliefs.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Intelligent Systems

Intelligent systems course provides a comprehensive, up-to-date guide to today 2019s revolutionary management support system technologies, and it demonstrates how they can be used for better decision making. The course takes the perspective of a general manager rather than a computer programmer, systems analyst or a computer scientist. The most important management support systems, such as data warehousing, business analytics, data mining, business performance management systems, knowledge management technologies and artificial intelligence methods are discussed and demonstrated. The course has three major objectives:

- to highlight the theoretical background of the intelligent systems

- to demonstrate students the tools necessary for understanding the features of intelligent systems

- to offer practical experiences about the application of different intelligent systems.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management Information Systems

The Management Information Systems course provides a good understanding of the role of information technology in the modern organization. It covers more or less all areas where a manager can come across with information systems. The objective of this course is not to create CIOs, it is rather to enable students to understand opportunities and threats that are coming along with IT. They have to sharpen their knowledge about new technologies, get open minded for changes, and discover the effects of changes on organizations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management

The purpose of the course is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of management, including basic concepts and terminology. Business firms around the world are experimenting with new organizational designs, changing their routines and processes as they seek to improve their current performance and their growth prospects. In the process they change the scope of their business operations, redraw their organization charts, redefine the allocation of decision-making authority and responsibility, and reconsider which activities to conduct in-house and which to outsource.

The course introduces students with powerful conceptual frameworks for analyzing the interrelations between organizational design features, competitive strategy and the business environment. Students will spend a significant portion of their time diagnosing the fit and misfits between various elements on the basis of open system theory. Specifically, it is the intent of this course to blend theory with practice, requiring students to observe the business environment, and actively applying concepts to the “real world”. The course draws on numerous examples of contemporary organizations through the use of case studies and role plays.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Environmental Management

To start, topics of sustainability, and instruments of environmental policy will be explained. We indicate how environmental policy is needed to correct market distortions caused by externalities, and corporate profitability and long-term survival is also influenced by this policy.

Environmental strategies can support business strategy and competitiveness provided they are properly chosen. We analyze the environmental strategy options of firms and selection of environmental tools that exist in the corporate toolbox, together with the circumstances that influence the correct choice among strategies and tools. The greenest is not necessarily the best for all kinds of companies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tourism Management and Marketing

This course will focus on the management of different types of tourism in a range of environment throughout the world. The development of tourism industry and the issues with tourism management have been growing at an unprecedented rate over the past decade. The industry’s sustainable and ethical management is essential, especially in the light of climate change, economic recessions and political disturbance. Different typologies of tourism will be discussed including cultural tourism, ecotourism and health tourism. The course will also provide an overview of the way in which tourism is managed in various regions and destinations of the world. This will involve the evaluation of new management and modern marketing tools being used in the industry.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Human Resource Management

Students will be provided with the technical background needed to be a knowledgeable consumer of human resource products and services, to manage HR effectively, or to be a successful HR professional. Course will emphasize how managers can more effectively acquire, develop, compensate, and manage the internal and external environment that relates to the management of human resources. Much attention will be given to the strategic use of HR Management and its evolvement across borders and cultures.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introduction to Hospitality Management

This course will focus on the ever changing nature of the global hospitality industry from shared economy products toluxury hotel products and gives academic, as well as practical knowledge inapplyingmanagementandmarketingtechniquesthatensurethesuccessofboththe business entity and its managers. The course will provide an overview of the latest management techniques, sales and marketing venues applied in the accommodation sector. The course will underline theimportance ofrevenue management in today’seconomically challenging environment and focusonsustainableaccommodation development toensurethe long term prosperity of the hospitality industry.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management Skills

The course will consist of lectures and seminars every week. Students will learn the basic concepts from lectures and the compulsory reading, then analyze and use the skills in cases and critically evaluate them in form of group discussions. The sequence of topics is built step by step from the self (please see the schedule) to managing groups, and so are the assignments.

The course aims at developing the student on three levels: knowledge, attitude and skill. The classes will include parts where readings are discussed and presentations given about recent findings about a skill with the aim of enriching students' knowledge. By analyzing cases and showing the enhanced performance and better results, an attitude towards conscious use of skills will be developed. On the knowledge gained, and the positive attitude developed, the skill level will be built by practicing in class and outside of it.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Global Business Stategy

The aim of the course is to provide a basis for international strategy analyses and formulation in global context. The most relevant concepts and topics will be discussed and illustrated by case studies. Some of them are the following: international strategy, reasons for foreign market entry and its main modes, multinational and global industries, configurations of multinational enterprises (MNEs), selection of host country, subsidiaries and their roles in MNEs, across border governance and ethical challenges and dilemmas.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organization Behavior and Design

In order to create good working climates and successful organizations companies need to have a clear purpose of existence together with outstanding leadership fitting their complex societal, economic and technological environments. During this course we will expand our knowledge about the hard aspects of management and organisation, strategy, structure and organisational design and investigate in detail the soft aspects of organisational and work life, most importantly personality, character development, motivation, teams, learning, culture and leadership.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Human Resource Management

This course is an introductory course to graduate students, who plan to work in a multinational environment in the future. The purpose of the course is to learn international aspects of the main functions of HRM and the place and role of the HR function within organizations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Marketing

The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization 2019s resources to satisfy customers 2019 wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. We will examine how marketers: understand consumers 2019 needs and wants, develop products and services that provide superior value, and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Services Marketing

The service sector of the world economy is huge and still growing, the complexity and diversity of services have been increasing over the past 50 years. All of the developed economies now have large service sectors and many service firms operate internationally. The course will highlight the fundamental differences between goods and services focusing on the managerial implications. An overview will be provided on service operations including service-related issues on innovation, communication, pricing, managing demand and managing people.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Advertising Management

This is an advertising management, especially practice-oriented course.

The overall aim is to create a deep understanding of marketing communication

planning and evaluation in general and to make participants of the course able

to efficiently translate local specialties into international communication

programs with respect to cultural differences

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Decision Techniques

Problem structuring, modeling, decision making and its techniques will be considered, with specific emphasis on their practical aspects. The course will explore the rational, emotional and group dynamic background of decisions and examine how decision theory, originally developed as a theory for individual decision making, can be applied to organizational decision making processes. This course is intended for students in various management disciplines. It relies on related economics and political science.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Operations Management

This course focuses on topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. These include quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Decision Making Skills

This course will provide an overview of the field of behavioral decision making and decision analytical perspectives. It addresses both the theoretical and practical processes and skills of decision making at the individual, organisational and social levels.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Project Management

Owing to the turbulent environment, one of the most salient features of an organisation, especially one of a business related in nature, is change. Change in order to avoid disadvantageous impacts and/or to utilise the positive ones. Direction of change is set by the organisational strategy while the means of execution of the strategy are projects and project management. Thus, projects are building blocks in the organisational strategy. The course (bearing in mind the case of single projects) encompasses the profession of project management from the point of view of the three aspects of competency, such as: knowledge, i.e. familiarity with the project management toolkit, skill, i.e. the ability of applying the knowledge, and attitude, i.e. the approach toward projects and managing projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Communism in East-Central Europe After World War II

This course examines the rise and fall of Soviet domination in the countries of East-Central Europe after 1945. The primary focus will be on Hungary but we will also analyze the communist dictatorships and the 1989-1990 revolutions in other countries of the region, such as Poland, East-Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Yugoslavia. During the semester, we will investigate the Sovietization of Hungary after the end of the Second World War, the Stalinist political and social system, the phase of state socialism, everyday life during communism and the period of the transition to democracy. We will also analyze the communist dictatorships and the 1989-1990 revolutions in other countries of the region, such as Poland, East-Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Yugoslavia. The students will watch two feature films connected with the course’s topic and have an opportunity to visit the House of Terror Museum.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Business Law

This course aims to provide students with the knowledge of legal structures and the operation of international business, tracking the legal forms (trade in goods, protection and licensing of international property rights, foreign direct investment) and basic market entry strategies of firms as they expand into international markets, indicating how law aids, prohibits or influences individual contractual deals.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Global Social Change and Global Inequalities

The course analyses key social processes (economic growth, economic inequalities, population and family change, migration, economic integration). It relates them to key social and institutional change for the last 60 years. It reflects on key theories and general interpretations of these changes from the perspective of current globalization. This course is a “must” for everybody who, as future international relations expert, sociologist, historian, economist, businessman, politician or administrative person would like to develop a broad interpretative perspective on processes of social change and social structures in our global society.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Elements of Accounting

During the course basic accounting issues will be studied. This includes foundations, techniques (double-entry) and basic items of the financial statements such as: inventories, property, plant and equipment, receivables – payables, intangible assets, revenue recognition, etc. Some basic but more complex accounting issues will also be included (provisions, events after the reporting date, etc.) The course is not designed to explain a specific set of accounting regulation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Managerial Accounting

The course is designed to develop the knowledge and understanding of students on the principles and concepts relating to managerial accounting and apply the calculation techniques that form industry standards.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Economics

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to identify trends affecting business, understand world economic systems and how they interact with and affect business, learn the different forms of business, understand what is needed to start a small business or to own a franchise and the importance of entrepreneurship in business. The role of ethics in business and socially responsible conduct of business will be emphasized.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Business Communication

In this course, students will be given the tools necessary to communicate in a variety of business situations. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to understand a situation, argue logically in favor of their position or goals, and then apply a correct communications strategy to the situation and the person they are communicating with.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Global Anti-Corruption Business and Governance Strategies

This course will begin with an overview of corruption, its various forms, and types, as it applies to the business world globally and regionally. It will move on to define the problems associated with tackling these types and the continuing need for governmental participation and development on a global scale in order to address and empower against corruption and corrupt practices. The course will consider what corrupt practices are common globally, as well as distinct problems and issues associated with the EU’s strategy and contribution, in addition to the roles of the international community in terms of organizations such as multilateral agencies and donors. Political efforts by way of improving public administration transparency and accountability will be considered and the course will conclude with consideration of the obstacles to reform and the anticipated future strategies to maximize potential impact in governance and business practices.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 3 Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Valuation

