Italy Florence Duomo 119178346

Students who choose to study abroad in Florence with API at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute (LdM) – Florence may elect to take 1 or 2 courses per four-week term; alternatively, they may elect to pursue a 6-credit workshop course.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and API Ambassador Program

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Entry requirement: valid passport
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 May 24, 2021 - Jun 24, 2021

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $5,830

Apr 1, 2021 Apr 1, 2021
Summer 1 and 2 Combined May 24, 2021 - Jul 29, 2021

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $11,680

Apr 1, 2021 Apr 1, 2021
Summer 2 Jun 28, 2021 - Jul 29, 2021

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $5,830

Apr 1, 2021 Apr 1, 2021

The prices listed below are for 1 course per session. Students who are interested in taking 2 courses per session will incur an additional fee of $1,350 per course, per session.

API students participate excursions designed to help familiarize them with the culture and surrounding areas of their host city and country. The following is a listing of potential excursions for API Florence programs. API may need to modify the excursions offered in a given term due to travel restrictions or health and safety concerns.

  • Cinque Terre

    The Cinque Terre, five villages hidden in little coastal inlets and clinging to the rocks overhanging the sea, are located near of the Ligure Riviera. Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore form the heart of the National Park, proclaimed a monument to the heritage of mankind by UNESCO.

  • Venice & Venetian Islands

    Venice is one of the most well-known and romantic cities in the world. Famous for the canals and beautiful Piazza San Marco, the city welcomes visitors and scholars to explore its winding streets, walk the numerous bridges connecting section to section, and to soak up the magic of this city on the water. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe. Its strategic location made Venice an important center of trade between the East and the West, and art and culture blossomed as well, leaving a legacy of amazing artistic and architectural treasures to discover throughout the winding streets and canals. During this trip, students will also visit the Venetian islands of Murano and Burano.

  • Verona

    Verona was home to most famous lovers in history: Romeo and Juliet (visitors can still find their famous balcony here). Today’s Verona has much more to offer than just references to Shakespeare, including the Roman Amphitheater (which is still used today for operas), the market at Piazza delle Erbe (once the Roman forum), and the medieval streets by the Adige river. Lake Garda is the biggest of the pre-Alpine lakes and the largest in Italy. The beauty of the countryside, the Mediterranean vegetation (vineyards, olive groves and citrus orchards), and its mild climate make Lake Garda one of the most thriving health and tourist centers in the country. One can find remnants of many different historical periods in the cities and villages around the lake, such as Roman ruins, medieval churches and beautiful liberty villas.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Cinque Terre

    The Cinque Terre, five villages hidden in little coastal inlets and clinging to the rocks overhanging the sea, are located near of the Ligure Riviera. Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore form the heart of the National Park, proclaimed a monument to the heritage of mankind by UNESCO.

  • Venice & Venetian Islands

    Venice is one of the most well-known and romantic cities in the world. Famous for the canals and beautiful Piazza San Marco, the city welcomes visitors and scholars to explore its winding streets, walk the numerous bridges connecting section to section, and to soak up the magic of this city on the water. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe. Its strategic location made Venice an important center of trade between the East and the West, and art and culture blossomed as well, leaving a legacy of amazing artistic and architectural treasures to discover throughout the winding streets and canals. During this trip, students will also visit the Venetian islands of Murano and Burano.

  • Verona

    Verona was home to most famous lovers in history: Romeo and Juliet (visitors can still find their famous balcony here). Today’s Verona has much more to offer than just references to Shakespeare, including the Roman Amphitheater (which is still used today for operas), the market at Piazza delle Erbe (once the Roman forum), and the medieval streets by the Adige river. Lake Garda is the biggest of the pre-Alpine lakes and the largest in Italy. The beauty of the countryside, the Mediterranean vegetation (vineyards, olive groves and citrus orchards), and its mild climate make Lake Garda one of the most thriving health and tourist centers in the country. One can find remnants of many different historical periods in the cities and villages around the lake, such as Roman ruins, medieval churches and beautiful liberty villas.

