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Students who choose to study abroad in Florence with API at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute (LdM) – Florence may elect to take 1 or 2 courses per four-week term; alternatively, they may elect to pursue a 6-credit workshop course.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Florence programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Cinque Terre

    The Cinque Terre, five villages hidden in little coastal inlets and clinging to the rocks overhanging the sea, are located near of the Ligure Riviera. Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore form the heart of the National Park, proclaimed a monument to the heritage of mankind by UNESCO.

  • Venice & Venetian Islands

    Venice is one of the most well-known and romantic cities in the world. Famous for the canals and beautiful Piazza San Marco, the city welcomes visitors and scholars to explore its winding streets, walk the numerous bridges connecting section to section, and to soak up the magic of this city on the water. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe. Its strategic location made Venice an important center of trade between the East and the West, and art and culture blossomed as well, leaving a legacy of amazing artistic and architectural treasures to discover throughout the winding streets and canals. During this trip, students will also visit the Venetian islands of Murano and Burano.

  • Verona

    Verona was home to most famous lovers in history: Romeo and Juliet (visitors can still find their famous balcony here). Today’s Verona has much more to offer than just references to Shakespeare, including the Roman Amphitheater (which is still used today for operas), the market at Piazza delle Erbe (once the Roman forum), and the medieval streets by the Adige river. Lake Garda is the biggest of the pre-Alpine lakes and the largest in Italy. The beauty of the countryside, the Mediterranean vegetation (vineyards, olive groves and citrus orchards), and its mild climate make Lake Garda one of the most thriving health and tourist centers in the country. One can find remnants of many different historical periods in the cities and villages around the lake, such as Roman ruins, medieval churches and beautiful liberty villas.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Cinque Terre

    The Cinque Terre, five villages hidden in little coastal inlets and clinging to the rocks overhanging the sea, are located near of the Ligure Riviera. Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore form the heart of the National Park, proclaimed a monument to the heritage of mankind by UNESCO.

  • Venice & Venetian Islands

    Venice is one of the most well-known and romantic cities in the world. Famous for the canals and beautiful Piazza San Marco, the city welcomes visitors and scholars to explore its winding streets, walk the numerous bridges connecting section to section, and to soak up the magic of this city on the water. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe. Its strategic location made Venice an important center of trade between the East and the West, and art and culture blossomed as well, leaving a legacy of amazing artistic and architectural treasures to discover throughout the winding streets and canals. During this trip, students will also visit the Venetian islands of Murano and Burano.

  • Verona

    Verona was home to most famous lovers in history: Romeo and Juliet (visitors can still find their famous balcony here). Today’s Verona has much more to offer than just references to Shakespeare, including the Roman Amphitheater (which is still used today for operas), the market at Piazza delle Erbe (once the Roman forum), and the medieval streets by the Adige river. Lake Garda is the biggest of the pre-Alpine lakes and the largest in Italy. The beauty of the countryside, the Mediterranean vegetation (vineyards, olive groves and citrus orchards), and its mild climate make Lake Garda one of the most thriving health and tourist centers in the country. One can find remnants of many different historical periods in the cities and villages around the lake, such as Roman ruins, medieval churches and beautiful liberty villas.

  • Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

  • Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-6 credits per session (up to 12 total)

Students who choose to study abroad in Florence with API at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute (LdM) – Florence may elect to take 1 or 2 courses per four-week term; alternatively, they may elect to pursue a 6-credit workshop course.

SUMMER WORKSHOPS

LdM offers a variety of studio workshops during the summer. These workshops provide students with the opportunity to work on-location and involve field work as well as theoretical lectures. The workshops are 4 weeks in duration and are worth 6 U.S. semester credits. Each workshop, based in Florence, focuses on a particular discipline and includes one week of field study. Workshop participants may not be able to attend all API excursions due to required course travel. Students are not reimbursed for any missed API excursions. Workshops are listed in the summer course offerings section along with the other course information.

LDM PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

The LdM Professional Opportunities Program offers students a non-credit experiential learning experience. It is similar to an internship, but it requires less time and is based on the completion of one single project. Students are given the opportunity to collaborate with both the LdM Institute and local Florentine businesses, organizations, and associations, and upon successful completion of the project, students receive a certificate of participation. The Professional Opportunities Project gives students the opportunity to add international work experience to their resume/curriculum vitae. The Professional Opportunities offered for each semester are generally announced at the beginning of the term after the students have arrived, and the professional opportunities offered differ from term to term.

