Italy Florence Duomo 73936825

API students who want to study abroad in Florence may choose from over 400 courses at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute – Florence (LdM). Courses are available in a wide variety of subjects across the arts, humanities, business, and international relations. In addition to the free-elective course structure, several additional opportunities are available including internships, certificate programs, and professional development opportunities.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

API students participate in excursions each session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Florence programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Cinque Terre

    The Cinque Terre, five villages hidden in little coastal inlets and clinging to the rocks overhanging the sea, are located near of the Ligure Riviera. Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore form the heart of the National Park, proclaimed a monument to the heritage of mankind by UNESCO.

  • Venice & Venetian Islands

    Venice is one of the most well-known and romantic cities in the world. Famous for the canals and beautiful Piazza San Marco, the city welcomes visitors and scholars to explore its winding streets, walk the numerous bridges connecting section to section, and to soak up the magic of this city on the water. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe. Its strategic location made Venice an important center of trade between the East and the West, and art and culture blossomed as well, leaving a legacy of amazing artistic and architectural treasures to discover throughout the winding streets and canals. During this trip, students will also visit the Venetian islands of Murano and Burano.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Cinque Terre

    The Cinque Terre, five villages hidden in little coastal inlets and clinging to the rocks overhanging the sea, are located near of the Ligure Riviera. Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore form the heart of the National Park, proclaimed a monument to the heritage of mankind by UNESCO.

  • Venice & Venetian Islands

    Venice is one of the most well-known and romantic cities in the world. Famous for the canals and beautiful Piazza San Marco, the city welcomes visitors and scholars to explore its winding streets, walk the numerous bridges connecting section to section, and to soak up the magic of this city on the water. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe. Its strategic location made Venice an important center of trade between the East and the West, and art and culture blossomed as well, leaving a legacy of amazing artistic and architectural treasures to discover throughout the winding streets and canals. During this trip, students will also visit the Venetian islands of Murano and Burano.

  • Bologna

    Bologna is the regional capital of Emilia-Romagna. It reached the height of its power in 1249 with the victory of the Fossalta battle when King Enzo, son of the Emperor Frederic II, was taken prisoner. In the 16th century, the town fell once and for all under the power of the Papal State, while at the same time maintaining its own ancient magistracies, and its own ambassador in Rome. In the charming historical center, among the best preserved in the world, many ancient palaces and churches stand as witness to the cultural relevance that Bologna has had over the course of the centuries.

  • Lucca

    Lucca is a provincial town rich in history, tradition, and culture, but it is also a premium tourist attraction. The town is unique for its intact 16th-century walls that surround the historical center, isolating it from the modern suburbs so that walking along its narrow streets (now a pedestrian area), one forgets about time, enjoying a much slower pace. The are numerous monuments, elegant palaces, churches and squares that make this town so beautiful. Examples include the Guinigi tower, the Amphitheater, the Holy Cross in the cathedral of San Martino and the National Museum of Palazzo Mansi.

  • Verona

    Verona was home to most famous lovers in history: Romeo and Juliet (visitors can still find their famous balcony here). Today’s Verona has much more to offer than just references to Shakespeare, including the Roman Amphitheater (which is still used today for operas), the market at Piazza delle Erbe (once the Roman forum), and the medieval streets by the Adige river. Lake Garda is the biggest of the pre-Alpine lakes and the largest in Italy. The beauty of the countryside, the Mediterranean vegetation (vineyards, olive groves and citrus orchards), and its mild climate make Lake Garda one of the most thriving health and tourist centers in the country. One can find remnants of many different historical periods in the cities and villages around the lake, such as Roman ruins, medieval churches and beautiful liberty villas.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Cinque Terre

    The Cinque Terre, five villages hidden in little coastal inlets and clinging to the rocks overhanging the sea, are located near of the Ligure Riviera. Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore form the heart of the National Park, proclaimed a monument to the heritage of mankind by UNESCO.

  • Venice & Venetian Islands

    Venice is one of the most well-known and romantic cities in the world. Famous for the canals and beautiful Piazza San Marco, the city welcomes visitors and scholars to explore its winding streets, walk the numerous bridges connecting section to section, and to soak up the magic of this city on the water. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe. Its strategic location made Venice an important center of trade between the East and the West, and art and culture blossomed as well, leaving a legacy of amazing artistic and architectural treasures to discover throughout the winding streets and canals. During this trip, students will also visit the Venetian islands of Murano and Burano.

  • Bologna

    Bologna is the regional capital of Emilia-Romagna. It reached the height of its power in 1249 with the victory of the Fossalta battle when King Enzo, son of the Emperor Frederic II, was taken prisoner. In the 16th century, the town fell once and for all under the power of the Papal State, while at the same time maintaining its own ancient magistracies, and its own ambassador in Rome. In the charming historical center, among the best preserved in the world, many ancient palaces and churches stand as witness to the cultural relevance that Bologna has had over the course of the centuries.

  • Lucca

    Lucca is a provincial town rich in history, tradition, and culture, but it is also a premium tourist attraction. The town is unique for its intact 16th-century walls that surround the historical center, isolating it from the modern suburbs so that walking along its narrow streets (now a pedestrian area), one forgets about time, enjoying a much slower pace. The are numerous monuments, elegant palaces, churches and squares that make this town so beautiful. Examples include the Guinigi tower, the Amphitheater, the Holy Cross in the cathedral of San Martino and the National Museum of Palazzo Mansi.

  • Verona

    Verona was home to most famous lovers in history: Romeo and Juliet (visitors can still find their famous balcony here). Today’s Verona has much more to offer than just references to Shakespeare, including the Roman Amphitheater (which is still used today for operas), the market at Piazza delle Erbe (once the Roman forum), and the medieval streets by the Adige river. Lake Garda is the biggest of the pre-Alpine lakes and the largest in Italy. The beauty of the countryside, the Mediterranean vegetation (vineyards, olive groves and citrus orchards), and its mild climate make Lake Garda one of the most thriving health and tourist centers in the country. One can find remnants of many different historical periods in the cities and villages around the lake, such as Roman ruins, medieval churches and beautiful liberty villas.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-16 credits per semester

API students who want to study abroad in Florence may choose from over 400 courses at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute – Florence (LdM). Courses are available in a wide variety of subjects across the arts, humanities, business, and international relations. In addition to the free-elective course structure, several additional opportunities are available including internships, certificate programs, and professional development opportunities. Note that all students must take at least one language course per semester.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS (15-18 credits per semester)

Semester certificates give students the opportunity to gather the professional skills and the theoretical underpinnings of exciting fields in design and other subjects in a single semester.

Semester certificates include:

  • Visual Communication for Fashion
  • Interior Design in Contemporary Living
  • Product Design towards Sustainability
  • Architecture in Urban Context
  • Art in Food: Italian Gastronomy and Balance in Nutrition: The Art of Cooking
  • International Conflict Transformation

Certificate program dates and prices are generally the same as the regular LdM Florence programs. An $800 additional fee is charged for any certificate programs that involve 18 U.S. credits per semester or more. For academic year certificate programs, beginning students must enroll in the first semester of the first year course sequence. More information is provided for each specific certificate program post-acceptance.

ONE- AND TWO-YEAR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

The LdM year-long Certificate Programs are designed to develop a student’s creativity, artistic talent, and technical skills within structured plans of study. These programs begin in the fall semester each year.

Combining a strong theoretical base with practical work for the pursuit of professional goals, LdM offers one- and two-year Certificates in the following disciplines:

  • Fashion Design
  • Fashion Marketing & Merchandising
  • Graphic Design & Visual Communication
  • Jewelry Design
  • Interior Design
  • Restoration & Conservation
  • Fine Arts.

LDM INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

LdM internships offer students the possibility to learn different aspects of working in Italy, a country known for its artisan and small business culture. LdM strives to place students in companies which enable them to explore and understand the strengths and structure of the Italian business environment in a variety of fields. Internships are available for credit and in combination with academic courses only.

Internship options are listed on the API/LdM course schedules on the website, and subjects may include:

  • Art History
  • Communications and Journalism
  • Education
  • Fashion Design, Marketing, and Merchandising
  • Graphic Design
  • International Business
  • Public Administration (in Italian)

Students should indicate their interest in an internship upon application, and submit a résumé/C.V., essay, and portfolio. The internship essay should discuss the student’s reason for applying, expectations about the internship, and a detailed description of the duties in which the student would like to partake. An on-site interview is required of all students. Placements are limited, so students are encouraged to apply early!

LDM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

The LdM Professional Opportunities Program offers students a non-credit experiential learning experience. It is similar to an internship, but it requires less time and is based on the completion of one single project. Students are given the opportunity to collaborate with both the LdM Institute and local Florentine businesses, organizations, and associations, and upon successful completion of the project, students receive a certificate of participation. The Professional Opportunities Project gives students the opportunity to add international work experience to their resume/curriculum vitae. The Professional Opportunities offered for each semester are generally announced at the beginning of the semester after the students have arrived, and the professional opportunities offered may differ from semester to semester.

Opportunities may include:

  • Blogging for LDM Marketing Office
  • Graphic Design for local businesses
  • Marketing and social media for local businesses

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive transcripts from U.S.-accredited Marist College for courses taken at LdM. Marist College is a four-year, fully accredited U.S. college in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Lauren Daniels

    Lauren Daniels will be your Program Manager for this location and will prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - lauren.daniels@apiabroad.com

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    Ryan McCann

    Ryan McCann will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - ryan.mccann@apiabroad.com

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    Monica Gabbrielli

    Monica will be one of our Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while you are in Italy!

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    Federica Guerrieri

    Federica Guerrieri is our Italy Regional Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Ellen Oyasaeter

    Ellen Oyasaeter will be one of your Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you on-site.

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    Valentina Scalini

    Valentina will be one of your Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while living in Italy with us!

COURSE OFFERINGS

Be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to prerequisites and class times in order to avoid conflicts.Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost.

Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who are taking Italian courses above the Elementary 101 level must take a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency. Students who do not meet proficiency standards are assigned to the appropriate course.

Note that all students must take at least one language course per semester.

When obtaining pre-approval for course selections, students should refer to the Marist College course codes and titles, as these will appear on the transcript. If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAM INFORMATION

Courses at LdM-Florence can fill up quickly. It is suggested that students apply EARLY for greater course availability. All students must take at least one Italian language course per semester. Italian language courses are taught at all levels (beginning through advanced), while most other courses are taught in English. Students take four to five courses and receive 12-16 credit hours per semester; most courses are equivalent to 3 credits. The number of credits for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course title. The program fee includes a maximum of 16 credits per semester session. Students may, however, take additional courses for credit for an additional fee per course. Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who choose above the 101 level of Italian must complete a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency. Students who do not meet the required proficiency level to complete an intermediate level or higher course are moved to the appropriate course. Not all courses listed in the catalog are offered every session. Course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed.

STUDIO ART COURSES

The class schedules on the API website indicate that many of the studio art courses involve two time blocks; students enrolled in those courses must attend both time blocks. Placement exams for studio arts courses are mandatory for any student wishing to register for a higher level than beginning. Studio art placement tests are administered during the first week of classes. Students are provided with the exact meeting time during orientation.

COURSE MATERIALS & LAB FEES

Many classes require that students purchase their own books and/or materials. The cost of materials varies depending on the type of course. While students may want to bring some basic, easily transportable materials (such as brushes or pastels) with them, most course materials should be purchased in Italy once classes start. By doing so, students can take the opportunity to speak directly with their instructors to make sure they buy exactly what is required for the course. Many studio arts, cuisine and wine appreciation courses require a lab fee that is paid by students upon arrival. In addition, several courses from different departments require that students pay for visits and field trips as noted in the course descriptions (on the website) for such courses.

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

20th Century Design and Architecture

The aim of the course is to give the students the instruments and methodology to understand and recognize interior design styles. During the lessons the students will become familiar with the work of the outstanding masters that often applied their talent to the small scale (object or interior design) as well as to the large one (architecture) from the mid 19th century to 1960. Because interior design is so strongly related to object design and architecture, the course analyses the history of these three fields as a whole, from the industrial revolution to the present time, by studying the influence of society, art, economy, political events and scientific and technological discoveries. The course provides students with the tools for understanding new and innovative elements that a new trend introduces and for keeping updated with the latest news in this ever-changing field.

20th Century Graphics and Illustration

This course deals with the history of graphic design and illustration and how it was interpreted in different cultures from the late 1800s to the present. We will investigate the origins of modern graphic design developed in Europe, Russia, and in the United States and how it relates to ancient graphic design created in the Near and Far East, Europe and the Americas. The course will present an in-depth study of graphics which can entail signs, letters of the alphabet, lines of a drawing, colors of a painting, and dots of a photograph. They all form images and they all convey ideas.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex structures of the language, such as the means to express personal opinions and preferences. In this level emphasis is given to the ability to maintain interaction and to cope flexibly both in speaking and writing with problems in everyday life. At the end of the course students will be able to manage conversations on topics of personal interest or everyday life, to describe experience and to narrate a story.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 2

This course focuses on the ability to understand extended speech, as well as complex and specialized texts. At the end of the course students will develop the ability to use language flexibly for social and professional purposes. They will be able to recognize a wide range of idioms and to apply register shifts.

Travel Writing

Throughout history, Italy has inspired writers and poets to wax lyrical as few other countries have done. Countless English-language novels, stories, and poems have woven a bel paese of words around the Italian experience. This course provides an opportunity for students to focus first-hand on the art and craft of travel writing, with particular emphasis on cities in Italy, but also with excursions into other worlds -- real or imaginary. Through reading, writing, and visits in and around the city center, students will explore places of historic, artistic, cultural, and personal interest. They will learn "by example" from a selection of great travel literature about the world in general, and about Italy in particular. And they will learn "by doing," via a series of guided exercises and assignments that explore the distinctive qualities of travel writing its combination of history, culture, information, rumination, musings, and memory and the ways in which this particular art can lead to a deeper understanding of their own experiences and cultural identity.

Archaeology Workshop

This course will introduce students to archaeology, and provide them with hands-on work on 2500-year-old archaeological artefacts in LdM's Archaeology Lab. These artefacts have recently been unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva. The necropolis, near Tuscania, central Italy, is the site of a joint excavation project currently conducted by CAMNES and LdM. Students will learn what happens to the finds once they leave their recovery contexts and arrive at the LdM's Archaeology Lab. in Florence. Here, under the guidance of the instructors, students will be involved in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage of the finds. Students will also have the opportunity to sign up for the Tuscania Summer Field School, which operates directly at one of the archaeological sites.

Ancient Rome

["This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the \"Fall of Rome\" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history;","the political organization of the Roman state;","the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere;","Roman religion and the spread of Christianity;","the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society;","the historiographical \"myth of Rome.\" In order to stimulate students\u0092 critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources."]

Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence

This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.

Greek and Roman Mythology

Greek and Roman gods and heroes, and their stories, have always been a fundamental subject of Western Art and literature, especially since they were rediscovered by Renaissance humanism. The course will examine the major deities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales. The post-classical afterlife of these myths will also be addressed. Visits to museums, monuments and/or sites will reinforce classroom learning. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.

Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine

["Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place also within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Following the guidelines of experimental archaeology students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities;","everyday eating habits and etiquette;","rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. The key of the analysis is the Food Sign, a specially-developed tool with two inseparable sides: anthropological meaning and gastronomy. This instrument helps to show that in Antiquity any given dish wasn\u0092t a mere result of a recipe to prepare food in a particular way as part of a meal, but was inevitably linked to sacral and social meanings. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to the modern cuisine (when a particular tradition has continued) and interests."]

The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature

The course focuses on ancient epic literature through the analysis and comparison of some of the oldest and greatest works of Western civilization. Through the reading of the most significant chapters of the Iliad and the Odyssey, students will get in contact with the supernatural world and the mighty heroes described by Homer in 8th century BCE. These stories, considered the Bible of classical civilization, show how Greeks used myth to express archetypal values, which became immortal for successive generations and civilizations. Myths are analyzed not only as amazing stories but also as expression of ancient cultural traditions, and as primary forms of communication and instruction. The influence of Greek myths on Roman legends will then be observed through the reading of some passages of the Aeneid, the national poem of Rome written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE.

Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk

How are anthropology and fashion related? How can this social science help us in analyzing both Western fashion and global fashion trends today? How can artifacts become fashion? What is the relationship between fashion and art? How is beauty constructed in fashion and visual culture? And how are gender and the body represented? Such questions, of more than specialized interest, have been raised since fashion started to be studied in academia in the 1980s. This course considers the particular contribution of anthropology to the study of fashion as an academic discipline and hence to understanding fashion as a significant cultural expression. We will study how meanings are constructed in fashion and visual culture, using the cross-cultural and transnational framework provided by anthropological research. We will also consider how fashion interacts with material culture through the production and consumption of fashion items, making fashion an interesting field of inquiry in the context of the anthropology of things.

Food and Culture

If you are what you eat, just why do you eat the way you do? This course considers the relationships between the multiple meanings of food and the acts of preparing and eating food, and further explores food and personal and social identity. Students will examine why different people make different food choices in their daily lives, why individuals from certain social classes will avoid or appreciate particular foods, and, in general, how food serves as a factor in self-definition. Because a person's attitude toward food can reveal not just personal identity traits, but a whole food ideology, this course will also analyze the role of food in the construction of ethnic identity, in the display of religious beliefs and in the negotiation of gender roles. Students learn how cultures and values are transmitted and preserved through food. Through personal essays and interdisciplinary secondary literature students will be guided to analyze the complex and fascinating relationships between people and food, helping them to understand how cultures (including their own) ultimately determine all human food choices.

The Built Environment of Florence

This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture and open spaces. The construction of the city up to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from the architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main interest will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents and the powerful families that ruled and determined different architectural choices.

Aesthetics of Design: Theory and Practice

["This course applies the methods and concepts of aesthetics (the investigation of what makes something a work of art) to the field of design (including product design, interior design, architecture, and graphic design). Students investigate issues relating to the creation, value, and experience of design, and they analyze and attempt to resolve problems relating to design as a form of art. One part of the course concentrates on meanings of formalism and expressionism;","another part explores issues that are involved in the evaluation of design such as cultural, social, and political environments. Specific attention is given to Italian Design, from its Renaissance heritage to the decades that made it internationally famous (1960-80s). Comparisons are made with Modern and Contemporary International Design. Students are encouraged to make the most of the visual and cultural experience offered by the city and by the international environment of the institute."]

Public Space Design

["The course will investigate the key role of public space in contemporary cities. Special attention will be placed on the capability of places to attract people and emotional scenarios linked to their reactions. Examples of recent works from world-renowned architects, landscape architects, and artists will provide the student with different design methods. A specific site in Florence or elsewhere in its surroundings will represent the core of the project;","students will be asked to start off with a conceptual idea and gradually give shape to it up to the final presentation through drawings, models, video, etc. The course will mainly be carried out in class although outdoor guided surveys will also take place."]

Contemporary Architecture

This course examines major developments in architecture, interior design and planning from 1960 to the present. Special focus is given to developments in the last two decades. The survey includes consideration of sociocultural developments, as well as debates in aesthetics and theory, such as the decline of Modernism. Key architects and studios are examined. The perspective is global, but with an emphasis on European and, especially, Italian

Sustainable Architecture

["Sustainability is a characteristic of a process or condition that can be maintained at a certain level indefinitely. Our current lifestyle is not sustainable because we base our energy requirements on burning fossil fuels that are running out, causing global warming and pollution. The key aim of the sustainable architecture approach is to help resolve the present energy crisis by designing self-sufficient buildings. The two basic principles applied are: reduction of energy needs and the use of renewable forms of energy (solar, wind, geothermic, hydroelectric or biomass). Other topics touched upon in the course are: the use of local building materials;","the study of local traditional passive strategies such as how to create a pleasant home despite climate conditions and encouraging a sustainable lifestyle such as cohabitation-housing."]

Architecture in its Environment

The goal of this course is to learn a method to understand the relationship between architecture and the urban context and to be able to design a relevant architectural project. Emphasis is on the vertical and horizontal dimensions of cities and towns, and on the analysis of shapes and uses of the urban space. The main course project relates to a specific urban situation. The process of the project starts with extensive onsite case study analysis of a site (with outdoor walking and sketching), of its historical context and urban surroundings. In class students will develop, examine, and discuss the main elements, themes, and issues of the project. The completed project includes sketches, site plans, architectural plans, elevations, and sections, as well as an oral presentation delivered in class.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

Architecture Studio: Special Topics

This course focuses on advanced design projects, which are based largely on a theme of local or national importance. It is usually concerned with the comprehensive analysis and design of modern medium/large scale complexes and public buildings such as museums, airports, railway stations, waterfronts, or emergency constructions. The course is organized to equip students with the skill sets to create a comprehensive design and implement architectural projects of notable complexity and scale.

History of Architecture

This course surveys the major periods and key monuments in the history of architecture of the Western world from antiquity to the present. We will focus on the historical periods from classical antiquity through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, to the Modern Age, and on contemporary developments. We will examine representative monuments and architects from ancient Greece (the Parthenon in Athens) to the present day. The architects pursuit of beauty, and the evolving concept of beauty, are the leitmotives of architecture development in masters such as Iktinos, Brunelleschi, Borromini, and Le Corbusier. The course will address different areas in this field: typologies, materials and construction technology, theory, urbanism, and cultural context. The course will also explore the great variety of architectural traditions, orders, styles, and movements. By experiencing actual buildings of various periods in the urban context, students will learn firsthand how to critically analyze a work of architecture.

Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.

Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation, and the desire to further investigate this field.

The World of Museums: Museology

The aim of this course is to provide an integrated approach to museum theory and practice. It will consider definitions and classifications of the term 'museum', and the centuries-long history of art collecting. We will examine the various forms and meanings of gathering beautiful, precious, and curious objects in various places, and the endeavor of assembling collections for world-famous museums, such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. We will analyze the concept of cultural heritage, considering its increasing value for society, as well as the legal and ethical issues involved. The course will also consider topics as research, methods of documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the importance of education and learning in museums, preventive and remedial conservation of collections, environmental monitoring and control, safety plans, and storage systems. We will focus on Italian and specifically Florentine museums, which students will be invited to analyze according to the most recent museological and museographical theories and practices.

Palaces of Florence

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.

Lost Symbolism: Secret Codes in Western Art

The course focuses on selected philosophical themes and artworks in Western art between 1300 and 1800, observed and analyzed through the combined tools of astrology, alchemy, geometry, and numerology. Art has served various functional and aesthetic purposes in different cultures and periods. During the Middle Ages, and later, art has embodied a symbolic language, mysterious to the majority, but highly significant to the minority able to read or decode it. For example, what we may call the secret messages of certain paintings and sculptures of past centuries can be interpreted in terms of astrology. We will employ the tools of iconography, a specific field of art history that studies subject matter, symbolism, and signification in works of art. Through this approach, students will examine the fascinating and complex range of meanings that artworks were intended to transmit and that can still be uncovered.

Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)

["Does a significant thread link a Vespa scooter, Vittorio De Sica's Neo-Realist movies, Gucci\u0092s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti\u0092s \u0093Superleggera\u0094 chair, Giuseppe Cavalli photographs of \u0093trulli\u0094 buildings, and Alberto Burri\u0092s \u0093Catrame\u0094 canvases? Our working hypothesis is that it is a common visual culture, with elements of national identity, plus uniquely Italian interconnections between fields and disciplines in the creative and productive processes. Students will test this claim by applying a communications-based approach to the whole of Italian visual culture of the period following World War II. We will view works of contemporary art and design as communicators and carriers of cultural messages. This blurs the sometimes artificial distinction between visual arts (sculpture, painting, conceptual art, film, photography) and design (urban planning, architecture;","interior, furniture, and industrial design, graphics, and fashion). Students explore selected case studies in which a designer, film director, or artist may have influenced each other or actually interacted. Theory takes a back seat to process and context, but is not ignored. Students learn to \u0093read\u0094 a particularly rich, diverse, and complex visual culture \u0096 often in the vanguard and the originator of global \u0093icons.\u0094 Students also learn concrete ways to innovate by adopting an interdisciplinary approach."]

Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence

This course examines the social, economical, political, and artistic life of Florence and its close relationship to the fortunes (and misfortunes) of a group of notable Florentine families, such as the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti, through the analysis of art works and objects, including wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, luxury clothing, and coats of arms. A study of these families, their history, their public and private lives, will help illustrate and uncover many significant characteristics of the city, not only in the past, but also today, as some of these families are still active in the social, political, and economic life of Florence.

International Art Business

The course is designed to introduce students to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote the art business, and give them an understanding of the current art market and auction house environment. Students will be given the opportunity to meet specialists in order to develop the ability to identify and analyze works of art, learn how to access marketing opportunities, and devise appropriate strategies. The roles of the art dealer and the art administrator will be analyzed in depth, together with the main principles of the international laws that govern this particular field.

Museum and Gallery Internship

["This internship entails individual work experience in a museum, gallery or church in the Florentine area, supervised by a faculty member and the cooperating museum, or Florentine curia staff. The internship provides students with practical experience, especially in the field of cultural mediation and museum education, through direct observation of the various activities developed at the hosting museums and churches, individual study and direct participation in guided tours at museums and churches, collections management in art galleries. Through this experience students have the opportunity to learn and apply professional skills, while directly interacting with institutional staff and the visitors. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. Please note that the Museum and Gallery internship requires interns to fulfill part of their internship hours on Saturdays.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Admission is also contingent upon the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test."]

Contemporary Art

["The aim of this course is to give students a thorough and comprehensive grounding in the conceptual and stylistic trends governing the art of the late 20th century. This period deals specifically with the transition from Greenbergian High Modernism, through the dematerialization of the art object in the 1970's, to the postmodern and deconstructive theories of the 1980's and 90's. The course is divided into two main sections: Section One (1950-1980): Abstract Expressionism and Informal Art \u0096 Conceptual Art (Europe and USA);","Section Two (1980-1990's): Postmodernism -- Current Trends (Europe and USA). The course will give particular attention to the development of Italian art from the 1950s to the present. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical and critical discourses relating to Modernism and Postmodernism."]

Foundations of Management

This is a foundational level management theory course designed to teach students with no background in business management the core concepts and terminology needed to be successful in subsequent management courses. It emphasizes the functions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. In each session the class explores some aspects of management in theoretical terms and then focuses on application of the theory to the practical problems managers face in their work.

Principles of Marketing

Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 Ps, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Marketing

The importance of marketing in management science The variety of fundamental concepts in marketing Marketing vocabulary to help with analysis of marketing phenomenon Oral presentation skills and teamwork

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Finance

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.

Event Planning

This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.

Wine Business

This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.

Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace

People from more than one culture increasingly have to work together, work side by side, or collaborate on international projects, both at home and abroad. How easy is it to step outside our own cultural expectations? This is an intercultural communications course aimed specifically at understanding intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both theoretical and practical standpoints. On a practical level, this course will involve the students' active participation in role play exercises and observations, and will help them predict and manage intercultural misunderstandings both in the workplace and in more informal social settings. Business practices in different countries, in particular Italy and the USA, and individual case studies will be assessed and discussed according to these frameworks.

Sociology of Consumerism

["This course will focus on the rise and development of consumer cultures. The aim is to study and to apply interdisciplinary theoretical approaches to the study of consumer society now and in the past. The course will explore key substantive themes in the history and sociology of consumption, including the following: 1) an overview of developments in the different theories of consumer culture;","2) the rise of commercial society, the relationship between freedom of choice and the power of commercial systems, models of consumer psychology and behavior, the nature of selves and identities in a post-traditional world, prosperity and progress;","3) the way class, gender, ethnicity, and age affect the nature of our participation in consumer culture;","4) the evolution of capitalism to the present day, as well as the history of commodities in a number of different settings (advertising, food and drink, fashion and clothes);","5) the social, cultural, and economic context of specific consumer groups, as well as case studies of specific commodities."]

Global Business and Society

This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances, and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.

Organizational Behavior

This course is about understanding how people and groups in organizations behave, react, and interpret events. It also describes the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping behavior, and explains how organizations really work. Drawing from fields including management, anthropology, sociology, and psychology, Organizational Behavior provides a foundation for the effective management of people in organizations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organizational Behavior

This course will focus on the challenges faced by individuals in international corporations with respect to Interpersonal relationships, communication, diversity, individual decision making, motivating self and workforce, group behavior and leadership, corporate culture, and change and stress management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

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International Marketing

International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the marketing decisions within an organization, from a global perspective. Students will be exposed to the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing management in a global business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course provides an introduction to international marketing. Topics include: analytical techniques used in international market research","determining prices and distribution channels in an international context","and marketing across linguistic and cultural borders.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Marketing

This course provides a general introduction to international marketing dealing with topics such as: making business in a global economy, strategies in export trade, international logistics, the impact of the new technologies in the world trade, the role of the media and of advertising in a consumer oriented society, different approaches for different targets, etc.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course will provide an understanding of the elements that makes up the international environment, examining the development of an international marketing strategy and providing practical information on how to expand into international markets.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

The main purpose of this course is to enable students to apply the specifics of international marketing to real situations in the business environment

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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International Marketing

This course will strengthen the concepts already acquired in international marketing by focusing on the all new marketing strategies as well as the differences between international marketing and domestic marketing.The main focus will be on ethnic marketing, viral marketing, and yield management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This module will examine the global aspects of marketing and students will learn to apply the basic concepts, practices and principles of marketing in an international context. The course will cover: the international marketing environment; the specificities of international marketing: increased complexity of the environment (economy, history and geography, cultures, politics, legal environment); the international marketing triad: segmenting, targeting and positioning in an international context; global competitive analysis and strategy; international market selection; international market entry strategies and expansion; understanding licensing, investment, and strategic alliances; global branding decisions; the 4 Ps in an international context, international product decisions, international pricing, international distribution, global communication strategies; implementing an international marketing plan and control.

