Iceland Waterfall Student 298286654

API students who study abroad in Reykjavik, Iceland will be able to directly enroll with Icelandic and other international students and be among a small, fortunate group of Americans studying abroad in Iceland! Students will take courses in a variety of subject areas, including international business, computer science (including game design), and engineering. Courses are geared toward upperclassmen, so students are recommended to have a background in the subjects they plan on studying.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5G.P.A.
  • Open to juniors and seniors
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • CV/Résumé
  • Official transcript
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with supporting documents (more information provided post-acceptance)

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-15 credits per semester

API students who study abroad in Reykjavik, Iceland will be able to directly enroll with Icelandic and other international students and be among a small, fortunate group of Americans studying abroad in Iceland! Students will take courses in a variety of subject areas, including international business, computer science (including game design), and engineering. Courses are geared toward upperclassmen, so students are recommended to have a background in the subjects they plan on studying.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive an official transcript from the Reykjavik University, upon successful completion of their program.

Courses

COURSE OFFERINGS

Reykjavik University offers courses in the following subjects in English:

  • Business (Branding, Finance, Human Resource Management, Marketing, Statistics, and more)
  • Computer Science (App Development, Cryptography, Game Design, Web Development, and more)
  • Engineering

Courses at Reykjavik University are generally worth 6 ECTS (or 3 U.S. semester credits).

Fall semester students will take 4 courses over a 12-week period, followed by a 2-week exam period and a final optional 3-week, 3-credit intensive project-based course. Spring semester students in both the School of Computer Science and Engineering will follow this same pattern. The School of Business does not offer 3-week intensive courses in the spring semester.

Courses are geared toward upperclassmen, so students are recommended to have a background in the subjects they plan on studying. Some graduate-level courses are available to students who meet the prerequisites.

Students are encouraged to take the majority of their courses from one academic department to better ensure course and schedule compatibility.

Please pay attention to the term a particular course is offered, along with that course's prerequisites. Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost. Contact your Program Manager if you have any questions about the course selection process.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Reykjavik University operates on the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). It is generally accepted that in order to convert from ECTS to U.S. credits, one should divide the ECTS total by 2, whereby most courses are worth 3 U.S. credits.

V-512-ATFE Behavioral Economics

This course describes how individuals and firms make financial decisions, and how those decisions might deviate from those predicted by traditional financial or economic theory. Using theories of human behavior from the fields of psychology, sociology and other fields of sciences related to decision-making, common features of irrational behavior in the financial markets will be described and analyzed.

View Syllabus

V-304-FMAR Financial Markets

Financial markets are important pillars of every civilized society. They facilitate economic activities and provide services and products to manage risks. It is important to understand the function of financial institutions in order to be able to predict their reactions towards different economic events and how they will evolve over time. This course is set to support students in their learning of different theories of finance and how those theories are linked with financial history, the strengths and weaknesses of financial institutions, such as banks, insurance companies, stock and derivatives markets, and what the future holds for those institutions.

View Syllabus

V-644-IEND Introduction to Accounting

During the course, students will be introduced to the basic factors in auditing of financial statements. Students will be introduced to the International Standards on Auditing (ISA´s) by reading a textbook. Students will go through the whole audit process, all from planning the audit to the procedures performed at the end of the audit. Also, students will be introduced to the basic factors in entities effective internal control. In the end of the course, students should be able to understand the purpose and theories of auditing and distinguish between different audit opinions. The course material will be the textbook Auditing and Assurance services by Aasmund Eilifsen, William F. Messier, Steven M. Glover og Douglas Pravitt as well as articles and other material that will be introduced during the course.

View Syllabus

V-311-OPMA Operations Management

Topics covered include:

  • The activities of operations management and the role of the operations function in achieving strategic success.
  • The development of operations management and process management.
  • The volume – variety effect on process design, layout, process technology, and job design.
  • Configuring the supply network.
  • The activities of supply chain management.
  • Types of relationships in supply chains.
  • Supply chain behavior.
  • The location of capacity.
  • Forecasting demand.
  • Planning and control activities.
  • Measuring demand and capacity.
  • The alternative capacity plans.
  • The use of OEE in capacity calculations.
  • Inventory management.
  • The volume decision – how much to order.
  • The timing decision – when to place an order.
  • JIT planning and control.
  • The maser production schedule and MRP.
  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP).
  • Project management.
  • Performance measurements, benchmarking and the balanced scorecard.
  • Quality control and how quality problems can be diagnosed.
  • Business improvement and improvement methods.
  • Improvement priorities.
  • Breakthrough vs. continuous improvement.
  • Business process reengineering (BPR).
  • Strategy and operations strategy.
  • Organizations and the importance of an end-to-end process focus when it comes to strategic planning and organizational design.
  • The process concept and the process focused organization.
  • Management systems: The Lean management system.
  • TQM and Six Sigma.
View Syllabus

V-601-EIGN Portfolio Management

The course objective is twofold. The main emphasis is on introducing students to investor methodology in the securities market when forming portfolios. Students are especially expected to gain an overview of what is available in the domestic and international financial markets. Students will be introduced to main theories and approaches of capital asset allocation. The major pricing models are also covered along with individual theories on the pricing of stocks. There is great emphasis on students being able to apply the technical part of the study, i.e. able to present the problems they are dealing with in an organized manner, using the necessary formulas.

View Syllabus

V-627-VERK Project Management

At the end of this course the student should expect the following outcomes:

  • Knowledge regarding traditional project management methods and it’s position in the world of management concepts and theories.
  • Knowledge concerning planning techniques of project ea project objectives, scoping, scheduling and cost planning with CPM, PERT and Gantt charts, use of learning curves and NPV calculations to estimate project profitability etc. Also to establish project control system based on Earned Value accounting methods.
  • To be familiar with the PRINCE2 project management environment.
  • Knowledge of project team building and the use of analysis ea decision trees, Ishikawa analysis, Pareto analysis, risk assessment etc to be able to focus on the main topics and tasks of the project.
View Syllabus

V-633-SOST Sales Management

This course covers the main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management, as well as how sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches students how to develop, manage and motivate a sales force. The course explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

View Syllabus

V-649-STMP Strategic Marketing Planning

The aim of the course is to introduce the marketing planning process. Students will conduct their own marketing plan built on current marketing practices. Key concepts and methodologies include marketing objectives and metrics, marketing planning, segmentation, consumer research and customer analytics, and marketing models. Strategic marketing planning takes students step-by-step through the process of developing a creative, effective marketing plan for a brand that they choose. Packed with real-life examples, up-to-date marketing ideas and detailed sample plans, the course offers practical guidance on how to research, prepare and present a valuable marketing plan. Emphasis is on student participation in class, discussions, analysis, presentations and case studies.

View Syllabus

T-637-GEDE Game Engine Architecture

The course covers the theory and practice of game engine software development, bringing together topics that range from large-scale software architectures and modern game programming paradigms to the design and implementation of subsystems for rendering, resource management, user interfaces, sound, collision, physics, and animation. Through practical lab exercises and group projects, the students will get technical hands-on experience in C++ game development, including the use and development of supporting tool pipelines.

T-622-ARTI Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is devoted to the computational study of intelligent behavior, including areas such as problem-solving, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning and scheduling, machine learning, perception, and communication. This course gives an overview of the aforementioned AI subfields from computer science perspective and introduces fundamental solution techniques for addressing them. As a part of the course, the students study a selected specialized topic in-depth.

T-501-FMAL Programming Languages

The evolution of programming languages is an important factor in computer science. The course describes this evolution from the first programming languages to the more recent languages. Different types of programming languages are discussed and their characteristics compared. Programming languages syntax is introduced as well as Backus-Naur Form (BNF). Main characteristics of imperative languages are examined, particularly regarding scope rules and procedure activations. The focus is on the Smalltalk programming environment while discussing object-oriented languages. The constructs of functional programming languages are examined with emphasis on Lambda calculus and the ML language. Logic programming is introduced and the Prolog language is specifically analyzed. Students are introduced to the design and syntax of the above languages and experiment with several programming projects using some of these languages.

T-611-NYTI New Technology

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course, students will look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular, students will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities, and effect on society.

T-419-CADP Concurrent and Distributed Programming - 3-Week Course

Multi-Core machines, networks of interconnected computers and heterogeneous computing environments have become ubiquitous. Writing programs that utilize these computer‘s resources to its fullest involves writing multi-threaded and distributed programs. In this course, participants learn to write such programs in C using the pthreads API and in Erlang. They learn to avoid unintended nondeterministic effects and deadlocks and they learn to structure concurrent and distributed programs. We repeat the basics of threads, processes, semaphores, and mutexes. Then, patterns are described to structure common algorithms for concurrent execution and understand the basic architectures (recursive parallelism, iterative parallelism, mesh parallelism, bag of tasks). We consider programming with monitors and with transactional memory. After understanding the problems of shared variable concurrency and its problem, we consider distributed message passing systems. By encapsulating a state and decoupling the control flow with messaging, one can avoid many problems of shared variable programs. Participants learn to structure distributed applications and understand their architecture. They will also consider coordination methods that describe how the activities of the processes in a distributed system achieve a common goal. Distributed systems will be implemented in Erlang. Erlang is a concurrency oriented, a functional programming language for distributed, soft-realtime, and fault-tolerant applications. Erlang is used, e.g. at Facebook and Amazon, for real-time trading applications and online games. At the end, participants are able to demonstrate a concurrent application, understand the way it is constructed and be able to justify the properties of the application. They understand the trade-offs of the language mechanism and know the structural similarities and differences the language mechanism exhibit.

T-219-REMO Real-time Models - 3-Week Course

The context for the course Computing systems are everywhere in modern society; they are becoming increasingly sophisticated and they control key aspects of our lives. In fact, computation is even more widely present in our world than most people realize! Think, for instance, of embedded computing devices, such as those that control ABS systems in cars, the temperature of our houses or the functioning of mobile phones. This population of ‘effectively invisible’ computers around us is embedded in the fabric of our homes, shops, vehicles, farms and some even in our bodies. They help us command, control, communicate, do business, travel and entertain ourselves, and these ‘invisible’ computers largely outnumber the desktop or laptop computers we see each day. In light of the increasing complexity of such computing devices, and of the fact that they control important, when not altogether safety critical, operations, it is important to adopt high standards of quality in their development and validation. However, when dealing with software controlled devices, we still accept routinely that such systems crash and must be rebooted. In fact, we would be surprised if we did not have to send error reports to software manufacturers! Come to think of it, software-controlled devices are just about the only products we engineer for which we accept this level of brittleness. You do not enter your car each day expecting it to stop and ready to send an error report to the car manufacturer, do you? Do software-controlled systems have to be more unreliable than cars, say? A key scientific challenge in computer science is to design and develop computing systems that do what they were designed to do and do so reliably. In order to meet the challenge of building dependable systems, computer scientists are increasingly using model-based approaches to their design and validation. This means that, before actually constructing a system, one follows the time-honored engineering approach of making a model of its design and of subjecting the model to a thorough analysis, whose ultimate aim is to certify that the design embodied by the model meets its intended specification.

The aim of this course is to introduce the basic ideas underlying the model of timed automata, a graphical formalism for the description of real-time computing systems due to Rajeev Alur and David Dill. During the course, you will use the model to describe algorithms, games, scheduling problems and other fun scenarios with relevance to computer science, and to analyze the behavior of the systems you have modeled using the automatic verification tool Uppaal. Uppaal is an integrated tool environment for the description, validation, and verification of real-time systems modeled as networks of communicating timed automata, extended with data types. Summing up, this is a course in which you will be introduced to a little neat theory with real impact on the practice of the development of computing systems in a world that increasingly depends on the quality of software-controlled devices. Can you do without this knowledge?

T-604-HGRE Design and Analysis of Algorithms - 3-Week Course

Students in this course will study all the major algorithmic strategies, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, network flow, and randomized algorithms. Think of this as a course on “how to solve it by a computer”. We do so by studying how classical paradigmatic problems are solved, and how to apply the ideas to new problems. We will also link the problem-solving part to programming contest problems. We emphasize reasoning: understanding why something works, and the ability to explain it. Course assignments will primarily focus on written arguments (in LaTeX), in addition to the problem-solving aspect. During recitation classes, students are expected to present their solutions to the class and participate in discussions.

T-631-SOE2 Software Engineering II – Testing - 3-Week Course

Building modern software systems requires not only programming skills but also engineering skills. Software development includes requirement analysis, design, implementation, and testing. Various studies show that over than 50% of efforts and costs of software development are devoted to activities related to testing. This includes test design, execution, and evaluation. This course is an introductory course to software testing in which students will learn quantitative, technical, and practical methods and techniques that software engineers use to test their software along with the software lifecycle. The course is based on the textbook: Introduction to Software Testing, by Paul Ammann and Jeff Offutt. Accordingly, the focus will be on how we can design better tests based on coverage criteria. The course covers topics, such as Graph Coverage, Logic Coverage, Input Space Partitioning and Syntax-Based Testing. In some discussions, we will use other references to get a deeper understanding of the subject.

T-634-AGDD Advanced Game Design & Development - 3-Week Course

This course expands RU’s prior offerings in game design & development with more advanced topics in game and interaction design. Through lectures, lab exercises, and project work, students will learn and gain experience with a variety of game design topics. Working together in teams, students will design, develop, and critically analyze several smaller games, each focused on applying the concepts that are discussed in class. Each of these exercises will differ in terms of either the team’s composition, the game’s scope, or the constraints that the instructors provide to guide the creative process. Each student will also take on a different development role for each exercise. After the exercises are complete, students will form new teams and apply their new knowledge to a larger development project. Masters students will additionally complete a small research project related to the course topics.

T-505-ROKF Logic in Computer Science - 3-Week Course

Logic has been called “the calculus of computer science”. The argument is that logic plays a fundamental role in computer science, similar to that played by calculus in the physical sciences and traditional engineering disciplines. Indeed, logic plays an important role in areas of Computer Science as disparate as architecture (logic gates), software engineering (specification and verification), programming languages (semantics, logic programming), databases (relational algebra and SQL), artificial intelligence (automatic theorem proving, multi-agent systems, knowledge and belief), algorithms (complexity and expressiveness), and theory of computation (general notions of computability). See, for instance, the slides available at http://www.ru.is/faculty/luca/SLIDES/logic-and-cs.pdf for more information. This course provides the student with a thorough introduction to computational logic, covering the topics of syntax, semantics, decision procedures and formal systems for various logics that play a crucial role in applications in computer science, namely propositional and first-order logic, and modal and temporal logics. The material is taught from a computer science perspective, with an emphasis on the use of logic as a specification language and general-purpose problem-solving tool in computer science. As part and parcel of the course, we shall introduce various logic-based software tools and the algorithms and data structures underlying them; examples include BDD-based tools, SAT solvers and model checkers. The goal is to prepare the students for using logic as a formal tool in computer science.

T-732-GAPL General Game Playing - 3-Week Course

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of general game playing. The aim of general game playing is to create intelligent autonomous agents that automatically learn how to play many different games at an expert level without any human intervention, given only a description of the game rules. This requires that the agents learn diverse game-playing strategies without any game-specific knowledge being provided by their developers. A successful realization of this task involves the understanding and application of topics from many artificial-intelligence sub-disciplines, such as knowledge representation, agent-based reasoning, heuristic search, and machine learning. This course provided the students with such a background as well as an introduction to different parallel processing paradigms in the context of game-tree search, but parallel processing is fast becoming increasingly more relevant because of the foreseen development of massively multi-core computers.

V-202-REGR Managerial Accounting - 3-Week Course

The course covers main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management. How sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches how to develop, manage and motivate your sales force. Explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in the workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

T-845-ENVI Introduction to Environmental Engineering

The purpose of this course is to get an overview of growing environmental problems and to understand and discuss how sciences and engineering principles can help reduce the anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. In particular, the importance of preserving clean water, air, and land resources for humans and for the wildlife will be discussed. In particular, the need and potential of clean and renewable energy production and low carbon economy will be discussed. Specific topics include climate change; environmental footprint, airborne pollution; groundwater; ecological disruption; and economic disruption. The course is composed of three parts: i) theoretical lectures about environmental engineering, ii) numerical and research exercises and iii) student project development. Students are expected to develop an environmental engineering project aiming at reducing the ecological footprint and enhancing the UN sustainability goals. MSc students have the option to develop a research plan in collaboration with an international partner institution for a potential MSc thesis.