Knowing what an asset is worth and what determines that value is a pre-requisite for intelligent decision making – in choosing investments for a portfolio, in deciding on the appropriate price to pay or receive in a takeover and in making investment, financing and dividend choices when running a business. The premise of this course is that we can make reasonable estimates of value for most assets and that the same fundamental principles determine the values of all types of assets, real as well as financial. This course harnesses the knowledge that students previously gained in the field of accounting and corporate finance by presenting the practical application of these principles and concepts in business performance analysis and valuation. Students will gain an insight into the various valuation techniques used by both business consultants and investment bankers as well as understand how the various elements in these models are derived, and equally, how our inherent bias and preconceptions do cloud the valuation process. This course also draws upon illustrations faced by a range of real-world companies across a broad spectrum of industries under different circumstances (start-up firms, private firms, inflation, non-perfect capital markets, inadequate financial data, cross-border valuations) so that students can grasp the full complexities that underlie each valuation process.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Economics

The course introduces students to the main theories and methods of international economics. The first half of the course deals with the basic models explaining international trade, such as the theory of comparative advantages, the Hecksher-Ohlin model, and various alternative trade theories. The effects and reasons of government intervention in international trade, a topic of growing importance today, will be discussed, along with the pros and cons of protectionism. During the second part of the semester the course will discuss other topics of international economics, such as international factor flows, international finance and foreign exchange. The course combines rigorous economic analysis with attention to issues of economic policy alive and important today. Special attention is given to analyzing current world economic events, as well as the relevance of empirical application of the theories and models discussed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Tourism and World Economy

The Tourism and World Economy course is a multi-disciplinary subject including economics, social theory, environmental theory, politics, and international relations. The course is designed to enable participants to efficiently respond to a dynamic and fast changing tourism industry. The module will identify challenges to the growth of the sector and analyze the current trends. The role of tourism in the economic development at a country, a region or a local level is a key issue. This module allows participants to appreciate the role of tourism in a globalize context and encourages students to actively participate in future regional tourism projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Corporate Financing Policy

Students will be introduced to a cornerstone of Corporate Financial decision- making: Capital Structure and the proportions of debt and equity financing that companies should adopt. We will begin our study with the famous theoretical propositions of Modigliani and Miller and analyze its applications to real world scenarios. The course will dwell in much detail on the discussion of how companies evaluate the financing process, the financing mix and choices as well as the process of achieving the optimal balance. We will also cover the other important pillar of corporate financial decision-making: the dividend decision and explore the contentious nature of dividends and how they do signal management's intention and firm's prospects, and as a result, are inextricably linked to firm's value. Much of the underlying theme of this course is grounded in real world applications where we would bring to our class discussions, corporate decision-making considerations that financial managers make.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Multinational Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to international financial markets and to the management of the special risks arising from international transactions. Topics include the environment of international financial management, foreign exchange and derivatives markets, foreign exchange risk management and foreign investment analysis. The basic thrust of this course is to provide a conceptual framework within which the essential financial decisions of the multinational firm can be analyzed. The approach is to treat international financial management as a natural and logical extension of the principles learned in the foundations course in financial management. Analytical techniques developed help to translate the often-vague rules of thumb used by international financial executives into specific decision criteria. Examples will show students the value of examining decision problems with the aid of a solid theoretical foundation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Effective E-Business Management

The course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of e­-business. Types, business models, and operations of e­-business applications will be demonstrated. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Appreciate the importance of e-­business in the modern economy Describe the history and principles behind e­-commerce infrastructure Explain the role of technology and information systems in an e-­business enterprise. Define the main ideas behind e-­commerce and discuss the importance of website design and maintenance Consider the roles of various stakeholders in the e­-commerce process Analyze business processes with the intent to gain competitive advantage Apply principles and key methods used in defining customer requirements Construct business models to analyze business plans Explain sound user interface design guidelines and system usability Utilize techniques and tools of payment systems Explain the role of different types of information system vulnerabilities, security and data protection measures Understand the structure and functionality of essential on­line marketing technologies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Web Development

This course gives a comprehensive view of the client-side web development including the optimization of the webpages for different browsers, resolutions and search engines. The students will learn HTML and CSS coding, webpage layouts and techniques of using HTML5 and CSS3 elements. The course gives an introduction to Visual Studio, and useful plugins. Students will get familiar with Javascript language, they will create simple dynamic web page.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Managing Enterprise Resource Planning with SAP R/3

The course aims at giving general overview of business information systems with special respect to enterprise resource planning software and the field of their applications. At first, students have to understand the value of IT in an enterprise, after that, they will get familiar with the idea of ERP. After that, students will work with SAP, leader ERPs, and they will see real-life scenarios in a widely used enterprise IT system. The main goal is not teaching the usage of the software, but demonstrating real life scenarios and their solution with integrated information and resource planning system.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Intelligence

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of business intelligence. Topics such as data warehousing, business analytics, business performance management systems, data, text and web mining will be covered. The course has three major objectives: a) to highlight the theoretical background of business intelligence, b) to demonstrate students the tools necessary for understanding the features of business intelligence, c) to offer practical experiences about the application of different business intelligence systems.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introduction to International Business

This course presents an introduction into the international world of business, and the impact and consequences of globalisation and competition on the firm. The student will study how firms adapt to their environment, and simultaneously deal with increased competition, new markets and opportunities, technology and the growth and influx of specialised services, and changing customer tastes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Comparative Cross-Cultural Management

The course introduces the main principles relating to management across cultural and national boundaries and focuses on interpersonal relations between people of different cultures in work settings. Throughout the course, students will understand the effect of culture and how it can then be applied to a wide variety of cross-cultural interactions in a number of organisational contexts.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Change Management

This is a course tailored towards training the student to understand how to implement a methodological change program within an organization. The student will gain an understanding on the theories, foundations and institutions governing the recent and current expansion of international trade and investments, and develop insights into the ever-changing business environment. This course dwells upon the change issues facing firms, and the difficulties of devising and implementing successful solutions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Consumer Behavior: Millennials and Generation Z

According to Goldman Sachs, millennials were born between the years 1980 and 2000. In the U.S, millennials are now the biggest generation in its history, even bigger than the Baby Boomers. Generation Z (Gen Z) is defined as those born between 2000 onwards. It is estimated that the size of the Gen Z population in India is an incredible 356 million people. In the U.S. by 2020, Gen Z will account for almost 40% of consumers and will soon overtake millennials as the largest generation. While millennials and Gen Z share some similarities, they are also noticeable differences. Since technology is now evolving more rapidly than ever, both millennials and Gen Z are not only being affected by technology, their behavior is actually shaping its future. This course will provide a deep dive into the consumer behavior of both millennials and Gen Z and explore how effectively brands utilize messaging and emerging technologies to grab the attention of those who have short attention spans.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Online and Digital Marketing

Online and digital marketing is an exciting area of marketing practice. In this course, we will cover the what, why, where, to whom and how of major current online and digital marketing approaches. The course will cover the different areas of marketing, and so include the marketing mix elements from consumer behaviour, digital products, technology aspects, innovation acceptance, online pricing, online distribution, online and digital communication.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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ART 300 - Budapest in the Twentieth Century: Historical Layers and Cultural Practice

The aim of the course is to present how the recent history of Hungary is reflected in literature, film and visual arts. The course if offering an overview of the twentieth-century history of Hungary, as well as an outline of how art is reflecting on key historical events. During the course students are going to look for traces of history in the urban spaces of Budapest, students will visit important locations and intriguing institutions. The course will touch upon the establishment of the “modern” Budapest at the turn of the century, the effects of the Trianon Treaty, Jewish Emancipation, the Second World War and the Holocaust, the Communist and State Socialist Era, the 1956 Revolution, and the Regime Change in 1989. We will also discuss issues contemporary works of art raise, and their critical societal visions. We will discuss the state of gender inclusion and feminism in Hungary, as well as the present anomalies of the inclusion of the Roma and of sexual minorities. The course aims to achieve its goals through the implementation of an intermedial and interdisciplinary view – that is, we are going to read literary texts, watch movies, visit art collections, meet artists, directors, and curators. Home assignments will require short explorative reseach; the mid- and end-term exams will consist of creative tasks as well as of theoretical questions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Essentials of Investing

This course will provide students with an insight into money and capital markets as well as the instruments traded in these markets. It will also provide students with a rigorous grounding in the methods and tools of investment analysis used by financial analysts as well as introduce the techniques of portfolio selection and management. This course also aims to hone students’ skills in conducting a sophisticated assessment of the current issues and debates covered by both popular media and the more specialised finance journals.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Microeconomics

The course seeks to introduce students to basic concepts and analysis of economic theory and science, enabling and facilitating a grounding which provides the ‘building blocks’ necessary to be able to analyse more complex issues inherent in the modern market economy. The course is designed to give students the most effective approach to the learning of microeconomic tools and concepts using an accessible, integrated structure. Students will be introduced to consumer, production and cost theories, forms of competition, such as perfect and imperfect, market power, strategic behaviour and special topics such as risk, externalities and public goods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Innovation Management

The course is designed to introduce students to the main theories and concepts of innovation and provides basic understanding of how innovative activities are managed. Among other things it deals with the concepts of open innovation, disruptive innovation, social innovation and “frugal” innovation. Aims and Objectives of the course: To understand the broad concept of innovation: developing and launching something new successfully. To understand innovation management and strategies, which produce the main source of competitiveness. To get useful knowledge about key management practices used by well recognized, successful innovating companies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Digital Disruption

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand what digital disruption is and how it is affecting all of our lives in an accelerating and profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Family Business

This course aims at supporting this preparation by introducing the field of family business studies. By the end of the course, the students will develop an understanding on the features of business organizations with family ownership structure, the heterogeneity of the population of family businesses, their unique advantages and the general challenges, on how to face these challenges and transcend them by their special resources originating from their ownership characteristics, and on what the implications of the constant interaction of family, business and ownership systems would mean for such specific problems as governance, strategy, ownership, succession and delivering advisory projects in these companies. The course will also put a strong emphasis on presenting how family dynamics can be grasped, understood and handled in this business environment both from the perspective of the business-owner family and an external stakeholder.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Foundations of Psychology

Why are some people more reliable than others? Is intelligence heritable? Does violence on TV make children more aggressive? Why do some people believe in superstitions? Why do we remember some events in our life but forget others? Can media messages change people’s attitudes to smoking? What makes somebody practice the banjo for six hours a day? Why do some people report having been abducted by space aliens?