NOTE: This course is offered as part of the fall CIB certificate program.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

International Marketing

THIS COURSE IS OFFERED DURING THE SECOND TWO WEEKS

In this course, students will have the opportunity to:

  • Acquire analytical, strategic and promotional tools to optimize marketing performance.
  • Discover how global companies are using cultures.
  • Develop sales and negotiation skills through an interactive sales game.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Integrated Marketing Communication

Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions. Students will research and evaluate a companys marketing and promotional situation and use this information in developing effective communication strategies and programs.

Crowdfunding

The purpose of the course is to provide students with a sound holistic view of crowdfunding: what it is, what its purpose is, how to take advantage of it or utilize it for projects or businesses, the essential key tips to plan, structure and run a successful campaign, and how to interact and make a campaign even more successful. The course will explain the crowdfunding process and the types of crowdfunding available, and it will focus on examining how the crowdfunding movement has changed the way in which startups and entrepreneurs can get their work to the public.Students will learn the characteristics of successful versus unsuccessful crowdfunding campaigns, and will also be able to analyze which crowdfunding platforms suit specific projects. Students will also examine the role of culture and context, by observing how and why different countries respond and participate in different ways in the crowdfunding phenomenon. At the end of the course, students will feel comfortable and confident with the concept of crowdfunding and will possess the necessary know how to develop an effective crowdfunding campaign strategy.

Luxury Brand Management

This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.

Social Media Marketing Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Social Media Marketing. The intern is monitored by both the on-site supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and on site duties may vary. The placement is with the LdM Social Media Office or with advertising or communication agencies. Interns develop and carry out various activities, which may include, but are not limited to: market research based on social media;","marketing strategy focused on promotional strategy and advertisement strategy;","developing and managing photo archives, the LdM alumni network \u0096 which establishes online communication tools for alumni;","managing the online database. \u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, and samples of writing and marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project, photos). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an on-site interview during the first week of the term."]

Global Financial Markets

This course offers a broad introduction to global financial system, the dynamics of the main financial markets (U.S., Europe, and Asia), the nature and the goals of the key financial institutions and the crucial role played by central banks and regulatory agencies. An important component of the course is the global economic and financial crisis, and the new global financial architecture it produced. We will review crisis causes and consequences, while also evaluating the contributions of the numerous government intervention schemes.

Operations Management

This course focuses on topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. These include quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Public Speaking and Presentation Skills

This course provides an introduction to public speaking in group and whole-class situations. It will help students develop their delivery skills as well as the content of their presentations, including the development and organization of ideas and the use of research materials. Students will analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral forms, and will be required to develop working outlines for their own presentations. Classes will also involve voice and body language exercises and will teach strategies for overcoming performance anxiety.

New Media: Communication in the Digital Age

What do we really mean when we use the term "mass media" today? Is it really the same thing we meant twenty years ago, when television was still the main tool for mass information? The digital age has introduced new communication devices (laptops, digital cameras, smart phones, iPods, iPads) and new virtual places (blogs, chat rooms, social networks, online shops, peer-to-peer platforms), shaped around our wants, though often perceived/imposed on as "needs." Following a two-step program, the student will learn about the causes and effects of the digital revolution: first analyzing features and functions of all main digital communication devices (and places), then discussing their influence on us as citizens, artists, professionals, individuals.

Advertising Principles

["Advertising is not a simple or random combination of images in an ad. The task of advertising is to build a positive perception of the product in the consumer's mind. Every commercial, every ad in magazines, every TV advertisement is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular audience. This course will deal with contemporary advertising and also with the media and graphic modes used to convey it. Topics include the philosophy of advertising and its role in society;","how advertising relates to life, society and economy;","current trends in advertising as viewed from creative, marketing and media standpoints;","the stereotypes that advertising instills in us and the reaction of our society to these suggestions;","how advertising is made, created, and projected."]

Body Language and Communication Techniques

This course enables students to understand and manage body language, and generally increase their relational and communicative capacities, preparing them to enter the working world and achieve greater professional and social success. Students develop expertise relating to verbal and non-verbal communication. Training involves working individually and in groups, and addresses motivation as well as the control of body language. The learning by doing methodology engages students in a practical and proactive way through exercises and improvisation, which help them evaluate their individual attitudes and capacities. A blend of participative and creative activities is employed, including theater techniques for non-verbal communication, improvisations, team building, self-presentations, body language exercises, and movement exercises. The course guides each student in the discovery of personal strengths and the activation of a personal plan to develop their expectations and capacities.

Communications Research Methods

This course introduces students to the practice of communications research in academic and applied settings. The emphasis will be on how to identify, evaluate, and apply research findings to communication needs. It grounds students in fundamentals of research design and strategy, data gathering, and analysis for a variety of qualitative and quantitative communications research methodologies.

Media Ethics

The rules of communication in todays world are quite complex. Crucial issues and problems are touched upon at such a fast pace, that we may not have time to consider all their ethical implications. This course will explore the ethical dimensions of the world of communication. Journalists, editors, professionals in advertising and public relations are called upon to weigh potential benefits and harm when by covering stories they reveal facts that would not have surfaced, and when they respect conflicting loyalties. They also find themselves confronted by situations in which they must choose between actions that seem simultaneously right and wrong. Everyone encounters ethical dilemmas when dealing with wartime and peacetime propaganda, the Western worlds information systems, the PR industry, digital convergence and new frontiers for mass communication. The media inevitably shape our image of society whether we are professionals, consumers, or global citizens.

Public Relations

We will study the definitions, functions, and evolution of public relations, including the application of PR theory and ways to plan a PR campaign (planning process, issue analysis, research methods and strategies). The different fields in which public relations practitioners operate will be presented through case studies and exercises: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. Finally, future perspectives and new technological opportunities will be taken into account, trying to define new boundaries for a discipline too often underrated or misunderstood.

War and Media

["This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which the media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet;","the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera;","the role of still and moving images;","the importance of journalists and journalistic conventions;","the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements;","the representation of war in movies and artists\u0092 works;","the media gap between \"North\" and \"South\";","the emergence of \"non-Western\" media;","and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war."]

Broadcasting: Italian Culture and Television

This course will examine today's main trends, strategies, and broadcast in Italian television. We will begin by examining the first steps of commercial television broadcasting at the radio, its rapid development, and how it created distinctive genres in Italy.Italian state and private television are analyzed and compared. The course will also consider different theoretical approaches to the impact that television has on other media. We will focus also on the deep connections between Italian television and Italian culture.

Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Intercultural Communication

This course introduces key concepts and models of international communication. The objective of the course is to master the main communication tools and concepts in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Global Media Strategies

This course will focus on using traditional and new media to develop successful media strategies for all stages of the customer relationship cycle. Students explore media usage habitswhat media consumers are using and how they use it to provide guidance on the best ways to reach and dialogue with new and existing customers. Students learn techniques for developing, measuring and improving multi-touch communications strategies for acquiring new customers, retaining existing customers, encouraging repeat purchases and building long-term, profitable relationships.

Communications Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Communications. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is with a Communications agency. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: writing new articles;","updating and adapting preexisting articles for different media formats;","database entry;","contributing to blogs, social media, Web sites;","developing new projects. \u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Communications / Event Planning Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Communication and Event Planning. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at an Event Management company. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: conceptualizing and organizing commercial and non-profit events independently or as part of a team, writing event proposals, assisting in logistics, communication, marketing and fundraising;","working on social media campaigns, assisting in clerical and administrative tasks.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Global Brand Management

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study into the major components involved in developing successful global brands. In this course, students will develop and apply research-based strategic planning to the development of new or existing global brands. This process involves examining the principles of consumer and shopper behavior and exploring the impact of current consumer and global trends on new and existing brands. Students will use primary and secondary consumer research to further develop a new or existing global brand. To conclude the class, students will develop integrated communications campaigns designed to launch the brand, acquire customers and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.

Consumer Insights and Strategic Development

Consumer behavior is defined as the behavior that consumers, groups or organizations display in searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services that they expect will satisfy their needs. Consumer Insights teach students the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives (e.g., brands, products, and retailers), and how consumers are influenced by their environment (e.g., culture, family, peers, media). In this course, students will learn to uncover and utilize relevant global and regional consumer insights to develop effective integrated marketing communication strategies. Blending the theory and practice of consumer behavior within a global context, students will delve beyond the consumers functional needs to understand the deeper needs, wants and motivations that drive consumer behavior. They will also understand that consumer behavior differs depending on the consumers cultural and socio-economic background.

Introduction to Multicultural Education

["Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, theories and strategies that constitute the five major dimensions of multicultural education as defined by James A. Banks: equity pedagogy;","content integration;","knowledge construction process;","prejudice reduction;","empowerment in school culture and social structure. We will explore these dimensions within the context of the host culture of Italy and analyze these forms of knowledge in terms of cultural differences, inclusions, and exclusions. Students will reflect on and describe how multicultural education connects with their experiences in the communities and in the schools in Italy. Because prior knowledge and cultural experiences shape our beliefs and values, students need to critically analyze their notions of race, culture, and ethnicity. Through immersion and first-hand experiences we will explore and inquire into how culture and different cultural contexts influence one's beliefs and behavior."]

Introduction to Environmental Issues

Introduction to ecological concepts that provide a foundation for understanding present and future critical environmental issues such as population growth, natural resource management, biodiversity and global changes, wilderness, food production, and changing habitats. Emphasis is placed on situating global environmental issues within an earth-systems science framework, including climate change, pollution, land and coastal degradation, water resources, and habitat loss.

Sustainable Food

This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.

Introduction to the Fashion Industry

This core introductory course provides students with an overview of the fashion industry from research and design to the marketing of the finished product. Potential career opportunities within the field are examined and the course briefly looks at the historical origins of fashion and the Made in Italy phenomenon of Italian-made products. An overview of the global textile industry and leather market is also included. Students will acquire knowledge of basic industry terms and the process of apparel production from concept to the consumer.

Construction Techniques

This course is the first in a series of technical studio courses in fashion design. In the production lab, students will learn to use different equipment, the process of assembling a garment and execute construction methods used in the apparel industry. A variety of sewing techniques from stitches and seam treatments to the application of trim and garment components will be included while completing samples in muslin. A sample book is developed of industry construction techniques as a reference guide. At the end of the course each student will produce a garment integrating the skills learned.

Fashion Illustration I

This course for beginning students explores the world of fashion illustration. Students will learn how to draw a fashion figure, render fabrics and designs using a variety of media such as markers, pencils, and collage. Special attention will be given to coloring and shading. During the semester there will be a site visit to the Costume Gallery at the Pitti Palace, a museum of worldwide importance. Students will learn to illustrate designs and technical flat drawings. In addition, they will research target markets, create a collection, and present a conceptual moodboard.

Textile Science

This core class teaches the fundamentals of textile and fabric science bringing awareness of the variety of materials used in fashion and their applications. Students will receive a comprehensive overview of the textile industry with special attention given to the dyeing, printing and finishing of textiles. Students will develop a basic knowledge of textile terminology, including fibers and their origin, structure, properties, and characteristics. The course will cover yarns, construction, weaves and knit structures and enable students to make appropriate fabric selections for various apparel and home furnishings products, categories, and markets.

Fashion Marketing

This course explores fashion marketing and merchandising. It focuses primarily on brands, and marketing strategies for product development, advertising, promotion, and retailing. The course analyzes the thinking behind the strategies for fashion products, paying special attention to the emotional aspects of fashion communication. Students will examine current business practices and new and emerging trends and issues that impact the fast-moving environment of the fashion and textile industry. The marketing aspects involved with the globalization of the industry, trade shows, and key events are included. Specialized topics consist of the importance of the European fashion system, with a comparison with some American brands and strategies. Case studies will provide a vision of how companies in todays environment are evolving marketing plans to meet the new consumers demand, in terms of product design, distribution, and communication.

Fashion Consumer Behavior

This course examines the decision-making process of the customer through fashion concepts, theories, cultural influences, demographics, psychographics, and consumer dynamics. Students learn the analysis of perceptions, communication, and ethics to determine how a customer can turn into a consumer by understanding behavior and reactions to the impact of purchasing. Students analyze research data and the application in assessing market strategy. The theory of motivation and the reasons underlying the wearing of clothes are also studied.

Visual Merchandising

This course explores contemporary visual merchandising strategies. It focuses primarily on understanding visual merchandising techniques, concepts and processes, and recognizes how visual merchandising efforts support retailing trends and sales success in retail store spaces. The course analyzes the philosophy behind the creative process and identifies a variety of resources for idea development such as marketplace dynamics and consumer trends. The aim of this course is to prepare students in the process of designing, planning, and organizing visual displays and in-store designs that effectively communicate brand identity. Through lectures students will learn theory and techniques for visual displays. Students will apply this knowledge to the design and creation of model window display and/or in-store designs. This course provides a vision of how retailers in todays environment are adapting visual merchandising and communication strategies to meet consumers' demands.

Retail Management

This course focuses on understanding the retail environment from a historical perspective, and on its new or emerging developments. In-depth knowledge of retail strategies, operations, organizational structure and formats, including managerial ethics, will help students become successful retailers. They will be introduced to multi-channel and international retailing, as well as to supply chain management. Students will also learn the importance of human resources management and strategic planning.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 1.25   Contact Hours: 3.5

Knitwear I

This course is designed to familiarize students with the fashion knitwear industry and is aimed at student interested in learning about the whole process, from yarn characteristics and structures, to knitting techniques, finally to finished hand-knitted garments. Students will master basic knit stitches and construction techniques, and will be able to create individual designs, from the phase of the yarn selection to the finished garment. The course has drawing and experimental components, and includes machine-knitting demonstrations. At the end of the course students will be able to assemble the research process into a knitwear portfolio.

Accessory Design

Accessory design has increasingly gained importance in the global fashion industry. While often contemporary fashion designers have expanded their brand identity by developing accessories lines, the heritage of many European fashion luxury brands originated in accessory design. The course includes the design and technical skills necessary in the creation of accessory products. Particular attention is given to trend forecasting, sketching, and technical drawings. Using CAD technology, students design a small range of accessories and develop a collection portfolio focused on handbags, millinery, scarves, and more. Site visits are included.

History of Costume

Students explore the historical styles of Western dress and adornment through the ages from the ancient Egyptian period to the 20th century. Costume is viewed within the context of the period related to major historical developments, technology, production, and the economy. Further discussions center on the cultural and religious influences, societal values, political climate and specific individuals seen to influence the fashions of each time period.

Fashion Buying Concepts

Retail and the fashion business are stimulating, fascinating, and in a process of continual change. Understanding the dynamics and significance of retail buying concepts will be critical to the success of anyone interested in buying, selling or communicating consumer fashion products and services. Students will study fundamentals of retail buying including planning, assorting, pricing and purchasing fashion inventories. The effect of different retail formats on purchasing, identification and evaluation of resources and ethical issues in sourcing are included. With global fashion industry constantly undergoing change, an important part of this class involves understanding current events and the effect on retail buying. The course is targeted towards students who are looking for careers in fashion buying, merchandising, marketing and should already have taken classes towards these majors. The ability to work in teams and to communicate is strongly emphasized.

History of Italian Fashion

["This course introduces students to the main historical styles, concepts, and definitions of fashion and fashion design throughout the history of Italian fashion, from its beginning to the present time. Italian fashion will be studied in context, using historical documents and other materials to illustrate relevant time periods, styles, or techniques. We will focus on the lives and careers of some of the most significant Italian designers, including Schiaparelli, Ferragamo, Fontana, Capucci, Valentino, Pucci, Armani, Versace, Dolce &","Gabbana, Prada, Gucci, and Cavalli. We will also give special emphasis on the rise of Italian fashion in Florence in the \u009250."]

Fashion Communication

["In this course students analyze how to convey fashion brand identity and positioning through both traditional and digital media channels. Fashion communication regards every facet of information relating to fashion, in all available media: journalism, magazines, cinema, visual arts, social media, photography, blogging and more. The course covers trends and solutions to improve brand value communication. Students learn to analyze Web marketing and communication strategies. Skills developed include fashion writing, fashion show reviews, analysis of advertising campaigns;","the ability to find and use social media and marketing research data;","strategies that enable brand value to be improved and conveyed to an expanding global consumer base."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 6   Course Level: Lower Division  

Product Development

In this advanced course students learn the methods used to plan, implement, and manage the development of apparel products. Target market description and analysis, trend forecasting, garment styling, materials selection, sourcing, and production are all part of the product development and apparel manufacturing process that are presented in this course. Additional topics focus on private label techniques, cost and quality control in the development from concept to finished product.

Trend Forecasting

["This course is designed to promote research and analytical skills by teaching the key methods to forecast fashion trends by exploring processes and methods used to define short and long term industry forecasts. Students acquire key techniques in the research and analysis of emerging trends. They learn the difference between macro and close-to-season trends, and why trend forecasting is primary to the fashion industry. The course examines the forecasting framework and the analysis of trend and lifestyle information, marketplace dynamics, and consumer profile. The increasing value trend forecasting provided can influence future businesses and affect diverse industries;","from automotive and apparel to interiors and household products. \u000bNote: Knowledge of Adobe Illustrator\/Photoshop is recommended."]

Fashion Entrepreneurship

This advanced course provides students an opportunity to plan a virtual company from concept to creation. The course entails writing a business plan, analyzing market and competition, creating the image of the brand, selecting multiple distribution channels, and managing human resources. Although focused on fashion, this upper-level course has general applicability.

Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth

The aim of this course is to examine the reach and impact that Darwins theory of natural selection has had on religion, gender, and race and to uncover some common misconceptions about his work. The Origin of Species brought about a profound intellectual revolution not only in the natural, but also in the social sciences. Part one of the course examines the building blocks of Darwin's theory and its dissemination, reception, and legacy. Part two examines the theoretical basis of modern evolutionary biology and analyzes some of the most popular (and contested) theories of evolutionary psychology relating to human reproduction, gender, relationships, and beauty. The course further offers a critical study of some evolutionary ideas after Darwin, focusing on eugenics, revealing flaws in modern popular scientific discourse as well as potential limitations to the scientific method and culture. Student presentations will consider Darwin's influence on areas such as art and media and also on our understanding of physical and mental disabilities.

Women in Religion

Women have been by turns defined by, harmed by, excluded from, but also enriched by religions. Often they have been and still are barred from equal spiritual footing with men in many religious institutions. But how do sacred texts and rituals define who we are and what roles we have as men and women? What do religious traditions teach communities about gender, bodies, sexuality, and the divine? This course considers the difficult question of gender (im)balances from within 3 major monotheistic Abrahamic religious traditions, namely Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will examine both the influences that religions have on women - through texts that have been written for, about, and against women -- and also the interrelated influence that women have on religions -- through texts written by women as individual participants in the religious experience or by feminist religious scholars who are challenging gender-exclusive language, roles, and institutions. This course asks questions of current relevance about the changing roles of women inside religious communities, in the public sphere of leadership and authority, in the family, and in everyday life. By examining traditional cultural beliefs and values derived from religions, and by using interfaith and gender perspective lenses, the course aims to offer resources to understand, evaluate, and possibly challenge traditional roles.

Women of the Medici Family

["This course is an introduction to some of the most famous women of the house of the Medici (1368-1743). Particular emphasis will be given to their biographies and the unique role that these women played in the European history. The Medici are the best-known and most prestigious Tuscan family;","their history developed over four centuries and embraced thirteen generations. Their name is deeply associated with the history of Florence. They emerged as merchants, became the most powerful bankers of the time, and turned into masters of Florence, and one of the most important families in Europe. Through the lens of the Medici women\u0092s lives, we will explore the Medici family across four centuries of their history\u0097the Medici men, their children, their strategy of power, and their role in the Florentine, Italian and European life."]

History of Prostitution

In the context of sexuality and body within the Western tradition, this course examines prostitution as a complex phenomenon at the intersection of gender roles, sexual practices, religious and moral views, social power and legal boundaries.The course will focus on classical antiquity, with some reference to the earliest historical cultures, and on the period spanning from medieval and early modern times to the Reformation. Strictly adhering to an interdisciplinary approach, we will touch upon history, religion, mythology, philosophy, visual arts, literary sources, and legal documents. Readings and discussions will address prostitution in Western society today, taking into consideration current research on the topic, and also public perceptions and understanding.

Female Characters in 20th Century Fiction

["This course will explore some of the most interesting and important female characters created in 20th-century European and American fiction. These characters include some created by male writers, such as Molly in James Joyce\u0092s Ulysses, Connie in D. H. Lawrence\u0092s Lady Chatterley\u0092s Lover, Sarah in John Fowles\u0092 The French Lieutenant\u0092s Woman, and Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita. One of the purposes of the course will be to compare and contrast these characters with those created by female authors\u0097these include Virginia Woolf\u0092s Orlando, Anna in Doris Lessing\u0092s The Golden Notebook, Christa Wolf\u0092s Cassandra, or Villanelle in Jeanette Winterson\u0092s The Passion. We will assume a gendered perspective to compare men and women writers and their different interpretations of womanhood;","yet, students will be challenged to overcome the enclosures of critical theories, and experience how great literature can never be reduced to a mere system."]

Digital Sketchbook

In this course students combine traditional and digital media. In drawing sessions at various locations in the historic center of Florence, students learn basic drawing concepts, followed by one-on-one instruction with the instructor to create drawings suitable for the computer lab sessions. These manual drawing sessions focus on creating three-dimensional space through the use of linear perspective and construction of complex forms using simple volumes, on the drawing of the sculpted and live human figure, and on creating balanced and interesting compositions. In the computer sessions students learn to scan selected drawings from the city drawing sessions and paint them digitally using Photoshop. Students explore painting concepts applicable to both traditional and digital painting and the most relevant and useful Photoshop functions. In the course, students create multiple versions of each painting (for example, day and night versions of one scene). Projects include painting a set of images using gouache, and developing and modifying using Photoshop one or more of their traditionally painted images. In this way, students discover the benefits and drawbacks with regard to traditional and graphic approaches. Note: Experience in drawing and in using Photoshop is helpful.

Graphic Design

This course gives students a theoretical and practical introduction to graphic design in the era of digital communication. Students follow a program based on practical applications, realized entirely using computer graphic techniques. The constant search for the harmony of shapes, colors, and words goes together with the learning of the most modern digital graphic techniques. During the course, bidimensional vector graphics will be used for the realization of all assigned projects. The fundamental concepts of the manipulation of the images are also taught to complete the same projects. In consideration of the great importance that advertising has in this course, student projects address communication issues, exploring the principal media and investigating ways of working with different targets. Curiosity and an inclination for research are the essential characteristics of students interested in this course. Students must be familiar with the computer environment. Professional printing skills are developed in a commercial printing center.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

Digital Graphic Techniques Fundamentals

This course trains students in the basics of computer graphics, developing foundational techniques and skills within the standard set of software applications for the design field. Image optimization and manipulation, graphic illustration basics and Web design principles are covered extensively. Students work on individual practical projects, image make-ups, graphic illustrations, and Web layout design. Professional printing skills are developed in the context of a commercial printing center.

Foundations of Visual Communication

This course is essential for all students that, either as beginners in graphic design or with previous experience in digital graphics, desire to learn the secrets of "good design." The aim of the course is to assist students in developing intellectual skills and familiarity with the rules which underpin the creation of graphic works that convey both aesthetic quality and communicative power. The course is structured into a series of projects, lectures, analyses, and drawing exercises which, through the application and study of design theories, aim at offering students a methodology for solving graphic and visual projects. Topics include: B/W techniques, layouts and grids, colors and shape balance, mirror and rotational symmetries, repetitive patterns, archetypes and primary shapes, fonts and typography, studies of visual languages and cultural backgrounds, analysis of styles and artwork, rules to derive families of shapes and colors, formats and harmonic proportions such as the diagonal of the square, icons, logotypes, and trademarks, studies of 3D models and packaging. The course places emphasis on the learning of graphic design principles and concepts that are independent of the tools used for production (digital or manual techniques). There is a focus on learning from the great tradition of Italian design, and the student is encouraged to make the most of the visual and cultural experience offered by the city of Florence.

Workshop in Graphic Design

["Conceived for students who have already learned how to develop the fundamentals of graphic design using the basic tools and expect to test themselves through more ambitious projects, the course offers the opportunity to learn by working on real cases with effective professional goals. The core of the assignments consists of a professional brief to be analyzed and discussed in order to develop successful solutions. Projects entail real challenges offered by firms or by competitions released by crowd-sourcing platforms;","the instructor will help students to understand specific project objectives, and to learn and refine the best techniques with which to realize their proposals. Activities include work group sessions. Projects may be printed, Web-based, or hybrid, and a presentation is required"]

Graphic Design Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Graphic Design. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is either with advertising and communications agencies or with the LdM Graphic Design Office. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: graphic design, packaging, corporate identity, logos, posters and flyers, catalogs, marketing materials, social media posting, layout of applications and e-commerce Web sites, Web programming, art direction.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent upon the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a portfolio. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Brand Design

Today a professional graphic designer is often called upon to extend his/her interest to fields that just a few years ago were very far from the natural focus of the designer. With this in mind, the present course guides students through the process of inventing a new brand, starting from the analysis of pertinent economic trends, then proceeding to understanding where the consumers choice will be addressed in the near future and last, based on these studies, finalizing everything in the creation of a new brand complete with all the features that concern graphic design: name, logo related to corporate identity, general look and feel, payoff, slogans and multi media formats. This course carries the range of activities of the graphic designer into the areas of marketing and copy writing.

The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses

This course is an introduction to the legacy of the Holocaust and its implications. The course explores Christian anti-Judaism as one of many factors in the Nazi rise to power and the "Final Solution." It then proceeds to various accounts of life in the Nazi ghettoes and death camps and deals with Christian and Jewish efforts to remember the Holocaust within particular communities and places. The course will focus on the Holocaust of the Italian Jews. It will begin with an analysis of the emergence of the Fascist movement in Italy, which led to the Racial Laws. It will proceed with the study of specific stories of persecution, deportation, and salvation in the various cities of Italy. We will study in depth the reaction of the Vatican to the Holocaust. In addition, we will analyze the reactions of Italian society to the Holocaust, starting right after the war until today.

The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture

The course offers students a first-hand experience of the historical city of Florence, which from 1252 was divided into four "quartieri" or quarters. Each quarter, which was named after the main church of the district, presents its own particular social, political and urban characteristics, and these form the central themes of the course. Students will discover the prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities and historical events that have characterized the development of each quarter from the medieval period to the modern age. Site visits will form an essential part of the learning experience.

The 1960s: A Global Counter Cultural Movement

The course will introduce the students to the seminal decade of the 1960s through the most important social, cultural, and artistic achievements of the period. We will focus especially on Italy, Great Britain, France, and the USA. In the first part of the course, students will explore the cultural climate marking the end of the 1950s and beginning of the 1960s in the USA and in Europe (topics include McCarthyism and Eurocommunism.) Students will investigate how this cultural climate contributed to the rise of a new responses to politics, minorities, women, culture, and social values. The central part of the course will focus on some of the leading personalities of the time, Martin Luther King, J. F. Kennedy, and D. Cohn-Bendit among them, and the main themes of the cultural debates of the timepacifism, new social values, individual creativity, and civil rights. The last part of the course will consider the achievements of the 1960s, and reflect on its most important consequences.

Italian Renaissance Civilization and Culture

["This course explores the historical, literary and cultural developments of one of the most remarkable and vibrant periods of Italian history: the Renaissance. Students will be introduced to the main historical developments of the Renaissance period from the late fourteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century. The Renaissance is above all the age of the individual and the affirmation of his\/her achievements, best summed up by the credo \"Man \u0096 the measure of all things\". The focus of this course is therefore upon great personalities of the Italian Renaissance mainly in the fields of the visual arts, literature and philosophy, but also drawn from those of politics and civic life. These include key figures of the most prominent Italian families: the Medici, the Sforza, the Della Rovere;","artists and architects: Brunelleschi, Leon Battista Alberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo;","writers, poets and philosophers: Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, as well as merchants and bankers. All these individuals left their mark in Italy between the early 1400s and the late 1500s."]

Italian Regional Food in Cultural Perspective

["Although characterized by unique and distinctive features, Italian cuisine is still perceived as the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over the centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. The course focuses on the different aspects of regional food in Italy, from ingredients to recipe preparation and cooking techniques, with particular attention to the following factors: historical origins and developments;","climate and environmental conditions;","social issues;","food production;","nutrition;","and safety and health. Emphasis will be placed on how food relates to the local lifestyle and culture. Regional economy and local resources will be analyzed and compared. Students will be introduced to the various local products through lectures and class demonstrations."]