T-621-CLIN Clinical Engineering

In this course, participation in class is necessary since most of the work will be performed in class during the lecturestime. Briefly, the course content is the follow: Part-I, CE General

  • Basic of biomedical engineering science and CE discipline.
  • Health technology evaluation, design, and control in the hospital, acquisition, maintenance and repair of medicaldevices.
  • Patient safety issue, risk management and electromagnetic interference in the hospital.
  • Medical device regulatory, health care quality, ISO standards.
  • Information system management, telemedicine, communication system (PACS).
  • Clinical engineering practise at Landspitali: medical device park, acquisition and maintenance Part-II, CE Electronic.
  • Electrical safety in clinical enviroments.
  • Leakage currents.
  • Fault conditions.
  • Medical devices utilization and service: intensive care, operating room, anaesthesiology.
  • Engineering the clinical environment: Physical plant, heating, air conditioning, operation room, electrical power.
  • The future of clinical engineering.
  • Practical measurements of leakage current.

VT HUN1003 Design in Mechanical Engineering

This course will begin with lectures on the basics of design including systematic processes to harness creative thinking. It will cover basics of collaboration software usage. Emphasis and evaluation will be placed equally on effective process, documentation/presentation, and results. The semester’s assignments will consist of a mixture of individual and team assignments.

T-420-HONX Design X

Students in this coursework in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of an RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car

T-509-RAFT Electronics

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Review of signal-processing basicsReview of feedback systems. Electronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Review of feedback systemsElectronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Electronic devices large and small-signal models
  • Large and small-signal models of diodes and transistors (MOSFET and BJT)Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifier.
  • Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifierElementary transistor stages:
  • Elementary transistor stages: biasing, operation point, small signal analysis. Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage
  • Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage amplifiersDifferential pair and
  • Differential pair and differential amplifier
  • Design with an operational amplifier. Transconductance amplifier.
  • Active-RC and OTA-C filtersPower amplifiers.
  • Power amplifiers.

T-620-FJAX Finance X

In this task, students will take on the role of a bond portfolio manager. Initially, they will familiarize themselves with the Icelandic bond market and in that process appreciate the following important points:

  • Market conditions that impact on the value of their investments.
  • How do the specifics of a bond impact on its risk-return profile?
  • Work out the correlation between the performances of individual bonds.

The next step is to move on to a portfolio of several bonds, which will be analyzed and optimized from a defined risk-return perspective. It is important to analyze in particular the following aspects,

  • Price, risk and portfolio returns.
  • Quantification of risk for bond portfolios
  • The role of different interest rate models
  • The impact of inflation on portfolios‘ risk and return characteristics
  • The role of inflation – and interest rate contracts

The students will put in place a “life system” that takes in real-time data from the market and updates the value and the risk position of the portfolio. Adjustments will be made to the portfolio as required and an investment policy will be determined and used to rebalance the portfolio. Some attention will be paid to the possible use of interest rate and/or inflation-indexed derivatives. The results will be presented in the form of a report and a demonstrator.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

The purpose of the course is that students learn to apply financial theory in a practice. The course will present how to approach real-world problems by using theory in the spreadsheet environment of Excel (and partly in the coding environment of Visual Basic and Matlab). At the completion of the course, students should be comfortable with pricing securities (bonds, stock, derivatives) and perform various types of risk evaluations. Students should also be able to perform term structure estimation, assess fund management performance, present portfolios on the efficient frontier, assess equilibrium price models, etc. In short, the purpose of the course is that students adopt the tools necessary to use financial theory in a practical way which will benefit them in any finance or research related position.

The main topics to be covered in the course are:

  • Interest rate calcul., term structure estim., pricing of bonds, immunization strategies
  • Portfolio theory and choice/management (e.g. efficient frontier)
  • Stock pricing models of financial markets (e.g. CAPM, Fama-French)
  • Event studies
  • Volatility predictions; standard deviation, MA, EWMA, ARCH, GARCH models
  • Option pricing (European, American, Asian and Bermuda options)
  • Risk measurement; the Value-at-Risk methodology and extensions thereof
  • In addition to the spreadsheet environment of Excel, the course will introduce how to apply Visual Basic Application (in Excel) and Matlab to conveniently solve some financial tasks.
  • Introduction to the main financial databases available online and elsewhere.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

The purpose of the course is that students learn to apply financial theory in a practice. The course will present how to approach real-world problems by using theory in the spreadsheet environment of Excel (and partly in the coding environment of Visual Basic and Matlab). At the completion of the course, students should be comfortable with pricing securities (bonds, stock, derivatives) and perform various types of risk evaluations. Students should also be able to perform term structure estimation, assess fund management performance, present portfolios on the efficient frontier, assess equilibrium price models, etc. In short, the purpose of the course is that students adopt the tools necessary to use financial theory in a practical way which will benefit them in any finance or research related position.

The main topics to be covered in the course are:

  • Interest rate calcul., term structure estim., pricing of bonds, immunization strategies
  • Portfolio theory and choice/management (e.g. efficient frontier)
  • Stock pricing models of financial markets (e.g. CAPM, Fama-French)
  • Event studies
  • Volatility predictions; standard deviation, MA, EWMA, ARCH, GARCH models
  • Option pricing (European, American, Asian and Bermuda options)
  • Risk measurement; the Value-at-Risk methodology and extensions thereof
  • In addition to the spreadsheet environment of Excel, the course will introduce how to apply Visual Basic Application (in Excel) and Matlab to conveniently solve some financial tasks.
  • Introduction to the main financial databases available online and elsewhere.

T-803-VERK Project Management and Strategic Planning

Course description currently unavailable. This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-806-SST2 Reinforced Concrete II

Course description currently unavailable.

This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-844-FEMM Finite Element Analysis in Engineering

This course will present the main features and possibilities of the finite element method (FEM) and its application in analysis of problems in mechanics. Aspects of the finite element method, from the mathematical background through to practical implementation and application are discussed. Emphasis is placed on possible errors and how to minimize them. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamentals of the finite element method and get some training in the use of commercial finite element software.

T-845-UMHV Sustainable Engineering and the Environment

Course description currently unavailable.

VT JAH1003 Geothermal Energy

  • Topics covered in this course include:
  • Geothermal systems
  • Geothermal exploration
  • Geothermal well drilling and well design
  • Geothermal well logging and testing of wells
  • Classification of geothermal systemsConceptual models.
  • Conceptual models
  • Response of geothermal systems to utilization
  • Reservoir management and reservoir models
  • Role of geothermal energy in the energy mix
  • Different uses of geothermal energy in Iceland and worldwide
  • Direct use of geothermal energy for space and district heating, swimming pools, greenhouses, snow melting and in industry
  • Geothermal heat pumps
  • Utilization of geothermal steam
  • Geothermal power plants, flash system power plants, binary power plants
  • Design of steam pipelines, structural design, process design
  • Power plant components, turbines, generators, condensers, cooling system, gas extraction system
  • Use of EES program
  • Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)
  • Environmental effects of geothermal energy

T-606-HEAT Heat Transfer

In this course the concepts of heat transfer are introduced:

  • Heat conduction: One-dimensional steady state heat conduction, the solution of the Fourier equation for steady-state and transient problems. Lumped analysis using thermal resistance. Application of numerical techniques.
  • Convective heat transfer: Natural convection, empirical relations in free convection. Forced convection, laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer analysis in external and internal flows, such as flows between parallel plates, over a flat plate and in a circular pipe. Condensation and boiling heat transfer. Empirical relations, application of numerical techniques in problem-solving.
  • Radiative heat transfer: Introduction to the physical mechanism, radiation properties, radiation shape factors black body radiation, and deviation from blackbody radiation, radiation from gases.
  • Heat exchangers: Classification of heat exchangers, temperature distribution, overall heat transfer coefficient, and fouling. Heat exchanger analysis using LMTD method and NTU method.

T-407-EFNI Materials Science

The fundamentals of the properties and structure of materials utilized in the practice of engineering are presented. The groups of materials studied include metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers and multiphase systems. The theoretical basis is given for the understanding of the behavior of materials where their electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are related to their molecular and crystalline structure. A brief introduction to biomedical applications is given. Methods for analyzing and testing of materials’ properties are studied as well as the methods used for controlling them, e.g. heat treatment, grain refinement and alloying. Corrosion and its prevention are studied and an introduction to binary and ternary phase diagrams is given. An insight into Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nano-systems are also provided.

T-535-MECH Mechatronic

Mechatronics-2 extends Mechatronics-1 by going into more details. While Mechatronics 1 is broader and more about getting results fast (what is possible), Mechatronics 2 is more about accuracy and how to match a design to a task with economy, accuracy, and robustness in mind (what is the limit). The course includes sensors, signal conditioning, interfacing, analog-digital conversion, digital input/outputs, timers, low level embedded firmware programming, actuators, UARTs and serial communication. It is expected that the student is familiar with the programming language C. Along with the lectures, each student has his/her own private project based on the fundamental elements of mechatronics: sense-think-act. For this project, the student holds a lab notebook. At the end of the course, the student delivers a report about the project.

T-620-LIKX Model X

This course will help students to make the vital step from a solid understanding of the fundamentals of engineering management and operations research to the application of theory to practical scenarios, as they arise in the real world. On completion of the course, the students will have extensively applied their knowledge of engineering management to a range of practical and relevant problems. The problems will require knowledge, of course, such as operations research, programming, data processing, simulation, and production and inventory management.

T-611-NYTI New Technology

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course we look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular we will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities and effect on society.

T-606-NUFF Numerical Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer

The main purpose of this course is to introduce the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for analyzing fluid flows and heat transfer. Hands-on exercises are used to study the basic theory of CFD through programming and using existing commercial and open source CFD codes. Finite difference and finite volume techniques are emphasized.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

Course description currently unavailable.

T-602-RISK Risk Management

This course starts by introducing basic concepts assessing and managing risk. The discussion will then focus on how risk arises, both in the corporate and financial environment and on ways to manage it, either by means of active hedging or diversification. Classification of risk will be explained with specific focus on equity -, interest rate – and credit risk. Value-at-risk (VaR) will be introduced as one way of quantifying risk and the KMV model, popular with rating agencies such as Moody’s, will be discussed for quantifying credit risk. For both models, we will emphasize their strengths and limitations. The course will also cover risks associated with positions in a range of different derivative contracts and how they can be hedged.

T-508-VARM Thermodynamics

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Introduction to the fundamental concepts of engineering thermodynamics: State, temperature, etc.
  • The first law of thermodynamics, work, heat, efficiency. Properties of pure substances, phase change, ideal gas, real gas, equations of state.
  • Thermodynamic analysis of open and closed systems e.g. turbines and heat exchangers.
  • Second law and its applications.
  • Reversible and irreversible processes, Carnot cycle etc. Entropy, the Clausius inequality, and the third law.
  • Energy and its applications for analysis.

VT SVF1003 Vibration Theory

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Free, damped and excited vibrations in linear systems
  • Nonlinear vibrations
  • Two-degree-of-freedom systems
  • Design for vibration suppression
  • Measurement and analysis of vibrations
  • The use of the ANSYS program for vibration analysis

T-420-HONX Design X - 3-Week Course

Students in this coursework in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of an RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car

V-406-TOL2 Applied Statistics II

Theoretical and applied econometrics will be covered. Emphasis will be stressed in various ways to evaluate coefficients of the linear model. Problems that arise during such evaluation will be covered and methods which respond to such problems. These methods will also be covered in grounds of the application. Statistical modeling and decision making is one of the basics of this course. Time series analysis and application of prediction models will be introduced. Emphasis on the practical use of the projects.

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V-644-BRAN Branding

This course explores the ideology of strategic brand management where the main emphasis is on fundamental definitions, different methods of measuring customer-based brand equity and how to design and implement an effective and successful branding strategy and maximize customer-based brand equity.

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V-107-FJAR Corporate Finance

This course covers the fundamental concepts of corporate finance. Based on the time value of money the course discusses key instruments in equity and debt financing and their valuation. This includes a discussion of the relationship between risk and return and key theories in that respect. The course also focuses on capital budgeting and its practical application. The capital structure choice is discussed in both perfect and imperfect market settings. This includes the impact of, e.g., taxes and financial distress as well as a discussion of ways to influence the capital structure including the issuance of securities and pay-out policies.

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V-504-AFLE Derivative

The course objective is to extend the students understanding of financial derivatives and how they are applied. After the course, students should be able to price most types of financial derivatives and have an understanding of when and how they are used. The topics covered in the course are Arbitrage and risk-free pricing; pricing and use of forward contracts, swaps and options; hedging; Introduction to interest rate options; use of derivatives in risk management and for investing purposes.

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V-552-STAF Digital Marketing

This course on Digital Marketing builds both an academic and practical understanding of professional practice in the field. The teaching emphasis such things as well defined objectives, key performance indicators, business models in digital media, metrics, and measurements, as well as integrated marketing communications. We will go through each and every media, its strengths and weaknesses. This includes search engine marketing (both organic and paid searches), web pages, social media, mobile, and affiliate marketing.

V-524 Leadership

Leadership is an important topic for many reasons and we will explore many of those reasons as well as study the key concepts of leadership. This course offers a special focus on ethical leadership, servant leadership, and team leadership. Through readings, work sessions, case studies, assignment projects etc. students will explore and develop their knowledge and understanding of effective leadership. In addition, the course will emphasize how effective leadership is achieved and how one can analyze and assess effective leadership.

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V-528-MAVI Marketing and Business Research Methods

This course will cover the role and importance of business research methods as well as the main steps in the research process, also cover the structure of each research method with a special emphasis on surveys. The structure of each method will be explored, its traditions and the way it is conducted. Emphasis is put on measurements, data collection, data analysis, and presentation. SPSS is taught in the course. The SPSS software is commonly used in business and marketing research. Practical assignments are emphasized.

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V-522-SERV Service Management

This course is an introduction course in Service Management and will present the main concepts and practical skills necessary to know and use for building good performance in the management of service companies.

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V-516-VERD Valuation

This course will examine all the major equity valuation methods. A consideration will be given to valuation under different situations and different types of companies, and how to evaluate the valuation criteria. The interpretation of the valuation and its reasoning will be discussed, taking into account the different results of various methods. There will be an examination of various research reports and real-life business cases. Valuation in M&A and financial restructuring situations will be examined. Value management and value enhancing methods will be addressed. The students are expected to complete one comprehensive valuation project culminating in a research report, which will be handed in in 3 modules. There may be a guest lecture(s) during the course.

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V-511-STST Human Resource Management - 3-Week Course

This course covers the employment process from recruitment to termination, including staffing, training and development, performance management, compensation, employee relations and legal issues. Emphasis on the strategic role of HRM, the roles of line managers vs. HR managers and measurement of results. Practical exercises and analysis of cases are used in class.

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V-208-ALVI International Business - 3-Week Course

This course focuses on one hand on the international environment: The global system of trade, international trade theory, political economy of trade, barriers to international trade, regional trading arrangements, EU and NAFTA, the impact of culture on international business, foreign investment, location of production, GATT, WTO, the international monetary system and IMF. On the other hand, it deals with the international interests of individual companies. This includes, e.g., gain and risk of foreign operations, analysis of different ways to internationalization; Icelandic companies: history and insights gained from foreign activity, the organization of international business; foreign marketing and development, alliances, im/exporting, management, financial control, and accounting.

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T-409-TSAM Computer Networks

This course begins with a short overview of network systems and services. Afte an introduction, the focus will be on the layers of the OSI and IETF models. The following network layers will be studied in the details: application layer (WWW, HTTP, DNS, SMTP, FTP etc), transport layer (UDP and TCP), network layer (link state routing and distance vector routing, IP, IP-addresses, link layer (MAC, Ethernet, Hubs and switches). Finally an introduction to some more specific topics such as mobile networks, multimedia networking, and network security will be given. Students will also work on the topics through programming assignments and homework.

T-504-ITML Introduction to Machine Learning

This course presents an overview of the field of machine learning, which deals with finding patterns and rules in large datasets. Such rules can then be used to predict outcomes of future events, for example with the aim of improving decision-making in a wide range of business and manufacturing disciplines. In this course, students will study machine learning techniques for classification and clustering as well as other selected techniques. In addition to introducing the underlying theory, the methods will be used to solve practical problems

T-511-TGRA Computer Graphics

Computer graphics is an increasing part of today’s programmer projects. The first part of this course covers the use of the OpenGL library, vector tools for graphics, transformations of objects and polygonal meshes.The second part deals in more detail with three-dimensional drawing with emphasis on perspective, depth, light, and color. In the end, several issues regarding the implementation of a renderer are presented, in addition to curve and surface design. During the course, students build several programs related to the course material.