Psychology studies the processes taking place in the human mind and the factors that determine how people behave. As the science of mind and behaviour, psychology has found answers to many questions like the ones above, and produced new questions still open to inquiry. This course is an introduction to psychological science providing students with an overview of the key topics in contemporary research. The lectures cover the following major areas of psychology: (1) cognitive psychology, (2) developmental psychology, (3) social psychology, (4) personality and intelligence, (5) psychopathology and (6) consciousness.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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International Retailing Management

The course covers the structural and strategic issues of international retail activities. Moreover, we discuss the tasks related to retail strategy (merchandise, retail pricing, communication, services, location, store layout), and financial performance measurement of retail companies. Exercises, case studies, project works are based on the examples of leading international retailers.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Personal Finance and Wealth Management

This course takes on a hands-on, practical approach to help students become better managers of their own money and time, by making informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing and investing. It will introduce students to the steps of the financial planning and decision-making process, and offer tools to help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of their decisions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Press Photography, Documentary, and Campaign Filmmaking

This course takes on a hands-on, practical approach to help students to better understand
visual language, to be able to distinguish between quality photographs from random shots. In a
world full of visual images that surround us and communicates with it is not only useful but also
necessary to understand their nature. This course will introduce students to the anatomy of
photo- and video camera. Helps to develop a story and how to tell it visually. Finally, to
experience the magic and creative force of editing.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Regional Studies

The aim of the course is to portray the non-European Regions from a complex perspective. The main idea behind the course is to analyse the main regions of the World from a political and economic perspective. The aim of the course is to enlarge our knowledge on the non-European world territories using the interdisciplinary tools of IR. It is a continuation of the Comparative History of Civilizations from a more contemporary perspective. The course leader invited experts on the different Areas. We focus on mainly foreign policy issues using a comprehensive approach and focusing on mainly the post-1989 developments of world regions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Social and Demographic Problems

The aim of the course is to make students acquainted with some social problems especially widespread or discussed in Hungary. Out of obtaining theoretical and statistical knowledge on different problems, students will visit also some institution where different social problems are treated or managed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Sustainable Procurement and Logistics

The main topics of the class are based on sustainability theory and the three fundamental aspects of supply chain management.(1) Sustainability theory and indicators (2) Sustainable product and process design (3)Sustainable procurement basics (4)Ecolabels and sustainability criteria (5) Green logistics and transportation (6) Reverse logistics (7)Product end-of-life cycle management (8) Life cycle costs and the financial side of sustainability programs (9) Emerging trends

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Budapest in the 20th Century: Historical Layers and Cultural Practice

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, cultural discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects, and to gain first hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours and strolls in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, music, architectural heritage, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city, as they are articulated, shaped and preserved in the contemporary urban space.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Entrepreneurs, Intrapreneurs, and Innovation

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand how evolving technologies are affecting all of our lives in a profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

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BUS 444 Digital Disruption

The course clarifies diverse (technological, economic, social, environmental) aspects of the digitalization induced disruption(s). It embraces various, often controversial tendencies connected to new aspects that accelerating digitalization generates – such as improved and potentially empowering access to internet enabled information and knowledge, on the one hand, and the growing impact of manipulative pressures like explosion of fake news and increasing echo chamber impacts created by intense usage of social media, on the other.

The course attempts to shed light on growing importance of data access and the contradicting consequences of big data analysis in personal (personal profiling vs. improved health prevention potential) as well as in business context (transformation of marketing, financial services, healthcare and health insurance).

The qualitative shift in digitalization tendencies connected to Artificial Intelligence, machine learning, robotization, complex automation, are often described by technology optimists as providers of solution for any challenges, while the same tendencies frequently are depicted as sources of social disempowerment. The concept of enactment (Orlikowski 1992, 2000) proposes a practical tool enabling to better understand the dynamic interplay among technology development processes and broader socio-economic tendencies facilitating to overcome dehumanized misperception(s) of technology and its disruptive effects and “nature”.

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

MAR 650 Public Relations

The primary purpose of the course is to introduce the theoretical basis of PR to the students
within the framework of marketing communication. The secondary aim of the course is to
provide a practical basis for students by introducing practitioners, decision-makers, industry
experts and renowned researchers via guest lectures and case studies.

Brand Management

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of the subjects of brands, brand equity and brand management. We highlight the specific characteristics of diverse brands such as retailer brands, country brands, luxury brands. The central theoretical model of the course is the customer-based brand equity model, both its sources and outcomes will be covered. We also focus on brand growth options and discuss the opportunities of brand architecture, brand extensions, brand revitalization and global branding. The course is designed for business students and requires basic marketing knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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NK4 NBK Security Studies

This course is a basic introduction to the field of security studies. It will examine contemporary issues in conflict and security studies and current major issues within the European and the Transatlantic security architecture (NATO, the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the EU), and global security issues (role of the UN Security Council, the emerging Responsibility to Protect doctrine in human security, the emergence of the so-called “new” security agenda) and surveys national security policies in Europe since the end of the Cold War. The course will also examine the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear weapons, chemical and biological weapons) and international non-proliferation and arms control regimes. The course covers a wide variety of topics to facilitate understanding of the global and regional security issues like current energy security developments and vulnerabilities related to EU, terrorism and counter-terrorism.

Language of Instruction: English   

Corporate Finance in Excel

While working in Excel on both smaller and more complex cases we review key problems of Corporate Finance decision making. We will review how to chose projects to invest in, how to analyse financial statements and predict financial performance. We will shortly review DCF-2 based business valuation techniques and focus on financing and dividend decisions. Students are expected to read theoretical materials in advance of the course (flipped-classroom concept) so we may concentrate on applying those for solving real-life-based cases during the classes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Hungarian for Beginners

This course is offered for students who want to acquire a basic command of the Hungarian language which would help them to obtain simple information and to express their requests and/or messages in a simple form. The course is also recommended for students who need only so-called "survival Hungarian".

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Hungarian for Intermediate Students

This course is offered for students who have a basic mastery of the Hungarian language and are at the intermediate level. The course is typically offered for 1.5 credits, but can be offered for 3 on a case-by-case basis.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 1.5   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Film and History

Three historical patterns, three regions have developed in Europe. Comparing the different development of the regions, this course reveals the distinctiveness of Central European history from both Eastern and Western patterns. By the outbreak of the First World War and the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, East-Central-Europe became the region of a number of small states. Have they been destined to become the satellites of the Great Powers? How did the region become the hotbed of such ideologies and dictatorships as fascism and bolshevism? What options were open to the nations of the region and especially to Hungarian society? These and other issues are highlighted through the examination of the main conflicts of the 20th century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Introduction to Legal Studies

The course deals with the legal system as the set of principles and standards of conduct, as Well as the law as a ruling system governing the society and having general application for it. Main topics of the course are the basic problems of legal reasoning as the characteristics of Law. During the course we will examine the law as a system of norms, accompanied by state sanctions, the process of lawmaking, the legal sources, legal norms, legal relationships, the court system, the institutional court, the hierarchy of norms, the role of the constitution. The Contract Law part includes explication of the offer and the acceptance", "the consideration", "the parties to the Contract and the major contractual rights and obligations. The Corporation Law part covers the business organization types, formation and management questions. Labour Law issues shall be dealt with in the course for all management issues. This will include: employment contract and management liability.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Debate (Model United Nations)

The objective of this course is to teach students the tenants of formal debate in a government setting, in such forums as the United Nations, African Union, Arab League, North Atlantic Treaty Organization or European Union. Students will become familiar with world events, and more importantly, will be able to argue about them from points of view that are not their own with regards to each issue.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Relations: 1945 to Present

This course gives a broad overview of international relations since 1945 with a regional focus on Europe. It traces the major political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved from the end of World War II to the present day. The first three sessions of the course will give an overview of international history in the twentieth century. Moving on, roughly two thirds of the course will be dedicated to case studies, partly based on student presentations. We will start with the concepts of international order and of the nation-state. In terms of world politics we will deal with the emergence of the two superpowers post 1945, the Cold War, and its end.

We will then deal with three cases in more detail: 1 former Yugoslavia, 2 contemporary Russia and the post-Soviet space, and 3 the Arab-Israeli conflict and the contemporary Middle East. All three cases are exemplary on the way how international politics is conducted in the 21st century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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European Union Politics

This course gives a broad overview of European integration since 1945. We will cover the history and theories of integration, major institutions, policy areas, and issues of debate. The historic part will place European integration into the global context of superpower domination and Europe searching for a new role since 1990. The part covering theories of integration confronts us with concepts and visions for Europe. They span from the concept of a “Europe of fatherlands” (Charles de Gaulle) to a full-fledged federal vision of a “United States of Europe” (Jean Monnet).