Wine and Culture I: Wines of Italy

This course investigates Italian wine in the context of the extraordinary history, philosophy, culture. and lifestyle of Italy. In this context wine is not only a much-loved drink, but also forms an essential part of rich cultural traditions going back to the Etruscans and the ancient Romans. From the study of wine we learn about the practices of earlier cultures, about their values and our own, and we gain a unique perspective on Italy today. The course focuses on the distinct traditions and economic, geographic, and climatic aspects of each area of Italian wine production. Students explore grape varieties and different techniques used to make wine, and the national and regional classifications. They also subject representative wines to organoleptic analysis (visual, olfactory, and gustative). Each wine is studied in terms of its characteristics, history, and traditions, and in relationship to the particular foods meant to accompany it.

Current Trends in Italian Cuisine

This course explores major trends in contemporary Italian cuisine that have been emerging in recent decades. These trends, revealed in both everyday and haute cuisine, involve fresh reinterpretations of regional traditions, revaluation of local products, interest in lighter and healthier diet, and an emphasis on creativity. Driving these trends are such diverse factors as interest in other cuisines, innovations by leading chefs, and especially changes in Italian society and lifestyles. Students learn basic cooking skills as well as some specialized cooking methods and techniques. They discover how to select quality ingredients, and they compare their eating habits with those common in Italy today. Particular focus is given to the following aspects: historical origins and developments of food production, regional dishes, seasonal and environmental conditions, social issues, nutrition, safety and health. In each lesson students learn how to prepare representative recipes, with attention to ingredients, nutritional values, and presentation.

Fundamentals of Food Design, Styling, and Photography

Cooking involves not only the preparation, but also the presentation of food products. Through this course students learn how to style food and beverages, and how to capture their essence in photography. Students have the opportunity to develop their personal creativity, and learn how to exercise good technical and compositional control. Through lab practice students learn to process, develop, and print photographs correctly and to use Photoshop techniques especially pertinent to Food Photography. The Food Photography competencies developed include specific lighting techniques, ability to arrange compositions and settings, and visual storytelling. To achieve this, the course grounds students in key theoretical elements of food design, involving visual and stylistic analysis. The course includes a number of guest lectures with a professional food stylist, a chef who will show tips for preparing dishes to be photographed, a field trip to a selected restaurant, and visits to special culinary venues.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Italian Food and Culture: Pairing Food &Wine

Italian cuisine is the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. Thanks in recent years to a greater availability of wines from different regions, the pairing of food and wine, always a traditional aspect of Italian cuisine, has become more important in the organization of a menu and the presentation of a meal. In this course the various ways of pairing Italian food and wine will be analyzed and used for menu planning. This involves research into aspects of both wine and food, with special emphasis on classification and technical terminology, nutritional and health issues, chemical composition, sensory and other evaluation techniques, as well as cooking skills that will be practiced regularly in class. Not suitable for vegetarians.

Interior Design I

["The course is an overview of the interior design profession. It introduces the student to the fundamental concepts of design, basic space planning and furnishing. Starting from the survey of an existing space, the student learns how to present the design through drawings. From a simple room like a kitchen or a bathroom and ending with a small residential apartment, the student will face all the problems concerning designing;","from the drawing representation and the scale system, to the choice of materials and colors. Exercises and projects will be started in class under the supervision of the instructor and then continued and finished individually."]

Product Design I

Paolo Fossati, an Italian expert in industrial design, stated: Design means to create a strict connection between ideation and production. Giovanni Klaus Koenig claimed that design is like a bat, half bird and half mouse. Starting from these two statements (one strictly formal, the other perceptive and witty), the aim of this course is to understand the term industrial design but chiefly the phenomena which modern human beings experience daily, if unconsciously. The design of objects destined to be manufactured by industries should have an essential quality of art. Although art is difficult to define, students learn that the designers work applies not only to the study of techniques, types of materials, assembly and problems concerning serial production and so on, but also, and most importantly, to their formal and artistic values. The course deals with the subject of design in a broad perspective, which includes product design, industrial design and interior design. The aesthetic, cultural, philosophical, and technical elements of the subject will be redefined through lectures and exercises. The teaching method is interactive and lessons involve slide lectures, readings, field trips to stores, exercises in basic design and discussions. Some classes focus on the history of design, Italian production, and semiotics.

Technical Drawing

The course aims at providing students with the necessary skills to execute technical drawings, skills that include drawing orthographic projections, axonometry, and perspective applications. Different methods of geometrical presentations are taken into account and students learn how to draw a plan, a section, and elevations. Students also enhance their abilities in sketching and rendering of architecture, interior and product design and in understanding construction drawings with codes and dimensions. This course is taught through lectures, case studies, and gradual practical exercises and assignments that enable students to learn geometrical drawing. Students will work at a portfolio project, and understand the technical design process, while also developing the tools they will be able to use in their future projects in architecture, interior and product design.

Design for Living Spaces

In this course students will learn to sharpen their analytical and technical skills in creating design solutions for living spaces as diverse in type as contemporary lifestyles and needs (single unit, family, social care, etc.). Students will carry out projects that must respond to the specific requirements of clients: space, technical, emotional atmosphere, accessibility, and so on. Students will be encouraged to explore design solutions that reflect definite decorative and architectural approaches. We will especially focus on programming, building code issues, space planning, and furniture arrangement. In their project, students will be asked to consider both functional and aesthetic aspects, to achieve a good solution, and to appropriately present it.

Interior Design II

["Starting from the survey of an existing place and learning how to present it through drawings (plants, sections, elevations), the student will deal with the solution of a given project in its entirety from marketing through the identification of targets to the solution of technical problems and layout. The project will consider functional and the aesthetic aspects, trying to formulate a good solution and present it in the appropriate way. The project process starts with the visit or explanation of the area. In class the students will examine and discuss some examples of finished projects and focus on the main elements and aspects of the project theme. The project will be composed of a general layout and inspiration board, plans, elevations, sections, perspective drawings, and sketches. Each project will be presented in class during the exam day;","all the presentations will be colored and integrated with images, photos, materials."]

Product Design II

A theme will be assigned and developed individually with the teachers help. The students will propose sketches, rendering, technical drawings with the appropriate dimensions, 3D drawings, and realize their final book, complete in all parts. They will also make a model, using the material they prefer. The students will be introduced to essential information about design, such as design definitions, the most important phenomena that have characterized the history of design, and the works of some of the most famous Italian and international designers. Students will be introduced to Bionics, the science of how nature teaches designers. The students will also be taught about the materials, both traditional and modern, and the technologies that are used to realize industrial products. The teacher will show the students the transformation of some products, from their birth to their present situation and characteristics.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

Lighting Design

The course is an introduction to the world of lighting. It provides a compendium of information on illumination design practices. The range of subjects covered is extensive. Methods of lighting design in this course include a section on lighting hardware (lamps and luminaires) and a part dedicated to practical experience through real lighting projects. The course will start with a quick theoretical overview of the different light sources, analyzing all types of new lamps currently on the market. Information about lighting objectives, visual comfort and pleasantness, color rendering, decorative, architectural and mood lighting, lighting control and application fields (offices, shops, exhibiting spaces) will be provided.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

Sustainable Design

["In a time of population growth, decreasing resources, climate change, pollution, economic uncertainty, and mass throwaway consumption, sustainability means survival. Sustainable design is the philosophy of designing for urban planning, architecture, interior spaces and products so as to comply with the principles of economic, social, and ecological sustainability. Since the three principles are closely related to human activities, this course emphasizes the study of passive strategies as the key to energy and material saving. The sustainable designer, increasingly in demand, makes responsible decisions fully aware of the long-term environmental impact of every aspect of the project, construction, and maintenance. The course cultivates this holistic design approach. On the one hand, it explores a range of issues and possible solutions to them;","students consider design in relation to renewable energy sources such as the sun, wind, water and geothermal power, as well as to energy reduction and efficiency, they further examine recycling, reuse, and reduction of materials in both construction and product design. On the other hand, students develop some feasible projects which meets rapidly evolving sustainability requirements while respecting creative and functional needs, making real-world choices.\u000bNote: A personal laptop for design projects is highly recommended."]

Interdisciplinary Design

This advanced course offers design students an opportunity to work in class teams with a collaborative approach, learning about the thinking and processes of diverse design disciplines while finding creative solutions. The teams consist of cross- or multi-disciplinary majors. The aim is to adopt a collective response to research development and problem-solving, in the process discovering the commonalities underlying design processes. Each collective response requires integrating ideas to create effective and innovative solutions to current design needs and problems. Through this course students acquire multiple viewpoints within a global context, simulating the demands of todays multidisciplinary work environment.

Furniture Design

The course aims at providing students with a basic understanding of the theories and techniques of furniture design. In class, we will examine the various design processes and procedures, while also considering space and the functional analysis of design. For the most part, each class will be a workshop for design projects. The course will also consider the importance of targets and visual communication signs. Students will carry out personal research on pieces of furniture, materials, and designers in order to explore furniture design and to develop a personal style.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions.

6-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1 and 2

This course aims to give a basic knowledge of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations, to describe their personal background and environment, express wishes and talk about past experiences and future plans, respond to simple, direct questions or requests for information. This course offers the students the opportunity of a more intensive learning experience thanks to the daily study and practice of the language. Multiple sections available.

6-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1 and 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, and the proper selection of different tenses when narrating past events. Constant attention is given to the practice of social discourse, both in written and oral communication. This course offers the students the opportunity of a more intensive learning experience thanks to the daily study and practice of the language.

Jewelry Making I

This course will give students a first approach to jewelry making, introducing them to the main equipment and tools (machinery, pliers, files, and saw), and to safety regulations. Students will work at the silversmith's bench, learn the basic techniques for creating simple pieces of jewelry with design transfer, sawing, filing, soldering, polishing, and simple settings for cabochon stones. The course will also introduce the lost wax casting methods and wax carving. The individual projects will help develop manual and creative ability.

Italian Crime Fiction

From the middle of the twentieth century, Italian writers such as Gadda and Sciascia began to integrate into their novels and short stories certain aspects of the crime genre, in such a way that the mystery element became an instrument for analyzing contemporary Italian realities. By the 1990's a new generation of writers such as Camilleri, Ammaniti and Lucarelli had developed a specifically Italian approach to an international literary genre, the "Italian noir", which aims at revealing unpleasant truths to a vast audience in an entertaining way. The goal of this course is to explore some of the most representative works of the crime fiction genre in contemporary Italian literature, from its early forms to the present. The study of these works will also involve an analysis of the strong socio-cultural dimensions of contemporary Italy, which are the result of a complex combination of geographical, historical, political and linguistic factors. These in turn affect different forms of organized and unorganized crime, and differences in the relationship between citizens and the law. During the course students will also study the relationship between Italian crime fiction and its foreign counterpart, including the works of authors such as Dibdin, Highsmith and Harris.

Shakespeare’s Italy

["Shakespeare, the greatest English-language dramatist of all time, set approximately one-fourth of his plays in Italian cities such as ancient Rome, Verona, and Venice. In this course, we will focus on a small selection of his \u0093Italian plays,\u0094 including Romeo and Juliet and The Merchant of Venice, in order to see how Shakespeare combined historical evidence and fiction, past and present, for dramatic effect and social commentary. Students will work with primary sources;","for the same purpose they may also perform selected scenes. This course allows students to learn more about Shakespeare\u0092s works and personality, and about relations between Elizabethan literary and theatrical culture and Renaissance Italy."]

Italian Grand Tour: Italy through the Eyes of Famous Travellers

This course is an introduction to the literature generated by the "Grand Tour" experiences between the 18th and the 19th centuries and to its continuation and development in the 20th century. The main focus will be the textual analysis of the memoirs, letters and diaries written by some of the most famous artists, writers, and intellectuals who resided and traveled in Italy. Our selection will include British, German, and American writers. Another important aspect of the course will be the study of the history, the works of art, the monuments, and the folklore events of the main Grand Tour destinations: Venice, Florence, Rome. Students will learn about the different experiences of famous foreign travelers in Italy through the centuries and will be able to understand some stereotypes, prejudices, and idealized views about Italy and Italians that still survive.

Digital Filmmaking I

An introduction to filmmaking techniques. Students learn the basics of shots, frame composition, elementary scripting and some editing. They will use personal equipment (such as smartphones and entry-level photo/video cameras) as basic videomaking tools, engaging in creative projects, testing visual storytelling possibilities and ultimately producing some brief but complete digital film pieces. Integrating hands-on activities are sessions in which students analyze the cinematic language and explore the recent evolution of the medium (e.g. the YouTube galaxy, on demand video-services, new media devices and practices) via a selection of film and web-native excerpts.

The Animated Short Film

In this course, students use digital media tools to create a short animated film. The course covers all steps of the creative process, from hand-drawn sketches of the characters and backgrounds through the creation of model sheets, storyboard and digital animatic, up to the final short film with music and sounds. Although closely supervised by the instructor, students develop each stage of the process. No prior drawing or animation experience is required.

Understanding Movies: Theory and Practice

Moving images are among the most distinctive innovations and experiences of the last century and remain one of the most enduring. In a media-dependent culture, developing a critical understanding and practical knowledge of this form is vital. This course studies the theory as well as the techniques of film-making. It analyzes the ever-evolving cinematic language in terms of both its historical development and its essential elements, techniques, and tools. Through the study of stylistic choices and the construction of images and sequences, students learn aesthetic and technical terms, rules, conventions, and social assumptions used to build meaning. In a series of stylistic exercises, students engage in hands-on experience of video shooting.

Screenwriting

This course will teach students writing for film. Feature-length screenplays demand a specific architecture. Students will bring to class an idea for a film. This idea can be based on something they experience during their stay in Italy, a memory, a story they heard, a concept based on a novel they read, or anything that inspires them. The course is articulated in three parts. 1. Through lectures, workshop discussions and scene work, students explore and develop an understanding of the basic principles of screenwriting. Topics include: style, format, development, geography, image, scene, sequence, plot vs. character, hearing voices. Students develop the subject. 2. Students learn how to build a coherent treatment a summary of the events and major emotional arcs of the film's three acts. They develop the subject into a treatment. 3. Students complete their feature-length screenplay.

Music and Film

This is an introductory course which explores the role of music in one of the most important 20th century artistic and entertainment media: film. The course surveys film music from its silent era origins, in which music was a major component in conveying emotions, up to the present. Topics for discussion will include film music history and the history of films. In the process, students will study the dramatic function of music as an element of cinematic "diegesis" and emphasis, the codification of musical iconography in the standard cinematic genres, the basics of film-making, musical forms, associative listening, the important basic musical elements, film music techniques, and how composers use them in film scoring. Some of the cinemas iconic scores and accompaniments will be discussed, from silent era movies through the films of such directors as Hitchcock, Kubrick, and Fellini.

Seriality: TV and Beyond

TV series are today a prominent form of entertaining, but the way they tell stories is not a new one. From Victorian novels to, in our time, newspapers, radio, cinema, and lately the web, have used this form of storytelling. The course intends to explore seriality as a pattern of narration. By comparing different media and analyzing through a historical perspective a variety of textual objects, the course will give students the tools to understand the specific creative and productive strategies behind serial texts. The course will also focus on the social effects of the phenomenon, the concept of fandom," and the revolution of consumption habits after the advent of digital devices and new content providers such as Netflix or Amazon.

Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts

This is an elementary course for Liberal Arts majors. It deals with topics emphasizing fundamental ideas of mathematics, selected from set theory, algebra, and geometry.

Introduction to Statistics

["This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of statistics. Topics include: the description of data;","simple probability;","binominal and normal distribution;","confidence interval estimation;","hypothesis testing;","simple regression and chi-squared distribution. \u000bNote: This course in not open to STEM students who should take MAT 280 Statistics for Science Majors."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to Statistics

The objective of this course is to understand the mathematical language of finance. Students will study some basic rules of finance, analysis, and probabilities. The content will cover anything related to gross and compound interests, cash flow, annuities and probabilities with a specific review of basic statistical distribution functions (normal law, Pareto, Poisson).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Nutrition Studies

["The aim of this dietary education course is to provide guidelines and develop critical thinking for a healthful diet and lifestyle. Intended for non-majors in science, the course addresses basics of the chemistry and biology of nutrition, including the physiological principles that underlie a balanced diet and the correct uptake of nutrients. Themes include nutrition requirements;","nutrition and wellness;","food sources and production;","consumer choices, all stage life diet (from child nutrition to elder nutrition);","social dynamics that lead to eating disorders such as emotional eating;","the effects of an unbalanced weight on health (excess weight and\/or weight loss). Part of the course will be supplemented by laboratories with food handling."]

Vegetarian Culture

Investigation of vegetarianism and veganism in terms of both dietary benefits and as practices related to cultural values. While vegetarianism is present in many cultures both ancient and modern, it started to gain wide currency with the systematic attention to healthy diet in the Nineteenth Century, and only comparatively recently has it been the object of empirical study. In our time, vegetarianism is often associated not only with personal health choices but also with stances on food production, sustainability, animal welfare, and other issues. Students review studies including the work of nutritionists, and participate in structured debates. Includes hands-on sessions in which selected dishes are prepared.

The Mediterranean Diet

This thematic course explores the various definitions and claims attached to the Mediterranean diet. Since it was first defined circa 1970, this influential concept has been the subject of much attention and controversy, both popular and scientific. Students will sort through the literature, using the basic methods of nutritional analysis. Among the questions they examine are the degree to which there really is a shared dietary culture and lifestyle in the Mediterranean, claims of health benefits and counter-claims, comparison with other dietary patterns, how nutritionists examine in regional and local diets, and how they distinguish between correlations and causes. Includes hands-on sessions in which selected dishes are prepared.

Topics in Nutrition: Italian Style Cooking

In an age of processed foods and widespread alteration of the environment, the importance of good diet is essential. Appropriate use of eliminative or healing remedies may provide additional influence on dietary metabolism. Healing nutrition provides unique opportunities to convert food into useful nourishment. It gives dietary therapy much added value. By studying the chemical structure of food and its effects on the human body's metabolism, students are introduced to the healthy side of Italian cuisine today, including the practical preparation of healthy dishes. The different food combinations and the way they affect digestion and metabolism will also be analyzed in order to plan a daily healthy diet.

The Science of Food, Health, and Well-Being

The primary focus of this course is to analyze the biological properties of the body and the effects that foods have on it. Students learn the basics of nutrition (proteins, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, natural supplements), including how the phytochemicals and nutrients of foods can improve health, and they will study habits, programs and dietary regimens for healthy living. Nutritional healing and wider questions of well-being are also addressed. Includes hands-on preparation of healthy dishes.

Principles of Drawing and Composition

This course will teach the basic techniques of figure and object drawing. The program is designed to introduce the fundamental principles and elements of drawing using charcoal, pencil and various other media, such as red chalk. Each lesson has a specific aim and forms part of a progressive buildup of skills through observation with a series of exercises. Still life, human figure, architecture and nature will be investigated as subject matter and perspective will be analyzed in depth. Reference to the exceptional works of art in the city of Florence will be investigated and analyzed as an integral part of the course. The aim of the course is to develop basic skills and a better understanding and knowledge of drawing, and to encourage further studies.

Foundation Oil Painting

["An introduction to the traditional techniques of oil paining. Fundamental skills are constructed progressively in highly structured lessons that involve demonstrations and guided work. Areas addressed include observational skills, the perception and buildup of form, tone, and color on a two-dimensional surface, color theory and mixing, linear perspective, and composition. The focus is on still-life subjects. Exceptional works of art in the city are referenced and analyzed as an integral part of the course. Prior studio training is not required;","non-majors are admitted."]

Expanding Creativity

This course is a space in which fine arts majors engage critically with the creative process in their work, focus on problem-solving, explore the limits of media and the links between them, exchange ideas, and better define their personal visions. The course fosters reflective practice, heightened creativity, and the ability to work independently. Students, at different stages of their studies, are closely guided in formulating and developing individual projects to meet appropriate, precise, and pragmatic objectives. Such objectives may have to do with moving between or combining media, or taking a set of technical skills to new personal limits. Projects may also delve into sources of inspiration, or articulate and apply a creative strategy.

Fundamentals of Art and Design: Color Theory

["This course concerns the analysis and theory of colors. Students will study harmony and contrast of colors: pure colors, light and dark colors (chiaroscuro), hot and cold colors, complementary colors, simultaneous contrast, quality contrast and quantity contrast. The course will study the relationship between form and color, and how colors relate to space and composition, as well as the perception and chromatic balance: the illusion of color. It will also analyze the expressive force of colors as an essential element in the creative process. Learning to develop an eye for color through experience and trial and error;","seeing the action of a color and feeling the relationships between colors will be achieved through practical exercises based on various color theory criteria. Investigation of nature, master artists\u0092 works, city life and architecture, and works of master artists will help to discover how colored light and shadow are perceived through the relationship between the \u0093eye,\" \u0093experience\u0094 and \u0093color theory.\u0094"]

Florence Sketchbook - Intermediate

This course consists of gathering research in the traditional form of sketching from the museums, streets, and environments of Florence as artists have done for centuries. This includes sketches taking inspiration from sculptures, paintings, architecture, formal gardens and squares, as well as drawing from life in streets and markets, with an in-depth study of foreshortening and perspective. Students will be encouraged to write annotations and observations as well as to investigate their areas of interest. Students gain firsthand knowledge of original works by direct observation in situ, learn drawing and painting skills in a refreshing way, and learn to create sketchbooks that may serve as source material for future projects.

Intermediate Drawing

This is a course for students wishing to improve the basic techniques of object drawing and human figure drawing. Students will work on figure and object drawing with emphasis on the structure and anatomy of the human body and analysis of the relationship between individual elements in the composition. The figure in space will be thoroughly investigated so as to assist the students in examining reality through his/her personal observation and perception on the page. Analyses of various mark-making techniques using diverse materials (charcoal, pencils, red chalk, ink) will be an integral part of this course. Exceptional works of art in the city of Florence will be referenced and investigated.

Intermediate Painting

The course is intended for students who have already taken the foundation-level course or have a similar background in painting. It takes students into further studies of oil painting techniques and methods. Focus is on the human figure as well as object painting using a number of different approaches to life painting. Some of the most important techniques of oil painting are covered to provide students with a sound foundation preparing them for more ambitious work. Emphasis is on color mixing, handling of brush strokes, glazing and scumbling, as well as traditional canvas preparation. Exceptional works of art in the city of Florence will be investigated and analyzed as an integral part of the course. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the most essential elements in life painting.

Advanced Painting I: Observation and Interpretation

The emphasis of this course is on furthering students knowledge and practice of the traditional techniques of oil painting through figurative and/or object work, in order to refine and improve the quality of work previously achieved. In addition, students will be introduced to different painting techniques, such as acrylic. Students will depart from direct observation in the first part of the course, moving onto more personal ideas and concepts which focus on individual means of expression, in the second part. The course focuses on subtleties within the techniques of oil painting and encourages personal expression in the work. Various exercises and projects allow students to approach elements pertaining to color and composition, and others pertaining to technical experimentation, such as glazing, impasto and painting mediums. At the end of the course students will work on a personal project in order to prepare them for more advanced work. Exceptional works of art inside and outside the city of Florence will be investigated and analyzed as an integral part of the course.

Introduction to Modern Dance

In this introductory course students study elementary modern dance techniques. Emphasis is on alignment, movement through space, and the use of body weight, while a range of movement qualities are developed.

Intermediate Modern Dance

This course focuses on building students musicality and performance skills by exploring modern dance as an art form and as a means of expression. With respect to the introductory level, techniques are reinforced and expanded. The course reflects on the historical development of modern dance and modern music and it emphasizes a broader dance vocabulary as well as more complex dance combinations. Attention is also given to an analysis of a range of different modern and contemporary styles (Graham, Cunningham, Orton) through video projections and viewing of live performances by professional dancers, and the execution by students of more elaborate choreographies.

Theatre History: The Contribution of Florence

Florence was one of the capitals of Western culture, not only with regard to art and literature, but also to performing arts and drama. Via a multidisciplinary approach the course outlines the contribution of Florentine theatrical culture to the definition of the Western theatrical model: from the fundamental input given by Machiavellis comedies, to the stage devices created by Giorgio Vasari, to the invention of Opera around the Medici court. The course will be divided into in-class lectures, with the support of slides and videos, and lessons in the field, visiting relevant sites. The aim is to make the students discover how political power, citizenship and urban space are involved in theatricality, how different elements (texts, acting, design, architecture and use of technology) combine to represent a shared model, and how many contemporary cultural attitudes still result from this.

Italian Culture through Music

This course offers students an approach to understanding Italian culture and society through an exploration of its rich and varied musical traditions. The geography of Italy, and its complex political history, have given this country a wide variety of musical styles and cultures. Taking the form of a musical journey across Italy, the course explores sacred, secular, and dramatic music from the major Italian cities and also strays off the beaten path to discover the vibrant folk traditions of villages and rural communities. The course also explores the origins and influence of Italys dramatic and lyrical tradition, from the early multimedia spectacles of 16th-century Florence to the patriotic operas of Verdi and the realism of Puccini. Classes will include musical illustrations and demonstrations and students will also be encouraged to go to related concerts and musical events in Florence and Tuscany.

Introduction to Ethics

This course introduces ethics as it has developed in the Western world over the last 2,500 years and as it is analyzed in most of the English-language academy. Much of the course revolves around classroom discussion. Student research may focus either on a particular normative (e.g. should we preserve wilderness?) or meta-ethical (e.g. are ethics grounded in emotions?) issue or another approved topic drawn from current events, literature, poetry or song. Students will present their findings and opinions first to the class, then in the research paper they submit. Course readings will be drawn from a wide range of historical and contemporary sources. Topics include the nature of ethics: the roles of reason and emotion, the role of gender, whether ethics are local or universal human rights, too? and theoretical foundations: the individuals well-being, the welfare of all, fundamental rights and duties, virtues reflected in character, what things a rational agent could agree to. An international slant is privileged in the study of particular cases, such as: duties to help strangers and immigrants, duties to help others at home and abroad, climate change, and foreign intervention.

Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern Thinkers

While introducing students to philosophy as a discipline in term of methods, contents, and questions, the course examines the evolution of the main schools of philosophical thought. The focus is on its main thinkers and fundamental concerns from the Middle Ages through the rich debates of the late Renaissance, with its reforms and Age of Science. However, since the ideas of many early Western philosophers were rooted in ancient philosophy, the course begins with the study of some key ideas of Greek, Roman, and Early Christian thinkers. Attention is given to the cross-influences between Catholicism and philosophy that are one of the special traits of the Italian cultural heritage. Among the thinkers analyzed are Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Dante, Petrarch, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, Giordano Bruno, and Galileo Galilei.

Logical, Critical, and Creative: The Power of Reason

This introduction to logic provides students the tools to develop logical thinking and sound reasoning skills. Logic is an essential tool in many academic fields, and it consistently plays a vital role in our daily lives. Logic is the basis for valid arguments to convince others, while analytical and critical thinking skills serve to evaluate positions taken by others, including the powerful and persuasive appeals made by commercial and political advertisers in this digital age. Students will analyze both media and Internet sources and learn how to construct well-reasoned arguments on a variety of topics. The course deals with traditional logic, with concepts and techniques of modern logic, and with some philosophical issues related to critical reasoning. Basic concepts explored early in the course include logic itself, the structure of arguments, how to distinguish arguments from non-arguments, deductive from inductive arguments, and how to evaluate such arguments in terms of their validity, strength, soundness, and cogency. In addition, the course examines formal logic and categorical propositions, and syllogisms. Some attention is given to propositional logic, how to use truth tables and predicate logic.

Introduction to Classic Photography

The course provides a basic approach to how the analog camera works, while examining the technical aspects of developing and printing a photographic (black and white) film. Through technical and conceptual assignments, the student is expected to gain confidence in how to use the photographic medium in a creative and expressive way. In the final part of the course, the student develops personal ideas into an individual project. The aim is to impart a working vocabulary of basic photography, in order to allow the student to become familiar with the technical aspects of the photographic camera, as the main tool in converting visual and personal expression into photographic images. All basic black and white printing techniques and some basic digital post-production techniques will be covered. In the course students acquire confidence in understanding how to use their camera well, increased technical control of the medium, and in developing a more critical eye. This course is 80% film and darkroom and 20% digital.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR film camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Introduction to Digital Photography

The course provides a basic approach to how the digital camera works. Students gain broad knowledge of the history of photography and an appreciation of aesthetic concerns that enable them to express themselves in a more cohesive and creative manner. Basic classic photography skills including an understanding of focal length, aperture, shutter speed, composition, and quality of light are integrated with techniques specific to digital capture and the manipulation of images in Photoshop. Photoshop software is used to process and print photographic imagery. During the semester specific assignments help students learn all basic digital techniques. In the course students acquire confidence in understanding how to use their camera well, increased technical control of the medium, and in developing a more critical eye.At the Florence site only this course is 80% digital and 20% film and darkroom, with some basic black and white developing and printing techniques.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Language of Instruction: English   

Principles of Fashion Photography

["The course provides a basic approach to photographic practice, with a focus on the essentials of fashion photography. A broad knowledge of the history of photography and major aesthetic concerns, combined with an overview of fashion photography to the present time (techniques, culture, esthetics, trends) help students increase their expressive and creative capacities. The course concentrates on the main technical aspects, such as lighting, settings, locations, use of flash units, portable and studio units, and light metering. Students learn basic and creative classic B&","W photography skills (including an understanding of the use of the camera) and digital techniques for fashion applications, with emphasis on digital photography colors using Camera Raw and Photoshop (used to process and print photographic imagery). Particular attention will be given to on-location shooting and studio photography activities, with practice photographing models. As far as possible students collaborate with the Fashion Department to develop fashion photography projects. For such projects students shoot images to meet the fashion application requirements of the project development team, thus experiencing a real working situation. This course is 70% digital and 30% film and darkroom.\u000bNote: Each student must be equipped with a SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens."]