T-519-STOR Theory of Computation

The main topic of this course is the theoretical basis of computer science. Various types of finite automata are introduced and connected to the formal definition of a programming language. Turing machines are introduced as a theoretical model for computation. Computability is discussed and the classification of solvable and unsolvable problems. Finally, there is a discussion of complexity classes and the classification of algorithmically hard and easy problems.

T-513-CRNU Cryptography and Number Theory

This class treats the basics of cryptography and number theory. The class starts with some classical ciphers and the tools from number theory necessary for doing cryptography. Students will cover symmetric and asymmetric ciphers. Some topics from groups, rings, and fields will be introduced and used, especially when looking at elliptic curve cryptography. There will be some programming exercises in addition to standard mathematical homework. Students will use the programming language Sage to program with.

E-402-STFO Mathematical Programming - 3-Week Course

Mathematics is generally discovered through experiments. Traditional tools for such experiments are pen and paper, and, of course, the mind. A (historically) recent addition to these tools is the computer. We will look at problems from several areas of mathematics and, in particular, how programming can be used as a means to better understand and ultimately solve those problems. This will involve designing and implementing algorithms, experimentation to make conjectures, and deductive/formal mathematics to prove conjectures. For programming we will use python/sage languages.

T-306-RAS1 Analog Circuit Analysis

This course will cover the following topics:

  • Basic concepts of charge, current, power, and energy.
  • Circuit elements, including different types of sources.
  • Basic laws, including Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws.
  • Series and parallel connections, and Delta and Wye transformations.
  • Circuit analysis methods; node voltage and mesh current methods.
  • Circuit theorems; superposition, source transformation, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems and maximum power transfer.
  • Operational amplifiers (Op-Amp) and its basic circuits.
  • Inductors and capacitors and series and parallel combinations.
  • First order RL and RC circuits, and the natural, forced and steady-state responses.
  • Second order series and parallel RLC circuits.
  • Concepts of phasors and impedances for AC sinusoidal analysis
  • Circuits methods and theorems for AC sinusoidal steady-state and AC power analysis

T-411-Mech Mechatronics I

This course provides an introduction to Mechatronics, the technique of interfacing software, electronics, and mechanical components. We will be utilizing the low-cost Arduino microcontroller platform as our method for sensing and control. Students will have to pay a fee for their personal lab kit which includes some shared parts for team-based labs.

The course will begin with an introduction to microcontroller programming and software engineering. This includes C++ and Subversion (for collaboration). The course will then shift to electronics design, implementation, and testing. The course will cover both analog and digital electronics with a focus on interfacing to sensors, DC motors, and stepper motors. Students will be designing and building PCB boards using Altium to integrate the electronics being developed.

Students will choose a final mechatronics group project to be presented at the end of the semester. This project should involve manufacturing mechanical elements and interface them with the microcontrollers to demonstrate their mastery of the subject.

T-316-STAF Digital Electronics - 3-Week Course

This course is an introduction to digital electronics with a link to Biomedical engineering applications. It covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics such as applications in Medical devices.

T-316-LABB Measurement Systems - 3-Week Course

This course introduces the essential general characteristics of measuring devices, data acquisition systems, uncertainty analysis, on how to use uncertainty analysis as a tool to design experiments, and sampling and spectral analysis. Planning and executing experiments, and report writing is also covered.

T-603-THYD Compilers

Compilers are the most important part of a programming development environment. The course defines the function & objective of a compiler. Lexical analysis of programs is discussed in detail, regular expression & finite automatons defined and the use of Lex introduced. Top-down and bottom-up approaches in parsing are discussed precisely & the use of Yacc introduced. Implementation of error handling illustrated particularly semantic analysis. Finally, code generation is covered. Construction of a compiler will be a large component of the course.

T-740-SPMM Software Project Management

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Course description currently unavailable.

T-809-DATA Datamining and Machine Learning

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Course description currently unavailable.

T-810-OPTI Optimization Methods

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Overview and approach: This course introduces the principal algorithms for linear, network, discrete, nonlinear, dynamic optimization and optimal control. Emphasis is on methodology and the underlying mathematical structures. Topics include the simplex method, network flow methods, branch and bound and cutting plane methods for discrete optimization, optimality conditions for nonlinear optimization, interior point methods for convex optimization, Newton’s method, heuristic methods, and dynamic programming and optimal control methods.

T-811-PROB Applied Probability

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Overview and approach: This heuristically and practically motivated course will discuss the computation of probabilities of events, discrete/continuous random variables, conditioning of random variables. In addition, the course will also cover transformations of random variables, Markov processes, and the applications of stochastic processes to queuing theory, derivatives/finance, decision theory and game theory.

T-814-PROD Integrated Product Development: Concepts & Processes

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

This course covers the engineering approach to innovation and entrepreneurship in lectures and a practical program in an active company. Due to increasing freedom in trade and internationalization, the competition between companies is boosting. At the same time, consumers demand new solutions, and the technology develops, resulting in older solutions becoming obsolete. Such conditions require constant innovation in companies management and an understanding of the nature of innovation and entrepreneurship. Innovation is not only necessary for technological companies, but in all companies that intend to live and prosper.The course will cover innovation and the ability companies have for innovation in light of market, science, engineering, planning and financial presumptions. Students will deal with the terms innovation and entrepreneurship and their significance for modern management and put in context with success. The course will also cover the value of knowledge, intellectual property rights, and patent rights. Then the course will cover the internationalization and its impact on the innovation process. Special emphasis will be put on systematic development of the processes connected to innovation and worked on a project in a real company in this field.

V-755-CORP Corporate Finance

The purpose of the course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of theories and models for corporations’ capital budgeting and financing decisions and to enhance their skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: Goal of the corporation, the capital budgeting decision, investment decisions under certainty, relationship between risk and return (portfolio risk, beta and CAPM), cost of capital, analyzing capital budgeting and risk, practical problems in capital budgeting, financing decisions, payout policy, capital structure, corporate governance and control, and an overview of the efficient market hypothesis. The course also addresses financial leasing, mergers, and corporate restructuring.

V-853-EQUI Equity Analysis

The focus of this course is on the financial analysis and valuation of companies. Therefore the course provides students with essential knowledge in equity valuation and develops skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: The course is segmented into major sections. It starts with a discussion of the drivers of corporate value, specifically return on invested capital (ROIC) and organic revenue growth. Based on this, it examines how to build an ROIC-based valuation model in conjunction with a free cash flow to firm (FCFF) model. Following that it covers financial analysis using data from the annual report based on traditional competitive benchmarking and to current metrics such as return on invested capital (ROIC) and economic profit. The primary goal is to build a true understanding of operating performance across business units and for the entire company. Having covered the above elements, the course focuses on building an integrated valuation model using discounted cash flow. This section of the course starts with the fundamentals of forecasting, how to determine the appropriate forecast period, and issues related to continuing value. It covers the weighted average cost of capital, focusing on how to estimate the inputs. The final section discusses alternatives to DCF valuation, such as multiples analysis to triangulate DCF valuation and comparison to investment strategies of major investors.

V-757-INTF International Finance

1
The purpose of the course is to provide students with advanced knowledge of corporate finance and financial management in an international context and to enhance their skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The course focuses on financing and investment decisions in the international corporate context, including the financial risks associated with these decisions. The course provides an overview of international financial markets, international financial institutions, currencies and exchange rates as well as international capital flows. It focuses on risks related to international business activities, with emphasis on country risk and foreign exchange risk, and risk management in this regard. Beyond this, it discusses how to finance international operations and trade as well as international capital budgeting.

V-852-PORT Portfolio Management

1
The purpose of the course is to give students advanced knowledge of systematic and analytical methods of considering and performing investment decisions and the skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: Risk and uncertainty in financial returns, financial performance measurement, basic utility theory, portfolio theory, optimal investment and portfolio choice, efficient frontier, models of the expected return (CAPM and APT), pricing and risk management in bond markets and mutual fund investments.

L-714-MAEV European Convention on Human Rights

1
The course will provide an in-depth analysis of the law of the European Convention on Human Rights. The first part of the course is dedicated to introducing the Council of Europe, The European Convention on Human Rights and its supervisory system. The European Court of Human Rights will be placed in focus with emphasis on its methods of interpretation and its procedure. Its current workload and future prospects will also be dealt with. Finally the connection between the Convention and European Law as well as the domestic law of member states will be covered. The second part of the course is dedicated to the principal substantive rights protected by the Convention and its Protocols, such as the right to life, the prohibition of torture, the right to a fair trial, the right to respect for private and family life, the freedom of thought, conscience and religion, the freedom of expression, the freedom of assembly and association, the prohibition of discrimination, the protection of property and the right to education.

L-712-IEEL International and European Energy Law

4
The course provides an overview of the organizational and regulatory framework concerning the energy sector, acknowledging the importance of energy on a global scale. The course is divided into two parts. The first and main part (6 ECTS) covers the principal legal and policy issues relating to international and European energy affairs. The second part (1.5 ECTS) is concerned with the legal framework of the Icelandic energy market. The students can choose to complete either 6 ECTS or 7.5 ECTS. The first part of the course deals with international energy relations and discusses the global quest for energy resources and the role of the major actors on the energy market. In this part the main policy and legal issues and principles governing the energy supply chain, i.e. generation, transmission and consumption, in the EU will be covered. A special focus will be on renewable energy matters and legal issues related to emission trading. In this part energy-specific regulation, the role of courts and international institutions in general will also be discussed. The second part of the course covers the legal framework of the Icelandic energy market. It focuses on Iceland’s obligations under the EEA-agreement in the field of energy and legal issues related to implementation of the relevant EU directives into national law.
Graduate

L-754-ISIN International Standards of Investment Protection

1
The course will focus on international investment law which is currently the fastest growing field of public international law. It will address how foreign direct investment is regulated under customary international law and subjected to various investment standards as prescribed in approximately 3,000 bilateral investment treaties (BITs) currently in force. Practical examples will be discussed dealing with major investments in Iceland, including Alusuisse’s aluminium smelter in Straumsvík and PCC Bakki Silicon Project in Húsavík. The course’s objectives are to present an overview of the current rules dealing with investment and engage students in a discussion about their nature and foundation. Major themes of international investment law will be analyzed and discussed, such as: •the concept of “investor” and “investment” •expropriation •fair and equitable treatment •full protection and security •national treatment and MFN treatment Furthermore, the course will deal with investment disputes between investors and host states and investment arbitration that addresses disputes stemming from various agreements made between investors and states receiving foreign direct investment (such as concession agreements involving hotel projects, electoral voting systems, mobile network development, aluminum smelter projects, etc.). Various arbitral awards will be discussed, such as CME (Netherlands) v Czech Republic (2001) where the respondent state was ordered to pay a Dutch investor 269 Million US Dollars in compensation for violating various principles of international investment law. Active student participation will be expected. The students will be required to discuss various investment cases dealing with investment disputes and in doing so read, analyze and present arbitral awards of various arbitral tribunals currently topical within the field of international investment law, such as Philip Morris Asia Ltd. (Hong Kong) v Australia (2015) where the investor failed to get compensation following the introduction of anti-tobacco legislation in Australia. Finally, the students will read relevant reading material to be used when discussing topical issues in international investment law.

L-747-EUMF European Law: Internal Market

7
European internal market law covers the primary law of the EU/EEA internal market and the fundamental economic freedoms. It constitutes the core of substantive European law. The internal market is a single market in which the free movement of goods, services, capital and persons as well as the freedom of establishment is assured, and in which citizens are free to live, work, study and do business. The aim of the course is to give the student an in-depth knowledge on the primary law of the internal market by analysing the economic freedoms and understanding the horizontal issues relevant to the freedoms. Moreover, the aim is to provide understanding of the relevance of primary law for secondary law, namely directives and regulations that have been adopted in various economic and social areas and incorporated into national law of the EU/EEA Member States. Primary law is thus of key importance for the understanding and interpretation of national law in these areas. The main focus will be on the study of selected case law of the Court of Justice of the EU and the case law of the EFTA Court. The student will become familiar with reading, analysing and presenting judgments and making use of supportive theoretical material.

L-719-EEAL EEA Moot Court Competition

2
The EEA Moot Court Competition is to be held in Iceland for the first time in 2016. The competition will consist teams competing in a moot court setting, in front of competent judges. The competition will consist of a written stage and an oral final stage. Furthermore, the course will consist of a preparatory stage. The overall aim of the course is to give students an opportunity to work on various areas of EU/EEA law through a challenging Moot Court Competition. Participation in this course and in the competition should strengthen students` knowledge of EU/EEA law, raise their analytical and research skills, and give them confidence in oral presentation.

L-734-IARB International Law of Arbitration

Course description currently unavailable.

L-755-DISP Dispute Resolution

3
This course covers the methods of dispute resolution with special emphasis on mediation. Mediation is a method of dispute resolution in which a neutral third party mediator assists parties to the dispute to find a solution to the problem. Mediation is in essence assisted negotiation and therefore it is preferrable for students to have some background in negotiation, but it is not a requirement for participation in this course. The course covers the methodology of mediations as well as practical considerations of the mediator. Students will learn about the mediation process and the mediator’s ethical code of conduct. The objective of the course is for students to gain a better understanding of what causes disputes, the impact of communication and how you can help the parties determine the real cause of disputes through techniques commonly used by mediators, such as active listening and reframing and asking questions.

T-723-VIEN Virtual Environments

3
This is a comprehensive course in both the theory and practice of Virtual Environments (VEs). Virtual Environments are simulations that engage the senses of users through real-time 3D graphics, audio and interaction to create an experience of presence within an artificial world. VEs are used in a variety of settings, including training, education, health, online collaboration, scientific visualization and entertainment. Their use is becoming more and more pervasive as hardware gets more capable of simulating reality in real-time (including graphics, physics and intelligent behavior). As part of the theoretical overview, the course will introduce the history of VEs, what kind of problems VEs have proven to be best at addressing, what are their shown limitations, what models of human-computer interaction apply to VEs and how these models are evolving and pushing the state-of-the-art in interactivity. The technical portion of the course will lead students through the construction and population of VEs in a very hands-on manner, covering topics such as world representation, real-time graphics and simulation issues, networked environments, avatars and interactive characters, event scripting and AI control, special real-time visual and aural effects and intuitive user interfaces.

T-801-RESM Research Methods I

Industry and society need people who can think critically, who can analyze complex situations and who can communicate their findings effectively. This can involve many tasks, including searching for and evaluating the worth of scientific literature and other forms of documentation.

In this course, we concentrate on scientific writing and reporting, survey techniques and presentations. It will prepare students for dealing with the information gathering, analysis and reporting skills that are required for all other courses.

Key topics covered: Literature surveys, search engines and other agencies, scientific writing, academic publishing, thesis writing, reviewing papers, managing a research project.

T-807-QUAL Quality Management

It is assumed that students have at least a minimum background in statistics. It is also important that students have finished a BS (or BA) degree or have considerable experience in management. The course covers quality management as management science and its important sub-disciplines such as lean and 6 sigma. Among the subjects of the course are the quality concept, clients, quality culture, suppliers and quality cost. Management systems, improvement, management standards, quality system design, certification and audits. Statistical quality control, use of SPC and process capability.

T-806-SIMU Simulation II

The purpose of the course is that students will be able to understand and apply the basic tools of System Analaysis and System Dynamics Modelling from a practical perspective. It has the steps from mission statement, system conceptualization and the process of creating simulation models from the conceptualization using the most modern, user-friendly software available called Stella. The course focuses on the fundamental concepts of system dynamics modelling such as positive and negative feedback structures as well as causal loop diagrams. System dynamics model formulation and simulation is introduced; rate equations and auxiliary equations, delays and graphical converters. Furthermore, policy and sensitivity analysis will be discussed. The course will focus on technical, ecological and economical topics and how they are linked. However, it will also cite examples of a greater variety, such as epidemical studies, interpersonal communications and group dynamics. Practical examples will be analysed both regarding business as well as public policy. The coupling between soft systems, such as decisions and human reactions and physical systems will be trained. By the end of the course the students will hopefully agree that modelling is both fun and useful.