  • Amalfi Coast: Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Amalfi Coast: Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-6 credits per session (up to 12 total)

Students who choose to study abroad in Florence with API at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute (LdM) – Florence may elect to take 1 or 2 courses per four-week term; alternatively, they may elect to pursue a 6-credit workshop course.

SUMMER WORKSHOPS

LdM offers a variety of studio workshops during the summer. These workshops provide students with the opportunity to work on-location and involve field work as well as theoretical lectures. The workshops are 4 weeks in duration and are worth 6 U.S. semester credits. Each workshop, based in Florence, focuses on a particular discipline and includes one week of field study. Workshop participants may not be able to attend all API excursions due to required course travel. Students are not reimbursed for any missed API excursions. Workshops are listed in the summer course offerings section along with the other course information.

LDM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

The LdM Professional Opportunities Program offers students a non-credit experiential learning experience. It is similar to an internship, but it requires less time and is based on the completion of one single project. Students are given the opportunity to collaborate with both the LdM Institute and local Florentine businesses, organizations, and associations, and upon successful completion of the project, students receive a certificate of participation. The Professional Opportunities Project gives students the opportunity to add international work experience to their resume/curriculum vitae. The Professional Opportunities offered for each semester are generally announced at the beginning of the term after the students have arrived, and the professional opportunities offered differ from term to term.

Opportunities may include:

  • Blogging for LDM Marketing Office
  • Graphic Design for local businesses
  • Marketing and social media for local businesses

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive transcripts from U.S.-accredited Marist College for courses taken at LdM. Marist College is a four-year, fully accredited U.S. college in Poughkeepsie, New York.

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    Lauren Daniels

    Lauren Daniels will be your Program Manager for this location and will prepare you to go abroad with us!

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    Federica Guerrieri

    Federica Guerrieri is our Italy Regional Director and a resource for you on-site.

  • Semekpretlisca1Orfio

    Valentina Scalini

    Valentina will be one of your Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while living in Italy with us!

COURSE OFFERINGS

Be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to prerequisites and class times in order to avoid conflicts.Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost.

Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who choose intermediate level Italian or higher must complete a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency. Students who do not meet proficiency standards are assigned to the appropriate course.

When obtaining pre-approval for course selections, students should refer to the Marist College course codes and titles, as these will appear on the transcript. If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAM INFORMATION

Program selection must be made at the time of application and cannot be changed on-site. Italian language courses are taught at all levels (beginning through advanced) while most other courses are taught in English. The program fee depends on whether a student elects to take 3 or 6 semester credits.

Students complete one or two courses and receive 3-6 credit hours per summer session, generally 3 credits per course. Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who choose above the 101 level of Italian must complete a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency.

Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost. Students should make their course selections from the online listings when completing the program application as course times, descriptions, prerequisites and lab fees are subject to change. API recommends that students obtain pre-approval from their home university for courses that they plan on taking abroad.

STUDIO ART COURSES

Class schedules on the API website indicate that many of the studio art courses include two time blocks; students enrolled in those courses must attend both time blocks.

Placement exams for studio arts courses are mandatory for any student wishing to register for higher level (e.g., non-beginning level) courses. Studio art placement tests are administered during the first week of classes. Students are provided with the exact meeting time during orientation.

COURSE MATERIALS & LAB FEES

Many classes require that students purchase their own books and/or materials. The cost of materials varies depending on the type of course. While students may want to bring some basic, easily transportable materials (such as brushes or pastels) with them, most course materials should be purchased in Italy once classes start. By doing so, students can take the opportunity to speak directly with their instructors to make sure they buy exactly what is required for the course.

Many studio arts, cuisine and wine appreciation courses require a lab fee that is paid by students upon arrival. In addition, several courses from different departments (especially the summer workshops) require that students pay for visits and field trips as noted in the course descriptions (on the website) for such courses.