Globalization and Social Change

["This course critically examines the subject of globalization from a sociological perspective. Globalization in some fashion has been happening for centuries, but never before has it so strongly reshaped society everywhere as today. Through an interdisciplinary approach that combines perspectives from sociology, anthropology, political science, economics, and philosophy, students attain an understanding of some fundamental features of globalization. Exploration of selected substantive topics (case studies) helps root the general in the particular. The concept of globalization;","the central themes of changing communications and social networks;","the main economic, political, and ideological dimensions of globalization, are analyzed. Emphasis will be given to a set of interconnected themes: the role of capitalism and other systems;","the function and effectiveness of institutions such as the IMF and the World Bank;","changes in global governance;","the relationship between globalization, inequality, and poverty;","the fate of cultural diversity in a globalizing world;","issues of gender, ethnicity, environment, social justice, and human rights."]

Italy and the European Union

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the development of European integration and of the structures within the European Union as well as of the Italian postwar developments and system with special focus on the changing and sometimes ambiguous or contradictory relationship between Italy and the E.U. The course is thus divided into two parts. In the first part, attention is given to the European Union's history, processes, functions, and current critical issues, such as the Greek financial crisis and the Italian migration situation. In the second part, Italian postwar developments and political structures will be examined with reference to the Italy-EU relationship.

The European Union

Europe is at the forefront of international regional integration. No other group of nation states has proceeded further in gathering sovereignty. This advanced course gives a broad overview of developments in the European Union (E.U.) from the aftermath of the Second World War to the 2004 wave of expansion that admitted countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the 2009 ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. The approach in this course is political and aims at helping students to understand the nature and the peculiar characteristics of European integration. The course is organized in three parts. First, it reviews the ideas, events, and actors that led to the foundation of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) and the European Economic Community (EEC) and to its enlargement from 6 to 27 countries. Second, the course takes an in-depth look at E.U. institutions and policies, casting a critical eye on the crucial period from 1985 to 1993 that led to the acceleration of European integration through the Single European Act, further enlargements, and the Maastricht Treaty. Finally, the course reflects on three major questions facing the E.U. in the new millennium: What is the E.U. as a political subject? What is its purpose? What should be its role in a global world? To explore the resonances of these questions the course considers practical policy dilemmas that the E.U. faces in various fields such as economic and monetary policy, regulatory and distributive questions, the democratic deficit, the challenge of expansion to the East, the Lisbon Treaty, and common foreign and security policy.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

International Politics

This course aims at introducing the basic concepts of International Politics and to get acquainted with the most important events in the world and the structure of international relations since the Peace of Westphalia (1648), outlining the main differences between the traditional interstate system and the present global order, with the growing importance of international organizations and of the principles related to peace, democracy, and human rights. This aims at giving students a general overview and an understanding of contemporary world politics, grounded in the idea that international politics are not distant from ordinary people, but, to the contrary, a matter that concerns and can be influenced by the citizens. It is, therefore, important that students are aware of what is happening around the world and of how the same event can be perceived differently by different peoples. In the first part of the course we will examine the importance of studying world politics and the methods to do it. We will also cover the difference between nationalism and globalization, and the growing emergence of international organizations. At the end of this part we will analyze the role of international law and diplomacy. In the second part we will focus on the globalization of economics by studying the main economic organizations and the process of regional integration. Special attention will be given to human rights protection and to international terrorism and the way it is affecting present international relationships.

International Conflict Resolution

The course presents concepts and theories related to the peaceful transformation of international violent conflicts, illustrating them with examples taken both by global peace initiatives and Italian experiences in the field. Approaches to International Conflict Resolution have become widely used and discussed in the last decade. New roles and tasks have emerged for international organizations such as the United Nations and the OSCE. At the same time, civil society organizations have increasingly played an important role in conflict resolution, through second-track or citizens' diplomacy, conflict sensitive approaches to development, as well as third party nonviolent intervention. In Italy, several peace organizations have their roots in Christian Catholic values. The strong tradition of self-government has also encouraged municipalities and regions to work on development and peace issues. At the end of the course participants will have a clear understanding of international conflict resolution and will have gained an insight into concrete examples from both global and Italian organizations.

International Law

["International relationships are characterized by a reciprocal respect for rules. Such commitment is considered mandatory by nation states. These rules are usually known as International Law. International society is made up of independent entities that are free to make their own choices. However, they are also, of necessity, interdependent, hence the need to establish regularized relationships through the creation of mutually agreed rules. In this course students, by being introduced to these rules, will come to understand how states conduct their foreign policy. The main topics under discussion will be: subjects of International Law;","international organizations (with especial emphasis upon the United Nations), international treaties;","international liability and international crimes (for example, terrorism)."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3.5   Course Level: Lower Division  

Basic Printmaking

This course is an introduction to the various techniques of black and white printmaking, such as etching (hard ground, soft ground, aquatint, sugar lift, dry point, pastel, spit bite and mixed media), woodcut and linoleum cut. The art and technique of reproducing and printing metal plates, wood panels, linoleum and other matrixes will be thoroughly investigated and understood. In learning the above techniques and methods, continuous reference will be made to printmaking, not only as a very old process practiced in Italy and in the rest of Europe during and after the Renaissance (Mantegna, Pollaiolo, Parmigianino, Rembrandt, Goya), but also as a modern approach (De Chirico, Carrà, Picasso, Munch, Seurat).

Introduction to Psychology

This course introduces students to the major areas of psychology through current empirical research and theoretical debate. Scientific and nonscientific approaches to the explanation of psychological phenomena are examined critically. Topics include: anthropological assumptions and implications, deontology, sensation and perception, cognitive processes, consciousness, language, learning, personality, development and psychopathology. Students will be introduced to the main theories for each of these topics from different perspectives (e.g., biological, behavioral, cognitive, and psychodynamic). Students will also look at the different types of scientific research (e.g., experiments, correlational research, review, meta-analysis), and will analyze the typical structure of a research paper (introduction, method, results, discussion, limitations, and implications).

Social Psychology

Social psychology is concerned with how we think about, influence, and relate to other people. This course is about the study of human social behavior, examining theories, findings, approaches, and methods in social psychology, as viewed from an interpersonal perspective. Topics include: the role of others in shaping self-concepts, as well as the formation of person perception, attitudes, attribution theory, obedience, conformity, and social relations. We will further look at the causes and methods of reducing prejudice and aggression, as well as exploring altruism, the development of gender roles, stereotypes, and nonverbal behavior. Readings and activities assigned will enhance discussion, broaden students' knowledge of and perspectives on human social interactions and give them a framework to interpret social behavior. In addition, since this course is taught in Florence, Italy, it provides a natural opportunity to compare and contrast the influence of culture on individuals. Living for even this short period in another country helps you to see and understand the relationship between the individual (self) and society, and a chance to view your own culture from a distance.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

Social Psychology

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive view of Social Psychology and its most important phenomena. Our approach will depart from the theoretical basis of social psychology but our learning process will be directly connected to our daily lives. This means that learning will combine the theoretical dimension with a set of new ways of looking at reality, at social others, and at yourself. To combine these two dimensions in our classes, we will complement the theoretical dimension with examples that will help us to identify and understand the theory on the basis of materials such as films, songs, conferences, and presentations of students’ research projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Child Psychology

This course is about the study of child development, from the prenatal period through adolescence, examining theories, findings, approaches and methods of developmental psychology. We will explore such questions as: What knowledge do infants have at birth? Is aggressiveness a stable attribute? Does early exposure to two languages confuse children? What do children understand about the causes of emotion? How do infants become attached? Why do school-age children pay more attention to their peers than their parents? Who raises altruistic children? We will cover the major domains of development -- biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional -- putting emphasis on discovering the many different biological and experiential factors that influence behavior, as well as the roles familial and extra familial factors play in the course of early human development. We will look at the causes and methods of reducing aggression, as well as exploring altruism, and moral development. The course will include practical exercises where students will be expected to conduct observations of children in real-life and/or on video, and plan appropriate methods to collect developmental data, with the opportunity to explore the differences between their own culture and Italian culture.

Adolescent Psychology

["Adolescence is a fascinating journey, and a particular time in the individual\u0092s lifespan when physical growth, emotional development and thinking take a new turn. Led by complex neurodevelopmental and hormonal changes, bodies develop markedly in size, shape, and appearance;","sexual feelings arise;","and action is shaped by new physical urges, sets of values, belief systems and the immense possibilities of abstract thinking. Adolescence is also the beginning of a quest for identity which demands a continuous renegotiation of family and social relationships, and in which desires for autonomy and independence coexist with cravings for guidance and connection. Furthermore, social media play an important role in adolescent development today as adolescents dedicate much time to it. This course discusses major theories and research studies on adolescent development and contemporary issues and concerns relating to adolescence and its psychology (school, family, media, sexuality, bullying, eating behavior, religion, etc.). The course will help students to develop their theoretical knowledge as well as their capacity for critical analysis. This will be achieved through reading and critiquing the scientific literature, and presenting their research in the form of group projects and individual assignments."]

Psychology of Crime

This course approaches the knowledge and understanding of criminal behavior and its impact upon individuals and society from developmental, cognitive-behavioral, and other psychological perspectives. The basic premise of this course is that multiple variables affect peoples behavior and for this reason this study requires attention to personality factors and how they interact with situational variables. Topics include: criminological theories, biological and psychological models of criminal behavior, crime and mental disorders, human aggression and violence, sexual assault, and criminal homicide. Students will acquire a new framework for interpreting criminal behavior. Students will be familiarized with different perspectives on criminal behavior as well as etiology, risk factors, assessment, and treatment in relation to different criminal behaviors as well as etiology, risk factors, assessment, and treatment in relation to different criminal behaviors. Recent research findings will be incorporated.

Forensic Psychology

The course offers an introduction to the field of forensic psychology, starting from the definition of crime and theories on development of criminal and delinquent behavior. Topics include: criminal homicide, stalking, sexual assault, family violence and child abuse. Students will acquire basic knowledge of investigative psychology including geographical and criminal profiling. Special emphasis is given to consulting with courts and the rehabilitation process in correctional facilities.

World Religions

["This course is designed as a historical and cultural survey of the basic teachings and doctrines of the major religious traditions of the world: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. The course will examine a significant number of specific themes in all religions studied such as the nature of this world and of the universe;","the relationship between the individual and the transcendent;","ultimate reality;","the meaning and goals of worldly life;","the importance of worship and rituals;","ethics and human action. Excerpts from important texts of each tradition will be analyzed such as The Torah, The Bible, The Koran, The Upanishads, The Bhagavad Gita, The Tao Te Ching, Chuang-Tzu, Buddhist Sutras, The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and The Confucian Canon. During the course, students will also learn the basic principles of meditation."]

Yoga: Breathing, Meditation, Spirituality

Exploration of yoga as a historical religious phenomenon, set of physical practices, and also as an element of modern culture;","includes both lecture and practical components. We will analyze yoga\u0092s roots in ancient India and such texts as the Upanishad and Pantajali\u0092s Yoga Sutras, as well as its popularity and place in contemporary culture. Students will examine yoga as a spiritual, mental, and physical practice;","in other words, as a path to attain spiritual realization and union with the divine, as a quieting and focusing technique, and as a healing and balancing physical exercise. Hence, we will study various breathing (pranayama) and meditation techniques along with ayurveda, an ancient Indian healing system and \u0093science of life.\u0094 Included is an overview of such different forms of yoga such as Hatha, Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Iyengar, Kundalini, Yin, as well as Laughter, Restorative, Bikram and yoga therapies for eating and addictive disorders. Finally, students will explore the interactions between practitioners of yoga and social, political, and environmental activism.

Fresco Painting and Restoration I

The students will be introduced to all phases of the art of Old Master fresco painting using techniques that include enlargement of a master drawing (students' choice), mixing fresco mortar (intonaco), and the use of pigments for fresco painting. Each student will also make a sinopia (preliminary drawing for fresco painting), complete a small fresco that will be detached as an exercise in fresco conservation, and create a graffito, a technique of mural decoration seen on many Florentine buildings.

Introductory Sculpture

["An introduction to the materials, technical skills, and processes used in creating sculpture. Covers basic skills of constructing figurative and abstract forms in three dimensions, with emphasis on additive and subtractive modes (modeling and carving). Materials used include clay, plaster, wax, wood, and metal;","projects include sculpture in the round, reliefs, and molds. Interactive critiques lay the foundation for self-assessment and critical analysis, with appropriate terminology, of sculpted works."]

Organized Crime: Sociology and History of the Italian Mafia

One of a long list of Italian words adopted in many other languages, Mafia is now applied to a variety of criminal organizations around the world. This course examines organized crime in Italy in historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its growth from the nineteenth century to the present. The chief focus is on the Sicilian Mafia as the original and primary form. Similar organizations in other Italian regions, as well as the Mafia in the United States, an outgrowth of Sicilian Mafia, are also considered. The course analyzes sociological aspects of the Mafia including language, message systems, the code of silence, the role of violence, structures of power, and social relationships. Also examined are the economics of organized crime and its impact on Italian society and politics.

Italian Society Today

A close look at the changing nature of Italian society, focusing on the postwar period and especially the last thirty years. Using a sociological framework, students analyze the opportunities and challenges affecting Italian society during the economic and cultural revival that followed reconstruction, and today. Themes addressed include everyday life, demographics and the lifespan, health, gender, family, education, religion, politics, legality, business and labor, culture, consumption and leisure, national and other identities and perceptions, urban and rural life, Italian regions and the southern question, emigration and immigration, race and ethnicity, diversity and integration (European, Mediterranean, global), and current issues. History and politics are addressed, but the primary focus is on social structures and tensions. This course offers a key to understanding the present and future of this distinctive and fascinating country.

Creative Writing

This course is geared toward students seriously motivated to write creatively and constructively through inspiration and self-discipline. The professor will stimulate students' creativity through the confrontation with different aids in order to help students create different kinds of written products. This class focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of creative writing by providing the basic principles and techniques that should be used when producing a written piece. Through inspirational exercises, the student will use the art of creative writing as a tool for literary expression and self-awareness. Reading work out loud for discussion and in-class critiquing allows the students to develop a critical awareness of their own writing as well as following the inspirational and editing process of fellow classmates. Mid-term and final projects will reflect students' writing progress. This course may be taken by students of English as a second language with advanced writing skills.

Anthropology of Violence and Conflict

Conflict pervades our daily lives, and violence erupts indirectly or directly into our experience. What is the distinction between the two, and what are intelligent and effective ways to deal with them? In this course students apply concepts from anthropology and political science to the dynamics of conflict and violence, of various types and levels, in contemporary society. The course examines major definitions of violence and conflict, exploring classic and notable theories and debates in the social sciences and other disciplines. A basic distinction between interpersonal and group dynamics receives much attention. Most focus will be upon the macro level: the ways in which communities, states, and other associations deal with the escalation of conflict and the real or presumed conditions underlying violence (such as exclusion or asymmetries in power structure). Issues addressed include the impact of globalization, cultural differences, identity and constituency, and the processes leading towards conflict transformation, peace, and reconciliation.

Florence Sketchbook - Beginning

In this course students develop basic observation, drawing and watercolor skills in a refreshing way. Students keep a series of sketchbooks and develop finished drawing projects from them. After initial training in fundamental drawing techniques for pencil, pen and other media, the course is dedicated principally to sketching outdoors in the city and environs. Students develop ability in representing a variety of subjects, including the human form, architecture, and landscape. Exploiting the advantages of the site, students explore such themes as historical monuments, street life, and formal gardens. They encounter art of the past, including efforts to sketch the same or similar topics. The course equips students to efficiently capture impressions by drawing in various media at various rates and scales, keeping annotations, ideas, sketches, and analyses of artwork in a journal, and developing personal interests. Students explore the monuments and vibrant street life of Florence, and observe numerous buildings, outdoor sculptures and squares that form part of the outstanding and entrancing artistic heritage of medieval and Renaissance Florence.

Florence and the House of the Medici

["The course deals with the full story of this extraordinary family, whose fortunes are traced over three hundred years, from the late 14th century to the early 18th century, from the rise of the Medici bank under Cosimo the Elder, to the final collapse of the house of the Medici when the last Medici Duke died in 1737. Through their immense power, the members of the Medici family ruled Florence, controlled the papacy, acted as the \"needle of the Italian compass,\" and sometimes influenced the policies of an entire continent. This course will provide students with an understanding of the history, politics, civic, and daily life of the period. The Medici were statesmen, scholars, patrons of the arts, collectors, entrepreneurs, and impresarios. Some of them were poets;","others were popes. The course will introduce students to the philosophical and artistic movements of the time, and will investigate the works of some of the artists who worked for the Medici\u0097Michelangelo, Poliziano, Donatello, Botticelli, and several musicians among them. Lectures will be supplemented by visits to the churches, museums, palaces, and galleries, that are relevant to the study of the Medici family."]

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World

This course looks at the supernatural (i.e. spirits, ghosts, afterlife, netherworld etc.) and at the different practices through which humans in ancient cultures got in touch with, and represented it. A large part of the course will be dedicated to the various aspects of magic and sorcery, along with shamanism, divination, necromancy (evocation of the dead) and curses (namely binding and love curses). Several classes will also be focused on restless dead and ghosts, a privileged medium through which ancient people were believed to get in touch with the beyond. Documentary material, such as reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets will be shown, and comparisons will be drawn when relevant with modern cultures and folklore.

Architecture Studio: Designing within and for Communities

This is a project-based service-learning studio course emphasizing team approaches to solving complex design problems that enhance social and civic functions within societies. Students develop architectural projects in the local community working hand-in-hand with institutional or not-for-profit type clients. It involves conducting client interviews and writing reviews, doing research and analysis of an existing site, sustainable goals setting, rudimentary urban planning and permitting, architectural programming, schematic design, project management and documentation. This course emphasizes community service activities and interactions with other professions within the built environment as a methodology to enrich personal growth and academic development.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

19th Century Art: From Neoclassicism to Post-Impressionism

["This course will examine European art between c.1790 and c.1900. This beginning of this period is marked by the passage from Neoclassicism to Romanticism, while its end corresponds to movements, such as Post-Impressionism, that heralded the avant-gardes of the 20th Century. In Europe, the 19th Century was an era of enormous changes, that affected many spheres, from politics to technology. We will investigate the links connecting society, ideology, culture, and the visual arts, and consider themes such as: critics and the public;","exhibitions and salons;","naturalism and realism;","nationalism;","Orientalism and Japonisme;","nature and landscape;","Impressionism;","dreams and inspiration;","heroism;","literary and historical themes. Special focus will be given to the notion of modernity, and its evolution. Artists studied include David, Goya, Delacroix, Turner, Courbet, Monet, Degas, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Seurat, Gauguin, Ensor, and Munch. Attention is also given to Italian artists and movements."]

Principles of Microeconomics

["Economic analysis is one of the most useful tools for understanding social phenomena. Principles of Microeconomics introduces students to the basics of economic ways of thinking. Economic theory is explained through the study of methods of analysis, assumptions and theories about how firms and individuals behave and how markets work. The course is useful for students in the applied social sciences, and is a necessary foundation for students wishing to continue the study of economics and business in their academic careers. The course is divided into four parts: The first is an introduction to languages, methods, and modeling used in microeconomics;","the second part focuses on the firm production process and market strategy;","the third analyses consumer theory and the way in which individual behavior is modeled by economists;","and the fourth and last part studies how the competitive and non-competitive market works. We will make extensive use of case studies and policy issues. which will be discussed in class."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Economics of the European Union

As the economic significance of the E.U. and its role at a global level have increased, and as the integration of the economies of the E.U. members have advanced, so the need for a sustained study of the development and impact of this new economic reality has grown. The basic objective of this course is the examination of the economic foundations of the European Union. The course starts with an in-depth analysis of the historical evolution of European integration and then moves to an examination of its economic aspects. The course is structured as follows: From the E.E.C. to the E.U. (historical evolution), the expansion of the E.U. into eastern Europe, the economic aspects of EC law within specific areas of EC law and policy (such as competition policy, agricultural policy, etc.), the European Monetary System (from the ECU to the Euro) and finally the external relationships of the E.U.

Wedding Planning

This course introduces students to Wedding Planning processes and implementation. Students learn to create, organize, coordinate, promote and market different types of weddings for different faiths and cultures as well as civil weddings. As in the Event Planning courses but with greater specificity, students will become familiar with this thriving industry learning about contracts, budgeting, vendors, venues and all other aspects for a successful event that satisfies diverse clients and settings. They will research and evaluate products and services including competition and target markets, working as a team, decision-making and developing business strategies. As part of the course the students will plan and design a typical wedding event with all the features of a real one and will involve interdepartmental collaboration in order to put into practice the skill sets learned.

Problems in Business Finance, Italy Focus

This course is intended both for business majors and for other students with an interest in international business and financial management. The class uses the case method of instruction to review, reinforce, and further develop the concepts of corporate finance introduced in your basic business introductory courses. Cases have been selected to take advantage of your study in Italy and to introduce you to improve your understanding of business situations in the US, Europe and Internationally. This class will begin with an overview of the business and economic history of Italy, concentrating on the recent decades. We will review Italys role in the European Union and its current challenges and opportunities.

Marketing / Event Planning Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Marketing and Event Planning. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at an Event Management company. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: participating in onsite events, assisting vendors with site visits and clients;","working on social media marketing campaigns;","designing marketing materials;","analyzing brand image, market appeal and customer projections;","clerical and administrative work as required.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Doing Business in the European Union, Italy Focus

This course is intended for students interested in living, conducting business in or with individuals and businesses in the European Union, with a focus on the Italy. The course will address cross-cultural analysis of values and environmental constraints that shape business patterns and policies. We will examine the formal business structures and expected business practices of Europe in general and Italy in particular. We will also focus on the influence of history and cultural on business style. We will compare European business culture with other business cultures around the world including the United States and Asia.

General Chemistry I with Laboratory

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental theories of inorganic chemistry including the structure of atoms, electronic structure, bonding, reactions in aqueous media, gas behavior, intermolecular forces, and properties of solutions. The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.

LAB Session for General Chemistry I

Mandatory laboratory portion for CHM 135.The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.

Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory sequence to organic chemistry. The course provides a thorough understanding of the relationship between structures, properties, functionalities, and resulting reactions of organic compounds. The compounds covered include alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers, which are studied with regards to nomenclature, stereochemistry, stability, reaction mechanism, and structural analysis with spectroscopic methods. Accompanying three-hour weekly laboratory session provides hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon the theories and concepts learned, with training in relevant techniques, such as purification, synthesis, and analytical methods. This course is for science majors only. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.

LAB Session for Organic Chemistry I

Mandatory laboratory portion for CHM 221.The three-hour weekly laboratory sessions is hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon the theories and concepts learned, with training in relevant techniques, such as purification, synthesis, and analytical methods.

Science for Conservators II

Addresses the scientific concepts and the nature of materials concerning the conservation and restoration of works of art that are needed by practitioners. Topics include the physical and chemical properties of porous materials, synthetic materials, deterioration and consolidation, the nature of dirt, mechanical cleaning, liquids and solutions, organic solvents, cleaning with water, acidity and alkalinity, and cleaning through chemical reaction.

Advanced Pattern Development

This advanced course provides an opportunity to further develop patternmaking skills and utilize flat pattern and draping methods to produce original designs. The focus will be on bias drape and cut techniques and creating volume as applied to the semester project of two complete eveningwear outfits. Design development includes meeting specific technical requirements and research for a target customer and market category. Market category may change each semester depending on industry trends or instructors area of expertise.

Web Design

This course gives students the knowledge of the essential techniques of Web design. When starting to study this vast subject, students will follow a theoretical program structured by the step-by-step learning of the fundamental concepts of the world of Information and communication technology. Students will first acquire the fundamentals. Then they will use the most advanced techniques of digital editing to work on graphic design. The course is based on communication, and students will be stimulated to realize projects oriented to multimedia communication. Curiosity and an inclination for research are the essential characteristics of students interested in this course. Student must be familiar with the computer environment.

Web Animation

This course is geared toward the realization of digital animation for the Web. The program is mainly based on the use of the most popular techniques in this field. Students learn to use the best and most appropriate software on a methodological, theoretical, and practical basis. They realize their own ideas applying techniques learned through the intense use of software for graphic animation and languages used for programming interactive applications.

Perspective Drawing and Rendering

This course aims at giving students the ability to render and represent an interior space and a product design object. Students will learn drawing techniques and their professional applications, without the use of the computer, both freehand and with the aid of technical tools. The elements will be rendered in detail, including finishes, fabrics, furniture, and accessories of many different materials (wood, plastic, stones, etc.), using rendering tools such as Promarker or other professional markers, chalks, and watercolors. Issues of presentation and different methods of representation, including sketching, and technical 2D and 3D drawing, will be covered.

Retail Design

This course is structured to help students develop awareness of the importance of graphic arts in the design and execution of presentations and promotions for consumer merchandise. This course is intended to teach the students the different aspects of the professional approach to the design of shops and showrooms. Students will learn to design complete layouts and how to represent them through technical drawings. During the semester different projects about retail shops will be developed. Students will carry out personal research on existing projects similar to the one they have to design in class in order to explore retail design and to develop personal sensitivity in creating project atmosphere. In the projects students must consider functional and aesthetic aspects, trying to formulate a good solution and present it in an appropriate way.Note: Students are highly recommended to be equipped with personal laptops for design projects

Computer Rendering for Interior Design

In this class students will be taught how to create a digital image from a 3D model by means of a software program. Digital images are produced using a variety of computer technologies. Modeling, color theory, surface rendering, and light control are emphasized in relation to technical illustration, hardware characteristics, and software capabilities.

Food in Italian Culture (in Italian only)

In this advanced course, taught entirely in Italian, the study of Italian regional food permits students to expand their cultural and linguistic competencies. Italian regional cuisine is closely linked to local history, geography, lifestyle and culture. The courses leitmotifs are the cultural representation of food and the value historically given to food in Italian society, with reference to cinema, to literature. Readings will reveal the complex relationship between food, culture and society. Frequent oral and written reports will enable students to strengthen the four main linguistic skills. This course combines theoretical topics and practical cuisine-related activities in the classroom, and includes cultural research analyzing specific texts and the local context and its surrounding territory. Each class session includes a brief hands-on cooking session in which students prepare one popular Italian dish.

Italian for Business (in Italian only)

The course is designed for advanced students of Italian who wish to further their linguistic knowledge in the specific areas of business. It aims to provide students with the specific vocabulary and professional expressions that are most often used. It gives grounding in Italian business operations and environments, and recreates the types of communicative situations relevant to the business world, by which students will acquire transferable academic and professional skills. Besides including Italian grammar and vocabulary as used in business, it incorporates simulations of meetings, telephoning, negotiations, and presentations. Lessons will help students build confidence in using Italian in professional and social scenarios. Students will also learn the Italian formats for writing formal business letters, faxes, e-mails and the curriculum vitae.

Italian Women's Literature (in Italian only)

["This course will examine the representation of Italian women from the Middle Ages to the present through a selection of contemporary writings and movies by Italian female authors. Among the topics considered are the relationship between women and their cultural and social backgrounds;","women's historical, cultural, and artistic contributions;","continuities and breaks with the dominant male tradition. Through group discussion and written assignments, students will critically analyze the value of the female experience as portrayed in contemporary Italian literature and cinema."]

6-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2 and Intermediate 1

This course is directed towards the acquisition of new structures, such as the means to express personal opinions and give simple narrations of events in the past. At the end of the course students will be able to manage conversations on topics of personal interest or everyday life. This course offers the students the opportunity of a more intensive learning experience thanks to the daily study and practice of the language.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 2

This course focuses on the ability to understand extended speech, as well as complex and specialized texts. At the end of the course students will develop the ability to use language flexibly for social and professional purposes. They will be able to recognize a wide range of idioms and to apply register shifts.

The History of Jewels and their Symbolism

This course will follow the evolution of jewelry, from the primitive shell beads to the Renaissance then the Art Nouveau and finally the modern jewelry masters. Jewelry illustrates stylistic changes, different fashions, and how taste evolves over time. We will analyze pieces of jewelry and their symbolic meaning, making reference to paintings, architecture, and decorative artworks. Part of the course will deal with jewelry as signs of power, and with the most renowned jewelry designers, from Benvenuto Cellini to Tiffany. This course will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of artistic techniques, a technical vocabulary, and a research methodology. Visits to museums, exhibitions and workshops in Florence will be integral parts of the course.