T-865-MADE Precision Machine Design

3
This course offers systematic approach to designing machines able to reliably and repeatedly perform a task. Factors that are of minor importance for low-performance simple machines can quickly become impossible obstacles without the right tools and techniques. The tools introduced in this class is Axiomatic Design Theory aka. Complexity Theory. In this class these techniques will be applied for designing and building high-perfomance machine(s) with our sponsors. Customers will be interviewed to develop Customer Needs(CN). From these CNs, Functional Requirements and Design Parameters will be developed to evaluate possible solutions. The chosen solution will be prototyped and evaluated. LaTeXintroduced for proper documentation and citation generation with Subversion as a mechanism for collaboration. There is a high expectation of documentation and mathematical analysis.

T-621-CLIN Clinical Engineering

In this course, participation in class is necessary since most of the work will be performed in class during the lecturestime. Briefly, the course content is the follow: Part-I, CE General

  • Basic of biomedical engineering science and CE discipline.
  • Health technology evaluation, design, and control in the hospital, acquisition, maintenance and repair of medicaldevices.
  • Patient safety issue, risk management and electromagnetic interference in the hospital.
  • Medical device regulatory, health care quality, ISO standards.
  • Information system management, telemedicine, communication system (PACS).
  • Clinical engineering practise at Landspitali: medical device park, acquisition and maintenance Part-II, CE Electronic.
  • Electrical safety in clinical enviroments.
  • Leakage currents.
  • Fault conditions.
  • Medical devices utilization and service: intensive care, operating room, anaesthesiology.
  • Engineering the clinical environment: Physical plant, heating, air conditioning, operation room, electrical power.
  • The future of clinical engineering.
  • Practical measurements of leakage current.

T-868-LISY Linear Dynamical Systems

This course gives an introduction to linear systems, applied algebra and system dynamics with emphasis on mechanical engineering and electrical engineering application areas, such as mechanical systems, fluid and thermal systems and electrical systems. Throughout the course, for a given dynamical system four main topics will be covered:

  • Mathematical modeling
  • System response-analysis (simulation)
  • Exploration of structural relations
  • Control or modification

T-863-EIIP Energy in Industrial Processes

The course covers the use of energy in industrial processes and society. The principles of mass and energy balance are applied to processes taking into account thermodynamics and thermochemistry. The chemistry of metallurgical processes such as iron and steel production is covered but the main focus is on the industrial processes that are prevalent in Iceland, aluminum and silicon. Also other energy intensive processes are addressed such as cement production, mineral wool, fertilizer and synthetic fuel.The main emphasis is on the student’s ability to get an overview over various processes in terms of material and energy flow, raw materials, energy use and efficiency, environmental effects and mitigation. Also the economic background i.e. the cost, profit and market conditions are addressed. Grading is based on problem solving, individual and group projects as well as a final exam. Field trips are an integral part of the course.

V-406-TOL2 Applied Statistics II

Theoretical and applied econometrics will be covered. Emphasis will be stressed in various ways to evaluate coefficients of the linear model. Problems that arise during such evaluation will be covered and methods which respond to such problems. These methods will also be covered in grounds of the application. Statistical modeling and decision making is one of the basics of this course. Time series analysis and application of prediction models will be introduced. Emphasis on the practical use of the projects.

View Syllabus

V-644-BRAN Branding

This course explores the ideology of strategic brand management where the main emphasis is on fundamental definitions, different methods of measuring customer-based brand equity and how to design and implement an effective and successful branding strategy and maximize customer-based brand equity.

View Syllabus

V-107-FJAR Corporate Finance

This course covers the fundamental concepts of corporate finance. Based on the time value of money the course discusses key instruments in equity and debt financing and their valuation. This includes a discussion of the relationship between risk and return and key theories in that respect. The course also focuses on capital budgeting and its practical application. The capital structure choice is discussed in both perfect and imperfect market settings. This includes the impact of, e.g., taxes and financial distress as well as a discussion of ways to influence the capital structure including the issuance of securities and pay-out policies.

View Syllabus

V-504-AFLE Derivative

The course objective is to extend the students understanding of financial derivatives and how they are applied. After the course, students should be able to price most types of financial derivatives and have an understanding of when and how they are used. The topics covered in the course are Arbitrage and risk-free pricing; pricing and use of forward contracts, swaps and options; hedging; Introduction to interest rate options; use of derivatives in risk management and for investing purposes.

View Syllabus

V-552-STAF Digital Marketing

This course on Digital Marketing builds both an academic and practical understanding of professional practice in the field. The teaching emphasis such things as well defined objectives, key performance indicators, business models in digital media, metrics, and measurements, as well as integrated marketing communications. We will go through each and every media, its strengths and weaknesses. This includes search engine marketing (both organic and paid searches), web pages, social media, mobile, and affiliate marketing.

V-524 Leadership

Leadership is an important topic for many reasons and we will explore many of those reasons as well as study the key concepts of leadership. This course offers a special focus on ethical leadership, servant leadership, and team leadership. Through readings, work sessions, case studies, assignment projects etc. students will explore and develop their knowledge and understanding of effective leadership. In addition, the course will emphasize how effective leadership is achieved and how one can analyze and assess effective leadership.

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V-528-MAVI Marketing and Business Research Methods

This course will cover the role and importance of business research methods as well as the main steps in the research process, also cover the structure of each research method with a special emphasis on surveys. The structure of each method will be explored, its traditions and the way it is conducted. Emphasis is put on measurements, data collection, data analysis, and presentation. SPSS is taught in the course. The SPSS software is commonly used in business and marketing research. Practical assignments are emphasized.

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V-522-SERV Service Management

This course is an introduction course in Service Management and will present the main concepts and practical skills necessary to know and use for building good performance in the management of service companies.

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V-516-VERD Valuation

This course will examine all the major equity valuation methods. A consideration will be given to valuation under different situations and different types of companies, and how to evaluate the valuation criteria. The interpretation of the valuation and its reasoning will be discussed, taking into account the different results of various methods. There will be an examination of various research reports and real-life business cases. Valuation in M&A and financial restructuring situations will be examined. Value management and value enhancing methods will be addressed. The students are expected to complete one comprehensive valuation project culminating in a research report, which will be handed in in 3 modules. There may be a guest lecture(s) during the course.

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V-511-STST Human Resource Management - 3-Week Course

This course covers the employment process from recruitment to termination, including staffing, training and development, performance management, compensation, employee relations and legal issues. Emphasis on the strategic role of HRM, the roles of line managers vs. HR managers and measurement of results. Practical exercises and analysis of cases are used in class.

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V-208-ALVI International Business - 3-Week Course

This course focuses on one hand on the international environment: The global system of trade, international trade theory, political economy of trade, barriers to international trade, regional trading arrangements, EU and NAFTA, the impact of culture on international business, foreign investment, location of production, GATT, WTO, the international monetary system and IMF. On the other hand, it deals with the international interests of individual companies. This includes, e.g., gain and risk of foreign operations, analysis of different ways to internationalization; Icelandic companies: history and insights gained from foreign activity, the organization of international business; foreign marketing and development, alliances, im/exporting, management, financial control, and accounting.

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V-512-ATFE Behavioral Economics

This course describes how individuals and firms make financial decisions, and how those decisions might deviate from those predicted by traditional financial or economic theory. Using theories of human behavior from the fields of psychology, sociology and other fields of sciences related to decision-making, common features of irrational behavior in the financial markets will be described and analyzed.

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V-304-FMAR Financial Markets

Financial markets are important pillars of every civilized society. They facilitate economic activities and provide services and products to manage risks. It is important to understand the function of financial institutions in order to be able to predict their reactions towards different economic events and how they will evolve over time. This course is set to support students in their learning of different theories of finance and how those theories are linked with financial history, the strengths and weaknesses of financial institutions, such as banks, insurance companies, stock and derivatives markets, and what the future holds for those institutions.

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V-644-IEND Introduction to Accounting

During the course, students will be introduced to the basic factors in auditing of financial statements. Students will be introduced to the International Standards on Auditing (ISA´s) by reading a textbook. Students will go through the whole audit process, all from planning the audit to the procedures performed at the end of the audit. Also, students will be introduced to the basic factors in entities effective internal control. In the end of the course, students should be able to understand the purpose and theories of auditing and distinguish between different audit opinions. The course material will be the textbook Auditing and Assurance services by Aasmund Eilifsen, William F. Messier, Steven M. Glover og Douglas Pravitt as well as articles and other material that will be introduced during the course.

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V-311-OPMA Operations Management

Topics covered include:

  • The activities of operations management and the role of the operations function in achieving strategic success.
  • The development of operations management and process management.
  • The volume – variety effect on process design, layout, process technology, and job design.
  • Configuring the supply network.
  • The activities of supply chain management.
  • Types of relationships in supply chains.
  • Supply chain behavior.
  • The location of capacity.
  • Forecasting demand.
  • Planning and control activities.
  • Measuring demand and capacity.
  • The alternative capacity plans.
  • The use of OEE in capacity calculations.
  • Inventory management.
  • The volume decision – how much to order.
  • The timing decision – when to place an order.
  • JIT planning and control.
  • The maser production schedule and MRP.
  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP).
  • Project management.
  • Performance measurements, benchmarking and the balanced scorecard.
  • Quality control and how quality problems can be diagnosed.
  • Business improvement and improvement methods.
  • Improvement priorities.
  • Breakthrough vs. continuous improvement.
  • Business process reengineering (BPR).
  • Strategy and operations strategy.
  • Organizations and the importance of an end-to-end process focus when it comes to strategic planning and organizational design.
  • The process concept and the process focused organization.
  • Management systems: The Lean management system.
  • TQM and Six Sigma.
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V-601-EIGN Portfolio Management

The course objective is twofold. The main emphasis is on introducing students to investor methodology in the securities market when forming portfolios. Students are especially expected to gain an overview of what is available in the domestic and international financial markets. Students will be introduced to main theories and approaches of capital asset allocation. The major pricing models are also covered along with individual theories on the pricing of stocks. There is great emphasis on students being able to apply the technical part of the study, i.e. able to present the problems they are dealing with in an organized manner, using the necessary formulas.

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V-627-VERK Project Management

At the end of this course the student should expect the following outcomes:

  • Knowledge regarding traditional project management methods and it’s position in the world of management concepts and theories.
  • Knowledge concerning planning techniques of project ea project objectives, scoping, scheduling and cost planning with CPM, PERT and Gantt charts, use of learning curves and NPV calculations to estimate project profitability etc. Also to establish project control system based on Earned Value accounting methods.
  • To be familiar with the PRINCE2 project management environment.
  • Knowledge of project team building and the use of analysis ea decision trees, Ishikawa analysis, Pareto analysis, risk assessment etc to be able to focus on the main topics and tasks of the project.
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V-633-SOST Sales Management

This course covers the main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management, as well as how sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches students how to develop, manage and motivate a sales force. The course explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

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V-649-STMP Strategic Marketing Planning

The aim of the course is to introduce the marketing planning process. Students will conduct their own marketing plan built on current marketing practices. Key concepts and methodologies include marketing objectives and metrics, marketing planning, segmentation, consumer research and customer analytics, and marketing models. Strategic marketing planning takes students step-by-step through the process of developing a creative, effective marketing plan for a brand that they choose. Packed with real-life examples, up-to-date marketing ideas and detailed sample plans, the course offers practical guidance on how to research, prepare and present a valuable marketing plan. Emphasis is on student participation in class, discussions, analysis, presentations and case studies.

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T-409-TSAM Computer Networks

This course begins with a short overview of network systems and services. Afte an introduction, the focus will be on the layers of the OSI and IETF models. The following network layers will be studied in the details: application layer (WWW, HTTP, DNS, SMTP, FTP etc), transport layer (UDP and TCP), network layer (link state routing and distance vector routing, IP, IP-addresses, link layer (MAC, Ethernet, Hubs and switches). Finally an introduction to some more specific topics such as mobile networks, multimedia networking, and network security will be given. Students will also work on the topics through programming assignments and homework.

T-504-ITML Introduction to Machine Learning

This course presents an overview of the field of machine learning, which deals with finding patterns and rules in large datasets. Such rules can then be used to predict outcomes of future events, for example with the aim of improving decision-making in a wide range of business and manufacturing disciplines. In this course, students will study machine learning techniques for classification and clustering as well as other selected techniques. In addition to introducing the underlying theory, the methods will be used to solve practical problems

T-511-TGRA Computer Graphics

Computer graphics is an increasing part of today’s programmer projects. The first part of this course covers the use of the OpenGL library, vector tools for graphics, transformations of objects and polygonal meshes.The second part deals in more detail with three-dimensional drawing with emphasis on perspective, depth, light, and color. In the end, several issues regarding the implementation of a renderer are presented, in addition to curve and surface design. During the course, students build several programs related to the course material.

T-519-STOR Theory of Computation

The main topic of this course is the theoretical basis of computer science. Various types of finite automata are introduced and connected to the formal definition of a programming language. Turing machines are introduced as a theoretical model for computation. Computability is discussed and the classification of solvable and unsolvable problems. Finally, there is a discussion of complexity classes and the classification of algorithmically hard and easy problems.

T-513-CRNU Cryptography and Number Theory

This class treats the basics of cryptography and number theory. The class starts with some classical ciphers and the tools from number theory necessary for doing cryptography. Students will cover symmetric and asymmetric ciphers. Some topics from groups, rings, and fields will be introduced and used, especially when looking at elliptic curve cryptography. There will be some programming exercises in addition to standard mathematical homework. Students will use the programming language Sage to program with.

E-402-STFO Mathematical Programming - 3-Week Course

Mathematics is generally discovered through experiments. Traditional tools for such experiments are pen and paper, and, of course, the mind. A (historically) recent addition to these tools is the computer. We will look at problems from several areas of mathematics and, in particular, how programming can be used as a means to better understand and ultimately solve those problems. This will involve designing and implementing algorithms, experimentation to make conjectures, and deductive/formal mathematics to prove conjectures. For programming we will use python/sage languages.

T-637-GEDE Game Engine Architecture

The course covers the theory and practice of game engine software development, bringing together topics that range from large-scale software architectures and modern game programming paradigms to the design and implementation of subsystems for rendering, resource management, user interfaces, sound, collision, physics, and animation. Through practical lab exercises and group projects, the students will get technical hands-on experience in C++ game development, including the use and development of supporting tool pipelines.

T-622-ARTI Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is devoted to the computational study of intelligent behavior, including areas such as problem-solving, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning and scheduling, machine learning, perception, and communication. This course gives an overview of the aforementioned AI subfields from computer science perspective and introduces fundamental solution techniques for addressing them. As a part of the course, the students study a selected specialized topic in-depth.

T-501-FMAL Programming Languages

The evolution of programming languages is an important factor in computer science. The course describes this evolution from the first programming languages to the more recent languages. Different types of programming languages are discussed and their characteristics compared. Programming languages syntax is introduced as well as Backus-Naur Form (BNF). Main characteristics of imperative languages are examined, particularly regarding scope rules and procedure activations. The focus is on the Smalltalk programming environment while discussing object-oriented languages. The constructs of functional programming languages are examined with emphasis on Lambda calculus and the ML language. Logic programming is introduced and the Prolog language is specifically analyzed. Students are introduced to the design and syntax of the above languages and experiment with several programming projects using some of these languages.

T-611-NYTI New Technology

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course, students will look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular, students will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities, and effect on society.

T-419-CADP Concurrent and Distributed Programming - 3-Week Course

Multi-Core machines, networks of interconnected computers and heterogeneous computing environments have become ubiquitous. Writing programs that utilize these computer‘s resources to its fullest involves writing multi-threaded and distributed programs. In this course, participants learn to write such programs in C using the pthreads API and in Erlang. They learn to avoid unintended nondeterministic effects and deadlocks and they learn to structure concurrent and distributed programs. We repeat the basics of threads, processes, semaphores, and mutexes. Then, patterns are described to structure common algorithms for concurrent execution and understand the basic architectures (recursive parallelism, iterative parallelism, mesh parallelism, bag of tasks). We consider programming with monitors and with transactional memory. After understanding the problems of shared variable concurrency and its problem, we consider distributed message passing systems. By encapsulating a state and decoupling the control flow with messaging, one can avoid many problems of shared variable programs. Participants learn to structure distributed applications and understand their architecture. They will also consider coordination methods that describe how the activities of the processes in a distributed system achieve a common goal. Distributed systems will be implemented in Erlang. Erlang is a concurrency oriented, a functional programming language for distributed, soft-realtime, and fault-tolerant applications. Erlang is used, e.g. at Facebook and Amazon, for real-time trading applications and online games. At the end, participants are able to demonstrate a concurrent application, understand the way it is constructed and be able to justify the properties of the application. They understand the trade-offs of the language mechanism and know the structural similarities and differences the language mechanism exhibit.

