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In this traveling study abroad program, students spend one month each in three of Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute’s (LdM) four locations and follow a structured program of five 3-credit courses, which together focus on interesting issues that intersect with the broader experience of Italy. In the Fall, the program finishes in Florence and for Spring 2020, the program finishes in Florence.

What's Included?

Click here for more information on what's included with your API program.

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API 3 Cities programs. All excursions are subject to change. Not all groups in 3 Cities will visit all of the following excursions sites.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Amalfi Coast/Enchanting Isles

    The Lazio region includes Rome and the three surrounding provinces: Sorrento, Capri, and Vesuvius. Day trips vary with season and terrain, from hill towns to seaside. The Castelli Romani area is dotted with hillside towns like Frascati, famous for its white wine, and Castel Gandolfo, the summer home of the Pope. Students may also visit Latina, a province known for its mozzarella production and numerous seaside towns such as Terracina and Sperlonga, linked along the coast by national parks and archaeological sites. To the west, Tivoli has offered an escape from Rome since the times of Emperor Hadrian, who built his villa there. Up the hill from Hadrian’s Villa, the Renaissance Villa d’Este has been recognized as the most beautiful park in Italy for its majestic, fountain-filled gardens.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. Located on the River Tiber, between the Apennine Mountains and the Tyrrhenian Sea, the “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today it remains the seat of the Italian government. One must be prepared to step into the world’s biggest open air museum – the Vatican, the Coliseum, the neighborhoods – and be enraptured.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 15 credits per semester

In this traveling study abroad program, students spend one month each in three of Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute’s (LdM) four locations and follow a structured program of five 3-credit courses, which together focus on interesting issues that intersect with the broader experience of Italy. Classes meet every day Monday through Thursday for two and a half hours each, providing a total of 45 contact hours per course.

TUSCANIA

In Tuscania, students take an Italian language course (all levels available), and Italian Regional Food from a Cultural Perspective, a course with hands-on learning that situates Italian gastronomy and cuisine within its geographical and social contexts.

ROME

In Rome, the course on Intercultural Communication uses the city as a laboratory to study relations between cultures. The physical and conceptual imprint of Ancient Roman civilization on the capital, and on the nation of Italy itself, are pursued in the second course.

FLORENCE

When the Three Cities experience culminates in Florence, students will explore first-hand and analyze the “Made in Italy” phenomenon, that is both country-specific and has a global impact.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive transcripts from U.S.-accredited Marist College for courses taken at LdM. Marist College is a four-year, fully accredited U.S. college in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Monica Gabbrielli

    Monica will be one of our Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while you are in Italy!

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    Lauren Daniels

    Lauren Daniels will be your Program Manager for this location and will prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - lauren.daniels@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

In the link below, be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to prerequisites and class times in order to avoid conflicts.Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost.

Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who choose intermediate level Italian or higher must complete a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency. Students who do not meet proficiency standards are assigned to the appropriate course.

When obtaining pre-approval for course selections, students should refer to the Marist College course codes and titles, as these will appear on the transcript. If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

CREDIT INFORMATION

API partner universities in Italy issue credit according to the American system, whereby most courses are worth 3-4 U.S. credits each.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions.

Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Intercultural Communication

This course introduces key concepts and models of international communication. The objective of the course is to master the main communication tools and concepts in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Ancient Roots of Italy

Todays Italy with its political and economic challenges, its uneasy relationship with the Catholic Church, and its role as a country of renewed cultural pluralism thanks to immigration and tourism, all, arguably, have their roots in Ancient Rome (although influences from the many peoples inhabiting the Italian peninsula even before the Romans also made their mark). This course explores significant aspects of the ancient Roman civilization. It examines the cohesiveness and identity of the culture and society and studies selected elements of its unique legacy impacting modern culture and the state that we know as Italy. Topics addressed include the transformation of ancient Rome from republican oligarchy to monarchy and empire, its cultural pluralism, the advent of Christianity, the Renaissance humanist image of ancient Rome as well as its place in the Italian political ideologies of the 1850s and onwards. Course materials include selected writings of ancient Roman authors in translation and works by modern historians. The course further utilizes sources on Roman archaeology, topography, art, and architecture, with site visits.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex structures of the language, such as the means to express personal opinions and preferences. In this level emphasis is given to the ability to maintain interaction and to cope flexibly both in speaking and writing with problems in everyday life. At the end of the course students will be able to manage conversations on topics of personal interest or everyday life, to describe experience and to narrate a story.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 2

This course focuses on the ability to understand extended speech, as well as complex and specialized texts. At the end of the course students will develop the ability to use language flexibly for social and professional purposes. They will be able to recognize a wide range of idioms and to apply register shifts.