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation, and the desire to further investigate this field.

Palaces of Florence

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.

The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture

The course offers students a first-hand experience of the historical city of Florence, which from 1252 was divided into four "quartieri" or quarters. Each quarter, which was named after the main church of the district, presents its own particular social, political and urban characteristics, and these form the central themes of the course. Students will discover the prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities and historical events that have characterized the development of each quarter from the medieval period to the modern age. Site visits will form an essential part of the learning experience.

Wine and Culture I: Wines of Italy

This course investigates Italian wine in the context of the extraordinary history, philosophy, culture. and lifestyle of Italy. In this context wine is not only a much-loved drink, but also forms an essential part of rich cultural traditions going back to the Etruscans and the ancient Romans. From the study of wine we learn about the practices of earlier cultures, about their values and our own, and we gain a unique perspective on Italy today. The course focuses on the distinct traditions and economic, geographic, and climatic aspects of each area of Italian wine production. Students explore grape varieties and different techniques used to make wine, and the national and regional classifications. They also subject representative wines to organoleptic analysis (visual, olfactory, and gustative). Each wine is studied in terms of its characteristics, history, and traditions, and in relationship to the particular foods meant to accompany it.

Language of Instruction: English   

Italian Food and Culture: Pairing Food &Wine

Italian cuisine is the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. Thanks in recent years to a greater availability of wines from different regions, the pairing of food and wine, always a traditional aspect of Italian cuisine, has become more important in the organization of a menu and the presentation of a meal. In this course the various ways of pairing Italian food and wine will be analyzed and used for menu planning. This involves research into aspects of both wine and food, with special emphasis on classification and technical terminology, nutritional and health issues, chemical composition, sensory and other evaluation techniques, as well as cooking skills that will be practiced regularly in class. Not suitable for vegetarians.

Organized Crime: Sociology and History of Italian Mafia

One of a long list of Italian words adopted in many other languages, mafia is now applied to a variety of criminal organizations around the world. This course examines organized crime in Italy in historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its growth from the nineteenth century to the present. The chief focus is on the Sicilian mafia as the original and primary form. Similar organizations in other Italian regions, as well as the mafia in the United States, an outgrowth of Sicilian mafia, are also considered. The course analyzes sociological aspects of the mafia including language, message systems, the code of silence, the role of violence, structures of power, and social relationships. Also examined are the economics of organized crime and its impact on Italian society and politics.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Language of Instruction: Italian   

Italian Crime Fiction

From the middle of the twentieth century, Italian writers such as Gadda and Sciascia began to integrate into their novels and short stories certain aspects of the crime genre, in such a way that the mystery element became an instrument for analyzing contemporary Italian realities. By the 1990's a new generation of writers such as Camilleri, Ammaniti and Lucarelli had developed a specifically Italian approach to an international literary genre, the "Italian noir", which aims at revealing unpleasant truths to a vast audience in an entertaining way. The goal of this course is to explore some of the most representative works of the crime fiction genre in contemporary Italian literature, from its early forms to the present. The study of these works will also involve an analysis of the strong socio-cultural dimensions of contemporary Italy, which are the result of a complex combination of geographical, historical, political and linguistic factors. These in turn affect different forms of organized and unorganized crime, and differences in the relationship between citizens and the law. During the course students will also study the relationship between Italian crime fiction and its foreign counterpart, including the works of authors such as Dibdin, Highsmith and Harris.

Highlights
  • Classes taught in English and Italian with international students
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (Marist College)
  • Field-based workshops available
  • Professional development opportunities

API students in Florence will live in apartments located within the historic district of Florence. Apartments are typically a 25-30 minute walk from the school. Some API apartments can house as many as 10 students, although most students will share a room with only 1-2 other students. All apartments come equipped with a kitchen, 1-3 bathrooms, and common areas. Washing machines are available, and students are responsible for their own meals. Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee. Apartments in Florence vary in size and layout.

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