T-219-REMO Real-time Models - 3-Week Course

The context for the course Computing systems are everywhere in modern society; they are becoming increasingly sophisticated and they control key aspects of our lives. In fact, computation is even more widely present in our world than most people realize! Think, for instance, of embedded computing devices, such as those that control ABS systems in cars, the temperature of our houses or the functioning of mobile phones. This population of ‘effectively invisible’ computers around us is embedded in the fabric of our homes, shops, vehicles, farms and some even in our bodies. They help us command, control, communicate, do business, travel and entertain ourselves, and these ‘invisible’ computers largely outnumber the desktop or laptop computers we see each day. In light of the increasing complexity of such computing devices, and of the fact that they control important, when not altogether safety critical, operations, it is important to adopt high standards of quality in their development and validation. However, when dealing with software controlled devices, we still accept routinely that such systems crash and must be rebooted. In fact, we would be surprised if we did not have to send error reports to software manufacturers! Come to think of it, software-controlled devices are just about the only products we engineer for which we accept this level of brittleness. You do not enter your car each day expecting it to stop and ready to send an error report to the car manufacturer, do you? Do software-controlled systems have to be more unreliable than cars, say? A key scientific challenge in computer science is to design and develop computing systems that do what they were designed to do and do so reliably. In order to meet the challenge of building dependable systems, computer scientists are increasingly using model-based approaches to their design and validation. This means that, before actually constructing a system, one follows the time-honored engineering approach of making a model of its design and of subjecting the model to a thorough analysis, whose ultimate aim is to certify that the design embodied by the model meets its intended specification.

The aim of this course is to introduce the basic ideas underlying the model of timed automata, a graphical formalism for the description of real-time computing systems due to Rajeev Alur and David Dill. During the course, you will use the model to describe algorithms, games, scheduling problems and other fun scenarios with relevance to computer science, and to analyze the behavior of the systems you have modeled using the automatic verification tool Uppaal. Uppaal is an integrated tool environment for the description, validation, and verification of real-time systems modeled as networks of communicating timed automata, extended with data types. Summing up, this is a course in which you will be introduced to a little neat theory with real impact on the practice of the development of computing systems in a world that increasingly depends on the quality of software-controlled devices. Can you do without this knowledge?

T-604-HGRE Design and Analysis of Algorithms - 3-Week Course

Students in this course will study all the major algorithmic strategies, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, network flow, and randomized algorithms. Think of this as a course on “how to solve it by a computer”. We do so by studying how classical paradigmatic problems are solved, and how to apply the ideas to new problems. We will also link the problem-solving part to programming contest problems. We emphasize reasoning: understanding why something works, and the ability to explain it. Course assignments will primarily focus on written arguments (in LaTeX), in addition to the problem-solving aspect. During recitation classes, students are expected to present their solutions to the class and participate in discussions.

T-631-SOE2 Software Engineering II – Testing - 3-Week Course

Building modern software systems requires not only programming skills but also engineering skills. Software development includes requirement analysis, design, implementation, and testing. Various studies show that over than 50% of efforts and costs of software development are devoted to activities related to testing. This includes test design, execution, and evaluation. This course is an introductory course to software testing in which students will learn quantitative, technical, and practical methods and techniques that software engineers use to test their software along with the software lifecycle. The course is based on the textbook: Introduction to Software Testing, by Paul Ammann and Jeff Offutt. Accordingly, the focus will be on how we can design better tests based on coverage criteria. The course covers topics, such as Graph Coverage, Logic Coverage, Input Space Partitioning and Syntax-Based Testing. In some discussions, we will use other references to get a deeper understanding of the subject.

T-634-AGDD Advanced Game Design & Development - 3-Week Course

This course expands RU’s prior offerings in game design & development with more advanced topics in game and interaction design. Through lectures, lab exercises, and project work, students will learn and gain experience with a variety of game design topics. Working together in teams, students will design, develop, and critically analyze several smaller games, each focused on applying the concepts that are discussed in class. Each of these exercises will differ in terms of either the team’s composition, the game’s scope, or the constraints that the instructors provide to guide the creative process. Each student will also take on a different development role for each exercise. After the exercises are complete, students will form new teams and apply their new knowledge to a larger development project. Masters students will additionally complete a small research project related to the course topics.

T-505-ROKF Logic in Computer Science - 3-Week Course

Logic has been called “the calculus of computer science”. The argument is that logic plays a fundamental role in computer science, similar to that played by calculus in the physical sciences and traditional engineering disciplines. Indeed, logic plays an important role in areas of Computer Science as disparate as architecture (logic gates), software engineering (specification and verification), programming languages (semantics, logic programming), databases (relational algebra and SQL), artificial intelligence (automatic theorem proving, multi-agent systems, knowledge and belief), algorithms (complexity and expressiveness), and theory of computation (general notions of computability). See, for instance, the slides available at http://www.ru.is/faculty/luca/SLIDES/logic-and-cs.pdf for more information. This course provides the student with a thorough introduction to computational logic, covering the topics of syntax, semantics, decision procedures and formal systems for various logics that play a crucial role in applications in computer science, namely propositional and first-order logic, and modal and temporal logics. The material is taught from a computer science perspective, with an emphasis on the use of logic as a specification language and general-purpose problem-solving tool in computer science. As part and parcel of the course, we shall introduce various logic-based software tools and the algorithms and data structures underlying them; examples include BDD-based tools, SAT solvers and model checkers. The goal is to prepare the students for using logic as a formal tool in computer science.

T-732-GAPL General Game Playing - 3-Week Course

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of general game playing. The aim of general game playing is to create intelligent autonomous agents that automatically learn how to play many different games at an expert level without any human intervention, given only a description of the game rules. This requires that the agents learn diverse game-playing strategies without any game-specific knowledge being provided by their developers. A successful realization of this task involves the understanding and application of topics from many artificial-intelligence sub-disciplines, such as knowledge representation, agent-based reasoning, heuristic search, and machine learning. This course provided the students with such a background as well as an introduction to different parallel processing paradigms in the context of game-tree search, but parallel processing is fast becoming increasingly more relevant because of the foreseen development of massively multi-core computers.

V-202-REGR Managerial Accounting - 3-Week Course

The course covers main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management. How sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches how to develop, manage and motivate your sales force. Explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in the workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

T-306-RAS1 Analog Circuit Analysis

This course will cover the following topics:

  • Basic concepts of charge, current, power, and energy.
  • Circuit elements, including different types of sources.
  • Basic laws, including Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws.
  • Series and parallel connections, and Delta and Wye transformations.
  • Circuit analysis methods; node voltage and mesh current methods.
  • Circuit theorems; superposition, source transformation, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems and maximum power transfer.
  • Operational amplifiers (Op-Amp) and its basic circuits.
  • Inductors and capacitors and series and parallel combinations.
  • First order RL and RC circuits, and the natural, forced and steady-state responses.
  • Second order series and parallel RLC circuits.
  • Concepts of phasors and impedances for AC sinusoidal analysis
  • Circuits methods and theorems for AC sinusoidal steady-state and AC power analysis

T-411-Mech Mechatronics I

This course provides an introduction to Mechatronics, the technique of interfacing software, electronics, and mechanical components. We will be utilizing the low-cost Arduino microcontroller platform as our method for sensing and control. Students will have to pay a fee for their personal lab kit which includes some shared parts for team-based labs.

The course will begin with an introduction to microcontroller programming and software engineering. This includes C++ and Subversion (for collaboration). The course will then shift to electronics design, implementation, and testing. The course will cover both analog and digital electronics with a focus on interfacing to sensors, DC motors, and stepper motors. Students will be designing and building PCB boards using Altium to integrate the electronics being developed.

Students will choose a final mechatronics group project to be presented at the end of the semester. This project should involve manufacturing mechanical elements and interface them with the microcontrollers to demonstrate their mastery of the subject.

T-316-STAF Digital Electronics - 3-Week Course

This course is an introduction to digital electronics with a link to Biomedical engineering applications. It covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics such as applications in Medical devices.

T-316-LABB Measurement Systems - 3-Week Course

This course introduces the essential general characteristics of measuring devices, data acquisition systems, uncertainty analysis, on how to use uncertainty analysis as a tool to design experiments, and sampling and spectral analysis. Planning and executing experiments, and report writing is also covered.

T-845-ENVI Introduction to Environmental Engineering

The purpose of this course is to get an overview of growing environmental problems and to understand and discuss how sciences and engineering principles can help reduce the anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. In particular, the importance of preserving clean water, air, and land resources for humans and for the wildlife will be discussed. In particular, the need and potential of clean and renewable energy production and low carbon economy will be discussed. Specific topics include climate change; environmental footprint, airborne pollution; groundwater; ecological disruption; and economic disruption. The course is composed of three parts: i) theoretical lectures about environmental engineering, ii) numerical and research exercises and iii) student project development. Students are expected to develop an environmental engineering project aiming at reducing the ecological footprint and enhancing the UN sustainability goals. MSc students have the option to develop a research plan in collaboration with an international partner institution for a potential MSc thesis.

T-621-CLIN Clinical Engineering

In this course, participation in class is necessary since most of the work will be performed in class during the lecturestime. Briefly, the course content is the follow: Part-I, CE General

  • Basic of biomedical engineering science and CE discipline.
  • Health technology evaluation, design, and control in the hospital, acquisition, maintenance and repair of medicaldevices.
  • Patient safety issue, risk management and electromagnetic interference in the hospital.
  • Medical device regulatory, health care quality, ISO standards.
  • Information system management, telemedicine, communication system (PACS).
  • Clinical engineering practise at Landspitali: medical device park, acquisition and maintenance Part-II, CE Electronic.
  • Electrical safety in clinical enviroments.
  • Leakage currents.
  • Fault conditions.
  • Medical devices utilization and service: intensive care, operating room, anaesthesiology.
  • Engineering the clinical environment: Physical plant, heating, air conditioning, operation room, electrical power.
  • The future of clinical engineering.
  • Practical measurements of leakage current.

VT HUN1003 Design in Mechanical Engineering

This course will begin with lectures on the basics of design including systematic processes to harness creative thinking. It will cover basics of collaboration software usage. Emphasis and evaluation will be placed equally on effective process, documentation/presentation, and results. The semester’s assignments will consist of a mixture of individual and team assignments.

T-420-HONX Design X

Students in this coursework in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of an RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car

T-509-RAFT Electronics

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Review of signal-processing basicsReview of feedback systems. Electronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Review of feedback systemsElectronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Electronic devices large and small-signal models
  • Large and small-signal models of diodes and transistors (MOSFET and BJT)Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifier.
  • Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifierElementary transistor stages:
  • Elementary transistor stages: biasing, operation point, small signal analysis. Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage
  • Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage amplifiersDifferential pair and
  • Differential pair and differential amplifier
  • Design with an operational amplifier. Transconductance amplifier.
  • Active-RC and OTA-C filtersPower amplifiers.
  • Power amplifiers.

T-620-FJAX Finance X

In this task, students will take on the role of a bond portfolio manager. Initially, they will familiarize themselves with the Icelandic bond market and in that process appreciate the following important points:

  • Market conditions that impact on the value of their investments.
  • How do the specifics of a bond impact on its risk-return profile?
  • Work out the correlation between the performances of individual bonds.

The next step is to move on to a portfolio of several bonds, which will be analyzed and optimized from a defined risk-return perspective. It is important to analyze in particular the following aspects,

  • Price, risk and portfolio returns.
  • Quantification of risk for bond portfolios
  • The role of different interest rate models
  • The impact of inflation on portfolios‘ risk and return characteristics
  • The role of inflation – and interest rate contracts

The students will put in place a “life system” that takes in real-time data from the market and updates the value and the risk position of the portfolio. Adjustments will be made to the portfolio as required and an investment policy will be determined and used to rebalance the portfolio. Some attention will be paid to the possible use of interest rate and/or inflation-indexed derivatives. The results will be presented in the form of a report and a demonstrator.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

The purpose of the course is that students learn to apply financial theory in a practice. The course will present how to approach real-world problems by using theory in the spreadsheet environment of Excel (and partly in the coding environment of Visual Basic and Matlab). At the completion of the course, students should be comfortable with pricing securities (bonds, stock, derivatives) and perform various types of risk evaluations. Students should also be able to perform term structure estimation, assess fund management performance, present portfolios on the efficient frontier, assess equilibrium price models, etc. In short, the purpose of the course is that students adopt the tools necessary to use financial theory in a practical way which will benefit them in any finance or research related position.

The main topics to be covered in the course are:

  • Interest rate calcul., term structure estim., pricing of bonds, immunization strategies
  • Portfolio theory and choice/management (e.g. efficient frontier)
  • Stock pricing models of financial markets (e.g. CAPM, Fama-French)
  • Event studies
  • Volatility predictions; standard deviation, MA, EWMA, ARCH, GARCH models
  • Option pricing (European, American, Asian and Bermuda options)
  • Risk measurement; the Value-at-Risk methodology and extensions thereof
  • In addition to the spreadsheet environment of Excel, the course will introduce how to apply Visual Basic Application (in Excel) and Matlab to conveniently solve some financial tasks.
  • Introduction to the main financial databases available online and elsewhere.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

The purpose of the course is that students learn to apply financial theory in a practice. The course will present how to approach real-world problems by using theory in the spreadsheet environment of Excel (and partly in the coding environment of Visual Basic and Matlab). At the completion of the course, students should be comfortable with pricing securities (bonds, stock, derivatives) and perform various types of risk evaluations. Students should also be able to perform term structure estimation, assess fund management performance, present portfolios on the efficient frontier, assess equilibrium price models, etc. In short, the purpose of the course is that students adopt the tools necessary to use financial theory in a practical way which will benefit them in any finance or research related position.

The main topics to be covered in the course are:

  • Interest rate calcul., term structure estim., pricing of bonds, immunization strategies
  • Portfolio theory and choice/management (e.g. efficient frontier)
  • Stock pricing models of financial markets (e.g. CAPM, Fama-French)
  • Event studies
  • Volatility predictions; standard deviation, MA, EWMA, ARCH, GARCH models
  • Option pricing (European, American, Asian and Bermuda options)
  • Risk measurement; the Value-at-Risk methodology and extensions thereof
  • In addition to the spreadsheet environment of Excel, the course will introduce how to apply Visual Basic Application (in Excel) and Matlab to conveniently solve some financial tasks.
  • Introduction to the main financial databases available online and elsewhere.

T-803-VERK Project Management and Strategic Planning

Course description currently unavailable. This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-806-SST2 Reinforced Concrete II

Course description currently unavailable.

This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-844-FEMM Finite Element Analysis in Engineering

This course will present the main features and possibilities of the finite element method (FEM) and its application in analysis of problems in mechanics. Aspects of the finite element method, from the mathematical background through to practical implementation and application are discussed. Emphasis is placed on possible errors and how to minimize them. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamentals of the finite element method and get some training in the use of commercial finite element software.

T-845-UMHV Sustainable Engineering and the Environment

Course description currently unavailable.

VT JAH1003 Geothermal Energy

  • Topics covered in this course include:
  • Geothermal systems
  • Geothermal exploration
  • Geothermal well drilling and well design
  • Geothermal well logging and testing of wells
  • Classification of geothermal systemsConceptual models.
  • Conceptual models
  • Response of geothermal systems to utilization
  • Reservoir management and reservoir models
  • Role of geothermal energy in the energy mix
  • Different uses of geothermal energy in Iceland and worldwide
  • Direct use of geothermal energy for space and district heating, swimming pools, greenhouses, snow melting and in industry
  • Geothermal heat pumps
  • Utilization of geothermal steam
  • Geothermal power plants, flash system power plants, binary power plants
  • Design of steam pipelines, structural design, process design
  • Power plant components, turbines, generators, condensers, cooling system, gas extraction system
  • Use of EES program
  • Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)
  • Environmental effects of geothermal energy

T-606-HEAT Heat Transfer

In this course the concepts of heat transfer are introduced:

  • Heat conduction: One-dimensional steady state heat conduction, the solution of the Fourier equation for steady-state and transient problems. Lumped analysis using thermal resistance. Application of numerical techniques.
  • Convective heat transfer: Natural convection, empirical relations in free convection. Forced convection, laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer analysis in external and internal flows, such as flows between parallel plates, over a flat plate and in a circular pipe. Condensation and boiling heat transfer. Empirical relations, application of numerical techniques in problem-solving.
  • Radiative heat transfer: Introduction to the physical mechanism, radiation properties, radiation shape factors black body radiation, and deviation from blackbody radiation, radiation from gases.
  • Heat exchangers: Classification of heat exchangers, temperature distribution, overall heat transfer coefficient, and fouling. Heat exchanger analysis using LMTD method and NTU method.