Jewelry Design I

Students are introduced to the creative design of jewels, by using hand drawn sketches and manual techniques. The main drawing techniques, such as orthographic projections and 3D sketches, will be taught, followed by rendering techniques using various media, such as watercolors, gouache, markers, and pastels. Existing projects by professional designers, publications, and objects from selected museums and exhibitions will be analyzed and used as additional resources.

Wax Carving and Casting Techniques I

["This course will introduce students to fundamental casting processes and focus on familiarizing students with hard and soft wax working techniques. Students will complete their own simple jewelry set by finishing and assembling the metal cast elements as in regular jewelry production. The traditional casting techniques, such as cuttlebone and sand casting, will also be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on preparing a design;","after an in-depth study of wax working, a corresponding master model will be created. This model will be duplicated with a reusable flexible \u0093rubber mold.\u0094"]

Contemporary Jewelry Design

The course, designed specifically for the Professional Jewelry Design Certificate program, will introduce students to the contemporary world of jewelry. Through both lectures and a practical approach, students will learn when, where, and how contemporary jewelry design began and who the jewelry makers were. Ideas and concepts by contemporary artists will be discussed. There will be practical drawing exercises, naturally building on the previous Jewelry Design courses. Also, the students will visit practicing artists in their own studios.

Jewelry Making III

This is an advanced jewelry course for students taking the Professional Jewelry Certificate, and who already have a general background in jewelry making. Students will address various methods of developing articulated mechanisms, such as hinges, lost hinges, gimbals, and closing systems (clasps, box catches). In addition, students will learn methods for forging and forming metals together with metal surface treatments through the advanced use of bench and hand-tools. Students will also be shown samples of machine-made components available in the trade and understand their use. The students will begin developing their own jewelry creating style.

Modern Technology in Jewelry

This theoretical course, designed for the Professional Study Certificate program, addresses the characteristics of various materials and metals used in the field of jewelry design. The theory of mechanical techniques, such as the use of the turning machine and the pantograph, will be demonstrated. Furthermore, jewelry-related high-tech machines, such as laser welding, electro-forming and 3D-printing machines, will be presented by visiting several modern jewelry studios.

Wax Carving and Casting Techniques II

This course builds on the fundamental techniques learned in the first part. The aim of this course is to improve students creative and manual abilities to make jewelry in wax, to be cast in bronze and silver. Emphasis will be placed on the design of a cohesive jewelry collection. Various wax casting principles will be addressed, such as the vulcanized rubber mold and wax injection. Specific materials in industrial and dental casting will be explained, such as various kinds of silicones and deep draw foil.

Stone Setting II

This course builds on the Stone Setting techniques learned in Stone Setting I. It will offer an in-depth study and practice of grain setting and manual engraving, using traditional tools and working processes. After an introduction to single stone and row grain settings, the students will create their own pieces of jewelry, using small brilliant cut zirconia or other kinds of stones of students choice. Principles of channel setting and pave setting will be explained. Furthermore, the students will learn to engrave designs on metal with gravers and grain tools. These methods and principles will be shown through both demonstration and practical exercises.

Florence in the Literary Imagination

Florence and Tuscany have long occupied a special place in the Anglo-American literary imagination. Since the Renaissance, English literature and culture have been permeated by Italian influences and specifically Tuscan ones. This course will take the student through the early Tuscan influences on English literature to then focus, through the study of travel notes, journals, novel,s and poems, on the works of those authors, both British and American, who were inspired by the Tuscan and Florentine environment. The course will focus on a range of novelists and poets such as P.B. Shelley, George Eliot, Elizabeth Browning, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster, Thomas Harris, Magdalena Nabb, John Mortimer, Sarah Dunant, and Salman Rushdie. Particular attention will also be given to films drawn from novels with Florentine settings - such as Romola (George Eliot) and A Room with a View (E.M. Forster). The works of some Florentine writers such as Dante Alighieri and Vasco Pratolini will be included as well.

Acting Dante's Inferno

Following the great interest aroused by the novels of Dan Brown, this course offers students in Florence a special approach to the roots of the Italian culture and language, represented by the work of Dante Alighieri and, in particular, the Divine Comedy. Each lesson will be divided into two parts, the first hour will be devoted to preparatory exercises to develop awareness, theatre discipline and cohesion of the working group. The remaining hours will be devoted to the study of some passages (in Italian) of Dante's Inferno taken from cantos V, XXVI and XXXIII (Paolo and Francesca, Ulysses and Count Ugolino). At the end of the course, students will have learned, in a completely dynamic way, the strength, the semantic and evocative power of Dante's language. An evocative performance, in the form of living pictures of extracts from these cantos, will take place at the end of the course, in The Inferno Room inside the museum of the Franco Zeffirelli Foundation.

Intermediate Ballet

["This course is for students who already have a basic knowledge of the studies listed in the elementary level course. In the intermediate level, barre and center exercises are more detailed, complex, and intensive. This course also includes adagio exercises, turn outs, jumps and point study;","a special look at the Romantic period will be included."]

Psychology of Art and Human Creativity

Creativity is universal to our species and art, one of its most fascinating forms of expression, has even been described by many scholars as the spearhead of human development. All cultures have developed different forms of art: from the earliest human music and dance, through Paleolithic cave frescoes and Michelangelos astonishing sculptures, to sophisticated contemporary conceptual art. Yet, such human activities are still a psychological enigma. At the intersection of the arts, neuroscience, cognitive studies, psychoanalysis, and cultural and developmental psychology, the course will address human creativity, its underlying psychological processes and its expression through various art forms (painting, sculpture, architecture, performance art, dance, music, film, photography) in the context of cultural and cognitive evolution. It will provide strong theoretical and practical foundations, foster critical reflection, and promote personal development through lectures, experiential workshops, hands-on class activities, a meeting with a local artist, inspiring site visits, and a creative personal project that will lead to a collective exhibition.

Painting and Polychrome Wooden Sculpture Conservation I

This course introduces students to the preliminary approach to the preservation of paintings. It is designed as a primer for materials, techniques, and methods which gradually lead the students from understanding the work of art and its challenges, to actual exposure to and application of basic conservation techniques. Students will work both on the individually designed mockups, as well as on original paintings present in the lab at the time.

Drawing for Conservators

This course will present academic concepts and historical methods of drawing in order to develop the capacity to see accurately through proportion, methods of measurement, and composition. The full form, plus sections of anatomy such as hands, feet, and head, will all be studied. Some attention will be dedicated to the relationship of the figure to the surrounding space (figure/ground relationships), and other projects will suggest unusual points-of-view, such as a particularly foreshortened form, focus, and detail. The technique of tratteggio will be emphasized for shading in order to obtain the effect of chiaroscuro found in historical drawings. Evaluation will focus on specific drawing techniques found in the Renaissance with technical and stylistic considerations, and a portfolio of anatomical drawings and portions of copies done with tratteggio. Homework to improve manual dexterity and exploration of technical ability is required.

Theory of Conservation

This course will discuss the techniques used in paintings on panel and on canvas, fresco, and polychrome wooden sculpture in order for the student to become acquainted with the actual historical materials and the conservation methods used on each of these. Practical demonstrations using real materials (pigments, glue, resin, plaster, canvas) will also help illustrate theoretical dimensions of this topic. Classes will also consider the ethics and issues encountered throughout the field of restoration and its history. These concepts will also be discussed during museum visits in Florence and will be used in class for discussion. Examination and discussion of a work of art are important elements before, during, and after every intervention. Lectures will examine various fresco techniques found throughout art history and specific examples of fresco restoration applied to these works. We will visit Santa Croce and the Brancacci Chapel to illustrate the technique and the restoration used on specific works. The restoration of paintings, both on panel and canvas, will be discussed using visual images and, most importantly, museum visits, for a better understanding of techniques. For example a visit to the Bargello will highlight the collection of polychrome wooden sculpture and the various restoration techniques found on this medium. The course will conclude with the students own opinions on restoration as a profession and will examine the various responsibilities that an art conservator encounters when working with art historys most precious documentation.

Historical Painting Lab II

Historical painting techniques learned in the first course will be used to make exact replicas of a chosen era (preferably of a work of art found in Florence). Students' works will be judged on accuracy of technique, drawing, and color. This full reproduction will demonstrate the student's manual dexterity and eye for color, as well as sensitivity of observation toward historical works of art. The finished replica will be an important asset for the students' portfolio if they are to continue their educational career in conservation.

Advanced Fresco Painting and Restoration

Students will have the opportunity to work with original works of art under the instructor's supervision. A thesis paper regarding specific techniques or issues in fresco conservation will be outlined, researched and written independently. Lab records and photographic documentation will be made for every technique used onsite.

Advanced Painting and Polychrome Wooden Sculpture Conservation

In this third course in the track sequence, intended for advanced students in painting conservation, students will acquire further confidence in the various phases of painting conservation. In this course it will be the student, under the instructor's supervision, who proposes the type of conservation and restoration treatments needed as well as the techniques and materials to be used. Accurate and complete proposals, in depth documentation and lab records, relevant research, and advanced practice on the mock ups will be evaluated.

Ceramics and Well-being

This course is suitable for students who do not have any experience with clay or have only basic knowledge of hand-building and wheel-throwing with clay. Students will be instructed in a wide range of concepts and practices. They will gain an outlet for creative expression, and, also, improve their well-being. The tactile experiences involved in the process, the focus on the creative process, the reconnection of the body to the earth, will be among the crucial tools of this course. Special attention will be given to the correct, and healthy, positions for the spine, hands, fingers, and wrist. Students will receive technical information about clay and firing, and at the end of the course, they will be able to decorate their objects with slips and glazes.

Travel Writing

Throughout history, Italy has inspired writers and poets to wax lyrical as few other countries have done. Countless English-language novels, stories, and poems have woven a bel paese of words around the Italian experience. This course provides an opportunity for students to focus first-hand on the art and craft of travel writing, with particular emphasis on cities in Italy, but also with excursions into other worlds -- real or imaginary. Through reading, writing, and visits in and around the city center, students will explore places of historic, artistic, cultural, and personal interest. They will learn "by example" from a selection of great travel literature about the world in general, and about Italy in particular. And they will learn "by doing," via a series of guided exercises and assignments that explore the distinctive qualities of travel writing its combination of history, culture, information, rumination, musings, and memory and the ways in which this particular art can lead to a deeper understanding of their own experiences and cultural identity.

Archaeology Workshop

This course will introduce students to archaeology, and provide them with hands-on work on 2500-year-old archaeological artefacts in LdM's Archaeology Lab. These artefacts have recently been unearthed at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva. The necropolis, near Tuscania, central Italy, is the site of a joint excavation project currently conducted by CAMNES and LdM. Students will learn what happens to the finds once they leave their recovery contexts and arrive at the LdM's Archaeology Lab. in Florence. Here, under the guidance of the instructors, students will be involved in the basic steps of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage of the finds. Students will also have the opportunity to sign up for the Tuscania Summer Field School, which operates directly at one of the archaeological sites.

Ancient Rome

["This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the \"Fall of Rome\" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history;","the political organization of the Roman state;","the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere;","Roman religion and the spread of Christianity;","the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society;","the historiographical \"myth of Rome.\" In order to stimulate students\u0092 critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources."]

Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence

This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.

Greek and Roman Mythology

Greek and Roman gods and heroes, and their stories, have always been a fundamental subject of Western Art and literature, especially since they were rediscovered by Renaissance humanism. The course will examine the major deities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales. The post-classical afterlife of these myths will also be addressed. Visits to museums, monuments and/or sites will reinforce classroom learning. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.

Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine

["Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place also within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Following the guidelines of experimental archaeology students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities;","everyday eating habits and etiquette;","rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. The key of the analysis is the Food Sign, a specially-developed tool with two inseparable sides: anthropological meaning and gastronomy. This instrument helps to show that in Antiquity any given dish wasn\u0092t a mere result of a recipe to prepare food in a particular way as part of a meal, but was inevitably linked to sacral and social meanings. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to the modern cuisine (when a particular tradition has continued) and interests."]

The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature

The course focuses on ancient epic literature through the analysis and comparison of some of the oldest and greatest works of Western civilization. Through the reading of the most significant chapters of the Iliad and the Odyssey, students will get in contact with the supernatural world and the mighty heroes described by Homer in 8th century BCE. These stories, considered the Bible of classical civilization, show how Greeks used myth to express archetypal values, which became immortal for successive generations and civilizations. Myths are analyzed not only as amazing stories but also as expression of ancient cultural traditions, and as primary forms of communication and instruction. The influence of Greek myths on Roman legends will then be observed through the reading of some passages of the Aeneid, the national poem of Rome written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE.

Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk

How are anthropology and fashion related? How can this social science help us in analyzing both Western fashion and global fashion trends today? How can artifacts become fashion? What is the relationship between fashion and art? How is beauty constructed in fashion and visual culture? And how are gender and the body represented? Such questions, of more than specialized interest, have been raised since fashion started to be studied in academia in the 1980s. This course considers the particular contribution of anthropology to the study of fashion as an academic discipline and hence to understanding fashion as a significant cultural expression. We will study how meanings are constructed in fashion and visual culture, using the cross-cultural and transnational framework provided by anthropological research. We will also consider how fashion interacts with material culture through the production and consumption of fashion items, making fashion an interesting field of inquiry in the context of the anthropology of things.

Food and Culture

If you are what you eat, just why do you eat the way you do? This course considers the relationships between the multiple meanings of food and the acts of preparing and eating food, and further explores food and personal and social identity. Students will examine why different people make different food choices in their daily lives, why individuals from certain social classes will avoid or appreciate particular foods, and, in general, how food serves as a factor in self-definition. Because a person's attitude toward food can reveal not just personal identity traits, but a whole food ideology, this course will also analyze the role of food in the construction of ethnic identity, in the display of religious beliefs and in the negotiation of gender roles. Students learn how cultures and values are transmitted and preserved through food. Through personal essays and interdisciplinary secondary literature students will be guided to analyze the complex and fascinating relationships between people and food, helping them to understand how cultures (including their own) ultimately determine all human food choices.

The Built Environment of Florence

This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture and open spaces. The construction of the city up to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from the architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main interest will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents and the powerful families that ruled and determined different architectural choices.

Aesthetics of Design: Theory and Practice

["This course applies the methods and concepts of aesthetics (the investigation of what makes something a work of art) to the field of design (including product design, interior design, architecture, and graphic design). Students investigate issues relating to the creation, value, and experience of design, and they analyze and attempt to resolve problems relating to design as a form of art. One part of the course concentrates on meanings of formalism and expressionism;","another part explores issues that are involved in the evaluation of design such as cultural, social, and political environments. Specific attention is given to Italian Design, from its Renaissance heritage to the decades that made it internationally famous (1960-80s). Comparisons are made with Modern and Contemporary International Design. Students are encouraged to make the most of the visual and cultural experience offered by the city and by the international environment of the institute."]

Public Space Design

["The course will investigate the key role of public space in contemporary cities. Special attention will be placed on the capability of places to attract people and emotional scenarios linked to their reactions. Examples of recent works from world-renowned architects, landscape architects, and artists will provide the student with different design methods. A specific site in Florence or elsewhere in its surroundings will represent the core of the project;","students will be asked to start off with a conceptual idea and gradually give shape to it up to the final presentation through drawings, models, video, etc. The course will mainly be carried out in class although outdoor guided surveys will also take place."]

Contemporary Architecture

This course examines major developments in architecture, interior design and planning from 1960 to the present. Special focus is given to developments in the last two decades. The survey includes consideration of sociocultural developments, as well as debates in aesthetics and theory, such as the decline of Modernism. Key architects and studios are examined. The perspective is global, but with an emphasis on European and, especially, Italian

Sustainable Architecture

["Sustainability is a characteristic of a process or condition that can be maintained at a certain level indefinitely. Our current lifestyle is not sustainable because we base our energy requirements on burning fossil fuels that are running out, causing global warming and pollution. The key aim of the sustainable architecture approach is to help resolve the present energy crisis by designing self-sufficient buildings. The two basic principles applied are: reduction of energy needs and the use of renewable forms of energy (solar, wind, geothermic, hydroelectric or biomass). Other topics touched upon in the course are: the use of local building materials;","the study of local traditional passive strategies such as how to create a pleasant home despite climate conditions and encouraging a sustainable lifestyle such as cohabitation-housing."]

Architecture in its Environment

The goal of this course is to learn a method to understand the relationship between architecture and the urban context and to be able to design a relevant architectural project. Emphasis is on the vertical and horizontal dimensions of cities and towns, and on the analysis of shapes and uses of the urban space. The main course project relates to a specific urban situation. The process of the project starts with extensive onsite case study analysis of a site (with outdoor walking and sketching), of its historical context and urban surroundings. In class students will develop, examine, and discuss the main elements, themes, and issues of the project. The completed project includes sketches, site plans, architectural plans, elevations, and sections, as well as an oral presentation delivered in class.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

Architecture Studio: Special Topics

This course focuses on advanced design projects, which are based largely on a theme of local or national importance. It is usually concerned with the comprehensive analysis and design of modern medium/large scale complexes and public buildings such as museums, airports, railway stations, waterfronts, or emergency constructions. The course is organized to equip students with the skill sets to create a comprehensive design and implement architectural projects of notable complexity and scale.

History of Architecture

This course surveys the major periods and key monuments in the history of architecture of the Western world from antiquity to the present. We will focus on the historical periods from classical antiquity through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, to the Modern Age, and on contemporary developments. We will examine representative monuments and architects from ancient Greece (the Parthenon in Athens) to the present day. The architects pursuit of beauty, and the evolving concept of beauty, are the leitmotives of architecture development in masters such as Iktinos, Brunelleschi, Borromini, and Le Corbusier. The course will address different areas in this field: typologies, materials and construction technology, theory, urbanism, and cultural context. The course will also explore the great variety of architectural traditions, orders, styles, and movements. By experiencing actual buildings of various periods in the urban context, students will learn firsthand how to critically analyze a work of architecture.

Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.

Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation, and the desire to further investigate this field.

The World of Museums: Museology

The aim of this course is to provide an integrated approach to museum theory and practice. It will consider definitions and classifications of the term 'museum', and the centuries-long history of art collecting. We will examine the various forms and meanings of gathering beautiful, precious, and curious objects in various places, and the endeavor of assembling collections for world-famous museums, such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. We will analyze the concept of cultural heritage, considering its increasing value for society, as well as the legal and ethical issues involved. The course will also consider topics as research, methods of documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the importance of education and learning in museums, preventive and remedial conservation of collections, environmental monitoring and control, safety plans, and storage systems. We will focus on Italian and specifically Florentine museums, which students will be invited to analyze according to the most recent museological and museographical theories and practices.

Palaces of Florence

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.

Lost Symbolism: Secret Codes in Western Art

The course focuses on selected philosophical themes and artworks in Western art between 1300 and 1800, observed and analyzed through the combined tools of astrology, alchemy, geometry, and numerology. Art has served various functional and aesthetic purposes in different cultures and periods. During the Middle Ages, and later, art has embodied a symbolic language, mysterious to the majority, but highly significant to the minority able to read or decode it. For example, what we may call the secret messages of certain paintings and sculptures of past centuries can be interpreted in terms of astrology. We will employ the tools of iconography, a specific field of art history that studies subject matter, symbolism, and signification in works of art. Through this approach, students will examine the fascinating and complex range of meanings that artworks were intended to transmit and that can still be uncovered.

Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)

["Does a significant thread link a Vespa scooter, Vittorio De Sica's Neo-Realist movies, Gucci\u0092s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti\u0092s \u0093Superleggera\u0094 chair, Giuseppe Cavalli photographs of \u0093trulli\u0094 buildings, and Alberto Burri\u0092s \u0093Catrame\u0094 canvases? Our working hypothesis is that it is a common visual culture, with elements of national identity, plus uniquely Italian interconnections between fields and disciplines in the creative and productive processes. Students will test this claim by applying a communications-based approach to the whole of Italian visual culture of the period following World War II. We will view works of contemporary art and design as communicators and carriers of cultural messages. This blurs the sometimes artificial distinction between visual arts (sculpture, painting, conceptual art, film, photography) and design (urban planning, architecture;","interior, furniture, and industrial design, graphics, and fashion). Students explore selected case studies in which a designer, film director, or artist may have influenced each other or actually interacted. Theory takes a back seat to process and context, but is not ignored. Students learn to \u0093read\u0094 a particularly rich, diverse, and complex visual culture \u0096 often in the vanguard and the originator of global \u0093icons.\u0094 Students also learn concrete ways to innovate by adopting an interdisciplinary approach."]

Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence

This course examines the social, economical, political, and artistic life of Florence and its close relationship to the fortunes (and misfortunes) of a group of notable Florentine families, such as the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti, through the analysis of art works and objects, including wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, luxury clothing, and coats of arms. A study of these families, their history, their public and private lives, will help illustrate and uncover many significant characteristics of the city, not only in the past, but also today, as some of these families are still active in the social, political, and economic life of Florence.

International Art Business

The course is designed to introduce students to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote the art business, and give them an understanding of the current art market and auction house environment. Students will be given the opportunity to meet specialists in order to develop the ability to identify and analyze works of art, learn how to access marketing opportunities, and devise appropriate strategies. The roles of the art dealer and the art administrator will be analyzed in depth, together with the main principles of the international laws that govern this particular field.

Museum and Gallery Internship

["This internship entails individual work experience in a museum, gallery or church in the Florentine area, supervised by a faculty member and the cooperating museum, or Florentine curia staff. The internship provides students with practical experience, especially in the field of cultural mediation and museum education, through direct observation of the various activities developed at the hosting museums and churches, individual study and direct participation in guided tours at museums and churches, collections management in art galleries. Through this experience students have the opportunity to learn and apply professional skills, while directly interacting with institutional staff and the visitors. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. Please note that the Museum and Gallery internship requires interns to fulfill part of their internship hours on Saturdays.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Admission is also contingent upon the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test."]

Contemporary Art

["The aim of this course is to give students a thorough and comprehensive grounding in the conceptual and stylistic trends governing the art of the late 20th century. This period deals specifically with the transition from Greenbergian High Modernism, through the dematerialization of the art object in the 1970's, to the postmodern and deconstructive theories of the 1980's and 90's. The course is divided into two main sections: Section One (1950-1980): Abstract Expressionism and Informal Art \u0096 Conceptual Art (Europe and USA);","Section Two (1980-1990's): Postmodernism -- Current Trends (Europe and USA). The course will give particular attention to the development of Italian art from the 1950s to the present. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical and critical discourses relating to Modernism and Postmodernism."]

Foundations of Management

This is a foundational level management theory course designed to teach students with no background in business management the core concepts and terminology needed to be successful in subsequent management courses. It emphasizes the functions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. In each session the class explores some aspects of management in theoretical terms and then focuses on application of the theory to the practical problems managers face in their work.

Principles of Marketing

Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 Ps, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Marketing

The importance of marketing in management science The variety of fundamental concepts in marketing Marketing vocabulary to help with analysis of marketing phenomenon Oral presentation skills and teamwork

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Finance

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.

Event Planning

This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.

Wine Business

This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.

Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace

People from more than one culture increasingly have to work together, work side by side, or collaborate on international projects, both at home and abroad. How easy is it to step outside our own cultural expectations? This is an intercultural communications course aimed specifically at understanding intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both theoretical and practical standpoints. On a practical level, this course will involve the students' active participation in role play exercises and observations, and will help them predict and manage intercultural misunderstandings both in the workplace and in more informal social settings. Business practices in different countries, in particular Italy and the USA, and individual case studies will be assessed and discussed according to these frameworks.

Sociology of Consumerism

["This course will focus on the rise and development of consumer cultures. The aim is to study and to apply interdisciplinary theoretical approaches to the study of consumer society now and in the past. The course will explore key substantive themes in the history and sociology of consumption, including the following: 1) an overview of developments in the different theories of consumer culture;","2) the rise of commercial society, the relationship between freedom of choice and the power of commercial systems, models of consumer psychology and behavior, the nature of selves and identities in a post-traditional world, prosperity and progress;","3) the way class, gender, ethnicity, and age affect the nature of our participation in consumer culture;","4) the evolution of capitalism to the present day, as well as the history of commodities in a number of different settings (advertising, food and drink, fashion and clothes);","5) the social, cultural, and economic context of specific consumer groups, as well as case studies of specific commodities."]

Global Business and Society

This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances, and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.

Organizational Behavior

This course is about understanding how people and groups in organizations behave, react, and interpret events. It also describes the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping behavior, and explains how organizations really work. Drawing from fields including management, anthropology, sociology, and psychology, Organizational Behavior provides a foundation for the effective management of people in organizations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organizational Behavior

This course will focus on the challenges faced by individuals in international corporations with respect to Interpersonal relationships, communication, diversity, individual decision making, motivating self and workforce, group behavior and leadership, corporate culture, and change and stress management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the marketing decisions within an organization, from a global perspective. Students will be exposed to the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing management in a global business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course provides an introduction to international marketing. Topics include: analytical techniques used in international market research","determining prices and distribution channels in an international context","and marketing across linguistic and cultural borders.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course provides a general introduction to international marketing dealing with topics such as: making business in a global economy, strategies in export trade, international logistics, the impact of the new technologies in the world trade, the role of the media and of advertising in a consumer oriented society, different approaches for different targets, etc.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course will provide an understanding of the elements that makes up the international environment, examining the development of an international marketing strategy and providing practical information on how to expand into international markets.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

The main purpose of this course is to enable students to apply the specifics of international marketing to real situations in the business environment

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course will strengthen the concepts already acquired in international marketing by focusing on the all new marketing strategies as well as the differences between international marketing and domestic marketing.The main focus will be on ethnic marketing, viral marketing, and yield management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This module will examine the global aspects of marketing and students will learn to apply the basic concepts, practices and principles of marketing in an international context. The course will cover: the international marketing environment; the specificities of international marketing: increased complexity of the environment (economy, history and geography, cultures, politics, legal environment); the international marketing triad: segmenting, targeting and positioning in an international context; global competitive analysis and strategy; international market selection; international market entry strategies and expansion; understanding licensing, investment, and strategic alliances; global branding decisions; the 4 Ps in an international context, international product decisions, international pricing, international distribution, global communication strategies; implementing an international marketing plan and control.

NOTE: This course is offered as part of the fall CIB certificate program.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

International Marketing

THIS COURSE IS OFFERED DURING THE SECOND TWO WEEKS

In this course, students will have the opportunity to:

  • Acquire analytical, strategic and promotional tools to optimize marketing performance.
  • Discover how global companies are using cultures.
  • Develop sales and negotiation skills through an interactive sales game.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Integrated Marketing Communication

Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions. Students will research and evaluate a companys marketing and promotional situation and use this information in developing effective communication strategies and programs.

Crowdfunding

The purpose of the course is to provide students with a sound holistic view of crowdfunding: what it is, what its purpose is, how to take advantage of it or utilize it for projects or businesses, the essential key tips to plan, structure and run a successful campaign, and how to interact and make a campaign even more successful. The course will explain the crowdfunding process and the types of crowdfunding available, and it will focus on examining how the crowdfunding movement has changed the way in which startups and entrepreneurs can get their work to the public.Students will learn the characteristics of successful versus unsuccessful crowdfunding campaigns, and will also be able to analyze which crowdfunding platforms suit specific projects. Students will also examine the role of culture and context, by observing how and why different countries respond and participate in different ways in the crowdfunding phenomenon. At the end of the course, students will feel comfortable and confident with the concept of crowdfunding and will possess the necessary know how to develop an effective crowdfunding campaign strategy.

Luxury Brand Management

This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.

Social Media Marketing Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Social Media Marketing. The intern is monitored by both the on-site supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and on site duties may vary. The placement is with the LdM Social Media Office or with advertising or communication agencies. Interns develop and carry out various activities, which may include, but are not limited to: market research based on social media;","marketing strategy focused on promotional strategy and advertisement strategy;","developing and managing photo archives, the LdM alumni network \u0096 which establishes online communication tools for alumni;","managing the online database. \u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, and samples of writing and marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project, photos). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an on-site interview during the first week of the term."]

Global Financial Markets

This course offers a broad introduction to global financial system, the dynamics of the main financial markets (U.S., Europe, and Asia), the nature and the goals of the key financial institutions and the crucial role played by central banks and regulatory agencies. An important component of the course is the global economic and financial crisis, and the new global financial architecture it produced. We will review crisis causes and consequences, while also evaluating the contributions of the numerous government intervention schemes.

Operations Management

This course focuses on topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. These include quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Public Speaking and Presentation Skills

This course provides an introduction to public speaking in group and whole-class situations. It will help students develop their delivery skills as well as the content of their presentations, including the development and organization of ideas and the use of research materials. Students will analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral forms, and will be required to develop working outlines for their own presentations. Classes will also involve voice and body language exercises and will teach strategies for overcoming performance anxiety.