Opportunities may include:

  • Blogging for LDM Marketing Office
  • Graphic Design for local businesses
  • Marketing and social media for local businesses

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive transcripts from U.S.-accredited Marist College for courses taken at LdM. Marist College is a four-year, fully accredited U.S. college in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Lauren Daniels

    Lauren Daniels will be your Program Manager for this location and will prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - lauren.daniels@apiabroad.com

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    Ryan McCann

    Ryan McCann will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - ryan.mccann@apiabroad.com

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    Federica Guerrieri

    Federica Guerrieri is our Italy Regional Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Monica Gabbrielli

    Monica will be one of our Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while you are in Italy!

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    Ellen Oyasaeter

    Ellen Oyasaeter will be one of your Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you on-site.

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    Valentina Scalini

    Valentina will be one of your Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while living in Italy with us!

COURSE OFFERINGS

Be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to prerequisites and class times in order to avoid conflicts.Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost.

Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who choose intermediate level Italian or higher must complete a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency. Students who do not meet proficiency standards are assigned to the appropriate course.

When obtaining pre-approval for course selections, students should refer to the Marist College course codes and titles, as these will appear on the transcript. If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAM INFORMATION

Program selection must be made at the time of application and cannot be changed on-site. Italian language courses are taught at all levels (beginning through advanced) while most other courses are taught in English. The program fee depends on whether a student elects to take 3 or 6 semester credits.

Students complete one or two courses and receive 3-6 credit hours per summer session, generally 3 credits per course. Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who choose above the 101 level of Italian must complete a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency.

Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost. Students should make their course selections from the online listings when completing the program application as course times, descriptions, prerequisites and lab fees are subject to change. API recommends that students obtain pre-approval from their home university for courses that they plan on taking abroad.

STUDIO ART COURSES

Class schedules on the API website indicate that many of the studio art courses include two time blocks; students enrolled in those courses must attend both time blocks.

Placement exams for studio arts courses are mandatory for any student wishing to register for higher level (e.g., non-beginning level) courses. Studio art placement tests are administered during the first week of classes. Students are provided with the exact meeting time during orientation.

COURSE MATERIALS & LAB FEES

Many classes require that students purchase their own books and/or materials. The cost of materials varies depending on the type of course. While students may want to bring some basic, easily transportable materials (such as brushes or pastels) with them, most course materials should be purchased in Italy once classes start. By doing so, students can take the opportunity to speak directly with their instructors to make sure they buy exactly what is required for the course.

Many studio arts, cuisine and wine appreciation courses require a lab fee that is paid by students upon arrival. In addition, several courses from different departments (especially the summer workshops) require that students pay for visits and field trips as noted in the course descriptions (on the website) for such courses.

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

Cultural Learning through Italian

This class alternates experiential learning, cultural insights and projects promoting communication and socio-cultural understanding.

Organic Agriculture

Organic agriculture of plant products is a method of production that aims to obtain quality food products while respecting the environment of the production process. This means coordinating the elements used in farming and ensuring the renaturalization of an environment compromised by intensive agriculture. Managing a farm that uses the organic agriculture philosophy entails using new operational techniques that permit productivity and quality, while respecting the constraints imposed by legislation, and at the same time optimizing business profitability. In the transition from traditional to organic farming it is important to choose techniques as well as a variety of products that generate the best results in that particular environment. True organic agriculture is not only a question of business management but it also requires knowledge of agronomy and an understanding of the systems methodology and history as well as its cultural aspect, i.e., the social, intellectual, and ethical values of this system. The course includes experiential learning with seasonal activities at a local farm and facilities, horticultural cultivation in Spring and olive harvest and pressing in Fall. The course meets for 45 hours in Fall and 90 hours in Spring.

Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence

This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.

Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine

["Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place also within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Following the guidelines of experimental archaeology students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities;","everyday eating habits and etiquette;","rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. The key of the analysis is the Food Sign, a specially-developed tool with two inseparable sides: anthropological meaning and gastronomy. This instrument helps to show that in Antiquity any given dish wasn\u0092t a mere result of a recipe to prepare food in a particular way as part of a meal, but was inevitably linked to sacral and social meanings. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to the modern cuisine (when a particular tradition has continued) and interests."]

The Mediterranean: History, Peoples, and Integration

This course introduces students to the peoples of the Mediterranean region, and aims to provide them with an understanding of the complex social, religious, and cultural realities of the area. After a historical overview of contemporary events (especially in the Maghreb region) and Euro-Mediterranean relationships, attention will be focused on the recent waves of migration from the south shore of the Mediterranean to Europe, its problems and possibilities for the future of the area. The course will analyze the difficulties of the coexistence with different cultures in European societies, and the ranges of intercultural mediation practices available that might foster real dialogue and reconciliation among different communities. Special attention will be paid to the analysis of the Islamic community and the success or failure of mediation practices in various social contexts.