T-407-EFNI Materials Science

The fundamentals of the properties and structure of materials utilized in the practice of engineering are presented. The groups of materials studied include metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers and multiphase systems. The theoretical basis is given for the understanding of the behavior of materials where their electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are related to their molecular and crystalline structure. A brief introduction to biomedical applications is given. Methods for analyzing and testing of materials’ properties are studied as well as the methods used for controlling them, e.g. heat treatment, grain refinement and alloying. Corrosion and its prevention are studied and an introduction to binary and ternary phase diagrams is given. An insight into Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nano-systems are also provided.

T-535-MECH Mechatronic

Mechatronics-2 extends Mechatronics-1 by going into more details. While Mechatronics 1 is broader and more about getting results fast (what is possible), Mechatronics 2 is more about accuracy and how to match a design to a task with economy, accuracy, and robustness in mind (what is the limit). The course includes sensors, signal conditioning, interfacing, analog-digital conversion, digital input/outputs, timers, low level embedded firmware programming, actuators, UARTs and serial communication. It is expected that the student is familiar with the programming language C. Along with the lectures, each student has his/her own private project based on the fundamental elements of mechatronics: sense-think-act. For this project, the student holds a lab notebook. At the end of the course, the student delivers a report about the project.

T-620-LIKX Model X

This course will help students to make the vital step from a solid understanding of the fundamentals of engineering management and operations research to the application of theory to practical scenarios, as they arise in the real world. On completion of the course, the students will have extensively applied their knowledge of engineering management to a range of practical and relevant problems. The problems will require knowledge, of course, such as operations research, programming, data processing, simulation, and production and inventory management.

T-611-NYTI New Technology

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course we look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular we will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities and effect on society.

T-606-NUFF Numerical Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer

The main purpose of this course is to introduce the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for analyzing fluid flows and heat transfer. Hands-on exercises are used to study the basic theory of CFD through programming and using existing commercial and open source CFD codes. Finite difference and finite volume techniques are emphasized.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

Course description currently unavailable.

T-602-RISK Risk Management

This course starts by introducing basic concepts assessing and managing risk. The discussion will then focus on how risk arises, both in the corporate and financial environment and on ways to manage it, either by means of active hedging or diversification. Classification of risk will be explained with specific focus on equity -, interest rate – and credit risk. Value-at-risk (VaR) will be introduced as one way of quantifying risk and the KMV model, popular with rating agencies such as Moody’s, will be discussed for quantifying credit risk. For both models, we will emphasize their strengths and limitations. The course will also cover risks associated with positions in a range of different derivative contracts and how they can be hedged.

T-508-VARM Thermodynamics

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Introduction to the fundamental concepts of engineering thermodynamics: State, temperature, etc.
  • The first law of thermodynamics, work, heat, efficiency. Properties of pure substances, phase change, ideal gas, real gas, equations of state.
  • Thermodynamic analysis of open and closed systems e.g. turbines and heat exchangers.
  • Second law and its applications.
  • Reversible and irreversible processes, Carnot cycle etc. Entropy, the Clausius inequality, and the third law.
  • Energy and its applications for analysis.

VT SVF1003 Vibration Theory

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Free, damped and excited vibrations in linear systems
  • Nonlinear vibrations
  • Two-degree-of-freedom systems
  • Design for vibration suppression
  • Measurement and analysis of vibrations
  • The use of the ANSYS program for vibration analysis

T-420-HONX Design X - 3-Week Course

Students in this coursework in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of an RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car

T-603-THYD Compilers

Compilers are the most important part of a programming development environment. The course defines the function & objective of a compiler. Lexical analysis of programs is discussed in detail, regular expression & finite automatons defined and the use of Lex introduced. Top-down and bottom-up approaches in parsing are discussed precisely & the use of Yacc introduced. Implementation of error handling illustrated particularly semantic analysis. Finally, code generation is covered. Construction of a compiler will be a large component of the course.

T-740-SPMM Software Project Management

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Course description currently unavailable.

T-809-DATA Datamining and Machine Learning

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Course description currently unavailable.

T-810-OPTI Optimization Methods

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Overview and approach: This course introduces the principal algorithms for linear, network, discrete, nonlinear, dynamic optimization and optimal control. Emphasis is on methodology and the underlying mathematical structures. Topics include the simplex method, network flow methods, branch and bound and cutting plane methods for discrete optimization, optimality conditions for nonlinear optimization, interior point methods for convex optimization, Newton’s method, heuristic methods, and dynamic programming and optimal control methods.

T-811-PROB Applied Probability

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

Overview and approach: This heuristically and practically motivated course will discuss the computation of probabilities of events, discrete/continuous random variables, conditioning of random variables. In addition, the course will also cover transformations of random variables, Markov processes, and the applications of stochastic processes to queuing theory, derivatives/finance, decision theory and game theory.

T-814-PROD Integrated Product Development: Concepts & Processes

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSE

This course covers the engineering approach to innovation and entrepreneurship in lectures and a practical program in an active company. Due to increasing freedom in trade and internationalization, the competition between companies is boosting. At the same time, consumers demand new solutions, and the technology develops, resulting in older solutions becoming obsolete. Such conditions require constant innovation in companies management and an understanding of the nature of innovation and entrepreneurship. Innovation is not only necessary for technological companies, but in all companies that intend to live and prosper.The course will cover innovation and the ability companies have for innovation in light of market, science, engineering, planning and financial presumptions. Students will deal with the terms innovation and entrepreneurship and their significance for modern management and put in context with success. The course will also cover the value of knowledge, intellectual property rights, and patent rights. Then the course will cover the internationalization and its impact on the innovation process. Special emphasis will be put on systematic development of the processes connected to innovation and worked on a project in a real company in this field.

V-755-CORP Corporate Finance

The purpose of the course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of theories and models for corporations’ capital budgeting and financing decisions and to enhance their skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: Goal of the corporation, the capital budgeting decision, investment decisions under certainty, relationship between risk and return (portfolio risk, beta and CAPM), cost of capital, analyzing capital budgeting and risk, practical problems in capital budgeting, financing decisions, payout policy, capital structure, corporate governance and control, and an overview of the efficient market hypothesis. The course also addresses financial leasing, mergers, and corporate restructuring.

V-853-EQUI Equity Analysis

The focus of this course is on the financial analysis and valuation of companies. Therefore the course provides students with essential knowledge in equity valuation and develops skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: The course is segmented into major sections. It starts with a discussion of the drivers of corporate value, specifically return on invested capital (ROIC) and organic revenue growth. Based on this, it examines how to build an ROIC-based valuation model in conjunction with a free cash flow to firm (FCFF) model. Following that it covers financial analysis using data from the annual report based on traditional competitive benchmarking and to current metrics such as return on invested capital (ROIC) and economic profit. The primary goal is to build a true understanding of operating performance across business units and for the entire company. Having covered the above elements, the course focuses on building an integrated valuation model using discounted cash flow. This section of the course starts with the fundamentals of forecasting, how to determine the appropriate forecast period, and issues related to continuing value. It covers the weighted average cost of capital, focusing on how to estimate the inputs. The final section discusses alternatives to DCF valuation, such as multiples analysis to triangulate DCF valuation and comparison to investment strategies of major investors.

V-757-INTF International Finance

1
The purpose of the course is to provide students with advanced knowledge of corporate finance and financial management in an international context and to enhance their skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The course focuses on financing and investment decisions in the international corporate context, including the financial risks associated with these decisions. The course provides an overview of international financial markets, international financial institutions, currencies and exchange rates as well as international capital flows. It focuses on risks related to international business activities, with emphasis on country risk and foreign exchange risk, and risk management in this regard. Beyond this, it discusses how to finance international operations and trade as well as international capital budgeting.

V-852-PORT Portfolio Management

1
The purpose of the course is to give students advanced knowledge of systematic and analytical methods of considering and performing investment decisions and the skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: Risk and uncertainty in financial returns, financial performance measurement, basic utility theory, portfolio theory, optimal investment and portfolio choice, efficient frontier, models of the expected return (CAPM and APT), pricing and risk management in bond markets and mutual fund investments.

L-714-MAEV European Convention on Human Rights

1
The course will provide an in-depth analysis of the law of the European Convention on Human Rights. The first part of the course is dedicated to introducing the Council of Europe, The European Convention on Human Rights and its supervisory system. The European Court of Human Rights will be placed in focus with emphasis on its methods of interpretation and its procedure. Its current workload and future prospects will also be dealt with. Finally the connection between the Convention and European Law as well as the domestic law of member states will be covered. The second part of the course is dedicated to the principal substantive rights protected by the Convention and its Protocols, such as the right to life, the prohibition of torture, the right to a fair trial, the right to respect for private and family life, the freedom of thought, conscience and religion, the freedom of expression, the freedom of assembly and association, the prohibition of discrimination, the protection of property and the right to education.

L-712-IEEL International and European Energy Law

4
The course provides an overview of the organizational and regulatory framework concerning the energy sector, acknowledging the importance of energy on a global scale. The course is divided into two parts. The first and main part (6 ECTS) covers the principal legal and policy issues relating to international and European energy affairs. The second part (1.5 ECTS) is concerned with the legal framework of the Icelandic energy market. The students can choose to complete either 6 ECTS or 7.5 ECTS. The first part of the course deals with international energy relations and discusses the global quest for energy resources and the role of the major actors on the energy market. In this part the main policy and legal issues and principles governing the energy supply chain, i.e. generation, transmission and consumption, in the EU will be covered. A special focus will be on renewable energy matters and legal issues related to emission trading. In this part energy-specific regulation, the role of courts and international institutions in general will also be discussed. The second part of the course covers the legal framework of the Icelandic energy market. It focuses on Iceland’s obligations under the EEA-agreement in the field of energy and legal issues related to implementation of the relevant EU directives into national law.
Graduate

L-754-ISIN International Standards of Investment Protection

1
The course will focus on international investment law which is currently the fastest growing field of public international law. It will address how foreign direct investment is regulated under customary international law and subjected to various investment standards as prescribed in approximately 3,000 bilateral investment treaties (BITs) currently in force. Practical examples will be discussed dealing with major investments in Iceland, including Alusuisse’s aluminium smelter in Straumsvík and PCC Bakki Silicon Project in Húsavík. The course’s objectives are to present an overview of the current rules dealing with investment and engage students in a discussion about their nature and foundation. Major themes of international investment law will be analyzed and discussed, such as: •the concept of “investor” and “investment” •expropriation •fair and equitable treatment •full protection and security •national treatment and MFN treatment Furthermore, the course will deal with investment disputes between investors and host states and investment arbitration that addresses disputes stemming from various agreements made between investors and states receiving foreign direct investment (such as concession agreements involving hotel projects, electoral voting systems, mobile network development, aluminum smelter projects, etc.). Various arbitral awards will be discussed, such as CME (Netherlands) v Czech Republic (2001) where the respondent state was ordered to pay a Dutch investor 269 Million US Dollars in compensation for violating various principles of international investment law. Active student participation will be expected. The students will be required to discuss various investment cases dealing with investment disputes and in doing so read, analyze and present arbitral awards of various arbitral tribunals currently topical within the field of international investment law, such as Philip Morris Asia Ltd. (Hong Kong) v Australia (2015) where the investor failed to get compensation following the introduction of anti-tobacco legislation in Australia. Finally, the students will read relevant reading material to be used when discussing topical issues in international investment law.

L-747-EUMF European Law: Internal Market

7
European internal market law covers the primary law of the EU/EEA internal market and the fundamental economic freedoms. It constitutes the core of substantive European law. The internal market is a single market in which the free movement of goods, services, capital and persons as well as the freedom of establishment is assured, and in which citizens are free to live, work, study and do business. The aim of the course is to give the student an in-depth knowledge on the primary law of the internal market by analysing the economic freedoms and understanding the horizontal issues relevant to the freedoms. Moreover, the aim is to provide understanding of the relevance of primary law for secondary law, namely directives and regulations that have been adopted in various economic and social areas and incorporated into national law of the EU/EEA Member States. Primary law is thus of key importance for the understanding and interpretation of national law in these areas. The main focus will be on the study of selected case law of the Court of Justice of the EU and the case law of the EFTA Court. The student will become familiar with reading, analysing and presenting judgments and making use of supportive theoretical material.

L-719-EEAL EEA Moot Court Competition

2
The EEA Moot Court Competition is to be held in Iceland for the first time in 2016. The competition will consist teams competing in a moot court setting, in front of competent judges. The competition will consist of a written stage and an oral final stage. Furthermore, the course will consist of a preparatory stage. The overall aim of the course is to give students an opportunity to work on various areas of EU/EEA law through a challenging Moot Court Competition. Participation in this course and in the competition should strengthen students` knowledge of EU/EEA law, raise their analytical and research skills, and give them confidence in oral presentation.

L-734-IARB International Law of Arbitration

Course description currently unavailable.

L-755-DISP Dispute Resolution

3
This course covers the methods of dispute resolution with special emphasis on mediation. Mediation is a method of dispute resolution in which a neutral third party mediator assists parties to the dispute to find a solution to the problem. Mediation is in essence assisted negotiation and therefore it is preferrable for students to have some background in negotiation, but it is not a requirement for participation in this course. The course covers the methodology of mediations as well as practical considerations of the mediator. Students will learn about the mediation process and the mediator’s ethical code of conduct. The objective of the course is for students to gain a better understanding of what causes disputes, the impact of communication and how you can help the parties determine the real cause of disputes through techniques commonly used by mediators, such as active listening and reframing and asking questions.

T-801-RESM Research Methods I

Industry and society need people who can think critically, who can analyze complex situations and who can communicate their findings effectively. This can involve many tasks, including searching for and evaluating the worth of scientific literature and other forms of documentation.

In this course, we concentrate on scientific writing and reporting, survey techniques and presentations. It will prepare students for dealing with the information gathering, analysis and reporting skills that are required for all other courses.

Key topics covered: Literature surveys, search engines and other agencies, scientific writing, academic publishing, thesis writing, reviewing papers, managing a research project.

T-807-QUAL Quality Management

It is assumed that students have at least a minimum background in statistics. It is also important that students have finished a BS (or BA) degree or have considerable experience in management. The course covers quality management as management science and its important sub-disciplines such as lean and 6 sigma. Among the subjects of the course are the quality concept, clients, quality culture, suppliers and quality cost. Management systems, improvement, management standards, quality system design, certification and audits. Statistical quality control, use of SPC and process capability.

T-806-SIMU Simulation II

The purpose of the course is that students will be able to understand and apply the basic tools of System Analaysis and System Dynamics Modelling from a practical perspective. It has the steps from mission statement, system conceptualization and the process of creating simulation models from the conceptualization using the most modern, user-friendly software available called Stella. The course focuses on the fundamental concepts of system dynamics modelling such as positive and negative feedback structures as well as causal loop diagrams. System dynamics model formulation and simulation is introduced; rate equations and auxiliary equations, delays and graphical converters. Furthermore, policy and sensitivity analysis will be discussed. The course will focus on technical, ecological and economical topics and how they are linked. However, it will also cite examples of a greater variety, such as epidemical studies, interpersonal communications and group dynamics. Practical examples will be analysed both regarding business as well as public policy. The coupling between soft systems, such as decisions and human reactions and physical systems will be trained. By the end of the course the students will hopefully agree that modelling is both fun and useful.

T-865-MADE Precision Machine Design

3
This course offers systematic approach to designing machines able to reliably and repeatedly perform a task. Factors that are of minor importance for low-performance simple machines can quickly become impossible obstacles without the right tools and techniques. The tools introduced in this class is Axiomatic Design Theory aka. Complexity Theory. In this class these techniques will be applied for designing and building high-perfomance machine(s) with our sponsors. Customers will be interviewed to develop Customer Needs(CN). From these CNs, Functional Requirements and Design Parameters will be developed to evaluate possible solutions. The chosen solution will be prototyped and evaluated. LaTeXintroduced for proper documentation and citation generation with Subversion as a mechanism for collaboration. There is a high expectation of documentation and mathematical analysis.