Travel Writing

Throughout history, Italy has inspired writers and poets to wax lyrical as few other countries have done. Countless English-language novels, stories, and poems have woven a bel paese of words around the Italian experience. This course provides an opportunity for students to focus first-hand on the art and craft of travel writing, with particular emphasis on cities in Italy, but also with excursions into other worlds -- real or imaginary. Through reading, writing, and visits in and around the city center, students will explore places of historic, artistic, cultural, and personal interest. They will learn "by example" from a selection of great travel literature about the world in general, and about Italy in particular. And they will learn "by doing," via a series of guided exercises and assignments that explore the distinctive qualities of travel writing its combination of history, culture, information, rumination, musings, and memory and the ways in which this particular art can lead to a deeper understanding of their own experiences and cultural identity.

Wine Business

This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.

Made in Italy: A Culture of Excellence

This course examines the "Made in Italy" phenomenon, emblematic of superlative quality. Home to the most iconic labels, brands, and craftsmanship, Italy is known for both its historic legacy and its present-day excellence in many fields. The course addresses the industries and fields of food and cuisine, fashion, and other areas of design, including industrial and architectural. Italian-made goods and services are an integral part of the Italian economy, society, history, and culture. Since a flow of expertise across time and disciplines seems to distinguish Made in Italy, students will connect the latter to patterns of continuity and change in Italian society and examine how the "Made in Italy" phenomenon has impacted the country's social fabric, character, and even mode of living ever since the Industrial Revolution, but, especially, since the post-war era, and how presently globalization is transforming the concept and its social reality. An additional concentration is on the business aspect of the label, in particular, on marketing, branding, and consumer behavior seen from both an Italian and international perspective. In careful consideration of recent developments, the focus may vary from semester to semester. Guest lectures and site visits will form part of this course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Sustainable Italy: Environmental Awareness and Ecotourism

The course explores the problems of natural resources management by creating awareness of the new possibilities provided by sustainability. Students will learn, thanks to the knowledge of the Italian and Tuscia territories, the potential provided by ecosystem services (Supporting, Provisioning, Regulating, Cultural) such as ecotourism. Environmental preservation, sustainable practices, the conservation of biological diversities and reserves management are keywords for a future where the students will be the main actors. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective, which brings together academic research and field experiences, the students will explore the complexity of the environment and they will be encouraged to reflect on their role in this important change.

Current Trends in Italian Cuisine

This course explores major trends in contemporary Italian cuisine that have been emerging in recent decades. These trends, revealed in both everyday and haute cuisine, involve fresh reinterpretations of regional traditions, revaluation of local products, interest in lighter and healthier diet, and an emphasis on creativity. Driving these trends are such diverse factors as interest in other cuisines, innovations by leading chefs, and especially changes in Italian society and lifestyles. Students learn basic cooking skills as well as some specialized cooking methods and techniques. They discover how to select quality ingredients, and they compare their eating habits with those common in Italy today. Particular focus is given to the following aspects: historical origins and developments of food production, regional dishes, seasonal and environmental conditions, social issues, nutrition, safety and health. In each lesson students learn how to prepare representative recipes, with attention to ingredients, nutritional values, and presentation.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions.

Highlights
  • Classes taught in English and Italian with international, and American students
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (Marist College)
  • Traveling program!

API students in the 3 Cities program live in student apartments in each respective city. Though students may request a single room, the traveling nature of the program implies that single rooms are not always available. Apartments for API students are generally within 25-30 minutes walking distance of the school. Each unit is furnished including a functional kitchen, and students are responsible for preparing their own meals. Washing machines are available, though dryers are not provided.

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Api Rome Housing 7977527747 O
Api Rome Housing 7977529692 O
Dining Area 5726784068 O
Apartment In Tuscania 8947865018 O

*Please note the application deadline has been extended for the Spring session. Additional fees may apply.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring Jan 27, 2020 - May 1, 2020 $15,280 Oct 15, 2019 Oct 30, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Fall Aug, 2020 - Nov, 2020 $15,280 Jun 1, 2020 Jun 15, 2020