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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PSY 311 Personality Types and Team Dynamics

This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to group dynamics and teamwork in the organizational context. Course content draws from a large body of group dynamics research in psychology, applied social science, and management. The modern professional team environment emphasizes the value of diversity and the strengths of its members. More than ever, today’s leaders must gain insight into individual differences in order to maximize talents, reframe potential sources of misunderstanding, and facilitate collaboration. This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to processes and issues that teams face: team development, social dilemma, communication, conflict, power, decision-making, leadership, problem solving, creativity, diversity, virtual teamwork, culture, reward systems, and training. This course emphasizes self-discovery and is highly interactive. In addition to providing academic content, the aim of this course is to facilitate student's self-awareness and self-reflexivity. Students will be equipped as practitioners of Psychological Type Theory, one of the most widely used frameworks for personality assessment and team development in the business world today. Students synthesize course content in a final service-learning group project involving a professional team interview, content-based team analysis and submission of a team development plan.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Enterprise: Start-Ups

The course gives a practice oriented, case-based introduction to the conditions as well as the means of venture creation and operation of startups. Students will learn how to avoid mistakes and pitfalls as well as how to take advantage of the largest benefit of a small and agile organization: the gift of flexibility, autonomous decision making and bias for action. The main goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to discover, select, process, interpret and use the necessary data to take decisions in an uncertain world and, then, to exploit market opportunities. The class is designed to provide students with the tools, methods and approaches - all through practical cases - which startups need to master in order to start and manage a successful new business venture. By the end of the course students will be able to identify opportunities, conduct customer development, develop business models and value proposition and test their hypothesis in a matter of hours/days. As a part of the class students are required to form teams and come up with ideas for their startup.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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SME Marketing

Students will be expected to study and understand marketing theory and practice, and more importantly learn how to apply their marketing knowledge and skills to real life problem solving situations by creating marketing action plans for SME organisations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Policy and Strategy

Strategic management can be defined as the art and science of formulating, implementing, and evaluating cross-functional decisions that enable an organization to achieve its objectives. As this definition implies, strategic management focuses on integrating management, marketing, finance/accounting, production/operations, research and development, and computer information systems to achieve organizational success.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Business Case Studies

The International Business course is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity required to work within a global environment. The course addresses issues in the strategy, organization marketing, and management of companies operating in the global market. In addition, the course will integrate the sciences of geography and history along with individual country flags and on-going current events.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Ethics

This course explores the ethical challenges facing business today, and how individuals and firms can address those challenges. The course aims to enhance the skills and expertise of participants in through combining examination of ethical and managerial theory with discussion of common ethical problems in context. It aims also to sensitize students with ethical aspects of business decisions. The theory and the practice of business ethics will be discussed during the course. Course material includes individual moral theory, the development of ethical organizational culture, the development of ethical management systems designed to respond to ethical challenges, and wide-ranging discussion regarding major trends, challenges, and opportunities in the field of ethical business.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Strategic Management

Weighing the ins and outs of crafting, implementing, and executing company strategies forces a total enterprise perspective, demands that many internal and external situational considerations be dealt with at once, and calls for judgments about how all the relevant factors add up. This trait is what makes strategic management an integrative course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success.

Throughout the course, the spotlight will be trained on the foremost issue in running a business enterprise: “What must managers do, and do well, to make the company a winner in the game of business?” The answer that emerges, and which becomes the theme of the course, is that good strategy-making and good strategy execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good management. The mission of the course is to explore why good strategic management leads to good business performance, to present the basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis, and to drill you in the methods of crafting a well-conceived strategy and executing it competently. Videos and case studies in order to develop students’ capacity to think strategically about a company, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the caliber of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining sustainable competitive advantage.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Macroeconomics

The course gives a practice oriented and systematic introduction to economy and economics in a macroscale. It is based on the professor’s practical experience in business management, investment, in running of own business, supporting young entrepreneurs and SMEs and in participation in the variety of the EU projects. The professor will also use her theoretical knowledge gained during doctoral studies completed in economics in the area of management.

Consequently, the main goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to discover, select, process, interpret and use the necessary data to be able to take economic decisions in an uncertain world and,then, to exploit market opportunities.

Since the main factors affecting economic skills and abilities are:

1. Personal characteristics such as alertness, hard-working attitude, ability to connect facts, creativity, teamwork and respect to others,

2. Knowledge acquired through the formal education and by means of on-the-job experience and learning-by-doing, the class is designed to provide future business & administration practitioners with the tools they need to master the most important issues involved in starting a professional carrier.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Globalization (Economic Theory)

Economy and Social Interaction among the various persons in our interconnected society. That activity and exchange necessarily take place among and between persons, and therefore have an ethical dimension. But the complexity of Politics, Economy and Social Interaction in the global agenda environment, as well as the rapid changes in different settings and practices caused by global changes. Technological and cultural changes often make it very difficult for us to perceive ethical issues in Cultural Globalization and to know how to deal with them.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Economics and the European Union

The course will commence with a historical overview of the initial post-war stages of formation, along with the reasons for arriving at a decision to link states in a common economic policy setting. From there, students will examine the theory and practice of economic integration, followed by monetary integration and monetary union.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Transition and Post-Transition Challenges in Hungary

The course is built around three sub-subjects, all related to the concept of change. One is socio-economic transformation or ‘regime change’ of Central and Eastern Europe. The second, and main, part deals with Hungary, in particular. This part covers a wide range of economic issues such as privatization, structural changes, fiscal and monetary regimes as well as topics related to geopolitical issues. The third part investigates recent developments and the particular challenges that Hungary faces within the Western alliance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Basic Finance

This course provides students with an intuitive and conceptual understanding

of finance. It aims to introduce students to the logic that drives finance so that

they will appreciate the interrelationships of interest rates, risk and return, and

their influence on corporate financial decisions. Utilising the theory and

analytical tools presented in the course, students should thus be able to

understand and evaluate events in the financial world.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Corporate Finance I

The aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and techniques of Corporate Finance and applying them to the main decisions faced by the financial manager. The concepts are immediately applicable to all firms, both large or small, privately run or publicly traded and involved in any industry – whether manufacturing, retail or service.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Corporate Finance II

This course is structured as a sequel to FIN 351 Corporate Finance I where students will gain greater ground in their understanding of corporate finance. Students will be introduced to the principles of Capital Structure, Dividend Policy and Working Capital management, Ratio\nAnalysis and Leasing understand the real world considerations that financial managers face.Students will be introduced to the other cornerstone of Corporate Financial decision-making:\nCapital Structure and the proportions of debt and equity financing that companies should adopt.\nWe will begin our study with the famous theoretical propositions of Modigliani and Miller and analyze its applications to real world scenarios. The course will dwell in much detail to the discussion of how companies evaluate between the choices of internal and external financing","how they plan and manage working capital and short term financing","the basis of share repurchase and dividend policies, ratio analysis and benchmarking, as well as identification of relevant cash flows in the lease decisions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Investment Analysis

This course takes the viewpoint of you, as an investor, faced with a plethora of investment choices from which you decide your own investment portfolio. The course is divided into 3 sections: the first section will examine the system of financial markets and instruments traded in these markets. The next section will detail the methods and tools of investment analysis used by financial analysts as well as introduce the techniques of portfolio selection and management, which are critical in determining the overall investment performance of your portfolio. Our final section will harness the collective knowledge from the earlier 2 sections and relate the concepts to that of personal finance and wealth management, and investment philosophies and beliefs.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Intelligent Systems

Intelligent systems course provides a comprehensive, up-to-date guide to today 2019s revolutionary management support system technologies, and it demonstrates how they can be used for better decision making. The course takes the perspective of a general manager rather than a computer programmer, systems analyst or a computer scientist. The most important management support systems, such as data warehousing, business analytics, data mining, business performance management systems, knowledge management technologies and artificial intelligence methods are discussed and demonstrated. The course has three major objectives:

- to highlight the theoretical background of the intelligent systems

- to demonstrate students the tools necessary for understanding the features of intelligent systems

- to offer practical experiences about the application of different intelligent systems.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management Information Systems

The Management Information Systems course provides a good understanding of the role of information technology in the modern organization. It covers more or less all areas where a manager can come across with information systems. The objective of this course is not to create CIOs, it is rather to enable students to understand opportunities and threats that are coming along with IT. They have to sharpen their knowledge about new technologies, get open minded for changes, and discover the effects of changes on organizations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management

The purpose of the course is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of management, including basic concepts and terminology. Business firms around the world are experimenting with new organizational designs, changing their routines and processes as they seek to improve their current performance and their growth prospects. In the process they change the scope of their business operations, redraw their organization charts, redefine the allocation of decision-making authority and responsibility, and reconsider which activities to conduct in-house and which to outsource.

The course introduces students with powerful conceptual frameworks for analyzing the interrelations between organizational design features, competitive strategy and the business environment. Students will spend a significant portion of their time diagnosing the fit and misfits between various elements on the basis of open system theory. Specifically, it is the intent of this course to blend theory with practice, requiring students to observe the business environment, and actively applying concepts to the “real world”. The course draws on numerous examples of contemporary organizations through the use of case studies and role plays.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Environmental Management

To start, topics of sustainability, and instruments of environmental policy will be explained. We indicate how environmental policy is needed to correct market distortions caused by externalities, and corporate profitability and long-term survival is also influenced by this policy.

Environmental strategies can support business strategy and competitiveness provided they are properly chosen. We analyze the environmental strategy options of firms and selection of environmental tools that exist in the corporate toolbox, together with the circumstances that influence the correct choice among strategies and tools. The greenest is not necessarily the best for all kinds of companies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tourism Management and Marketing

This course will focus on the management of different types of tourism in a range of environment throughout the world. The development of tourism industry and the issues with tourism management have been growing at an unprecedented rate over the past decade. The industry’s sustainable and ethical management is essential, especially in the light of climate change, economic recessions and political disturbance. Different typologies of tourism will be discussed including cultural tourism, ecotourism and health tourism. The course will also provide an overview of the way in which tourism is managed in various regions and destinations of the world. This will involve the evaluation of new management and modern marketing tools being used in the industry.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Human Resource Management

Students will be provided with the technical background needed to be a knowledgeable consumer of human resource products and services, to manage HR effectively, or to be a successful HR professional. Course will emphasize how managers can more effectively acquire, develop, compensate, and manage the internal and external environment that relates to the management of human resources. Much attention will be given to the strategic use of HR Management and its evolvement across borders and cultures.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management Skills

The course will consist of lectures and seminars every week. Students will learn the basic concepts from lectures and the compulsory reading, then analyze and use the skills in cases and critically evaluate them in form of group discussions. The sequence of topics is built step by step from the self (please see the schedule) to managing groups, and so are the assignments.