T-868-LISY Linear Dynamical Systems

This course gives an introduction to linear systems, applied algebra and system dynamics with emphasis on mechanical engineering and electrical engineering application areas, such as mechanical systems, fluid and thermal systems and electrical systems. Throughout the course, for a given dynamical system four main topics will be covered:

  • Mathematical modeling
  • System response-analysis (simulation)
  • Exploration of structural relations
  • Control or modification

T-863-EIIP Energy in Industrial Processes

The course covers the use of energy in industrial processes and society. The principles of mass and energy balance are applied to processes taking into account thermodynamics and thermochemistry. The chemistry of metallurgical processes such as iron and steel production is covered but the main focus is on the industrial processes that are prevalent in Iceland, aluminum and silicon. Also other energy intensive processes are addressed such as cement production, mineral wool, fertilizer and synthetic fuel.The main emphasis is on the student’s ability to get an overview over various processes in terms of material and energy flow, raw materials, energy use and efficiency, environmental effects and mitigation. Also the economic background i.e. the cost, profit and market conditions are addressed. Grading is based on problem solving, individual and group projects as well as a final exam. Field trips are an integral part of the course.

V-512-ATFE Behavioral Economics

This course describes how individuals and firms make financial decisions, and how those decisions might deviate from those predicted by traditional financial or economic theory. Using theories of human behavior from the fields of psychology, sociology and other fields of sciences related to decision-making, common features of irrational behavior in the financial markets will be described and analyzed.

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V-304-FMAR Financial Markets

Financial markets are important pillars of every civilized society. They facilitate economic activities and provide services and products to manage risks. It is important to understand the function of financial institutions in order to be able to predict their reactions towards different economic events and how they will evolve over time. This course is set to support students in their learning of different theories of finance and how those theories are linked with financial history, the strengths and weaknesses of financial institutions, such as banks, insurance companies, stock and derivatives markets, and what the future holds for those institutions.

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V-601-EIGN Portfolio Management

The course objective is twofold. The main emphasis is on introducing students to investor methodology in the securities market when forming portfolios. Students are especially expected to gain an overview of what is available in the domestic and international financial markets. Students will be introduced to main theories and approaches of capital asset allocation. The major pricing models are also covered along with individual theories on the pricing of stocks. There is great emphasis on students being able to apply the technical part of the study, i.e. able to present the problems they are dealing with in an organized manner, using the necessary formulas.

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V-644-BRAN Branding

This course explores the ideology of strategic brand management where the main emphasis is on fundamental definitions, different methods of measuring customer-based brand equity and how to design and implement an effective and successful branding strategy and maximize customer-based brand equity.

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V-311-OPMA Operations Management

Topics covered include:

  • The activities of operations management and the role of the operations function in achieving strategic success.
  • The development of operations management and process management.
  • The volume – variety effect on process design, layout, process technology, and job design.
  • Configuring the supply network.
  • The activities of supply chain management.
  • Types of relationships in supply chains.
  • Supply chain behavior.
  • The location of capacity.
  • Forecasting demand.
  • Planning and control activities.
  • Measuring demand and capacity.
  • The alternative capacity plans.
  • The use of OEE in capacity calculations.
  • Inventory management.
  • The volume decision – how much to order.
  • The timing decision – when to place an order.
  • JIT planning and control.
  • The maser production schedule and MRP.
  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP).
  • Project management.
  • Performance measurements, benchmarking and the balanced scorecard.
  • Quality control and how quality problems can be diagnosed.
  • Business improvement and improvement methods.
  • Improvement priorities.
  • Breakthrough vs. continuous improvement.
  • Business process reengineering (BPR).
  • Strategy and operations strategy.
  • Organizations and the importance of an end-to-end process focus when it comes to strategic planning and organizational design.
  • The process concept and the process focused organization.
  • Management systems: The Lean management system.
  • TQM and Six Sigma.
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V-627-VERK Project Management

At the end of this course the student should expect the following outcomes:

  • Knowledge regarding traditional project management methods and it’s position in the world of management concepts and theories.
  • Knowledge concerning planning techniques of project ea project objectives, scoping, scheduling and cost planning with CPM, PERT and Gantt charts, use of learning curves and NPV calculations to estimate project profitability etc. Also to establish project control system based on Earned Value accounting methods.
  • To be familiar with the PRINCE2 project management environment.
  • Knowledge of project team building and the use of analysis ea decision trees, Ishikawa analysis, Pareto analysis, risk assessment etc to be able to focus on the main topics and tasks of the project.
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V-633-SOST Sales Management

This course covers the main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management, as well as how sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches students how to develop, manage and motivate a sales force. The course explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

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V-649-STMP Strategic Marketing Planning

The aim of the course is to introduce the marketing planning process. Students will conduct their own marketing plan built on current marketing practices. Key concepts and methodologies include marketing objectives and metrics, marketing planning, segmentation, consumer research and customer analytics, and marketing models. Strategic marketing planning takes students step-by-step through the process of developing a creative, effective marketing plan for a brand that they choose. Packed with real-life examples, up-to-date marketing ideas and detailed sample plans, the course offers practical guidance on how to research, prepare and present a valuable marketing plan. Emphasis is on student participation in class, discussions, analysis, presentations and case studies.

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T-637-GEDE Game Engine Architecture

The course covers the theory and practice of game engine software development, bringing together topics that range from large-scale software architectures and modern game programming paradigms to the design and implementation of subsystems for rendering, resource management, user interfaces, sound, collision, physics, and animation. Through practical lab exercises and group projects, the students will get technical hands-on experience in C++ game development, including the use and development of supporting tool pipelines.

T-622-ARTI Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is devoted to the computational study of intelligent behavior, including areas such as problem-solving, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning and scheduling, machine learning, perception, and communication. This course gives an overview of the aforementioned AI subfields from computer science perspective and introduces fundamental solution techniques for addressing them. As a part of the course, the students study a selected specialized topic in-depth.

T-501-FMAL Programming Languages

The evolution of programming languages is an important factor in computer science. The course describes this evolution from the first programming languages to the more recent languages. Different types of programming languages are discussed and their characteristics compared. Programming languages syntax is introduced as well as Backus-Naur Form (BNF). Main characteristics of imperative languages are examined, particularly regarding scope rules and procedure activations. The focus is on the Smalltalk programming environment while discussing object-oriented languages. The constructs of functional programming languages are examined with emphasis on Lambda calculus and the ML language. Logic programming is introduced and the Prolog language is specifically analyzed. Students are introduced to the design and syntax of the above languages and experiment with several programming projects using some of these languages.

T-611-NYTI New Technology

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course, students will look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular, students will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities, and effect on society.

T-419-CADP Concurrent and Distributed Programming - 3-Week Course

Multi-Core machines, networks of interconnected computers and heterogeneous computing environments have become ubiquitous. Writing programs that utilize these computer‘s resources to its fullest involves writing multi-threaded and distributed programs. In this course, participants learn to write such programs in C using the pthreads API and in Erlang. They learn to avoid unintended nondeterministic effects and deadlocks and they learn to structure concurrent and distributed programs. We repeat the basics of threads, processes, semaphores, and mutexes. Then, patterns are described to structure common algorithms for concurrent execution and understand the basic architectures (recursive parallelism, iterative parallelism, mesh parallelism, bag of tasks). We consider programming with monitors and with transactional memory. After understanding the problems of shared variable concurrency and its problem, we consider distributed message passing systems. By encapsulating a state and decoupling the control flow with messaging, one can avoid many problems of shared variable programs. Participants learn to structure distributed applications and understand their architecture. They will also consider coordination methods that describe how the activities of the processes in a distributed system achieve a common goal. Distributed systems will be implemented in Erlang. Erlang is a concurrency oriented, a functional programming language for distributed, soft-realtime, and fault-tolerant applications. Erlang is used, e.g. at Facebook and Amazon, for real-time trading applications and online games. At the end, participants are able to demonstrate a concurrent application, understand the way it is constructed and be able to justify the properties of the application. They understand the trade-offs of the language mechanism and know the structural similarities and differences the language mechanism exhibit.

T-219-REMO Real-time Models - 3-Week Course

The context for the course Computing systems are everywhere in modern society; they are becoming increasingly sophisticated and they control key aspects of our lives. In fact, computation is even more widely present in our world than most people realize! Think, for instance, of embedded computing devices, such as those that control ABS systems in cars, the temperature of our houses or the functioning of mobile phones. This population of ‘effectively invisible’ computers around us is embedded in the fabric of our homes, shops, vehicles, farms and some even in our bodies. They help us command, control, communicate, do business, travel and entertain ourselves, and these ‘invisible’ computers largely outnumber the desktop or laptop computers we see each day. In light of the increasing complexity of such computing devices, and of the fact that they control important, when not altogether safety critical, operations, it is important to adopt high standards of quality in their development and validation. However, when dealing with software controlled devices, we still accept routinely that such systems crash and must be rebooted. In fact, we would be surprised if we did not have to send error reports to software manufacturers! Come to think of it, software-controlled devices are just about the only products we engineer for which we accept this level of brittleness. You do not enter your car each day expecting it to stop and ready to send an error report to the car manufacturer, do you? Do software-controlled systems have to be more unreliable than cars, say? A key scientific challenge in computer science is to design and develop computing systems that do what they were designed to do and do so reliably. In order to meet the challenge of building dependable systems, computer scientists are increasingly using model-based approaches to their design and validation. This means that, before actually constructing a system, one follows the time-honored engineering approach of making a model of its design and of subjecting the model to a thorough analysis, whose ultimate aim is to certify that the design embodied by the model meets its intended specification.

The aim of this course is to introduce the basic ideas underlying the model of timed automata, a graphical formalism for the description of real-time computing systems due to Rajeev Alur and David Dill. During the course, you will use the model to describe algorithms, games, scheduling problems and other fun scenarios with relevance to computer science, and to analyze the behavior of the systems you have modeled using the automatic verification tool Uppaal. Uppaal is an integrated tool environment for the description, validation, and verification of real-time systems modeled as networks of communicating timed automata, extended with data types. Summing up, this is a course in which you will be introduced to a little neat theory with real impact on the practice of the development of computing systems in a world that increasingly depends on the quality of software-controlled devices. Can you do without this knowledge?

T-604-HGRE Design and Analysis of Algorithms - 3-Week Course

Students in this course will study all the major algorithmic strategies, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, network flow, and randomized algorithms. Think of this as a course on “how to solve it by a computer”. We do so by studying how classical paradigmatic problems are solved, and how to apply the ideas to new problems. We will also link the problem-solving part to programming contest problems. We emphasize reasoning: understanding why something works, and the ability to explain it. Course assignments will primarily focus on written arguments (in LaTeX), in addition to the problem-solving aspect. During recitation classes, students are expected to present their solutions to the class and participate in discussions.

T-631-SOE2 Software Engineering II – Testing - 3-Week Course

Building modern software systems requires not only programming skills but also engineering skills. Software development includes requirement analysis, design, implementation, and testing. Various studies show that over than 50% of efforts and costs of software development are devoted to activities related to testing. This includes test design, execution, and evaluation. This course is an introductory course to software testing in which students will learn quantitative, technical, and practical methods and techniques that software engineers use to test their software along with the software lifecycle. The course is based on the textbook: Introduction to Software Testing, by Paul Ammann and Jeff Offutt. Accordingly, the focus will be on how we can design better tests based on coverage criteria. The course covers topics, such as Graph Coverage, Logic Coverage, Input Space Partitioning and Syntax-Based Testing. In some discussions, we will use other references to get a deeper understanding of the subject.

T-634-AGDD Advanced Game Design & Development - 3-Week Course

This course expands RU’s prior offerings in game design & development with more advanced topics in game and interaction design. Through lectures, lab exercises, and project work, students will learn and gain experience with a variety of game design topics. Working together in teams, students will design, develop, and critically analyze several smaller games, each focused on applying the concepts that are discussed in class. Each of these exercises will differ in terms of either the team’s composition, the game’s scope, or the constraints that the instructors provide to guide the creative process. Each student will also take on a different development role for each exercise. After the exercises are complete, students will form new teams and apply their new knowledge to a larger development project. Masters students will additionally complete a small research project related to the course topics.

T-505-ROKF Logic in Computer Science - 3-Week Course

Logic has been called “the calculus of computer science”. The argument is that logic plays a fundamental role in computer science, similar to that played by calculus in the physical sciences and traditional engineering disciplines. Indeed, logic plays an important role in areas of Computer Science as disparate as architecture (logic gates), software engineering (specification and verification), programming languages (semantics, logic programming), databases (relational algebra and SQL), artificial intelligence (automatic theorem proving, multi-agent systems, knowledge and belief), algorithms (complexity and expressiveness), and theory of computation (general notions of computability). See, for instance, the slides available at http://www.ru.is/faculty/luca/SLIDES/logic-and-cs.pdf for more information. This course provides the student with a thorough introduction to computational logic, covering the topics of syntax, semantics, decision procedures and formal systems for various logics that play a crucial role in applications in computer science, namely propositional and first-order logic, and modal and temporal logics. The material is taught from a computer science perspective, with an emphasis on the use of logic as a specification language and general-purpose problem-solving tool in computer science. As part and parcel of the course, we shall introduce various logic-based software tools and the algorithms and data structures underlying them; examples include BDD-based tools, SAT solvers and model checkers. The goal is to prepare the students for using logic as a formal tool in computer science.

T-732-GAPL General Game Playing - 3-Week Course

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of general game playing. The aim of general game playing is to create intelligent autonomous agents that automatically learn how to play many different games at an expert level without any human intervention, given only a description of the game rules. This requires that the agents learn diverse game-playing strategies without any game-specific knowledge being provided by their developers. A successful realization of this task involves the understanding and application of topics from many artificial-intelligence sub-disciplines, such as knowledge representation, agent-based reasoning, heuristic search, and machine learning. This course provided the students with such a background as well as an introduction to different parallel processing paradigms in the context of game-tree search, but parallel processing is fast becoming increasingly more relevant because of the foreseen development of massively multi-core computers.

V-202-REGR Managerial Accounting - 3-Week Course

The course covers main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management. How sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches how to develop, manage and motivate your sales force. Explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in the workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

T-845-ENVI Introduction to Environmental Engineering

The purpose of this course is to get an overview of growing environmental problems and to understand and discuss how sciences and engineering principles can help reduce the anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. In particular, the importance of preserving clean water, air, and land resources for humans and for the wildlife will be discussed. In particular, the need and potential of clean and renewable energy production and low carbon economy will be discussed. Specific topics include climate change; environmental footprint, airborne pollution; groundwater; ecological disruption; and economic disruption. The course is composed of three parts: i) theoretical lectures about environmental engineering, ii) numerical and research exercises and iii) student project development. Students are expected to develop an environmental engineering project aiming at reducing the ecological footprint and enhancing the UN sustainability goals. MSc students have the option to develop a research plan in collaboration with an international partner institution for a potential MSc thesis.

T-621-CLIN Clinical Engineering

In this course, participation in class is necessary since most of the work will be performed in class during the lecturestime. Briefly, the course content is the follow: Part-I, CE General

  • Basic of biomedical engineering science and CE discipline.
  • Health technology evaluation, design, and control in the hospital, acquisition, maintenance and repair of medicaldevices.
  • Patient safety issue, risk management and electromagnetic interference in the hospital.
  • Medical device regulatory, health care quality, ISO standards.
  • Information system management, telemedicine, communication system (PACS).
  • Clinical engineering practise at Landspitali: medical device park, acquisition and maintenance Part-II, CE Electronic.
  • Electrical safety in clinical enviroments.
  • Leakage currents.
  • Fault conditions.
  • Medical devices utilization and service: intensive care, operating room, anaesthesiology.
  • Engineering the clinical environment: Physical plant, heating, air conditioning, operation room, electrical power.
  • The future of clinical engineering.
  • Practical measurements of leakage current.

VT HUN1003 Design in Mechanical Engineering

This course will begin with lectures on the basics of design including systematic processes to harness creative thinking. It will cover basics of collaboration software usage. Emphasis and evaluation will be placed equally on effective process, documentation/presentation, and results. The semester’s assignments will consist of a mixture of individual and team assignments.