New Media: Communication in the Digital Age

What do we really mean when we use the term "mass media" today? Is it really the same thing we meant twenty years ago, when television was still the main tool for mass information? The digital age has introduced new communication devices (laptops, digital cameras, smart phones, iPods, iPads) and new virtual places (blogs, chat rooms, social networks, online shops, peer-to-peer platforms), shaped around our wants, though often perceived/imposed on as "needs." Following a two-step program, the student will learn about the causes and effects of the digital revolution: first analyzing features and functions of all main digital communication devices (and places), then discussing their influence on us as citizens, artists, professionals, individuals.

Advertising Principles

["Advertising is not a simple or random combination of images in an ad. The task of advertising is to build a positive perception of the product in the consumer's mind. Every commercial, every ad in magazines, every TV advertisement is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular audience. This course will deal with contemporary advertising and also with the media and graphic modes used to convey it. Topics include the philosophy of advertising and its role in society;","how advertising relates to life, society and economy;","current trends in advertising as viewed from creative, marketing and media standpoints;","the stereotypes that advertising instills in us and the reaction of our society to these suggestions;","how advertising is made, created, and projected."]

Body Language and Communication Techniques

This course enables students to understand and manage body language, and generally increase their relational and communicative capacities, preparing them to enter the working world and achieve greater professional and social success. Students develop expertise relating to verbal and non-verbal communication. Training involves working individually and in groups, and addresses motivation as well as the control of body language. The learning by doing methodology engages students in a practical and proactive way through exercises and improvisation, which help them evaluate their individual attitudes and capacities. A blend of participative and creative activities is employed, including theater techniques for non-verbal communication, improvisations, team building, self-presentations, body language exercises, and movement exercises. The course guides each student in the discovery of personal strengths and the activation of a personal plan to develop their expectations and capacities.

Communications Research Methods

This course introduces students to the practice of communications research in academic and applied settings. The emphasis will be on how to identify, evaluate, and apply research findings to communication needs. It grounds students in fundamentals of research design and strategy, data gathering, and analysis for a variety of qualitative and quantitative communications research methodologies.

Media Ethics

The rules of communication in todays world are quite complex. Crucial issues and problems are touched upon at such a fast pace, that we may not have time to consider all their ethical implications. This course will explore the ethical dimensions of the world of communication. Journalists, editors, professionals in advertising and public relations are called upon to weigh potential benefits and harm when by covering stories they reveal facts that would not have surfaced, and when they respect conflicting loyalties. They also find themselves confronted by situations in which they must choose between actions that seem simultaneously right and wrong. Everyone encounters ethical dilemmas when dealing with wartime and peacetime propaganda, the Western worlds information systems, the PR industry, digital convergence and new frontiers for mass communication. The media inevitably shape our image of society whether we are professionals, consumers, or global citizens.

Public Relations

We will study the definitions, functions, and evolution of public relations, including the application of PR theory and ways to plan a PR campaign (planning process, issue analysis, research methods and strategies). The different fields in which public relations practitioners operate will be presented through case studies and exercises: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. Finally, future perspectives and new technological opportunities will be taken into account, trying to define new boundaries for a discipline too often underrated or misunderstood.

War and Media

["This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which the media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet;","the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera;","the role of still and moving images;","the importance of journalists and journalistic conventions;","the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements;","the representation of war in movies and artists\u0092 works;","the media gap between \"North\" and \"South\";","the emergence of \"non-Western\" media;","and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war."]

Broadcasting: Italian Culture and Television

This course will examine today's main trends, strategies, and broadcast in Italian television. We will begin by examining the first steps of commercial television broadcasting at the radio, its rapid development, and how it created distinctive genres in Italy.Italian state and private television are analyzed and compared. The course will also consider different theoretical approaches to the impact that television has on other media. We will focus also on the deep connections between Italian television and Italian culture.

Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Intercultural Communication

This course introduces key concepts and models of international communication. The objective of the course is to master the main communication tools and concepts in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Global Media Strategies

This course will focus on using traditional and new media to develop successful media strategies for all stages of the customer relationship cycle. Students explore media usage habitswhat media consumers are using and how they use it to provide guidance on the best ways to reach and dialogue with new and existing customers. Students learn techniques for developing, measuring and improving multi-touch communications strategies for acquiring new customers, retaining existing customers, encouraging repeat purchases and building long-term, profitable relationships.

Communications Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Communications. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is with a Communications agency. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: writing new articles;","updating and adapting preexisting articles for different media formats;","database entry;","contributing to blogs, social media, Web sites;","developing new projects. \u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Communications / Event Planning Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Communication and Event Planning. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at an Event Management company. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: conceptualizing and organizing commercial and non-profit events independently or as part of a team, writing event proposals, assisting in logistics, communication, marketing and fundraising;","working on social media campaigns, assisting in clerical and administrative tasks.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Global Brand Management

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study into the major components involved in developing successful global brands. In this course, students will develop and apply research-based strategic planning to the development of new or existing global brands. This process involves examining the principles of consumer and shopper behavior and exploring the impact of current consumer and global trends on new and existing brands. Students will use primary and secondary consumer research to further develop a new or existing global brand. To conclude the class, students will develop integrated communications campaigns designed to launch the brand, acquire customers and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.

Consumer Insights and Strategic Development

Consumer behavior is defined as the behavior that consumers, groups or organizations display in searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services that they expect will satisfy their needs. Consumer Insights teach students the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives (e.g., brands, products, and retailers), and how consumers are influenced by their environment (e.g., culture, family, peers, media). In this course, students will learn to uncover and utilize relevant global and regional consumer insights to develop effective integrated marketing communication strategies. Blending the theory and practice of consumer behavior within a global context, students will delve beyond the consumers functional needs to understand the deeper needs, wants and motivations that drive consumer behavior. They will also understand that consumer behavior differs depending on the consumers cultural and socio-economic background.

Introduction to Multicultural Education

["Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, theories and strategies that constitute the five major dimensions of multicultural education as defined by James A. Banks: equity pedagogy;","content integration;","knowledge construction process;","prejudice reduction;","empowerment in school culture and social structure. We will explore these dimensions within the context of the host culture of Italy and analyze these forms of knowledge in terms of cultural differences, inclusions, and exclusions. Students will reflect on and describe how multicultural education connects with their experiences in the communities and in the schools in Italy. Because prior knowledge and cultural experiences shape our beliefs and values, students need to critically analyze their notions of race, culture, and ethnicity. Through immersion and first-hand experiences we will explore and inquire into how culture and different cultural contexts influence one's beliefs and behavior."]

Introduction to Environmental Issues

Introduction to ecological concepts that provide a foundation for understanding present and future critical environmental issues such as population growth, natural resource management, biodiversity and global changes, wilderness, food production, and changing habitats. Emphasis is placed on situating global environmental issues within an earth-systems science framework, including climate change, pollution, land and coastal degradation, water resources, and habitat loss.

Sustainable Food

This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.

Introduction to the Fashion Industry

This core introductory course provides students with an overview of the fashion industry from research and design to the marketing of the finished product. Potential career opportunities within the field are examined and the course briefly looks at the historical origins of fashion and the Made in Italy phenomenon of Italian-made products. An overview of the global textile industry and leather market is also included. Students will acquire knowledge of basic industry terms and the process of apparel production from concept to the consumer.

Construction Techniques

This course is the first in a series of technical studio courses in fashion design. In the production lab, students will learn to use different equipment, the process of assembling a garment and execute construction methods used in the apparel industry. A variety of sewing techniques from stitches and seam treatments to the application of trim and garment components will be included while completing samples in muslin. A sample book is developed of industry construction techniques as a reference guide. At the end of the course each student will produce a garment integrating the skills learned.

Fashion Illustration I

This course for beginning students explores the world of fashion illustration. Students will learn how to draw a fashion figure, render fabrics and designs using a variety of media such as markers, pencils, and collage. Special attention will be given to coloring and shading. During the semester there will be a site visit to the Costume Gallery at the Pitti Palace, a museum of worldwide importance. Students will learn to illustrate designs and technical flat drawings. In addition, they will research target markets, create a collection, and present a conceptual moodboard.

Textile Science

This core class teaches the fundamentals of textile and fabric science bringing awareness of the variety of materials used in fashion and their applications. Students will receive a comprehensive overview of the textile industry with special attention given to the dyeing, printing and finishing of textiles. Students will develop a basic knowledge of textile terminology, including fibers and their origin, structure, properties, and characteristics. The course will cover yarns, construction, weaves and knit structures and enable students to make appropriate fabric selections for various apparel and home furnishings products, categories, and markets.

Fashion Marketing

This course explores fashion marketing and merchandising. It focuses primarily on brands, and marketing strategies for product development, advertising, promotion, and retailing. The course analyzes the thinking behind the strategies for fashion products, paying special attention to the emotional aspects of fashion communication. Students will examine current business practices and new and emerging trends and issues that impact the fast-moving environment of the fashion and textile industry. The marketing aspects involved with the globalization of the industry, trade shows, and key events are included. Specialized topics consist of the importance of the European fashion system, with a comparison with some American brands and strategies. Case studies will provide a vision of how companies in todays environment are evolving marketing plans to meet the new consumers demand, in terms of product design, distribution, and communication.

Fashion Consumer Behavior

This course examines the decision-making process of the customer through fashion concepts, theories, cultural influences, demographics, psychographics, and consumer dynamics. Students learn the analysis of perceptions, communication, and ethics to determine how a customer can turn into a consumer by understanding behavior and reactions to the impact of purchasing. Students analyze research data and the application in assessing market strategy. The theory of motivation and the reasons underlying the wearing of clothes are also studied.

Visual Merchandising

This course explores contemporary visual merchandising strategies. It focuses primarily on understanding visual merchandising techniques, concepts and processes, and recognizes how visual merchandising efforts support retailing trends and sales success in retail store spaces. The course analyzes the philosophy behind the creative process and identifies a variety of resources for idea development such as marketplace dynamics and consumer trends. The aim of this course is to prepare students in the process of designing, planning, and organizing visual displays and in-store designs that effectively communicate brand identity. Through lectures students will learn theory and techniques for visual displays. Students will apply this knowledge to the design and creation of model window display and/or in-store designs. This course provides a vision of how retailers in todays environment are adapting visual merchandising and communication strategies to meet consumers' demands.

Retail Management

This course focuses on understanding the retail environment from a historical perspective, and on its new or emerging developments. In-depth knowledge of retail strategies, operations, organizational structure and formats, including managerial ethics, will help students become successful retailers. They will be introduced to multi-channel and international retailing, as well as to supply chain management. Students will also learn the importance of human resources management and strategic planning.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 1.25   Contact Hours: 3.5

Knitwear I

This course is designed to familiarize students with the fashion knitwear industry and is aimed at student interested in learning about the whole process, from yarn characteristics and structures, to knitting techniques, finally to finished hand-knitted garments. Students will master basic knit stitches and construction techniques, and will be able to create individual designs, from the phase of the yarn selection to the finished garment. The course has drawing and experimental components, and includes machine-knitting demonstrations. At the end of the course students will be able to assemble the research process into a knitwear portfolio.

Accessory Design

Accessory design has increasingly gained importance in the global fashion industry. While often contemporary fashion designers have expanded their brand identity by developing accessories lines, the heritage of many European fashion luxury brands originated in accessory design. The course includes the design and technical skills necessary in the creation of accessory products. Particular attention is given to trend forecasting, sketching, and technical drawings. Using CAD technology, students design a small range of accessories and develop a collection portfolio focused on handbags, millinery, scarves, and more. Site visits are included.

History of Costume

Students explore the historical styles of Western dress and adornment through the ages from the ancient Egyptian period to the 20th century. Costume is viewed within the context of the period related to major historical developments, technology, production, and the economy. Further discussions center on the cultural and religious influences, societal values, political climate and specific individuals seen to influence the fashions of each time period.

Fashion Buying Concepts

Retail and the fashion business are stimulating, fascinating, and in a process of continual change. Understanding the dynamics and significance of retail buying concepts will be critical to the success of anyone interested in buying, selling or communicating consumer fashion products and services. Students will study fundamentals of retail buying including planning, assorting, pricing and purchasing fashion inventories. The effect of different retail formats on purchasing, identification and evaluation of resources and ethical issues in sourcing are included. With global fashion industry constantly undergoing change, an important part of this class involves understanding current events and the effect on retail buying. The course is targeted towards students who are looking for careers in fashion buying, merchandising, marketing and should already have taken classes towards these majors. The ability to work in teams and to communicate is strongly emphasized.

History of Italian Fashion

["This course introduces students to the main historical styles, concepts, and definitions of fashion and fashion design throughout the history of Italian fashion, from its beginning to the present time. Italian fashion will be studied in context, using historical documents and other materials to illustrate relevant time periods, styles, or techniques. We will focus on the lives and careers of some of the most significant Italian designers, including Schiaparelli, Ferragamo, Fontana, Capucci, Valentino, Pucci, Armani, Versace, Dolce &","Gabbana, Prada, Gucci, and Cavalli. We will also give special emphasis on the rise of Italian fashion in Florence in the \u009250."]

Fashion Communication

["In this course students analyze how to convey fashion brand identity and positioning through both traditional and digital media channels. Fashion communication regards every facet of information relating to fashion, in all available media: journalism, magazines, cinema, visual arts, social media, photography, blogging and more. The course covers trends and solutions to improve brand value communication. Students learn to analyze Web marketing and communication strategies. Skills developed include fashion writing, fashion show reviews, analysis of advertising campaigns;","the ability to find and use social media and marketing research data;","strategies that enable brand value to be improved and conveyed to an expanding global consumer base."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 6   Course Level: Lower Division  

Product Development

In this advanced course students learn the methods used to plan, implement, and manage the development of apparel products. Target market description and analysis, trend forecasting, garment styling, materials selection, sourcing, and production are all part of the product development and apparel manufacturing process that are presented in this course. Additional topics focus on private label techniques, cost and quality control in the development from concept to finished product.

Trend Forecasting

["This course is designed to promote research and analytical skills by teaching the key methods to forecast fashion trends by exploring processes and methods used to define short and long term industry forecasts. Students acquire key techniques in the research and analysis of emerging trends. They learn the difference between macro and close-to-season trends, and why trend forecasting is primary to the fashion industry. The course examines the forecasting framework and the analysis of trend and lifestyle information, marketplace dynamics, and consumer profile. The increasing value trend forecasting provided can influence future businesses and affect diverse industries;","from automotive and apparel to interiors and household products. \u000bNote: Knowledge of Adobe Illustrator\/Photoshop is recommended."]

Fashion Entrepreneurship

This advanced course provides students an opportunity to plan a virtual company from concept to creation. The course entails writing a business plan, analyzing market and competition, creating the image of the brand, selecting multiple distribution channels, and managing human resources. Although focused on fashion, this upper-level course has general applicability.

Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth

The aim of this course is to examine the reach and impact that Darwins theory of natural selection has had on religion, gender, and race and to uncover some common misconceptions about his work. The Origin of Species brought about a profound intellectual revolution not only in the natural, but also in the social sciences. Part one of the course examines the building blocks of Darwin's theory and its dissemination, reception, and legacy. Part two examines the theoretical basis of modern evolutionary biology and analyzes some of the most popular (and contested) theories of evolutionary psychology relating to human reproduction, gender, relationships, and beauty. The course further offers a critical study of some evolutionary ideas after Darwin, focusing on eugenics, revealing flaws in modern popular scientific discourse as well as potential limitations to the scientific method and culture. Student presentations will consider Darwin's influence on areas such as art and media and also on our understanding of physical and mental disabilities.

Women in Religion

Women have been by turns defined by, harmed by, excluded from, but also enriched by religions. Often they have been and still are barred from equal spiritual footing with men in many religious institutions. But how do sacred texts and rituals define who we are and what roles we have as men and women? What do religious traditions teach communities about gender, bodies, sexuality, and the divine? This course considers the difficult question of gender (im)balances from within 3 major monotheistic Abrahamic religious traditions, namely Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will examine both the influences that religions have on women - through texts that have been written for, about, and against women -- and also the interrelated influence that women have on religions -- through texts written by women as individual participants in the religious experience or by feminist religious scholars who are challenging gender-exclusive language, roles, and institutions. This course asks questions of current relevance about the changing roles of women inside religious communities, in the public sphere of leadership and authority, in the family, and in everyday life. By examining traditional cultural beliefs and values derived from religions, and by using interfaith and gender perspective lenses, the course aims to offer resources to understand, evaluate, and possibly challenge traditional roles.

Women of the Medici Family

["This course is an introduction to some of the most famous women of the house of the Medici (1368-1743). Particular emphasis will be given to their biographies and the unique role that these women played in the European history. The Medici are the best-known and most prestigious Tuscan family;","their history developed over four centuries and embraced thirteen generations. Their name is deeply associated with the history of Florence. They emerged as merchants, became the most powerful bankers of the time, and turned into masters of Florence, and one of the most important families in Europe. Through the lens of the Medici women\u0092s lives, we will explore the Medici family across four centuries of their history\u0097the Medici men, their children, their strategy of power, and their role in the Florentine, Italian and European life."]

History of Prostitution

In the context of sexuality and body within the Western tradition, this course examines prostitution as a complex phenomenon at the intersection of gender roles, sexual practices, religious and moral views, social power and legal boundaries.The course will focus on classical antiquity, with some reference to the earliest historical cultures, and on the period spanning from medieval and early modern times to the Reformation. Strictly adhering to an interdisciplinary approach, we will touch upon history, religion, mythology, philosophy, visual arts, literary sources, and legal documents. Readings and discussions will address prostitution in Western society today, taking into consideration current research on the topic, and also public perceptions and understanding.

Female Characters in 20th Century Fiction

["This course will explore some of the most interesting and important female characters created in 20th-century European and American fiction. These characters include some created by male writers, such as Molly in James Joyce\u0092s Ulysses, Connie in D. H. Lawrence\u0092s Lady Chatterley\u0092s Lover, Sarah in John Fowles\u0092 The French Lieutenant\u0092s Woman, and Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita. One of the purposes of the course will be to compare and contrast these characters with those created by female authors\u0097these include Virginia Woolf\u0092s Orlando, Anna in Doris Lessing\u0092s The Golden Notebook, Christa Wolf\u0092s Cassandra, or Villanelle in Jeanette Winterson\u0092s The Passion. We will assume a gendered perspective to compare men and women writers and their different interpretations of womanhood;","yet, students will be challenged to overcome the enclosures of critical theories, and experience how great literature can never be reduced to a mere system."]

20th Century Graphics and Illustration

This course deals with the history of graphic design and illustration and how it was interpreted in different cultures from the late 1800s to the present. We will investigate the origins of modern graphic design developed in Europe, Russia, and in the United States and how it relates to ancient graphic design created in the Near and Far East, Europe and the Americas. The course will present an in-depth study of graphics which can entail signs, letters of the alphabet, lines of a drawing, colors of a painting, and dots of a photograph. They all form images and they all convey ideas.

Digital Sketchbook

In this course students combine traditional and digital media. In drawing sessions at various locations in the historic center of Florence, students learn basic drawing concepts, followed by one-on-one instruction with the instructor to create drawings suitable for the computer lab sessions. These manual drawing sessions focus on creating three-dimensional space through the use of linear perspective and construction of complex forms using simple volumes, on the drawing of the sculpted and live human figure, and on creating balanced and interesting compositions. In the computer sessions students learn to scan selected drawings from the city drawing sessions and paint them digitally using Photoshop. Students explore painting concepts applicable to both traditional and digital painting and the most relevant and useful Photoshop functions. In the course, students create multiple versions of each painting (for example, day and night versions of one scene). Projects include painting a set of images using gouache, and developing and modifying using Photoshop one or more of their traditionally painted images. In this way, students discover the benefits and drawbacks with regard to traditional and graphic approaches. Note: Experience in drawing and in using Photoshop is helpful.

Graphic Design

This course gives students a theoretical and practical introduction to graphic design in the era of digital communication. Students follow a program based on practical applications, realized entirely using computer graphic techniques. The constant search for the harmony of shapes, colors, and words goes together with the learning of the most modern digital graphic techniques. During the course, bidimensional vector graphics will be used for the realization of all assigned projects. The fundamental concepts of the manipulation of the images are also taught to complete the same projects. In consideration of the great importance that advertising has in this course, student projects address communication issues, exploring the principal media and investigating ways of working with different targets. Curiosity and an inclination for research are the essential characteristics of students interested in this course. Students must be familiar with the computer environment. Professional printing skills are developed in a commercial printing center.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

Digital Graphic Techniques Fundamentals

This course trains students in the basics of computer graphics, developing foundational techniques and skills within the standard set of software applications for the design field. Image optimization and manipulation, graphic illustration basics and Web design principles are covered extensively. Students work on individual practical projects, image make-ups, graphic illustrations, and Web layout design. Professional printing skills are developed in the context of a commercial printing center.

Foundations of Visual Communication

This course is essential for all students that, either as beginners in graphic design or with previous experience in digital graphics, desire to learn the secrets of "good design." The aim of the course is to assist students in developing intellectual skills and familiarity with the rules which underpin the creation of graphic works that convey both aesthetic quality and communicative power. The course is structured into a series of projects, lectures, analyses, and drawing exercises which, through the application and study of design theories, aim at offering students a methodology for solving graphic and visual projects. Topics include: B/W techniques, layouts and grids, colors and shape balance, mirror and rotational symmetries, repetitive patterns, archetypes and primary shapes, fonts and typography, studies of visual languages and cultural backgrounds, analysis of styles and artwork, rules to derive families of shapes and colors, formats and harmonic proportions such as the diagonal of the square, icons, logotypes, and trademarks, studies of 3D models and packaging. The course places emphasis on the learning of graphic design principles and concepts that are independent of the tools used for production (digital or manual techniques). There is a focus on learning from the great tradition of Italian design, and the student is encouraged to make the most of the visual and cultural experience offered by the city of Florence.

Workshop in Graphic Design

["Conceived for students who have already learned how to develop the fundamentals of graphic design using the basic tools and expect to test themselves through more ambitious projects, the course offers the opportunity to learn by working on real cases with effective professional goals. The core of the assignments consists of a professional brief to be analyzed and discussed in order to develop successful solutions. Projects entail real challenges offered by firms or by competitions released by crowd-sourcing platforms;","the instructor will help students to understand specific project objectives, and to learn and refine the best techniques with which to realize their proposals. Activities include work group sessions. Projects may be printed, Web-based, or hybrid, and a presentation is required"]

Graphic Design Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Graphic Design. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is either with advertising and communications agencies or with the LdM Graphic Design Office. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: graphic design, packaging, corporate identity, logos, posters and flyers, catalogs, marketing materials, social media posting, layout of applications and e-commerce Web sites, Web programming, art direction.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent upon the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a portfolio. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Brand Design

Today a professional graphic designer is often called upon to extend his/her interest to fields that just a few years ago were very far from the natural focus of the designer. With this in mind, the present course guides students through the process of inventing a new brand, starting from the analysis of pertinent economic trends, then proceeding to understanding where the consumers choice will be addressed in the near future and last, based on these studies, finalizing everything in the creation of a new brand complete with all the features that concern graphic design: name, logo related to corporate identity, general look and feel, payoff, slogans and multi media formats. This course carries the range of activities of the graphic designer into the areas of marketing and copy writing.

The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses

This course is an introduction to the legacy of the Holocaust and its implications. The course explores Christian anti-Judaism as one of many factors in the Nazi rise to power and the "Final Solution." It then proceeds to various accounts of life in the Nazi ghettoes and death camps and deals with Christian and Jewish efforts to remember the Holocaust within particular communities and places. The course will focus on the Holocaust of the Italian Jews. It will begin with an analysis of the emergence of the Fascist movement in Italy, which led to the Racial Laws. It will proceed with the study of specific stories of persecution, deportation, and salvation in the various cities of Italy. We will study in depth the reaction of the Vatican to the Holocaust. In addition, we will analyze the reactions of Italian society to the Holocaust, starting right after the war until today.

The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture

The course offers students a first-hand experience of the historical city of Florence, which from 1252 was divided into four "quartieri" or quarters. Each quarter, which was named after the main church of the district, presents its own particular social, political and urban characteristics, and these form the central themes of the course. Students will discover the prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities and historical events that have characterized the development of each quarter from the medieval period to the modern age. Site visits will form an essential part of the learning experience.

The 1960s: A Global Counter Cultural Movement

The course will introduce the students to the seminal decade of the 1960s through the most important social, cultural, and artistic achievements of the period. We will focus especially on Italy, Great Britain, France, and the USA. In the first part of the course, students will explore the cultural climate marking the end of the 1950s and beginning of the 1960s in the USA and in Europe (topics include McCarthyism and Eurocommunism.) Students will investigate how this cultural climate contributed to the rise of a new responses to politics, minorities, women, culture, and social values. The central part of the course will focus on some of the leading personalities of the time, Martin Luther King, J. F. Kennedy, and D. Cohn-Bendit among them, and the main themes of the cultural debates of the timepacifism, new social values, individual creativity, and civil rights. The last part of the course will consider the achievements of the 1960s, and reflect on its most important consequences.

Italian Renaissance Civilization and Culture

["This course explores the historical, literary and cultural developments of one of the most remarkable and vibrant periods of Italian history: the Renaissance. Students will be introduced to the main historical developments of the Renaissance period from the late fourteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century. The Renaissance is above all the age of the individual and the affirmation of his\/her achievements, best summed up by the credo \"Man \u0096 the measure of all things\". The focus of this course is therefore upon great personalities of the Italian Renaissance mainly in the fields of the visual arts, literature and philosophy, but also drawn from those of politics and civic life. These include key figures of the most prominent Italian families: the Medici, the Sforza, the Della Rovere;","artists and architects: Brunelleschi, Leon Battista Alberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo;","writers, poets and philosophers: Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, as well as merchants and bankers. All these individuals left their mark in Italy between the early 1400s and the late 1500s."]

Italian Regional Food in Cultural Perspective

["Although characterized by unique and distinctive features, Italian cuisine is still perceived as the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over the centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. The course focuses on the different aspects of regional food in Italy, from ingredients to recipe preparation and cooking techniques, with particular attention to the following factors: historical origins and developments;","climate and environmental conditions;","social issues;","food production;","nutrition;","and safety and health. Emphasis will be placed on how food relates to the local lifestyle and culture. Regional economy and local resources will be analyzed and compared. Students will be introduced to the various local products through lectures and class demonstrations."]

Wine and Culture I: Wines of Italy

This course investigates Italian wine in the context of the extraordinary history, philosophy, culture. and lifestyle of Italy. In this context wine is not only a much-loved drink, but also forms an essential part of rich cultural traditions going back to the Etruscans and the ancient Romans. From the study of wine we learn about the practices of earlier cultures, about their values and our own, and we gain a unique perspective on Italy today. The course focuses on the distinct traditions and economic, geographic, and climatic aspects of each area of Italian wine production. Students explore grape varieties and different techniques used to make wine, and the national and regional classifications. They also subject representative wines to organoleptic analysis (visual, olfactory, and gustative). Each wine is studied in terms of its characteristics, history, and traditions, and in relationship to the particular foods meant to accompany it.

Current Trends in Italian Cuisine

This course explores major trends in contemporary Italian cuisine that have been emerging in recent decades. These trends, revealed in both everyday and haute cuisine, involve fresh reinterpretations of regional traditions, revaluation of local products, interest in lighter and healthier diet, and an emphasis on creativity. Driving these trends are such diverse factors as interest in other cuisines, innovations by leading chefs, and especially changes in Italian society and lifestyles. Students learn basic cooking skills as well as some specialized cooking methods and techniques. They discover how to select quality ingredients, and they compare their eating habits with those common in Italy today. Particular focus is given to the following aspects: historical origins and developments of food production, regional dishes, seasonal and environmental conditions, social issues, nutrition, safety and health. In each lesson students learn how to prepare representative recipes, with attention to ingredients, nutritional values, and presentation.

Fundamentals of Food Design, Styling, and Photography

Cooking involves not only the preparation, but also the presentation of food products. Through this course students learn how to style food and beverages, and how to capture their essence in photography. Students have the opportunity to develop their personal creativity, and learn how to exercise good technical and compositional control. Through lab practice students learn to process, develop, and print photographs correctly and to use Photoshop techniques especially pertinent to Food Photography. The Food Photography competencies developed include specific lighting techniques, ability to arrange compositions and settings, and visual storytelling. To achieve this, the course grounds students in key theoretical elements of food design, involving visual and stylistic analysis. The course includes a number of guest lectures with a professional food stylist, a chef who will show tips for preparing dishes to be photographed, a field trip to a selected restaurant, and visits to special culinary venues.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Italian Food and Culture: Pairing Food &Wine

Italian cuisine is the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. Thanks in recent years to a greater availability of wines from different regions, the pairing of food and wine, always a traditional aspect of Italian cuisine, has become more important in the organization of a menu and the presentation of a meal. In this course the various ways of pairing Italian food and wine will be analyzed and used for menu planning. This involves research into aspects of both wine and food, with special emphasis on classification and technical terminology, nutritional and health issues, chemical composition, sensory and other evaluation techniques, as well as cooking skills that will be practiced regularly in class. Not suitable for vegetarians.