The course aims at developing the student on three levels: knowledge, attitude and skill. The classes will include parts where readings are discussed and presentations given about recent findings about a skill with the aim of enriching students' knowledge. By analyzing cases and showing the enhanced performance and better results, an attitude towards conscious use of skills will be developed. On the knowledge gained, and the positive attitude developed, the skill level will be built by practicing in class and outside of it.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Global Business Stategy

The aim of the course is to provide a basis for international strategy analyses and formulation in global context. The most relevant concepts and topics will be discussed and illustrated by case studies. Some of them are the following: international strategy, reasons for foreign market entry and its main modes, multinational and global industries, configurations of multinational enterprises (MNEs), selection of host country, subsidiaries and their roles in MNEs, across border governance and ethical challenges and dilemmas.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organization Behavior and Design

In order to create good working climates and successful organizations companies need to have a clear purpose of existence together with outstanding leadership fitting their complex societal, economic and technological environments. During this course we will expand our knowledge about the hard aspects of management and organisation, strategy, structure and organisational design and investigate in detail the soft aspects of organisational and work life, most importantly personality, character development, motivation, teams, learning, culture and leadership.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Human Resource Management

This course is an introductory course to graduate students, who plan to work in a multinational environment in the future. The purpose of the course is to learn international aspects of the main functions of HRM and the place and role of the HR function within organizations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Marketing

The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization 2019s resources to satisfy customers 2019 wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. We will examine how marketers: understand consumers 2019 needs and wants, develop products and services that provide superior value, and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Services Marketing

The service sector of the world economy is huge and still growing, the complexity and diversity of services have been increasing over the past 50 years. All of the developed economies now have large service sectors and many service firms operate internationally. The course will highlight the fundamental differences between goods and services focusing on the managerial implications. An overview will be provided on service operations including service-related issues on innovation, communication, pricing, managing demand and managing people.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Advertising Management

This is an advertising management, especially practice-oriented course.

The overall aim is to create a deep understanding of marketing communication

planning and evaluation in general and to make participants of the course able

to efficiently translate local specialties into international communication

programs with respect to cultural differences

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Decision Techniques

Problem structuring, modeling, decision making and its techniques will be considered, with specific emphasis on their practical aspects. The course will explore the rational, emotional and group dynamic background of decisions and examine how decision theory, originally developed as a theory for individual decision making, can be applied to organizational decision making processes. This course is intended for students in various management disciplines. It relies on related economics and political science.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Operations Management

This course focuses on topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. These include quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Project Management

Owing to the turbulent environment, one of the most salient features of an organisation, especially one of a business related in nature, is change. Change in order to avoid disadvantageous impacts and/or to utilise the positive ones. Direction of change is set by the organisational strategy while the means of execution of the strategy are projects and project management. Thus, projects are building blocks in the organisational strategy. The course (bearing in mind the case of single projects) encompasses the profession of project management from the point of view of the three aspects of competency, such as: knowledge, i.e. familiarity with the project management toolkit, skill, i.e. the ability of applying the knowledge, and attitude, i.e. the approach toward projects and managing projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Digital Disruption

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand what digital disruption is and how it is affecting all of our lives in an accelerating and profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Foundations of Psychology

Why are some people more reliable than others? Is intelligence heritable? Does violence on TV make children more aggressive? Why do some people believe in superstitions? Why do we remember some events in our life but forget others? Can media messages change people’s attitudes to smoking? What makes somebody practice the banjo for six hours a day? Why do some people report having been abducted by space aliens?

Psychology studies the processes taking place in the human mind and the factors that determine how people behave. As the science of mind and behaviour, psychology has found answers to many questions like the ones above, and produced new questions still open to inquiry. This course is an introduction to psychological science providing students with an overview of the key topics in contemporary research. The lectures cover the following major areas of psychology: (1) cognitive psychology, (2) developmental psychology, (3) social psychology, (4) personality and intelligence, (5) psychopathology and (6) consciousness.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Press Photography, Documentary, and Campaign Filmmaking

This course takes on a hands-on, practical approach to help students to better understand
visual language, to be able to distinguish between quality photographs from random shots. In a
world full of visual images that surround us and communicates with it is not only useful but also
necessary to understand their nature. This course will introduce students to the anatomy of
photo- and video camera. Helps to develop a story and how to tell it visually. Finally, to
experience the magic and creative force of editing.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Retailing Management

The course covers the structural and strategic issues of international retail activities. Moreover, we discuss the tasks related to retail strategy (merchandise, retail pricing, communication, services, location, store layout), and financial performance measurement of retail companies. Exercises, case studies, project works are based on the examples of leading international retailers.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Regional Studies

The aim of the course is to portray the non-European Regions from a complex perspective. The main idea behind the course is to analyse the main regions of the World from a political and economic perspective. The aim of the course is to enlarge our knowledge on the non-European world territories using the interdisciplinary tools of IR. It is a continuation of the Comparative History of Civilizations from a more contemporary perspective. The course leader invited experts on the different Areas. We focus on mainly foreign policy issues using a comprehensive approach and focusing on mainly the post-1989 developments of world regions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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History of Modern Europe

This course will provide an overview of the history of twentieth century Europe. A focus will be laid on Central Europe, in particular Hungary, and on how major West European states (France, Great Britain, Germany) and the superpowers (USA, former Soviet Union) influenced and shaped political and economic developments in Central and East Central Europe.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Social and Demographic Problems

The aim of the course is to make students acquainted with some social problems especially widespread or discussed in Hungary. Out of obtaining theoretical and statistical knowledge on different problems, students will visit also some institution where different social problems are treated or managed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Budapest in the 20th Century: Historical Layers and Cultural Practice

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, cultural discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects, and to gain first hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours and strolls in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, music, architectural heritage, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city, as they are articulated, shaped and preserved in the contemporary urban space.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Budapest: Explorations of the Urban Space

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, artistic etc. discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects and to gain first-hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Communism in East-Central Europe

During the semester, we will investigate the Sovietization of Hungary after the end of the Second World War, the Stalinist political and social system, the phase of state socialism, everyday life during communism and the period of the transition to democracy. We will also analyze the communist dictatorships and the 1989-1990 revolutions in other countries of the region, such as Poland, East-Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Yugoslavia. The students will watch two feature films connected with the course’s topic and have an opportunity to visit the House of Terror Museum.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Consumer Behavior: Millenials and Generation Z

According to Goldman Sachs, millennials were born between the years 1980 and 2000. In the U.S, millennials are now the biggest generation in its history, even bigger than the Baby Boomers.

Generation Z (Gen Z) is defined as those born between 2000 onwards. It is estimated that the size of the Gen Z population in India is an incredible 356 million people. In the U.S. by 2020, Gen Z will account for almost 40% of consumers and will soon overtake millennials as the largest generation.

While millennials and Gen Z share some similarities, they are also noticeable differences. Since technology is now evolving more rapidly than ever, both millennials and Gen Z are not only being affected by technology, their behavior is actually shaping its future. This course will provide a deep dive into the consumer behavior of both millennials and Gen Z and explore how effectively brands utilize messaging and emerging technologies to grab the attention of those who have short attention spans.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Cross Cultural Communication and Marketing

In the first part of the semester (until the midterm) the focus of the course will be on discussing cultures, different theories of culture, country images, stereotypes, analyzing specific countries from different points of view. In the second part of the semester - based on the concepts learnt in the first part - we will practice how to use this knowledge in evaluating companies’ international marketing activities and formulating intercultural marketing strategies.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Entrepreneurs, Intrapreneurs, and Innovation

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand how evolving technologies are affecting all of our lives in a profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Innovation Management

The course is designed to introduce students to the main theories and concepts of innovation and provides basic understanding of how innovative activities are managed. Among other things it deals with the concepts of open innovation, disruptive innovation, social innovation and “frugal” innovation.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Human Resource Management

During the course important topics of human resource management and their international dimensions will be discussed, such as international career, special issues of expatriation, international recruitment and selection, training and development, international aspects of performance appraisal and compensation.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

The course is a combination of lectures and seminars. In some cases the two will be combined. It provides the participants with the understanding of how to design, implement and control companies’ international marketing activity as well as of how to elaborate an international marketing plan. The students will learn to assess the global market with respect to the cultural dynamics, the business customs and practices, the political and the geographical environment.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Managerial Accounting

Management accounting systems accumulate, classify, summarize and report information that will assist employees within an organization in their decision-making, planning, control and performance measurement activities. The course material will be presented from the perspective of both the provider and user of cost information.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Managing the Multinational Enterprise

This course aims to achieve a double objective: First, to develop students’ emotional intelligence and skills that are required to be able to work and collaborate with others within the context of a Multinational Corporation. Second, to help every student to gain insights about the role that most naturally suits he/she in his/her professional career. In order to achieve these goals, the course is designed to be as practice-oriented and as hands-on as possible with a micro view on management. Students will have the opportunity to listen guest lectures invited from multinational corporations, who will share their insights and personal experiences; as well as provide examples to common challenges and potential solutions.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Online and Digital Marketing

Online and digital marketing is an exciting area of marketing practice. In this course, we will cover the what, why, where, to whom and how of major current online and digital marketing approaches. The course will cover the different areas of marketing, and so include the marketing mix elements from consumer behaviour, digital products, technology aspects, innovation acceptance, online pricing, online distribution, online and digital communication.