T-420-HONX Design X

Students in this coursework in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of an RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car

T-509-RAFT Electronics

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Review of signal-processing basicsReview of feedback systems. Electronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Review of feedback systemsElectronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Electronic devices large and small-signal models
  • Large and small-signal models of diodes and transistors (MOSFET and BJT)Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifier.
  • Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifierElementary transistor stages:
  • Elementary transistor stages: biasing, operation point, small signal analysis. Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage
  • Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage amplifiersDifferential pair and
  • Differential pair and differential amplifier
  • Design with an operational amplifier. Transconductance amplifier.
  • Active-RC and OTA-C filtersPower amplifiers.
  • Power amplifiers.

T-620-FJAX Finance X

In this task, students will take on the role of a bond portfolio manager. Initially, they will familiarize themselves with the Icelandic bond market and in that process appreciate the following important points:

  • Market conditions that impact on the value of their investments.
  • How do the specifics of a bond impact on its risk-return profile?
  • Work out the correlation between the performances of individual bonds.

The next step is to move on to a portfolio of several bonds, which will be analyzed and optimized from a defined risk-return perspective. It is important to analyze in particular the following aspects,

  • Price, risk and portfolio returns.
  • Quantification of risk for bond portfolios
  • The role of different interest rate models
  • The impact of inflation on portfolios‘ risk and return characteristics
  • The role of inflation – and interest rate contracts

The students will put in place a “life system” that takes in real-time data from the market and updates the value and the risk position of the portfolio. Adjustments will be made to the portfolio as required and an investment policy will be determined and used to rebalance the portfolio. Some attention will be paid to the possible use of interest rate and/or inflation-indexed derivatives. The results will be presented in the form of a report and a demonstrator.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

The purpose of the course is that students learn to apply financial theory in a practice. The course will present how to approach real-world problems by using theory in the spreadsheet environment of Excel (and partly in the coding environment of Visual Basic and Matlab). At the completion of the course, students should be comfortable with pricing securities (bonds, stock, derivatives) and perform various types of risk evaluations. Students should also be able to perform term structure estimation, assess fund management performance, present portfolios on the efficient frontier, assess equilibrium price models, etc. In short, the purpose of the course is that students adopt the tools necessary to use financial theory in a practical way which will benefit them in any finance or research related position.

The main topics to be covered in the course are:

  • Interest rate calcul., term structure estim., pricing of bonds, immunization strategies
  • Portfolio theory and choice/management (e.g. efficient frontier)
  • Stock pricing models of financial markets (e.g. CAPM, Fama-French)
  • Event studies
  • Volatility predictions; standard deviation, MA, EWMA, ARCH, GARCH models
  • Option pricing (European, American, Asian and Bermuda options)
  • Risk measurement; the Value-at-Risk methodology and extensions thereof
  • In addition to the spreadsheet environment of Excel, the course will introduce how to apply Visual Basic Application (in Excel) and Matlab to conveniently solve some financial tasks.
  • Introduction to the main financial databases available online and elsewhere.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

The purpose of the course is that students learn to apply financial theory in a practice. The course will present how to approach real-world problems by using theory in the spreadsheet environment of Excel (and partly in the coding environment of Visual Basic and Matlab). At the completion of the course, students should be comfortable with pricing securities (bonds, stock, derivatives) and perform various types of risk evaluations. Students should also be able to perform term structure estimation, assess fund management performance, present portfolios on the efficient frontier, assess equilibrium price models, etc. In short, the purpose of the course is that students adopt the tools necessary to use financial theory in a practical way which will benefit them in any finance or research related position.

The main topics to be covered in the course are:

  • Interest rate calcul., term structure estim., pricing of bonds, immunization strategies
  • Portfolio theory and choice/management (e.g. efficient frontier)
  • Stock pricing models of financial markets (e.g. CAPM, Fama-French)
  • Event studies
  • Volatility predictions; standard deviation, MA, EWMA, ARCH, GARCH models
  • Option pricing (European, American, Asian and Bermuda options)
  • Risk measurement; the Value-at-Risk methodology and extensions thereof
  • In addition to the spreadsheet environment of Excel, the course will introduce how to apply Visual Basic Application (in Excel) and Matlab to conveniently solve some financial tasks.
  • Introduction to the main financial databases available online and elsewhere.

T-803-VERK Project Management and Strategic Planning

Course description currently unavailable. This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-806-SST2 Reinforced Concrete II

Course description currently unavailable.

This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-844-FEMM Finite Element Analysis in Engineering

This course will present the main features and possibilities of the finite element method (FEM) and its application in analysis of problems in mechanics. Aspects of the finite element method, from the mathematical background through to practical implementation and application are discussed. Emphasis is placed on possible errors and how to minimize them. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamentals of the finite element method and get some training in the use of commercial finite element software.

T-845-UMHV Sustainable Engineering and the Environment

Course description currently unavailable.

VT SVF1003 Vibration Theory

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Free, damped and excited vibrations in linear systems
  • Nonlinear vibrations
  • Two-degree-of-freedom systems
  • Design for vibration suppression
  • Measurement and analysis of vibrations
  • The use of the ANSYS program for vibration analysis

VT JAH1003 Geothermal Energy

  • Topics covered in this course include:
  • Geothermal systems
  • Geothermal exploration
  • Geothermal well drilling and well design
  • Geothermal well logging and testing of wells
  • Classification of geothermal systemsConceptual models.
  • Conceptual models
  • Response of geothermal systems to utilization
  • Reservoir management and reservoir models
  • Role of geothermal energy in the energy mix
  • Different uses of geothermal energy in Iceland and worldwide
  • Direct use of geothermal energy for space and district heating, swimming pools, greenhouses, snow melting and in industry
  • Geothermal heat pumps
  • Utilization of geothermal steam
  • Geothermal power plants, flash system power plants, binary power plants
  • Design of steam pipelines, structural design, process design
  • Power plant components, turbines, generators, condensers, cooling system, gas extraction system
  • Use of EES program
  • Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)
  • Environmental effects of geothermal energy

T-606-NUFF Numerical Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer

The main purpose of this course is to introduce the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for analyzing fluid flows and heat transfer. Hands-on exercises are used to study the basic theory of CFD through programming and using existing commercial and open source CFD codes. Finite difference and finite volume techniques are emphasized.

T-606-HEAT Heat Transfer

In this course the concepts of heat transfer are introduced:

  • Heat conduction: One-dimensional steady state heat conduction, the solution of the Fourier equation for steady-state and transient problems. Lumped analysis using thermal resistance. Application of numerical techniques.
  • Convective heat transfer: Natural convection, empirical relations in free convection. Forced convection, laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer analysis in external and internal flows, such as flows between parallel plates, over a flat plate and in a circular pipe. Condensation and boiling heat transfer. Empirical relations, application of numerical techniques in problem-solving.
  • Radiative heat transfer: Introduction to the physical mechanism, radiation properties, radiation shape factors black body radiation, and deviation from blackbody radiation, radiation from gases.
  • Heat exchangers: Classification of heat exchangers, temperature distribution, overall heat transfer coefficient, and fouling. Heat exchanger analysis using LMTD method and NTU method.

T-407-EFNI Materials Science

The fundamentals of the properties and structure of materials utilized in the practice of engineering are presented. The groups of materials studied include metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers and multiphase systems. The theoretical basis is given for the understanding of the behavior of materials where their electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are related to their molecular and crystalline structure. A brief introduction to biomedical applications is given. Methods for analyzing and testing of materials’ properties are studied as well as the methods used for controlling them, e.g. heat treatment, grain refinement and alloying. Corrosion and its prevention are studied and an introduction to binary and ternary phase diagrams is given. An insight into Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nano-systems are also provided.

T-535-MECH Mechatronic

Mechatronics-2 extends Mechatronics-1 by going into more details. While Mechatronics 1 is broader and more about getting results fast (what is possible), Mechatronics 2 is more about accuracy and how to match a design to a task with economy, accuracy, and robustness in mind (what is the limit). The course includes sensors, signal conditioning, interfacing, analog-digital conversion, digital input/outputs, timers, low level embedded firmware programming, actuators, UARTs and serial communication. It is expected that the student is familiar with the programming language C. Along with the lectures, each student has his/her own private project based on the fundamental elements of mechatronics: sense-think-act. For this project, the student holds a lab notebook. At the end of the course, the student delivers a report about the project.

T-620-LIKX Model X

This course will help students to make the vital step from a solid understanding of the fundamentals of engineering management and operations research to the application of theory to practical scenarios, as they arise in the real world. On completion of the course, the students will have extensively applied their knowledge of engineering management to a range of practical and relevant problems. The problems will require knowledge, of course, such as operations research, programming, data processing, simulation, and production and inventory management.

T-611-NYTI New Technology

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course we look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular we will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities and effect on society.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques

Course description currently unavailable.

T-602-RISK Risk Management

This course starts by introducing basic concepts assessing and managing risk. The discussion will then focus on how risk arises, both in the corporate and financial environment and on ways to manage it, either by means of active hedging or diversification. Classification of risk will be explained with specific focus on equity -, interest rate – and credit risk. Value-at-risk (VaR) will be introduced as one way of quantifying risk and the KMV model, popular with rating agencies such as Moody’s, will be discussed for quantifying credit risk. For both models, we will emphasize their strengths and limitations. The course will also cover risks associated with positions in a range of different derivative contracts and how they can be hedged.

T-508-VARM Thermodynamics

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Introduction to the fundamental concepts of engineering thermodynamics: State, temperature, etc.
  • The first law of thermodynamics, work, heat, efficiency. Properties of pure substances, phase change, ideal gas, real gas, equations of state.
  • Thermodynamic analysis of open and closed systems e.g. turbines and heat exchangers.
  • Second law and its applications.
  • Reversible and irreversible processes, Carnot cycle etc. Entropy, the Clausius inequality, and the third law.
  • Energy and its applications for analysis.

T-420-HONX Design X - 3-Week Course

Students in this coursework in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of an RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car
Highlights
  • Classes in English with Icelandic students
  • STEM and business courses

Faculty

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    Kelsey Patton

    Kelsey Patton will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - kelsey.patton@apiabroad.com

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    Hjördís Hreinsdóttir

    Hjördís will be your Resident Director in Reykjavik and a resource for you while you are in Iceland!

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Reykjavik programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Snæfellsnes Peninsula

    On this excursion, you will see volcanoes, glaciers, geothermal areas, cultural sites, beautiful stretches of coast and geological marvels. You will also have an opportunity to cave in a 7000-year-old lava tube and to hunt for the elusive and magical Northern Lights. This is where Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth started.

  • South Coast Tour

    Experience the exquisite beauty of Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon with this fantastic two-day tour exploring the many highlights of Iceland’s south coast. You will be able to walk behind a waterfall, admire the black sand beaches with the roaring ocean, drive through moss and lava, and hike up a glacier! If weather permits, you will also be able to catch a glimpse of the infamous Eyjafjallajökull volcano.

  • Golden Circle and Secret Lagoon

    This trip will start at the Þingvellir National Park, which is one the most beautiful and historic places in Iceland. From Þingvellir, the group will travel to the geyser area at Geysir before visiting the famous Gullfoss waterfall.

    After the main sites of the Golden Circle, the group will journey to the Secret Lagoon, one of Iceland’s oldest pools, and soak for a while. Although the pool is man-made, the water for it comes from a nearby geyser which makes the experience that much nicer. All modern facilities are available (changing rooms, showers, etc.) so all students need to bring with you their swimsuit and a towel (both can be rented if forgotten).

    For those who don’t want to take a dip in the Secret Lagoon, you can take a stroll around the surrounding areas while your fellow travelers enjoy the pool.

  • Snæfellsnes Peninsula

    On this excursion, you will see volcanoes, glaciers, geothermal areas, cultural sites, beautiful stretches of coast and geological marvels. You will also have an opportunity to cave in a 7000-year-old lava tube and to hunt for the elusive and magical Northern Lights. This is where Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth started.

  • Akureyri and Northern Iceland

    This trip begins with a visit to the Geysir geothermal area, the site of numerous hot springs. A glimpse of the majestic Gullfoss waterfall is next on the agenda, before the drive north, up to the high plane of Kjölur. The name refers to the plateau between the glaciers Langjökull in the west and Hofsjökull towards the east, at an altitude of 650 m above sea level. The first stop of the day is in Kerlingarfjöll mountain cabins, a popular stop for hikers, before continuing the journey. The highland road leads on through the rugged wilderness to the oasis of Hveravellir, with its geothermal area and bathing attractions. After a brief stop, the bus continues along the highland road past Blönduvirkjun hydroelectric power station. In Langidalur valley the road joins Highway 1 and the tour ends with a visit and tour of the northern Icelandic town of Akureyri.

  • Jet Boating and the Secret Lagoon

    Students will experience a thrilling ride on a jet boat on the Hvítá river! Following the exciting boat ride, students may be ready for a bit of serenity. The natural hot pool at the stunning geothermal village of Flúðir, is the oldest swimming pool in Iceland. For a long time only local people knew about it, but nowadays the secret is out, so API students can enjoy the magic and great photo opportunities! Bathing in the natural hot water surrounded by peaceful scenery is one of the most relaxing and loveliest experiences you can have in Iceland.

  • Snæfellsnes Peninsula

    On this excursion, you will see volcanoes, glaciers, geothermal areas, cultural sites, beautiful stretches of coast and geological marvels. You will also have an opportunity to cave in a 7000-year-old lava tube and to hunt for the elusive and magical Northern Lights. This is where Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth started.

  • South Coast Tour

    Experience the exquisite beauty of Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon with this fantastic two-day tour exploring the many highlights of Iceland’s south coast. You will be able to walk behind a waterfall, admire the black sand beaches with the roaring ocean, drive through moss and lava, and hike up a glacier! If weather permits, you will also be able to catch a glimpse of the infamous Eyjafjallajökull volcano.

  • Golden Circle and Secret Lagoon

    This trip will start at the Þingvellir National Park, which is one the most beautiful and historic places in Iceland. From Þingvellir, the group will travel to the geyser area at Geysir before visiting the famous Gullfoss waterfall.

    After the main sites of the Golden Circle, the group will journey to the Secret Lagoon, one of Iceland’s oldest pools, and soak for a while. Although the pool is man-made, the water for it comes from a nearby geyser which makes the experience that much nicer. All modern facilities are available (changing rooms, showers, etc.) so all students need to bring with you their swimsuit and a towel (both can be rented if forgotten).

    For those who don’t want to take a dip in the Secret Lagoon, you can take a stroll around the surrounding areas while your fellow travelers enjoy the pool.

  • Akureyri and Northern Iceland

    This trip begins with a visit to the Geysir geothermal area, the site of numerous hot springs. A glimpse of the majestic Gullfoss waterfall is next on the agenda, before the drive north, up to the high plane of Kjölur. The name refers to the plateau between the glaciers Langjökull in the west and Hofsjökull towards the east, at an altitude of 650 m above sea level. The first stop of the day is in Kerlingarfjöll mountain cabins, a popular stop for hikers, before continuing the journey. The highland road leads on through the rugged wilderness to the oasis of Hveravellir, with its geothermal area and bathing attractions. After a brief stop, the bus continues along the highland road past Blönduvirkjun hydroelectric power station. In Langidalur valley the road joins Highway 1 and the tour ends with a visit and tour of the northern Icelandic town of Akureyri.

  • Jet Boating and the Secret Lagoon

    Students will experience a thrilling ride on a jet boat on the Hvítá river! Following the exciting boat ride, students may be ready for a bit of serenity. The natural hot pool at the stunning geothermal village of Flúðir, is the oldest swimming pool in Iceland. For a long time only local people knew about it, but nowadays the secret is out, so API students can enjoy the magic and great photo opportunities! Bathing in the natural hot water surrounded by peaceful scenery is one of the most relaxing and loveliest experiences you can have in Iceland.

Students in Reykjavik will live in local apartments and guesthouses. Rooms will generally be double-occupancy with shared bathrooms, living areas, kitchen, and laundry facilities.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Fall Aug 10, 2019 - Dec 18, 2019 $12,980 Apr 15, 2019 May 1, 2019
Academic Year Aug, 2019 - May, 2020 $24,980 Apr 15, 2019 May 1, 2019
Spring Jan, 2020 - May, 2020 $12,980 Oct 1, 2019 Oct 15, 2019
Spring Jan 5, 2019 - May 23, 2019 $12,980 Oct 1, 2018 Oct 15, 2018