Interior Design I

["The course is an overview of the interior design profession. It introduces the student to the fundamental concepts of design, basic space planning and furnishing. Starting from the survey of an existing space, the student learns how to present the design through drawings. From a simple room like a kitchen or a bathroom and ending with a small residential apartment, the student will face all the problems concerning designing;","from the drawing representation and the scale system, to the choice of materials and colors. Exercises and projects will be started in class under the supervision of the instructor and then continued and finished individually."]

Product Design I

Paolo Fossati, an Italian expert in industrial design, stated: Design means to create a strict connection between ideation and production. Giovanni Klaus Koenig claimed that design is like a bat, half bird and half mouse. Starting from these two statements (one strictly formal, the other perceptive and witty), the aim of this course is to understand the term industrial design but chiefly the phenomena which modern human beings experience daily, if unconsciously. The design of objects destined to be manufactured by industries should have an essential quality of art. Although art is difficult to define, students learn that the designers work applies not only to the study of techniques, types of materials, assembly and problems concerning serial production and so on, but also, and most importantly, to their formal and artistic values. The course deals with the subject of design in a broad perspective, which includes product design, industrial design and interior design. The aesthetic, cultural, philosophical, and technical elements of the subject will be redefined through lectures and exercises. The teaching method is interactive and lessons involve slide lectures, readings, field trips to stores, exercises in basic design and discussions. Some classes focus on the history of design, Italian production, and semiotics.

Technical Drawing

The course aims at providing students with the necessary skills to execute technical drawings, skills that include drawing orthographic projections, axonometry, and perspective applications. Different methods of geometrical presentations are taken into account and students learn how to draw a plan, a section, and elevations. Students also enhance their abilities in sketching and rendering of architecture, interior and product design and in understanding construction drawings with codes and dimensions. This course is taught through lectures, case studies, and gradual practical exercises and assignments that enable students to learn geometrical drawing. Students will work at a portfolio project, and understand the technical design process, while also developing the tools they will be able to use in their future projects in architecture, interior and product design.

Design for Living Spaces

In this course students will learn to sharpen their analytical and technical skills in creating design solutions for living spaces as diverse in type as contemporary lifestyles and needs (single unit, family, social care, etc.). Students will carry out projects that must respond to the specific requirements of clients: space, technical, emotional atmosphere, accessibility, and so on. Students will be encouraged to explore design solutions that reflect definite decorative and architectural approaches. We will especially focus on programming, building code issues, space planning, and furniture arrangement. In their project, students will be asked to consider both functional and aesthetic aspects, to achieve a good solution, and to appropriately present it.

Interior Design II

["Starting from the survey of an existing place and learning how to present it through drawings (plants, sections, elevations), the student will deal with the solution of a given project in its entirety from marketing through the identification of targets to the solution of technical problems and layout. The project will consider functional and the aesthetic aspects, trying to formulate a good solution and present it in the appropriate way. The project process starts with the visit or explanation of the area. In class the students will examine and discuss some examples of finished projects and focus on the main elements and aspects of the project theme. The project will be composed of a general layout and inspiration board, plans, elevations, sections, perspective drawings, and sketches. Each project will be presented in class during the exam day;","all the presentations will be colored and integrated with images, photos, materials."]

Product Design II

A theme will be assigned and developed individually with the teachers help. The students will propose sketches, rendering, technical drawings with the appropriate dimensions, 3D drawings, and realize their final book, complete in all parts. They will also make a model, using the material they prefer. The students will be introduced to essential information about design, such as design definitions, the most important phenomena that have characterized the history of design, and the works of some of the most famous Italian and international designers. Students will be introduced to Bionics, the science of how nature teaches designers. The students will also be taught about the materials, both traditional and modern, and the technologies that are used to realize industrial products. The teacher will show the students the transformation of some products, from their birth to their present situation and characteristics.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

Lighting Design

The course is an introduction to the world of lighting. It provides a compendium of information on illumination design practices. The range of subjects covered is extensive. Methods of lighting design in this course include a section on lighting hardware (lamps and luminaires) and a part dedicated to practical experience through real lighting projects. The course will start with a quick theoretical overview of the different light sources, analyzing all types of new lamps currently on the market. Information about lighting objectives, visual comfort and pleasantness, color rendering, decorative, architectural and mood lighting, lighting control and application fields (offices, shops, exhibiting spaces) will be provided.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

Sustainable Design

["In a time of population growth, decreasing resources, climate change, pollution, economic uncertainty, and mass throwaway consumption, sustainability means survival. Sustainable design is the philosophy of designing for urban planning, architecture, interior spaces and products so as to comply with the principles of economic, social, and ecological sustainability. Since the three principles are closely related to human activities, this course emphasizes the study of passive strategies as the key to energy and material saving. The sustainable designer, increasingly in demand, makes responsible decisions fully aware of the long-term environmental impact of every aspect of the project, construction, and maintenance. The course cultivates this holistic design approach. On the one hand, it explores a range of issues and possible solutions to them;","students consider design in relation to renewable energy sources such as the sun, wind, water and geothermal power, as well as to energy reduction and efficiency, they further examine recycling, reuse, and reduction of materials in both construction and product design. On the other hand, students develop some feasible projects which meets rapidly evolving sustainability requirements while respecting creative and functional needs, making real-world choices.\u000bNote: A personal laptop for design projects is highly recommended."]

Interdisciplinary Design

This advanced course offers design students an opportunity to work in class teams with a collaborative approach, learning about the thinking and processes of diverse design disciplines while finding creative solutions. The teams consist of cross- or multi-disciplinary majors. The aim is to adopt a collective response to research development and problem-solving, in the process discovering the commonalities underlying design processes. Each collective response requires integrating ideas to create effective and innovative solutions to current design needs and problems. Through this course students acquire multiple viewpoints within a global context, simulating the demands of todays multidisciplinary work environment.

Furniture Design

The course aims at providing students with a basic understanding of the theories and techniques of furniture design. In class, we will examine the various design processes and procedures, while also considering space and the functional analysis of design. For the most part, each class will be a workshop for design projects. The course will also consider the importance of targets and visual communication signs. Students will carry out personal research on pieces of furniture, materials, and designers in order to explore furniture design and to develop a personal style.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions.

6-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1 and 2

This course aims to give a basic knowledge of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations, to describe their personal background and environment, express wishes and talk about past experiences and future plans, respond to simple, direct questions or requests for information. This course offers the students the opportunity of a more intensive learning experience thanks to the daily study and practice of the language. Multiple sections available.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex structures of the language, such as the means to express personal opinions and preferences. In this level emphasis is given to the ability to maintain interaction and to cope flexibly both in speaking and writing with problems in everyday life. At the end of the course students will be able to manage conversations on topics of personal interest or everyday life, to describe experience and to narrate a story.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts.

6-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1 and 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, and the proper selection of different tenses when narrating past events. Constant attention is given to the practice of social discourse, both in written and oral communication. This course offers the students the opportunity of a more intensive learning experience thanks to the daily study and practice of the language.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing.

Jewelry Making I

This course will give students a first approach to jewelry making, introducing them to the main equipment and tools (machinery, pliers, files, and saw), and to safety regulations. Students will work at the silversmith's bench, learn the basic techniques for creating simple pieces of jewelry with design transfer, sawing, filing, soldering, polishing, and simple settings for cabochon stones. The course will also introduce the lost wax casting methods and wax carving. The individual projects will help develop manual and creative ability.

Italian Crime Fiction

From the middle of the twentieth century, Italian writers such as Gadda and Sciascia began to integrate into their novels and short stories certain aspects of the crime genre, in such a way that the mystery element became an instrument for analyzing contemporary Italian realities. By the 1990's a new generation of writers such as Camilleri, Ammaniti and Lucarelli had developed a specifically Italian approach to an international literary genre, the "Italian noir", which aims at revealing unpleasant truths to a vast audience in an entertaining way. The goal of this course is to explore some of the most representative works of the crime fiction genre in contemporary Italian literature, from its early forms to the present. The study of these works will also involve an analysis of the strong socio-cultural dimensions of contemporary Italy, which are the result of a complex combination of geographical, historical, political and linguistic factors. These in turn affect different forms of organized and unorganized crime, and differences in the relationship between citizens and the law. During the course students will also study the relationship between Italian crime fiction and its foreign counterpart, including the works of authors such as Dibdin, Highsmith and Harris.

Shakespeare’s Italy

["Shakespeare, the greatest English-language dramatist of all time, set approximately one-fourth of his plays in Italian cities such as ancient Rome, Verona, and Venice. In this course, we will focus on a small selection of his \u0093Italian plays,\u0094 including Romeo and Juliet and The Merchant of Venice, in order to see how Shakespeare combined historical evidence and fiction, past and present, for dramatic effect and social commentary. Students will work with primary sources;","for the same purpose they may also perform selected scenes. This course allows students to learn more about Shakespeare\u0092s works and personality, and about relations between Elizabethan literary and theatrical culture and Renaissance Italy."]

Italian Grand Tour: Italy through the Eyes of Famous Travellers

This course is an introduction to the literature generated by the "Grand Tour" experiences between the 18th and the 19th centuries and to its continuation and development in the 20th century. The main focus will be the textual analysis of the memoirs, letters and diaries written by some of the most famous artists, writers, and intellectuals who resided and traveled in Italy. Our selection will include British, German, and American writers. Another important aspect of the course will be the study of the history, the works of art, the monuments, and the folklore events of the main Grand Tour destinations: Venice, Florence, Rome. Students will learn about the different experiences of famous foreign travelers in Italy through the centuries and will be able to understand some stereotypes, prejudices, and idealized views about Italy and Italians that still survive.

Digital Filmmaking I

An introduction to filmmaking techniques. Students learn the basics of shots, frame composition, elementary scripting and some editing. They will use personal equipment (such as smartphones and entry-level photo/video cameras) as basic videomaking tools, engaging in creative projects, testing visual storytelling possibilities and ultimately producing some brief but complete digital film pieces. Integrating hands-on activities are sessions in which students analyze the cinematic language and explore the recent evolution of the medium (e.g. the YouTube galaxy, on demand video-services, new media devices and practices) via a selection of film and web-native excerpts.

The Animated Short Film

In this course, students use digital media tools to create a short animated film. The course covers all steps of the creative process, from hand-drawn sketches of the characters and backgrounds through the creation of model sheets, storyboard and digital animatic, up to the final short film with music and sounds. Although closely supervised by the instructor, students develop each stage of the process. No prior drawing or animation experience is required.

Understanding Movies: Theory and Practice

Moving images are among the most distinctive innovations and experiences of the last century and remain one of the most enduring. In a media-dependent culture, developing a critical understanding and practical knowledge of this form is vital. This course studies the theory as well as the techniques of film-making. It analyzes the ever-evolving cinematic language in terms of both its historical development and its essential elements, techniques, and tools. Through the study of stylistic choices and the construction of images and sequences, students learn aesthetic and technical terms, rules, conventions, and social assumptions used to build meaning. In a series of stylistic exercises, students engage in hands-on experience of video shooting.

Screenwriting

This course will teach students writing for film. Feature-length screenplays demand a specific architecture. Students will bring to class an idea for a film. This idea can be based on something they experience during their stay in Italy, a memory, a story they heard, a concept based on a novel they read, or anything that inspires them. The course is articulated in three parts. 1. Through lectures, workshop discussions and scene work, students explore and develop an understanding of the basic principles of screenwriting. Topics include: style, format, development, geography, image, scene, sequence, plot vs. character, hearing voices. Students develop the subject. 2. Students learn how to build a coherent treatment a summary of the events and major emotional arcs of the film's three acts. They develop the subject into a treatment. 3. Students complete their feature-length screenplay.

Music and Film

This is an introductory course which explores the role of music in one of the most important 20th century artistic and entertainment media: film. The course surveys film music from its silent era origins, in which music was a major component in conveying emotions, up to the present. Topics for discussion will include film music history and the history of films. In the process, students will study the dramatic function of music as an element of cinematic "diegesis" and emphasis, the codification of musical iconography in the standard cinematic genres, the basics of film-making, musical forms, associative listening, the important basic musical elements, film music techniques, and how composers use them in film scoring. Some of the cinemas iconic scores and accompaniments will be discussed, from silent era movies through the films of such directors as Hitchcock, Kubrick, and Fellini.

Seriality: TV and Beyond

TV series are today a prominent form of entertaining, but the way they tell stories is not a new one. From Victorian novels to, in our time, newspapers, radio, cinema, and lately the web, have used this form of storytelling. The course intends to explore seriality as a pattern of narration. By comparing different media and analyzing through a historical perspective a variety of textual objects, the course will give students the tools to understand the specific creative and productive strategies behind serial texts. The course will also focus on the social effects of the phenomenon, the concept of fandom," and the revolution of consumption habits after the advent of digital devices and new content providers such as Netflix or Amazon.

Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts

This is an elementary course for Liberal Arts majors. It deals with topics emphasizing fundamental ideas of mathematics, selected from set theory, algebra, and geometry.

Introduction to Statistics

["This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of statistics. Topics include: the description of data;","simple probability;","binominal and normal distribution;","confidence interval estimation;","hypothesis testing;","simple regression and chi-squared distribution. \u000bNote: This course in not open to STEM students who should take MAT 280 Statistics for Science Majors."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to Statistics

The objective of this course is to understand the mathematical language of finance. Students will study some basic rules of finance, analysis, and probabilities. The content will cover anything related to gross and compound interests, cash flow, annuities and probabilities with a specific review of basic statistical distribution functions (normal law, Pareto, Poisson).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Nutrition Studies

["The aim of this dietary education course is to provide guidelines and develop critical thinking for a healthful diet and lifestyle. Intended for non-majors in science, the course addresses basics of the chemistry and biology of nutrition, including the physiological principles that underlie a balanced diet and the correct uptake of nutrients. Themes include nutrition requirements;","nutrition and wellness;","food sources and production;","consumer choices, all stage life diet (from child nutrition to elder nutrition);","social dynamics that lead to eating disorders such as emotional eating;","the effects of an unbalanced weight on health (excess weight and\/or weight loss). Part of the course will be supplemented by laboratories with food handling."]

Vegetarian Culture

Investigation of vegetarianism and veganism in terms of both dietary benefits and as practices related to cultural values. While vegetarianism is present in many cultures both ancient and modern, it started to gain wide currency with the systematic attention to healthy diet in the Nineteenth Century, and only comparatively recently has it been the object of empirical study. In our time, vegetarianism is often associated not only with personal health choices but also with stances on food production, sustainability, animal welfare, and other issues. Students review studies including the work of nutritionists, and participate in structured debates. Includes hands-on sessions in which selected dishes are prepared.

The Mediterranean Diet

This thematic course explores the various definitions and claims attached to the Mediterranean diet. Since it was first defined circa 1970, this influential concept has been the subject of much attention and controversy, both popular and scientific. Students will sort through the literature, using the basic methods of nutritional analysis. Among the questions they examine are the degree to which there really is a shared dietary culture and lifestyle in the Mediterranean, claims of health benefits and counter-claims, comparison with other dietary patterns, how nutritionists examine in regional and local diets, and how they distinguish between correlations and causes. Includes hands-on sessions in which selected dishes are prepared.

Topics in Nutrition: Italian Style Cooking

In an age of processed foods and widespread alteration of the environment, the importance of good diet is essential. Appropriate use of eliminative or healing remedies may provide additional influence on dietary metabolism. Healing nutrition provides unique opportunities to convert food into useful nourishment. It gives dietary therapy much added value. By studying the chemical structure of food and its effects on the human body's metabolism, students are introduced to the healthy side of Italian cuisine today, including the practical preparation of healthy dishes. The different food combinations and the way they affect digestion and metabolism will also be analyzed in order to plan a daily healthy diet.

The Science of Food, Health, and Well-Being

The primary focus of this course is to analyze the biological properties of the body and the effects that foods have on it. Students learn the basics of nutrition (proteins, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, natural supplements), including how the phytochemicals and nutrients of foods can improve health, and they will study habits, programs and dietary regimens for healthy living. Nutritional healing and wider questions of well-being are also addressed. Includes hands-on preparation of healthy dishes.

Principles of Drawing and Composition

This course will teach the basic techniques of figure and object drawing. The program is designed to introduce the fundamental principles and elements of drawing using charcoal, pencil and various other media, such as red chalk. Each lesson has a specific aim and forms part of a progressive buildup of skills through observation with a series of exercises. Still life, human figure, architecture and nature will be investigated as subject matter and perspective will be analyzed in depth. Reference to the exceptional works of art in the city of Florence will be investigated and analyzed as an integral part of the course. The aim of the course is to develop basic skills and a better understanding and knowledge of drawing, and to encourage further studies.

Foundation Oil Painting

["An introduction to the traditional techniques of oil paining. Fundamental skills are constructed progressively in highly structured lessons that involve demonstrations and guided work. Areas addressed include observational skills, the perception and buildup of form, tone, and color on a two-dimensional surface, color theory and mixing, linear perspective, and composition. The focus is on still-life subjects. Exceptional works of art in the city are referenced and analyzed as an integral part of the course. Prior studio training is not required;","non-majors are admitted."]

Expanding Creativity

This course is a space in which fine arts majors engage critically with the creative process in their work, focus on problem-solving, explore the limits of media and the links between them, exchange ideas, and better define their personal visions. The course fosters reflective practice, heightened creativity, and the ability to work independently. Students, at different stages of their studies, are closely guided in formulating and developing individual projects to meet appropriate, precise, and pragmatic objectives. Such objectives may have to do with moving between or combining media, or taking a set of technical skills to new personal limits. Projects may also delve into sources of inspiration, or articulate and apply a creative strategy.

Fundamentals of Art and Design: Color Theory

["This course concerns the analysis and theory of colors. Students will study harmony and contrast of colors: pure colors, light and dark colors (chiaroscuro), hot and cold colors, complementary colors, simultaneous contrast, quality contrast and quantity contrast. The course will study the relationship between form and color, and how colors relate to space and composition, as well as the perception and chromatic balance: the illusion of color. It will also analyze the expressive force of colors as an essential element in the creative process. Learning to develop an eye for color through experience and trial and error;","seeing the action of a color and feeling the relationships between colors will be achieved through practical exercises based on various color theory criteria. Investigation of nature, master artists\u0092 works, city life and architecture, and works of master artists will help to discover how colored light and shadow are perceived through the relationship between the \u0093eye,\" \u0093experience\u0094 and \u0093color theory.\u0094"]

Florence Sketchbook - Intermediate

This course consists of gathering research in the traditional form of sketching from the museums, streets, and environments of Florence as artists have done for centuries. This includes sketches taking inspiration from sculptures, paintings, architecture, formal gardens and squares, as well as drawing from life in streets and markets, with an in-depth study of foreshortening and perspective. Students will be encouraged to write annotations and observations as well as to investigate their areas of interest. Students gain firsthand knowledge of original works by direct observation in situ, learn drawing and painting skills in a refreshing way, and learn to create sketchbooks that may serve as source material for future projects.

Intermediate Drawing

This is a course for students wishing to improve the basic techniques of object drawing and human figure drawing. Students will work on figure and object drawing with emphasis on the structure and anatomy of the human body and analysis of the relationship between individual elements in the composition. The figure in space will be thoroughly investigated so as to assist the students in examining reality through his/her personal observation and perception on the page. Analyses of various mark-making techniques using diverse materials (charcoal, pencils, red chalk, ink) will be an integral part of this course. Exceptional works of art in the city of Florence will be referenced and investigated.

Intermediate Painting

The course is intended for students who have already taken the foundation-level course or have a similar background in painting. It takes students into further studies of oil painting techniques and methods. Focus is on the human figure as well as object painting using a number of different approaches to life painting. Some of the most important techniques of oil painting are covered to provide students with a sound foundation preparing them for more ambitious work. Emphasis is on color mixing, handling of brush strokes, glazing and scumbling, as well as traditional canvas preparation. Exceptional works of art in the city of Florence will be investigated and analyzed as an integral part of the course. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the most essential elements in life painting.

Advanced Painting I: Observation and Interpretation

The emphasis of this course is on furthering students knowledge and practice of the traditional techniques of oil painting through figurative and/or object work, in order to refine and improve the quality of work previously achieved. In addition, students will be introduced to different painting techniques, such as acrylic. Students will depart from direct observation in the first part of the course, moving onto more personal ideas and concepts which focus on individual means of expression, in the second part. The course focuses on subtleties within the techniques of oil painting and encourages personal expression in the work. Various exercises and projects allow students to approach elements pertaining to color and composition, and others pertaining to technical experimentation, such as glazing, impasto and painting mediums. At the end of the course students will work on a personal project in order to prepare them for more advanced work. Exceptional works of art inside and outside the city of Florence will be investigated and analyzed as an integral part of the course.

Introduction to Modern Dance

In this introductory course students study elementary modern dance techniques. Emphasis is on alignment, movement through space, and the use of body weight, while a range of movement qualities are developed.

Intermediate Modern Dance

This course focuses on building students musicality and performance skills by exploring modern dance as an art form and as a means of expression. With respect to the introductory level, techniques are reinforced and expanded. The course reflects on the historical development of modern dance and modern music and it emphasizes a broader dance vocabulary as well as more complex dance combinations. Attention is also given to an analysis of a range of different modern and contemporary styles (Graham, Cunningham, Orton) through video projections and viewing of live performances by professional dancers, and the execution by students of more elaborate choreographies.

Theatre History: The Contribution of Florence

Florence was one of the capitals of Western culture, not only with regard to art and literature, but also to performing arts and drama. Via a multidisciplinary approach the course outlines the contribution of Florentine theatrical culture to the definition of the Western theatrical model: from the fundamental input given by Machiavellis comedies, to the stage devices created by Giorgio Vasari, to the invention of Opera around the Medici court. The course will be divided into in-class lectures, with the support of slides and videos, and lessons in the field, visiting relevant sites. The aim is to make the students discover how political power, citizenship and urban space are involved in theatricality, how different elements (texts, acting, design, architecture and use of technology) combine to represent a shared model, and how many contemporary cultural attitudes still result from this.

Italian Culture through Music

This course offers students an approach to understanding Italian culture and society through an exploration of its rich and varied musical traditions. The geography of Italy, and its complex political history, have given this country a wide variety of musical styles and cultures. Taking the form of a musical journey across Italy, the course explores sacred, secular, and dramatic music from the major Italian cities and also strays off the beaten path to discover the vibrant folk traditions of villages and rural communities. The course also explores the origins and influence of Italys dramatic and lyrical tradition, from the early multimedia spectacles of 16th-century Florence to the patriotic operas of Verdi and the realism of Puccini. Classes will include musical illustrations and demonstrations and students will also be encouraged to go to related concerts and musical events in Florence and Tuscany.

Introduction to Ethics

This course introduces ethics as it has developed in the Western world over the last 2,500 years and as it is analyzed in most of the English-language academy. Much of the course revolves around classroom discussion. Student research may focus either on a particular normative (e.g. should we preserve wilderness?) or meta-ethical (e.g. are ethics grounded in emotions?) issue or another approved topic drawn from current events, literature, poetry or song. Students will present their findings and opinions first to the class, then in the research paper they submit. Course readings will be drawn from a wide range of historical and contemporary sources. Topics include the nature of ethics: the roles of reason and emotion, the role of gender, whether ethics are local or universal human rights, too? and theoretical foundations: the individuals well-being, the welfare of all, fundamental rights and duties, virtues reflected in character, what things a rational agent could agree to. An international slant is privileged in the study of particular cases, such as: duties to help strangers and immigrants, duties to help others at home and abroad, climate change, and foreign intervention.

Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern Thinkers

While introducing students to philosophy as a discipline in term of methods, contents, and questions, the course examines the evolution of the main schools of philosophical thought. The focus is on its main thinkers and fundamental concerns from the Middle Ages through the rich debates of the late Renaissance, with its reforms and Age of Science. However, since the ideas of many early Western philosophers were rooted in ancient philosophy, the course begins with the study of some key ideas of Greek, Roman, and Early Christian thinkers. Attention is given to the cross-influences between Catholicism and philosophy that are one of the special traits of the Italian cultural heritage. Among the thinkers analyzed are Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Dante, Petrarch, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, Giordano Bruno, and Galileo Galilei.

Logical, Critical, and Creative: The Power of Reason

This introduction to logic provides students the tools to develop logical thinking and sound reasoning skills. Logic is an essential tool in many academic fields, and it consistently plays a vital role in our daily lives. Logic is the basis for valid arguments to convince others, while analytical and critical thinking skills serve to evaluate positions taken by others, including the powerful and persuasive appeals made by commercial and political advertisers in this digital age. Students will analyze both media and Internet sources and learn how to construct well-reasoned arguments on a variety of topics. The course deals with traditional logic, with concepts and techniques of modern logic, and with some philosophical issues related to critical reasoning. Basic concepts explored early in the course include logic itself, the structure of arguments, how to distinguish arguments from non-arguments, deductive from inductive arguments, and how to evaluate such arguments in terms of their validity, strength, soundness, and cogency. In addition, the course examines formal logic and categorical propositions, and syllogisms. Some attention is given to propositional logic, how to use truth tables and predicate logic.

Introduction to Classic Photography

The course provides a basic approach to how the analog camera works, while examining the technical aspects of developing and printing a photographic (black and white) film. Through technical and conceptual assignments, the student is expected to gain confidence in how to use the photographic medium in a creative and expressive way. In the final part of the course, the student develops personal ideas into an individual project. The aim is to impart a working vocabulary of basic photography, in order to allow the student to become familiar with the technical aspects of the photographic camera, as the main tool in converting visual and personal expression into photographic images. All basic black and white printing techniques and some basic digital post-production techniques will be covered. In the course students acquire confidence in understanding how to use their camera well, increased technical control of the medium, and in developing a more critical eye. This course is 80% film and darkroom and 20% digital.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR film camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Introduction to Digital Photography

The course provides a basic approach to how the digital camera works. Students gain broad knowledge of the history of photography and an appreciation of aesthetic concerns that enable them to express themselves in a more cohesive and creative manner. Basic classic photography skills including an understanding of focal length, aperture, shutter speed, composition, and quality of light are integrated with techniques specific to digital capture and the manipulation of images in Photoshop. Photoshop software is used to process and print photographic imagery. During the semester specific assignments help students learn all basic digital techniques. In the course students acquire confidence in understanding how to use their camera well, increased technical control of the medium, and in developing a more critical eye.At the Florence site only this course is 80% digital and 20% film and darkroom, with some basic black and white developing and printing techniques.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Language of Instruction: English   

Principles of Fashion Photography

["The course provides a basic approach to photographic practice, with a focus on the essentials of fashion photography. A broad knowledge of the history of photography and major aesthetic concerns, combined with an overview of fashion photography to the present time (techniques, culture, esthetics, trends) help students increase their expressive and creative capacities. The course concentrates on the main technical aspects, such as lighting, settings, locations, use of flash units, portable and studio units, and light metering. Students learn basic and creative classic B&","W photography skills (including an understanding of the use of the camera) and digital techniques for fashion applications, with emphasis on digital photography colors using Camera Raw and Photoshop (used to process and print photographic imagery). Particular attention will be given to on-location shooting and studio photography activities, with practice photographing models. As far as possible students collaborate with the Fashion Department to develop fashion photography projects. For such projects students shoot images to meet the fashion application requirements of the project development team, thus experiencing a real working situation. This course is 70% digital and 30% film and darkroom.\u000bNote: Each student must be equipped with a SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens."]

Globalization and Social Change

["This course critically examines the subject of globalization from a sociological perspective. Globalization in some fashion has been happening for centuries, but never before has it so strongly reshaped society everywhere as today. Through an interdisciplinary approach that combines perspectives from sociology, anthropology, political science, economics, and philosophy, students attain an understanding of some fundamental features of globalization. Exploration of selected substantive topics (case studies) helps root the general in the particular. The concept of globalization;","the central themes of changing communications and social networks;","the main economic, political, and ideological dimensions of globalization, are analyzed. Emphasis will be given to a set of interconnected themes: the role of capitalism and other systems;","the function and effectiveness of institutions such as the IMF and the World Bank;","changes in global governance;","the relationship between globalization, inequality, and poverty;","the fate of cultural diversity in a globalizing world;","issues of gender, ethnicity, environment, social justice, and human rights."]

Italy and the European Union

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the development of European integration and of the structures within the European Union as well as of the Italian postwar developments and system with special focus on the changing and sometimes ambiguous or contradictory relationship between Italy and the E.U. The course is thus divided into two parts. In the first part, attention is given to the European Union's history, processes, functions, and current critical issues, such as the Greek financial crisis and the Italian migration situation. In the second part, Italian postwar developments and political structures will be examined with reference to the Italy-EU relationship.