We will put special focus on selected specific areas of online presence, content creation and communication interactions as search engine marketing, social media channels and participation in audience interactions.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Public Relations

In this course the students have the opportunity to prepare for effective and ethical public communication. They will acquire knowledge about the history and different theories of effective public relations and related skills,e.g. practical arts of market/audience analysis, campaign development, crisis management, media relations and communication ethics.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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The Economics and Ethics of Globalization

Learning the practices and consequences of managing ethically in the changing cultural, economic, political, technological, in a global environment.

This course examines the norms or principles that establish and justify societies and determine the rights and responsibilities of a society in a globalized world. Furthermore, we will analyze, what is the responsibility of individuals in relation to each other and to society as a whole, and of a society in relation to other societies. The course will consider the application of these principles to such issues as justice, ethics, political, and social institutions, in a world community.

The class is, first and foremost, a course about ethics and economics in a globalized world. It is also a class designed with a heavy emphasis on reading, writing, and class participation.

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Corporate Finance in Excel

While working in Excel on both smaller and more complex cases we review key problems of Corporate Finance decision making. We will review how to chose projects to invest in, how to analyse financial statements and predict financial performance. We will shortly review DCF-2 based business valuation techniques and focus on financing and dividend decisions. Students are expected to read theoretical materials in advance of the course (flipped-classroom concept) so we may concentrate on applying those for solving real-life-based cases during the classes.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Hungarian for Beginners

This course is offered for students who want to acquire a basic command of the Hungarian language which would help them to obtain simple information and to express their requests and/or messages in a simple form. The course is also recommended for students who need only so-called "survival Hungarian".

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Fields and Scenes: Reading the Arts, Culture and Design

The course provides an overview of how cultural fields are shaped and constructed from the perspective of the classics of scholarship on cultural production and art, taking stock of the current trends and interpretations of how cultural organizations, the art markets, and culture beyond markets work. Field visits (an independent radio station, cultural and community centers, and an ‘underground plaza’) are planned during the course

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Budapest: Explorations of the Urban Space

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, artistic etc. discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects and to gain first-hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Film and History

Three historical patterns, three regions have developed in Europe. Comparing the different development of the regions, this course reveals the distinctiveness of Central European history from both Eastern and Western patterns. By the outbreak of the First World War and the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, East-Central-Europe became the region of a number of small states. Have they been destined to become the satellites of the Great Powers? How did the region become the hotbed of such ideologies and dictatorships as fascism and bolshevism? What options were open to the nations of the region and especially to Hungarian society? These and other issues are highlighted through the examination of the main conflicts of the 20th century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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History of Modern Europe

This course will provide an overview of the history of twentieth century Europe. A focus will be laid on Central Europe, in particular Hungary, and on how major West European states (France, Great Britain, Germany) and the superpowers (USA, former Soviet Union) influenced and shaped political and economic developments in Central and East Central Europe.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Debate (Model United Nations)

The objective of this course is to teach students the tenants of formal debate in a government setting, in such forums as the United Nations, African Union, Arab League, North Atlantic Treaty Organization or European Union. Students will become familiar with world events, and more importantly, will be able to argue about them from points of view that are not their own with regards to each issue.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Relations: 1945 to Present

This course gives a broad overview of international relations since 1945 with a regional focus on Europe. It traces the major political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved from the end of World War II to the present day. The first three sessions of the course will give an overview of international history in the twentieth century. Moving on, roughly two thirds of the course will be dedicated to case studies, partly based on student presentations. We will start with the concepts of international order and of the nation-state. In terms of world politics we will deal with the emergence of the two superpowers post 1945, the Cold War, and its end.

We will then deal with three cases in more detail: 1 former Yugoslavia, 2 contemporary Russia and the post-Soviet space, and 3 the Arab-Israeli conflict and the contemporary Middle East. All three cases are exemplary on the way how international politics is conducted in the 21st century.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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European Union Politics

This course gives a broad overview of European integration since 1945. We will cover the history and theories of integration, major institutions, policy areas, and issues of debate. The historic part will place European integration into the global context of superpower domination and Europe searching for a new role since 1990. The part covering theories of integration confronts us with concepts and visions for Europe. They span from the concept of a “Europe of fatherlands” (Charles de Gaulle) to a full-fledged federal vision of a “United States of Europe” (Jean Monnet).

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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PSY 311 Personality Types and Team Dynamics

This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to group dynamics and teamwork in the organizational context. Course content draws from a large body of group dynamics research in psychology, applied social science, and management. The modern professional team environment emphasizes the value of diversity and the strengths of its members. More than ever, today’s leaders must gain insight into individual differences in order to maximize talents, reframe potential sources of misunderstanding, and facilitate collaboration. This course offers knowledge and practical experience related to processes and issues that teams face: team development, social dilemma, communication, conflict, power, decision-making, leadership, problem solving, creativity, diversity, virtual teamwork, culture, reward systems, and training. This course emphasizes self-discovery and is highly interactive. In addition to providing academic content, the aim of this course is to facilitate student's self-awareness and self-reflexivity. Students will be equipped as practitioners of Psychological Type Theory, one of the most widely used frameworks for personality assessment and team development in the business world today. Students synthesize course content in a final service-learning group project involving a professional team interview, content-based team analysis and submission of a team development plan.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Enterprise: Start-Ups

The course gives a practice oriented, case-based introduction to the conditions as well as the means of venture creation and operation of startups. Students will learn how to avoid mistakes and pitfalls as well as how to take advantage of the largest benefit of a small and agile organization: the gift of flexibility, autonomous decision making and bias for action. The main goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to discover, select, process, interpret and use the necessary data to take decisions in an uncertain world and, then, to exploit market opportunities. The class is designed to provide students with the tools, methods and approaches - all through practical cases - which startups need to master in order to start and manage a successful new business venture. By the end of the course students will be able to identify opportunities, conduct customer development, develop business models and value proposition and test their hypothesis in a matter of hours/days. As a part of the class students are required to form teams and come up with ideas for their startup.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Business Case Studies

The International Business course is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity required to work within a global environment. The course addresses issues in the strategy, organization marketing, and management of companies operating in the global market. In addition, the course will integrate the sciences of geography and history along with individual country flags and on-going current events.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Ethics

This course explores the ethical challenges facing business today, and how individuals and firms can address those challenges. The course aims to enhance the skills and expertise of participants in through combining examination of ethical and managerial theory with discussion of common ethical problems in context. It aims also to sensitize students with ethical aspects of business decisions. The theory and the practice of business ethics will be discussed during the course. Course material includes individual moral theory, the development of ethical organizational culture, the development of ethical management systems designed to respond to ethical challenges, and wide-ranging discussion regarding major trends, challenges, and opportunities in the field of ethical business.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Entrepreneurship

The aim of this course is to provide a meaty and creative environment for teasing ideas on the controversies and complexity of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Social Entrepreneurship plus other trendy and sensual buzzwords of this field.

Students learn about the diverse background of CSR (corporate philanthropy, business ethics, strategic management, etc.), the various existing – and often competing – approaches to this management concept by looking at best and worst business examples. By listening to guest speakers and seeing the results of most recent research we understand the trends and nature of the “industry” around CSR. Students practice the preparation and evaluation of CSR actions and tools. The course also provides and the opportunity to meet real-life professionals of CSR.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Strategic Management

Weighing the ins and outs of crafting, implementing, and executing company strategies forces a total enterprise perspective, demands that many internal and external situational considerations be dealt with at once, and calls for judgments about how all the relevant factors add up. This trait is what makes strategic management an integrative course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success.

Throughout the course, the spotlight will be trained on the foremost issue in running a business enterprise: “What must managers do, and do well, to make the company a winner in the game of business?” The answer that emerges, and which becomes the theme of the course, is that good strategy-making and good strategy execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good management. The mission of the course is to explore why good strategic management leads to good business performance, to present the basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis, and to drill you in the methods of crafting a well-conceived strategy and executing it competently. Videos and case studies in order to develop students’ capacity to think strategically about a company, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the caliber of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining sustainable competitive advantage.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Globalization (Economic Theory)

Economy and Social Interaction among the various persons in our interconnected society. That activity and exchange necessarily take place among and between persons, and therefore have an ethical dimension. But the complexity of Politics, Economy and Social Interaction in the global agenda environment, as well as the rapid changes in different settings and practices caused by global changes. Technological and cultural changes often make it very difficult for us to perceive ethical issues in Cultural Globalization and to know how to deal with them.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Economics and the European Union

The course will commence with a historical overview of the initial post-war stages of formation, along with the reasons for arriving at a decision to link states in a common economic policy setting. From there, students will examine the theory and practice of economic integration, followed by monetary integration and monetary union.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Transition and Post-Transition Challenges in Hungary

The course is built around three sub-subjects, all related to the concept of change. One is socio-economic transformation or ‘regime change’ of Central and Eastern Europe. The second, and main, part deals with Hungary, in particular. This part covers a wide range of economic issues such as privatization, structural changes, fiscal and monetary regimes as well as topics related to geopolitical issues. The third part investigates recent developments and the particular challenges that Hungary faces within the Western alliance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Corporate Finance I

The aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and techniques of Corporate Finance and applying them to the main decisions faced by the financial manager. The concepts are immediately applicable to all firms, both large or small, privately run or publicly traded and involved in any industry – whether manufacturing, retail or service.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Environmental Management

To start, topics of sustainability, and instruments of environmental policy will be explained. We indicate how environmental policy is needed to correct market distortions caused by externalities, and corporate profitability and long-term survival is also influenced by this policy.