The European Union

Europe is at the forefront of international regional integration. No other group of nation states has proceeded further in gathering sovereignty. This advanced course gives a broad overview of developments in the European Union (E.U.) from the aftermath of the Second World War to the 2004 wave of expansion that admitted countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the 2009 ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. The approach in this course is political and aims at helping students to understand the nature and the peculiar characteristics of European integration. The course is organized in three parts. First, it reviews the ideas, events, and actors that led to the foundation of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) and the European Economic Community (EEC) and to its enlargement from 6 to 27 countries. Second, the course takes an in-depth look at E.U. institutions and policies, casting a critical eye on the crucial period from 1985 to 1993 that led to the acceleration of European integration through the Single European Act, further enlargements, and the Maastricht Treaty. Finally, the course reflects on three major questions facing the E.U. in the new millennium: What is the E.U. as a political subject? What is its purpose? What should be its role in a global world? To explore the resonances of these questions the course considers practical policy dilemmas that the E.U. faces in various fields such as economic and monetary policy, regulatory and distributive questions, the democratic deficit, the challenge of expansion to the East, the Lisbon Treaty, and common foreign and security policy.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

International Politics

This course aims at introducing the basic concepts of International Politics and to get acquainted with the most important events in the world and the structure of international relations since the Peace of Westphalia (1648), outlining the main differences between the traditional interstate system and the present global order, with the growing importance of international organizations and of the principles related to peace, democracy, and human rights. This aims at giving students a general overview and an understanding of contemporary world politics, grounded in the idea that international politics are not distant from ordinary people, but, to the contrary, a matter that concerns and can be influenced by the citizens. It is, therefore, important that students are aware of what is happening around the world and of how the same event can be perceived differently by different peoples. In the first part of the course we will examine the importance of studying world politics and the methods to do it. We will also cover the difference between nationalism and globalization, and the growing emergence of international organizations. At the end of this part we will analyze the role of international law and diplomacy. In the second part we will focus on the globalization of economics by studying the main economic organizations and the process of regional integration. Special attention will be given to human rights protection and to international terrorism and the way it is affecting present international relationships.

International Conflict Resolution

The course presents concepts and theories related to the peaceful transformation of international violent conflicts, illustrating them with examples taken both by global peace initiatives and Italian experiences in the field. Approaches to International Conflict Resolution have become widely used and discussed in the last decade. New roles and tasks have emerged for international organizations such as the United Nations and the OSCE. At the same time, civil society organizations have increasingly played an important role in conflict resolution, through second-track or citizens' diplomacy, conflict sensitive approaches to development, as well as third party nonviolent intervention. In Italy, several peace organizations have their roots in Christian Catholic values. The strong tradition of self-government has also encouraged municipalities and regions to work on development and peace issues. At the end of the course participants will have a clear understanding of international conflict resolution and will have gained an insight into concrete examples from both global and Italian organizations.

International Law

["International relationships are characterized by a reciprocal respect for rules. Such commitment is considered mandatory by nation states. These rules are usually known as International Law. International society is made up of independent entities that are free to make their own choices. However, they are also, of necessity, interdependent, hence the need to establish regularized relationships through the creation of mutually agreed rules. In this course students, by being introduced to these rules, will come to understand how states conduct their foreign policy. The main topics under discussion will be: subjects of International Law;","international organizations (with especial emphasis upon the United Nations), international treaties;","international liability and international crimes (for example, terrorism)."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3.5   Course Level: Lower Division  

Basic Printmaking

This course is an introduction to the various techniques of black and white printmaking, such as etching (hard ground, soft ground, aquatint, sugar lift, dry point, pastel, spit bite and mixed media), woodcut and linoleum cut. The art and technique of reproducing and printing metal plates, wood panels, linoleum and other matrixes will be thoroughly investigated and understood. In learning the above techniques and methods, continuous reference will be made to printmaking, not only as a very old process practiced in Italy and in the rest of Europe during and after the Renaissance (Mantegna, Pollaiolo, Parmigianino, Rembrandt, Goya), but also as a modern approach (De Chirico, Carrà, Picasso, Munch, Seurat).

Introduction to Psychology

This course introduces students to the major areas of psychology through current empirical research and theoretical debate. Scientific and nonscientific approaches to the explanation of psychological phenomena are examined critically. Topics include: anthropological assumptions and implications, deontology, sensation and perception, cognitive processes, consciousness, language, learning, personality, development and psychopathology. Students will be introduced to the main theories for each of these topics from different perspectives (e.g., biological, behavioral, cognitive, and psychodynamic). Students will also look at the different types of scientific research (e.g., experiments, correlational research, review, meta-analysis), and will analyze the typical structure of a research paper (introduction, method, results, discussion, limitations, and implications).

Social Psychology

Social psychology is concerned with how we think about, influence, and relate to other people. This course is about the study of human social behavior, examining theories, findings, approaches, and methods in social psychology, as viewed from an interpersonal perspective. Topics include: the role of others in shaping self-concepts, as well as the formation of person perception, attitudes, attribution theory, obedience, conformity, and social relations. We will further look at the causes and methods of reducing prejudice and aggression, as well as exploring altruism, the development of gender roles, stereotypes, and nonverbal behavior. Readings and activities assigned will enhance discussion, broaden students' knowledge of and perspectives on human social interactions and give them a framework to interpret social behavior. In addition, since this course is taught in Florence, Italy, it provides a natural opportunity to compare and contrast the influence of culture on individuals. Living for even this short period in another country helps you to see and understand the relationship between the individual (self) and society, and a chance to view your own culture from a distance.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

Social Psychology

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive view of Social Psychology and its most important phenomena. Our approach will depart from the theoretical basis of social psychology but our learning process will be directly connected to our daily lives. This means that learning will combine the theoretical dimension with a set of new ways of looking at reality, at social others, and at yourself. To combine these two dimensions in our classes, we will complement the theoretical dimension with examples that will help us to identify and understand the theory on the basis of materials such as films, songs, conferences, and presentations of students’ research projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Child Psychology

This course is about the study of child development, from the prenatal period through adolescence, examining theories, findings, approaches and methods of developmental psychology. We will explore such questions as: What knowledge do infants have at birth? Is aggressiveness a stable attribute? Does early exposure to two languages confuse children? What do children understand about the causes of emotion? How do infants become attached? Why do school-age children pay more attention to their peers than their parents? Who raises altruistic children? We will cover the major domains of development -- biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional -- putting emphasis on discovering the many different biological and experiential factors that influence behavior, as well as the roles familial and extra familial factors play in the course of early human development. We will look at the causes and methods of reducing aggression, as well as exploring altruism, and moral development. The course will include practical exercises where students will be expected to conduct observations of children in real-life and/or on video, and plan appropriate methods to collect developmental data, with the opportunity to explore the differences between their own culture and Italian culture.

Adolescent Psychology

["Adolescence is a fascinating journey, and a particular time in the individual\u0092s lifespan when physical growth, emotional development and thinking take a new turn. Led by complex neurodevelopmental and hormonal changes, bodies develop markedly in size, shape, and appearance;","sexual feelings arise;","and action is shaped by new physical urges, sets of values, belief systems and the immense possibilities of abstract thinking. Adolescence is also the beginning of a quest for identity which demands a continuous renegotiation of family and social relationships, and in which desires for autonomy and independence coexist with cravings for guidance and connection. Furthermore, social media play an important role in adolescent development today as adolescents dedicate much time to it. This course discusses major theories and research studies on adolescent development and contemporary issues and concerns relating to adolescence and its psychology (school, family, media, sexuality, bullying, eating behavior, religion, etc.). The course will help students to develop their theoretical knowledge as well as their capacity for critical analysis. This will be achieved through reading and critiquing the scientific literature, and presenting their research in the form of group projects and individual assignments."]

Psychology of Crime

This course approaches the knowledge and understanding of criminal behavior and its impact upon individuals and society from developmental, cognitive-behavioral, and other psychological perspectives. The basic premise of this course is that multiple variables affect peoples behavior and for this reason this study requires attention to personality factors and how they interact with situational variables. Topics include: criminological theories, biological and psychological models of criminal behavior, crime and mental disorders, human aggression and violence, sexual assault, and criminal homicide. Students will acquire a new framework for interpreting criminal behavior. Students will be familiarized with different perspectives on criminal behavior as well as etiology, risk factors, assessment, and treatment in relation to different criminal behaviors as well as etiology, risk factors, assessment, and treatment in relation to different criminal behaviors. Recent research findings will be incorporated.

Forensic Psychology

The course offers an introduction to the field of forensic psychology, starting from the definition of crime and theories on development of criminal and delinquent behavior. Topics include: criminal homicide, stalking, sexual assault, family violence and child abuse. Students will acquire basic knowledge of investigative psychology including geographical and criminal profiling. Special emphasis is given to consulting with courts and the rehabilitation process in correctional facilities.

World Religions

["This course is designed as a historical and cultural survey of the basic teachings and doctrines of the major religious traditions of the world: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. The course will examine a significant number of specific themes in all religions studied such as the nature of this world and of the universe;","the relationship between the individual and the transcendent;","ultimate reality;","the meaning and goals of worldly life;","the importance of worship and rituals;","ethics and human action. Excerpts from important texts of each tradition will be analyzed such as The Torah, The Bible, The Koran, The Upanishads, The Bhagavad Gita, The Tao Te Ching, Chuang-Tzu, Buddhist Sutras, The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and The Confucian Canon. During the course, students will also learn the basic principles of meditation."]

Yoga: Breathing, Meditation, Spirituality

Exploration of yoga as a historical religious phenomenon, set of physical practices, and also as an element of modern culture;","includes both lecture and practical components. We will analyze yoga\u0092s roots in ancient India and such texts as the Upanishad and Pantajali\u0092s Yoga Sutras, as well as its popularity and place in contemporary culture. Students will examine yoga as a spiritual, mental, and physical practice;","in other words, as a path to attain spiritual realization and union with the divine, as a quieting and focusing technique, and as a healing and balancing physical exercise. Hence, we will study various breathing (pranayama) and meditation techniques along with ayurveda, an ancient Indian healing system and \u0093science of life.\u0094 Included is an overview of such different forms of yoga such as Hatha, Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Iyengar, Kundalini, Yin, as well as Laughter, Restorative, Bikram and yoga therapies for eating and addictive disorders. Finally, students will explore the interactions between practitioners of yoga and social, political, and environmental activism.

Fresco Painting and Restoration I

The students will be introduced to all phases of the art of Old Master fresco painting using techniques that include enlargement of a master drawing (students' choice), mixing fresco mortar (intonaco), and the use of pigments for fresco painting. Each student will also make a sinopia (preliminary drawing for fresco painting), complete a small fresco that will be detached as an exercise in fresco conservation, and create a graffito, a technique of mural decoration seen on many Florentine buildings.

Introductory Sculpture

["An introduction to the materials, technical skills, and processes used in creating sculpture. Covers basic skills of constructing figurative and abstract forms in three dimensions, with emphasis on additive and subtractive modes (modeling and carving). Materials used include clay, plaster, wax, wood, and metal;","projects include sculpture in the round, reliefs, and molds. Interactive critiques lay the foundation for self-assessment and critical analysis, with appropriate terminology, of sculpted works."]

Organized Crime: Sociology and History of the Italian Mafia

One of a long list of Italian words adopted in many other languages, Mafia is now applied to a variety of criminal organizations around the world. This course examines organized crime in Italy in historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its growth from the nineteenth century to the present. The chief focus is on the Sicilian Mafia as the original and primary form. Similar organizations in other Italian regions, as well as the Mafia in the United States, an outgrowth of Sicilian Mafia, are also considered. The course analyzes sociological aspects of the Mafia including language, message systems, the code of silence, the role of violence, structures of power, and social relationships. Also examined are the economics of organized crime and its impact on Italian society and politics.

Italian Society Today

A close look at the changing nature of Italian society, focusing on the postwar period and especially the last thirty years. Using a sociological framework, students analyze the opportunities and challenges affecting Italian society during the economic and cultural revival that followed reconstruction, and today. Themes addressed include everyday life, demographics and the lifespan, health, gender, family, education, religion, politics, legality, business and labor, culture, consumption and leisure, national and other identities and perceptions, urban and rural life, Italian regions and the southern question, emigration and immigration, race and ethnicity, diversity and integration (European, Mediterranean, global), and current issues. History and politics are addressed, but the primary focus is on social structures and tensions. This course offers a key to understanding the present and future of this distinctive and fascinating country.

Creative Writing

This course is geared toward students seriously motivated to write creatively and constructively through inspiration and self-discipline. The professor will stimulate students' creativity through the confrontation with different aids in order to help students create different kinds of written products. This class focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of creative writing by providing the basic principles and techniques that should be used when producing a written piece. Through inspirational exercises, the student will use the art of creative writing as a tool for literary expression and self-awareness. Reading work out loud for discussion and in-class critiquing allows the students to develop a critical awareness of their own writing as well as following the inspirational and editing process of fellow classmates. Mid-term and final projects will reflect students' writing progress. This course may be taken by students of English as a second language with advanced writing skills.

Anthropology of Violence and Conflict

Conflict pervades our daily lives, and violence erupts indirectly or directly into our experience. What is the distinction between the two, and what are intelligent and effective ways to deal with them? In this course students apply concepts from anthropology and political science to the dynamics of conflict and violence, of various types and levels, in contemporary society. The course examines major definitions of violence and conflict, exploring classic and notable theories and debates in the social sciences and other disciplines. A basic distinction between interpersonal and group dynamics receives much attention. Most focus will be upon the macro level: the ways in which communities, states, and other associations deal with the escalation of conflict and the real or presumed conditions underlying violence (such as exclusion or asymmetries in power structure). Issues addressed include the impact of globalization, cultural differences, identity and constituency, and the processes leading towards conflict transformation, peace, and reconciliation.

Florence Sketchbook - Beginning

In this course students develop basic observation, drawing and watercolor skills in a refreshing way. Students keep a series of sketchbooks and develop finished drawing projects from them. After initial training in fundamental drawing techniques for pencil, pen and other media, the course is dedicated principally to sketching outdoors in the city and environs. Students develop ability in representing a variety of subjects, including the human form, architecture, and landscape. Exploiting the advantages of the site, students explore such themes as historical monuments, street life, and formal gardens. They encounter art of the past, including efforts to sketch the same or similar topics. The course equips students to efficiently capture impressions by drawing in various media at various rates and scales, keeping annotations, ideas, sketches, and analyses of artwork in a journal, and developing personal interests. Students explore the monuments and vibrant street life of Florence, and observe numerous buildings, outdoor sculptures and squares that form part of the outstanding and entrancing artistic heritage of medieval and Renaissance Florence.

Florence and the House of the Medici

["The course deals with the full story of this extraordinary family, whose fortunes are traced over three hundred years, from the late 14th century to the early 18th century, from the rise of the Medici bank under Cosimo the Elder, to the final collapse of the house of the Medici when the last Medici Duke died in 1737. Through their immense power, the members of the Medici family ruled Florence, controlled the papacy, acted as the \"needle of the Italian compass,\" and sometimes influenced the policies of an entire continent. This course will provide students with an understanding of the history, politics, civic, and daily life of the period. The Medici were statesmen, scholars, patrons of the arts, collectors, entrepreneurs, and impresarios. Some of them were poets;","others were popes. The course will introduce students to the philosophical and artistic movements of the time, and will investigate the works of some of the artists who worked for the Medici\u0097Michelangelo, Poliziano, Donatello, Botticelli, and several musicians among them. Lectures will be supplemented by visits to the churches, museums, palaces, and galleries, that are relevant to the study of the Medici family."]

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

Magic, Divination, and Ghosts in the Ancient World

This course looks at the supernatural (i.e. spirits, ghosts, afterlife, netherworld etc.) and at the different practices through which humans in ancient cultures got in touch with, and represented it. A large part of the course will be dedicated to the various aspects of magic and sorcery, along with shamanism, divination, necromancy (evocation of the dead) and curses (namely binding and love curses). Several classes will also be focused on restless dead and ghosts, a privileged medium through which ancient people were believed to get in touch with the beyond. Documentary material, such as reproductions of ancient magical papyri and cursed tablets will be shown, and comparisons will be drawn when relevant with modern cultures and folklore.

Architecture Studio: Designing within and for Communities

This is a project-based service-learning studio course emphasizing team approaches to solving complex design problems that enhance social and civic functions within societies. Students develop architectural projects in the local community working hand-in-hand with institutional or not-for-profit type clients. It involves conducting client interviews and writing reviews, doing research and analysis of an existing site, sustainable goals setting, rudimentary urban planning and permitting, architectural programming, schematic design, project management and documentation. This course emphasizes community service activities and interactions with other professions within the built environment as a methodology to enrich personal growth and academic development.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

19th Century Art: From Neoclassicism to Post-Impressionism

["This course will examine European art between c.1790 and c.1900. This beginning of this period is marked by the passage from Neoclassicism to Romanticism, while its end corresponds to movements, such as Post-Impressionism, that heralded the avant-gardes of the 20th Century. In Europe, the 19th Century was an era of enormous changes, that affected many spheres, from politics to technology. We will investigate the links connecting society, ideology, culture, and the visual arts, and consider themes such as: critics and the public;","exhibitions and salons;","naturalism and realism;","nationalism;","Orientalism and Japonisme;","nature and landscape;","Impressionism;","dreams and inspiration;","heroism;","literary and historical themes. Special focus will be given to the notion of modernity, and its evolution. Artists studied include David, Goya, Delacroix, Turner, Courbet, Monet, Degas, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Seurat, Gauguin, Ensor, and Munch. Attention is also given to Italian artists and movements."]

Principles of Microeconomics

["Economic analysis is one of the most useful tools for understanding social phenomena. Principles of Microeconomics introduces students to the basics of economic ways of thinking. Economic theory is explained through the study of methods of analysis, assumptions and theories about how firms and individuals behave and how markets work. The course is useful for students in the applied social sciences, and is a necessary foundation for students wishing to continue the study of economics and business in their academic careers. The course is divided into four parts: The first is an introduction to languages, methods, and modeling used in microeconomics;","the second part focuses on the firm production process and market strategy;","the third analyses consumer theory and the way in which individual behavior is modeled by economists;","and the fourth and last part studies how the competitive and non-competitive market works. We will make extensive use of case studies and policy issues. which will be discussed in class."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Economics of the European Union

As the economic significance of the E.U. and its role at a global level have increased, and as the integration of the economies of the E.U. members have advanced, so the need for a sustained study of the development and impact of this new economic reality has grown. The basic objective of this course is the examination of the economic foundations of the European Union. The course starts with an in-depth analysis of the historical evolution of European integration and then moves to an examination of its economic aspects. The course is structured as follows: From the E.E.C. to the E.U. (historical evolution), the expansion of the E.U. into eastern Europe, the economic aspects of EC law within specific areas of EC law and policy (such as competition policy, agricultural policy, etc.), the European Monetary System (from the ECU to the Euro) and finally the external relationships of the E.U.

Wedding Planning

This course introduces students to Wedding Planning processes and implementation. Students learn to create, organize, coordinate, promote and market different types of weddings for different faiths and cultures as well as civil weddings. As in the Event Planning courses but with greater specificity, students will become familiar with this thriving industry learning about contracts, budgeting, vendors, venues and all other aspects for a successful event that satisfies diverse clients and settings. They will research and evaluate products and services including competition and target markets, working as a team, decision-making and developing business strategies. As part of the course the students will plan and design a typical wedding event with all the features of a real one and will involve interdepartmental collaboration in order to put into practice the skill sets learned.

Problems in Business Finance, Italy Focus

This course is intended both for business majors and for other students with an interest in international business and financial management. The class uses the case method of instruction to review, reinforce, and further develop the concepts of corporate finance introduced in your basic business introductory courses. Cases have been selected to take advantage of your study in Italy and to introduce you to improve your understanding of business situations in the US, Europe and Internationally. This class will begin with an overview of the business and economic history of Italy, concentrating on the recent decades. We will review Italys role in the European Union and its current challenges and opportunities.

Marketing / Event Planning Internship

["This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Marketing and Event Planning. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at an Event Management company. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: participating in onsite events, assisting vendors with site visits and clients;","working on social media marketing campaigns;","designing marketing materials;","analyzing brand image, market appeal and customer projections;","clerical and administrative work as required.\u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term."]

Doing Business in the European Union, Italy Focus

This course is intended for students interested in living, conducting business in or with individuals and businesses in the European Union, with a focus on the Italy. The course will address cross-cultural analysis of values and environmental constraints that shape business patterns and policies. We will examine the formal business structures and expected business practices of Europe in general and Italy in particular. We will also focus on the influence of history and cultural on business style. We will compare European business culture with other business cultures around the world including the United States and Asia.

General Chemistry I with Laboratory

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental theories of inorganic chemistry including the structure of atoms, electronic structure, bonding, reactions in aqueous media, gas behavior, intermolecular forces, and properties of solutions. The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.

LAB Session for General Chemistry I

Mandatory laboratory portion for CHM 135.The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.

Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory sequence to organic chemistry. The course provides a thorough understanding of the relationship between structures, properties, functionalities, and resulting reactions of organic compounds. The compounds covered include alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers, which are studied with regards to nomenclature, stereochemistry, stability, reaction mechanism, and structural analysis with spectroscopic methods. Accompanying three-hour weekly laboratory session provides hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon the theories and concepts learned, with training in relevant techniques, such as purification, synthesis, and analytical methods. This course is for science majors only. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.

LAB Session for Organic Chemistry I

Mandatory laboratory portion for CHM 221.The three-hour weekly laboratory sessions is hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon the theories and concepts learned, with training in relevant techniques, such as purification, synthesis, and analytical methods.

Science for Conservators II

Addresses the scientific concepts and the nature of materials concerning the conservation and restoration of works of art that are needed by practitioners. Topics include the physical and chemical properties of porous materials, synthetic materials, deterioration and consolidation, the nature of dirt, mechanical cleaning, liquids and solutions, organic solvents, cleaning with water, acidity and alkalinity, and cleaning through chemical reaction.

Advanced Pattern Development

This advanced course provides an opportunity to further develop patternmaking skills and utilize flat pattern and draping methods to produce original designs. The focus will be on bias drape and cut techniques and creating volume as applied to the semester project of two complete eveningwear outfits. Design development includes meeting specific technical requirements and research for a target customer and market category. Market category may change each semester depending on industry trends or instructors area of expertise.

Web Design

This course gives students the knowledge of the essential techniques of Web design. When starting to study this vast subject, students will follow a theoretical program structured by the step-by-step learning of the fundamental concepts of the world of Information and communication technology. Students will first acquire the fundamentals. Then they will use the most advanced techniques of digital editing to work on graphic design. The course is based on communication, and students will be stimulated to realize projects oriented to multimedia communication. Curiosity and an inclination for research are the essential characteristics of students interested in this course. Student must be familiar with the computer environment.

Web Animation

This course is geared toward the realization of digital animation for the Web. The program is mainly based on the use of the most popular techniques in this field. Students learn to use the best and most appropriate software on a methodological, theoretical, and practical basis. They realize their own ideas applying techniques learned through the intense use of software for graphic animation and languages used for programming interactive applications.

Perspective Drawing and Rendering

This course aims at giving students the ability to render and represent an interior space and a product design object. Students will learn drawing techniques and their professional applications, without the use of the computer, both freehand and with the aid of technical tools. The elements will be rendered in detail, including finishes, fabrics, furniture, and accessories of many different materials (wood, plastic, stones, etc.), using rendering tools such as Promarker or other professional markers, chalks, and watercolors. Issues of presentation and different methods of representation, including sketching, and technical 2D and 3D drawing, will be covered.

Retail Design

This course is structured to help students develop awareness of the importance of graphic arts in the design and execution of presentations and promotions for consumer merchandise. This course is intended to teach the students the different aspects of the professional approach to the design of shops and showrooms. Students will learn to design complete layouts and how to represent them through technical drawings. During the semester different projects about retail shops will be developed. Students will carry out personal research on existing projects similar to the one they have to design in class in order to explore retail design and to develop personal sensitivity in creating project atmosphere. In the projects students must consider functional and aesthetic aspects, trying to formulate a good solution and present it in an appropriate way.Note: Students are highly recommended to be equipped with personal laptops for design projects

Computer Rendering for Interior Design

In this class students will be taught how to create a digital image from a 3D model by means of a software program. Digital images are produced using a variety of computer technologies. Modeling, color theory, surface rendering, and light control are emphasized in relation to technical illustration, hardware characteristics, and software capabilities.

Food in Italian Culture (in Italian only)

In this advanced course, taught entirely in Italian, the study of Italian regional food permits students to expand their cultural and linguistic competencies. Italian regional cuisine is closely linked to local history, geography, lifestyle and culture. The courses leitmotifs are the cultural representation of food and the value historically given to food in Italian society, with reference to cinema, to literature. Readings will reveal the complex relationship between food, culture and society. Frequent oral and written reports will enable students to strengthen the four main linguistic skills. This course combines theoretical topics and practical cuisine-related activities in the classroom, and includes cultural research analyzing specific texts and the local context and its surrounding territory. Each class session includes a brief hands-on cooking session in which students prepare one popular Italian dish.

Italian for Business (in Italian only)

The course is designed for advanced students of Italian who wish to further their linguistic knowledge in the specific areas of business. It aims to provide students with the specific vocabulary and professional expressions that are most often used. It gives grounding in Italian business operations and environments, and recreates the types of communicative situations relevant to the business world, by which students will acquire transferable academic and professional skills. Besides including Italian grammar and vocabulary as used in business, it incorporates simulations of meetings, telephoning, negotiations, and presentations. Lessons will help students build confidence in using Italian in professional and social scenarios. Students will also learn the Italian formats for writing formal business letters, faxes, e-mails and the curriculum vitae.

Italian Women's Literature (in Italian only)

["This course will examine the representation of Italian women from the Middle Ages to the present through a selection of contemporary writings and movies by Italian female authors. Among the topics considered are the relationship between women and their cultural and social backgrounds;","women's historical, cultural, and artistic contributions;","continuities and breaks with the dominant male tradition. Through group discussion and written assignments, students will critically analyze the value of the female experience as portrayed in contemporary Italian literature and cinema."]

6-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2 and Intermediate 1

This course is directed towards the acquisition of new structures, such as the means to express personal opinions and give simple narrations of events in the past. At the end of the course students will be able to manage conversations on topics of personal interest or everyday life. This course offers the students the opportunity of a more intensive learning experience thanks to the daily study and practice of the language.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 2

This course focuses on the ability to understand extended speech, as well as complex and specialized texts. At the end of the course students will develop the ability to use language flexibly for social and professional purposes. They will be able to recognize a wide range of idioms and to apply register shifts.

The History of Jewels and their Symbolism

This course will follow the evolution of jewelry, from the primitive shell beads to the Renaissance then the Art Nouveau and finally the modern jewelry masters. Jewelry illustrates stylistic changes, different fashions, and how taste evolves over time. We will analyze pieces of jewelry and their symbolic meaning, making reference to paintings, architecture, and decorative artworks. Part of the course will deal with jewelry as signs of power, and with the most renowned jewelry designers, from Benvenuto Cellini to Tiffany. This course will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of artistic techniques, a technical vocabulary, and a research methodology. Visits to museums, exhibitions and workshops in Florence will be integral parts of the course.

Jewelry Design I

Students are introduced to the creative design of jewels, by using hand drawn sketches and manual techniques. The main drawing techniques, such as orthographic projections and 3D sketches, will be taught, followed by rendering techniques using various media, such as watercolors, gouache, markers, and pastels. Existing projects by professional designers, publications, and objects from selected museums and exhibitions will be analyzed and used as additional resources.

Wax Carving and Casting Techniques I

["This course will introduce students to fundamental casting processes and focus on familiarizing students with hard and soft wax working techniques. Students will complete their own simple jewelry set by finishing and assembling the metal cast elements as in regular jewelry production. The traditional casting techniques, such as cuttlebone and sand casting, will also be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on preparing a design;","after an in-depth study of wax working, a corresponding master model will be created. This model will be duplicated with a reusable flexible \u0093rubber mold.\u0094"]

Contemporary Jewelry Design

The course, designed specifically for the Professional Jewelry Design Certificate program, will introduce students to the contemporary world of jewelry. Through both lectures and a practical approach, students will learn when, where, and how contemporary jewelry design began and who the jewelry makers were. Ideas and concepts by contemporary artists will be discussed. There will be practical drawing exercises, naturally building on the previous Jewelry Design courses. Also, the students will visit practicing artists in their own studios.

Jewelry Making III

This is an advanced jewelry course for students taking the Professional Jewelry Certificate, and who already have a general background in jewelry making. Students will address various methods of developing articulated mechanisms, such as hinges, lost hinges, gimbals, and closing systems (clasps, box catches). In addition, students will learn methods for forging and forming metals together with metal surface treatments through the advanced use of bench and hand-tools. Students will also be shown samples of machine-made components available in the trade and understand their use. The students will begin developing their own jewelry creating style.

Modern Technology in Jewelry

This theoretical course, designed for the Professional Study Certificate program, addresses the characteristics of various materials and metals used in the field of jewelry design. The theory of mechanical techniques, such as the use of the turning machine and the pantograph, will be demonstrated. Furthermore, jewelry-related high-tech machines, such as laser welding, electro-forming and 3D-printing machines, will be presented by visiting several modern jewelry studios.

Wax Carving and Casting Techniques II

This course builds on the fundamental techniques learned in the first part. The aim of this course is to improve students creative and manual abilities to make jewelry in wax, to be cast in bronze and silver. Emphasis will be placed on the design of a cohesive jewelry collection. V