Environmental strategies can support business strategy and competitiveness provided they are properly chosen. We analyze the environmental strategy options of firms and selection of environmental tools that exist in the corporate toolbox, together with the circumstances that influence the correct choice among strategies and tools. The greenest is not necessarily the best for all kinds of companies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Tourism Management and Marketing

This course will focus on the management of different types of tourism in a range of environment throughout the world. The development of tourism industry and the issues with tourism management have been growing at an unprecedented rate over the past decade. The industry’s sustainable and ethical management is essential, especially in the light of climate change, economic recessions and political disturbance. Different typologies of tourism will be discussed including cultural tourism, ecotourism and health tourism. The course will also provide an overview of the way in which tourism is managed in various regions and destinations of the world. This will involve the evaluation of new management and modern marketing tools being used in the industry.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Human Resource Management

Students will be provided with the technical background needed to be a knowledgeable consumer of human resource products and services, to manage HR effectively, or to be a successful HR professional. Course will emphasize how managers can more effectively acquire, develop, compensate, and manage the internal and external environment that relates to the management of human resources. Much attention will be given to the strategic use of HR Management and its evolvement across borders and cultures.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management Skills

The course will consist of lectures and seminars every week. Students will learn the basic concepts from lectures and the compulsory reading, then analyze and use the skills in cases and critically evaluate them in form of group discussions. The sequence of topics is built step by step from the self (please see the schedule) to managing groups, and so are the assignments.

The course aims at developing the student on three levels: knowledge, attitude and skill. The classes will include parts where readings are discussed and presentations given about recent findings about a skill with the aim of enriching students' knowledge. By analyzing cases and showing the enhanced performance and better results, an attitude towards conscious use of skills will be developed. On the knowledge gained, and the positive attitude developed, the skill level will be built by practicing in class and outside of it.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Global Business Stategy

The aim of the course is to provide a basis for international strategy analyses and formulation in global context. The most relevant concepts and topics will be discussed and illustrated by case studies. Some of them are the following: international strategy, reasons for foreign market entry and its main modes, multinational and global industries, configurations of multinational enterprises (MNEs), selection of host country, subsidiaries and their roles in MNEs, across border governance and ethical challenges and dilemmas.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Marketing

The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization 2019s resources to satisfy customers 2019 wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. We will examine how marketers: understand consumers 2019 needs and wants, develop products and services that provide superior value, and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Services Marketing

The service sector of the world economy is huge and still growing, the complexity and diversity of services have been increasing over the past 50 years. All of the developed economies now have large service sectors and many service firms operate internationally. The course will highlight the fundamental differences between goods and services focusing on the managerial implications. An overview will be provided on service operations including service-related issues on innovation, communication, pricing, managing demand and managing people.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Decision Techniques

Problem structuring, modeling, decision making and its techniques will be considered, with specific emphasis on their practical aspects. The course will explore the rational, emotional and group dynamic background of decisions and examine how decision theory, originally developed as a theory for individual decision making, can be applied to organizational decision making processes. This course is intended for students in various management disciplines. It relies on related economics and political science.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Decision Making Skills

This course will provide an overview of the field of behavioral decision making and decision analytical perspectives. It addresses both the theoretical and practical processes and skills of decision making at the individual, organisational and social levels.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Project Management

Owing to the turbulent environment, one of the most salient features of an organisation, especially one of a business related in nature, is change. Change in order to avoid disadvantageous impacts and/or to utilise the positive ones. Direction of change is set by the organisational strategy while the means of execution of the strategy are projects and project management. Thus, projects are building blocks in the organisational strategy. The course (bearing in mind the case of single projects) encompasses the profession of project management from the point of view of the three aspects of competency, such as: knowledge, i.e. familiarity with the project management toolkit, skill, i.e. the ability of applying the knowledge, and attitude, i.e. the approach toward projects and managing projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Communism in East-Central Europe After World War II

This course examines the rise and fall of Soviet domination in the countries of East-Central Europe after 1945. The primary focus will be on Hungary but we will also analyze the communist dictatorships and the 1989-1990 revolutions in other countries of the region, such as Poland, East-Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Yugoslavia. During the semester, we will investigate the Sovietization of Hungary after the end of the Second World War, the Stalinist political and social system, the phase of state socialism, everyday life during communism and the period of the transition to democracy. We will also analyze the communist dictatorships and the 1989-1990 revolutions in other countries of the region, such as Poland, East-Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Yugoslavia. The students will watch two feature films connected with the course’s topic and have an opportunity to visit the House of Terror Museum.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Business Law

This course aims to provide students with the knowledge of legal structures and the operation of international business, tracking the legal forms (trade in goods, protection and licensing of international property rights, foreign direct investment) and basic market entry strategies of firms as they expand into international markets, indicating how law aids, prohibits or influences individual contractual deals.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Global Social Change and Global Inequalities

The course analyses key social processes (economic growth, economic inequalities, population and family change, migration, economic integration). It relates them to key social and institutional change for the last 60 years. It reflects on key theories and general interpretations of these changes from the perspective of current globalization. This course is a “must” for everybody who, as future international relations expert, sociologist, historian, economist, businessman, politician or administrative person would like to develop a broad interpretative perspective on processes of social change and social structures in our global society.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Elements of Accounting

During the course basic accounting issues will be studied. This includes foundations, techniques (double-entry) and basic items of the financial statements such as: inventories, property, plant and equipment, receivables – payables, intangible assets, revenue recognition, etc. Some basic but more complex accounting issues will also be included (provisions, events after the reporting date, etc.) The course is not designed to explain a specific set of accounting regulation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Managerial Accounting

The course is designed to develop the knowledge and understanding of students on the principles and concepts relating to managerial accounting and apply the calculation techniques that form industry standards.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Economics

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to identify trends affecting business, understand world economic systems and how they interact with and affect business, learn the different forms of business, understand what is needed to start a small business or to own a franchise and the importance of entrepreneurship in business. The role of ethics in business and socially responsible conduct of business will be emphasized.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Business Communication

In this course, students will be given the tools necessary to communicate in a variety of business situations. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to understand a situation, argue logically in favor of their position or goals, and then apply a correct communications strategy to the situation and the person they are communicating with.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Global Anti-Corruption Business and Governance Strategies

This course will begin with an overview of corruption, its various forms, and types, as it applies to the business world globally and regionally. It will move on to define the problems associated with tackling these types and the continuing need for governmental participation and development on a global scale in order to address and empower against corruption and corrupt practices. The course will consider what corrupt practices are common globally, as well as distinct problems and issues associated with the EU’s strategy and contribution, in addition to the roles of the international community in terms of organizations such as multilateral agencies and donors. Political efforts by way of improving public administration transparency and accountability will be considered and the course will conclude with consideration of the obstacles to reform and the anticipated future strategies to maximize potential impact in governance and business practices.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Contact Hours: 3 Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Valuation

Knowing what an asset is worth and what determines that value is a pre-requisite for intelligent decision making – in choosing investments for a portfolio, in deciding on the appropriate price to pay or receive in a takeover and in making investment, financing and dividend choices when running a business. The premise of this course is that we can make reasonable estimates of value for most assets and that the same fundamental principles determine the values of all types of assets, real as well as financial. This course harnesses the knowledge that students previously gained in the field of accounting and corporate finance by presenting the practical application of these principles and concepts in business performance analysis and valuation. Students will gain an insight into the various valuation techniques used by both business consultants and investment bankers as well as understand how the various elements in these models are derived, and equally, how our inherent bias and preconceptions do cloud the valuation process. This course also draws upon illustrations faced by a range of real-world companies across a broad spectrum of industries under different circumstances (start-up firms, private firms, inflation, non-perfect capital markets, inadequate financial data, cross-border valuations) so that students can grasp the full complexities that underlie each valuation process.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Economics

The course introduces students to the main theories and methods of international economics. The first half of the course deals with the basic models explaining international trade, such as the theory of comparative advantages, the Hecksher-Ohlin model, and various alternative trade theories. The effects and reasons of government intervention in international trade, a topic of growing importance today, will be discussed, along with the pros and cons of protectionism. During the second part of the semester the course will discuss other topics of international economics, such as international factor flows, international finance and foreign exchange. The course combines rigorous economic analysis with attention to issues of economic policy alive and important today. Special attention is given to analyzing current world economic events, as well as the relevance of empirical application of the theories and models discussed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Tourism and World Economy

The Tourism and World Economy course is a multi-disciplinary subject including economics, social theory, environmental theory, politics, and international relations. The course is designed to enable participants to efficiently respond to a dynamic and fast changing tourism industry. The module will identify challenges to the growth of the sector and analyze the current trends. The role of tourism in the economic development at a country, a region or a local level is a key issue. This module allows participants to appreciate the role of tourism in a globalize context and encourages students to actively participate in future regional tourism projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Corporate Financing Policy

Students will be introduced to a cornerstone of Corporate Financial decision- making: Capital Structure and the proportions of debt and equity financing that companies should adopt. We will begin our study with the famous theoretical propositions of Modigliani and Miller and analyze its applications to real world scenarios. The course will dwell in much detail on the discussion of how companies evaluate the financing process, the financing mix and choices as well as the process of achieving the optimal balance. We will also cover the other important pillar of corporate financial decision-making: the dividend decision and explore the contentious nature of dividends and how they do signal management's intention and firm's prospects, and as a result, are inextricably linked to firm's value. Much of the underlying theme of this course is grounded in real world applications where we would bring to our class discussions, corporate decision-making considerations that financial managers make.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Multinational Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to international financial markets and to the management of the special risks arising from international transactions. Topics include the environment of international financial management, foreign exchange and derivatives markets, foreign exchange risk management and foreign investment analysis. The basic thrust of this course is to provide a conceptual framework within which the essential financial decisions of the multinational firm can be analyzed. The approach is to treat international financial management as a natural and logical extension of the principles learned in the foundations course in financial management. Analytical techniques developed help to translate the often-vague rules of thumb used by international financial executives into specific decision criteria. Examples will show students the value of examining decision problems with the aid of a solid theoretical foundation.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Effective E-Business Management

The course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of e­-business. Types, business models, and operations of e­-business applications will be demonstrated. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Appreciate the importance of e-­business in the modern economy Describe the history and principles behind e­-commerce infrastructure Explain the role of technology and information systems in an e-­business enterprise. Define the main ideas behind e-­commerce and discuss the importance of website design and maintenance Consider the roles of various stakeholders in the e­-commerce process Analyze business processes with the intent to gain competitive advantage Apply principles and key methods used in defining customer requirements Construct business models to analyze business plans Explain sound user interface design guidelines and system usability Utilize techniques and tools of payment systems Explain the role of different types of information system vulnerabilities, security and data protection measures Understand the structure and functionality of essential on­line marketing technologies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Web Development

This course gives a comprehensive view of the client-side web development including the optimization of the webpages for different browsers, resolutions and search engines. The students will learn HTML and CSS coding, webpage layouts and techniques of using HTML5 and CSS3 elements. The course gives an introduction to Visual Studio, and useful plugins. Students will get familiar with Javascript language, they will create simple dynamic web page.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Managing Enterprise Resource Planning with SAP R/3

The course aims at giving general overview of business information systems with special respect to enterprise resource planning software and the field of their applications. At first, students have to understand the value of IT in an enterprise, after that, they will get familiar with the idea of ERP. After that, students will work with SAP, leader ERPs, and they will see real-life scenarios in a widely used enterprise IT system. The main goal is not teaching the usage of the software, but demonstrating real life scenarios and their solution with integrated information and resource planning system.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Intelligence

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of business intelligence. Topics such as data warehousing, business analytics, business performance management systems, data, text and web mining will be covered. The course has three major objectives: a) to highlight the theoretical background of business intelligence, b) to demonstrate students the tools necessary for understanding the features of business intelligence, c) to offer practical experiences about the application of different business intelligence systems.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Comparative Cross-Cultural Management

The course introduces the main principles relating to management across cultural and national boundaries and focuses on interpersonal relations between people of different cultures in work settings. Throughout the course, students will understand the effect of culture and how it can then be applied to a wide variety of cross-cultural interactions in a number of organisational contexts.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Change Management

This is a course tailored towards training the student to understand how to implement a methodological change program within an organization. The student will gain an understanding on the theories, foundations and institutions governing the recent and current expansion of international trade and investments, and develop insights into the ever-changing business environment. This course dwells upon the change issues facing firms, and the difficulties of devising and implementing successful solutions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Consumer Behavior: Millennials and Generation Z

According to Goldman Sachs, millennials were born between the years 1980 and 2000. In the U.S, millennials are now the biggest generation in its history, even bigger than the Baby Boomers. Generation Z (Gen Z) is defined as those born between 2000 onwards. It is estimated that the size of the Gen Z population in India is an incredible 356 million people. In the U.S. by 2020, Gen Z will account for almost 40% of consumers and will soon overtake millennials as the largest generation. While millennials and Gen Z share some similarities, they are also noticeable differences. Since technology is now evolving more rapidly than ever, both millennials and Gen Z are not only being affected by technology, their behavior is actually shaping its future. This course will provide a deep dive into the consumer behavior of both millennials and Gen Z and explore how effectively brands utilize messaging and emerging technologies to grab the attention of those who have short attention spans.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Online and Digital Marketing

Online and digital marketing is an exciting area of marketing practice. In this course, we will cover the what, why, where, to whom and how of major current online and digital marketing approaches. The course will cover the different areas of marketing, and so include the marketing mix elements from consumer behaviour, digital products, technology aspects, innovation acceptance, online pricing, online distribution, online and digital communication.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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ART 300 - Budapest in the Twentieth Century: Historical Layers and Cultural Practice

The aim of the course is to present how the recent history of Hungary is reflected in literature, film and visual arts. The course if offering an overview of the twentieth-century history of Hungary, as well as an outline of how art is reflecting on key historical events. During the course students are going to look for traces of history in the urban spaces of Budapest, students will visit important locations and intriguing institutions. The course will touch upon the establishment of the “modern” Budapest at the turn of the century, the effects of the Trianon Treaty, Jewish Emancipation, the Second World War and the Holocaust, the Communist and State Socialist Era, the 1956 Revolution, and the Regime Change in 1989. We will also discuss issues contemporary works of art raise, and their critical societal visions. We will discuss the state of gender inclusion and feminism in Hungary, as well as the present anomalies of the inclusion of the Roma and of sexual minorities. The course aims to achieve its goals through the implementation of an intermedial and interdisciplinary view – that is, we are going to read literary texts, watch movies, visit art collections, meet artists, directors, and curators. Home assignments will require short explorative reseach; the mid- and end-term exams will consist of creative tasks as well as of theoretical questions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Essentials of Investing

This course will provide students with an insight into money and capital markets as well as the instruments traded in these markets. It will also provide students with a rigorous grounding in the methods and tools of investment analysis used by financial analysts as well as introduce the techniques of portfolio selection and management. This course also aims to hone students’ skills in conducting a sophisticated assessment of the current issues and debates covered by both popular media and the more specialised finance journals.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Microeconomics

The course seeks to introduce students to basic concepts and analysis of economic theory and science, enabling and facilitating a grounding which provides the ‘building blocks’ necessary to be able to analyse more complex issues inherent in the modern market economy. The course is designed to give students the most effective approach to the learning of microeconomic tools and concepts using an accessible, integrated structure. Students will be introduced to consumer, production and cost theories, forms of competition, such as perfect and imperfect, market power, strategic behaviour and special topics such as risk, externalities and public goods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Innovation Management

The course is designed to introduce students to the main theories and concepts of innovation and provides basic understanding of how innovative activities are managed. Among other things it deals with the concepts of open innovation, disruptive innovation, social innovation and “frugal” innovation. Aims and Objectives of the course: To understand the broad concept of innovation: developing and launching something new successfully. To understand innovation management and strategies, which produce the main source of competitiveness. To get useful knowledge about key management practices used by well recognized, successful innovating companies.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Digital Disruption

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand what digital disruption is and how it is affecting all of our lives in an accelerating and profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Entrepreneurs, Intrapreneurs, and Innovation

This is an intensive course for students who want to better understand how evolving technologies are affecting all of our lives in a profound way. It is an astonishing fact that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past few years. Data, along with other key enabling factors such as algorithms, networks, cloud computing, and exponential hardware growth, have created the conditions for a “Cambrian” like explosion never seen before in the history of mankind. We are truly living in extraordinary times.

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Personal Finance and Wealth Management

This course takes on a hands-on, practical approach to help students become better managers of their own money and time, by making informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing and investing. It will introduce students to the steps of the financial planning and decision-making process, and offer tools to help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of their decisions.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Press Photography, Documentary, and Campaign Filmmaking

This course takes on a hands-on, practical approach to help students to better understand
visual language, to be able to distinguish between quality photographs from random shots. In a
world full of visual images that surround us and communicates with it is not only useful but also
necessary to understand their nature. This course will introduce students to the anatomy of
photo- and video camera. Helps to develop a story and how to tell it visually. Finally, to
experience the magic and creative force of editing.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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MAR 650 Public Relations

The primary purpose of the course is to introduce the theoretical basis of PR to the students
within the framework of marketing communication. The secondary aim of the course is to
provide a practical basis for students by introducing practitioners, decision-makers, industry
experts and renowned researchers via guest lectures and case studies.

Introduction to International Business

This course presents an introduction into the international world of business, and the impact and consequences of globalisation and competition on the firm. The student will study how firms adapt to their environment, and simultaneously deal with increased competition, new markets and opportunities, technology and the growth and influx of specialised services, and changing customer tastes.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Brand Management

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of the subjects of brands, brand equity and brand management. We highlight the specific characteristics of diverse brands such as retailer brands, country brands, luxury brands. The central theoretical model of the course is the customer-based brand equity model, both its sources and outcomes will be covered. We also focus on brand growth options and discuss the opportunities of brand architecture, brand extensions, brand revitalization and global branding. The course is designed for business students and requires basic marketing knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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NK4 NBK Security Studies

This course is a basic introduction to the field of security studies. It will examine contemporary issues in conflict and security studies and current major issues within the European and the Transatlantic security architecture (NATO, the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the EU), and global security issues (role of the UN Security Council, the emerging Responsibility to Protect doctrine in human security, the emergence of the so-called “new” security agenda) and surveys national security policies in Europe since the end of the Cold War. The course will also examine the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear weapons, chemical and biological weapons) and international non-proliferation and arms control regimes. The course covers a wide variety of topics to facilitate understanding of the global and regional security issues like current energy security developments and vulnerabilities related to EU, terrorism and counter-terrorism.

Language of Instruction: English   

Highlights
  • Classes taught in English except for Hungarian language classes
  • Tandem partner program
  • Volunteer opportunities
  • International excursion

Semester students in Budapest live in furnished student apartments with other API participants. All apartments are within a 20-30 minute commute from the university via public transportation. Most apartments have two double rooms and one single room, a shared bathroom, kitchen, and living areas. Students are responsible for providing their own meals as these are not included in the program fee.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included.

Eotvos Living Room 2 32506452050 O
Eotvos View 2 32762965961 O
Hollo Utca Bedroom 2 3 32845947966 O
Hollo Utca Bedroom 3 3 32044100214 O
Hollo Utca Bedroom 3 4 32044099464 O
Hollo Utca Kitchen 2 2 32044098604 O
Hollo Utca Kitchen 2 4 32044097514 O
Oktober 6 Double Bedroom 2 32506488140 O
Oktober 6 Kitchen 1 32072077573 O
Podmaniczky Bedroom 2 1 32506450320 O

*Please note the application deadline has been extended for the Spring session. Additional fees may apply.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring Feb 2, 2020 - May 23, 2020 $12,480 Oct 20, 2019 Nov 1, 2019 Nov 15, 2019
Fall Sep, 2020 - Dec, 2020 $12,300 May 1, 2020 Jun 1, 2020
Academic Year Sep, 2020 - May, 2021 $22,600 May 1, 2020 Jun 1, 2020
Academic Year Sep 1, 2019 - May 23, 2020 $22,600 May 1, 2019 Jun 1, 2019