The Built Environment of Florence

This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture and open spaces. The construction of the city up to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from the architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main interest will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents and the powerful families that ruled and determined different architectural choices.

Public Space Design (Summer only)

["The course will investigate the key role of public space in contemporary cities. Special attention will be placed on the capability of places to attract people and emotional scenarios linked to their reactions. Examples of recent works from world-renowned architects, landscape architects, and artists will provide the student with different design methods. A specific site in Florence or elsewhere in its surroundings will represent the core of the project;","students will be asked to start off with a conceptual idea and gradually give shape to it up to the final presentation through drawings, models, video, etc. The course will mainly be carried out in class although outdoor guided surveys will also take place."]

Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.

Crossroads of Faith: The Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Heritage of Rome

This course proposes an itinerary from Late Antiquity to Contemporaneity focusing on the artistic production and historical interactions pertinent to non-Catholic religious groups in Rome. It is intended to give students an overview of the main artistic and urbanistic achievements regarding the Jewish community, but also, to a lesser extent, of some of the production relevant to Eastern Christians, Protestants and Muslims. Classes are designed to offer an alternative perspective on the Eternal City, mostly perceived as the cradle of Catholicism. Lessons will cover a range of different topics, such as the analysis of artifacts and texts (manuscripts, prints, textiles, but also legends, midrashim, oral accounts), and it will also include the study of various sites, both thanks to documentary sources (lost buildings, destroyed churches), and through on-site visits (Ghetto, Synagogue, Jewish Museum, Non-Catholic Cemetery, monuments to Giordano Bruno and Giuseppe Garibaldi).

Wine Business

This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.

Global Business and Society

This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances, and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.

Social Media Marketing

This course covers the planning and integration of social media into marketing plans and it will explain how to build winning strategies and how to track their effectiveness. This includes learning about fundamental marketing concepts that are relevant to the digital world and acquiring new skills for creating and implementing successful marketing campaigns, online strategies and operations pursued through new media. Students will be introduced to the most popular social media platforms and will learn about the differences between specific media tools and the different purposes of operations pursued through each of them and their proper use to expand business and engage with online customers. In this course, students will be able to build effective digital tactics and gain skills to become social media managers.

Luxury Brand Management

This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.

Public Relations

We will study the definitions, functions, and evolution of public relations, including the application of PR theory and ways to plan a PR campaign (planning process, issue analysis, research methods and strategies). The different fields in which public relations practitioners operate will be presented through case studies and exercises: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. Finally, future perspectives and new technological opportunities will be taken into account, trying to define new boundaries for a discipline too often underrated or misunderstood.

Intercultural Communication

The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Intercultural Communication

This course introduces key concepts and models of international communication. The objective of the course is to master the main communication tools and concepts in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Global Sports Marketing

This course will cover the practice of sports marketing in the increasingly globalized athletic economy. Students will begin by discussing the global sports economy and the creation of international sports brands. Students will study the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships to event planning to understanding public relations and publicity, all within the complex nature of international sporting events and audiences. Students will examine the differences in marketing practices across nations and cultures and study the challenges of marketing international sporting events to varied audiences. Students will also look at the impact of globalization on the needs for corporate sponsorships, as well as the impact of global sporting events on local and international communities. Students will examine case studies of various global sporting events to better understand best practices. By the end of the class, students will create a strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.

Engineering Economy

This course teaches methods of economic evaluation of engineering projects and alternatives. Topics include time value of money, decision-making methods, break-even and sensitivity analysis, capital budgeting, replacement analysis, depreciation, taxes and public work analysis.Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply

Fashion Illustration I (Summer only)

This course for beginning students explores the world of fashion illustration. Students will learn how to draw a fashion figure, render fabrics and designs using a variety of media such as markers, pencils, and collage. Special attention will be given to coloring and shading. During the semester there will be a site visit to the Costume Gallery at the Pitti Palace, a museum of worldwide importance. Students will learn to illustrate designs and technical flat drawings. In addition, they will research target markets and costumer profiles, create a collection, and present a conceptual moodboard.

Fashion Consumer Behavior

This course examines the decision-making process of the customer through fashion concepts, theories, cultural influences, demographics, psychographics, and consumer dynamics. Students learn the analysis of perceptions, communication, and ethics to determine how a customer can turn into a consumer by understanding behavior and reactions to the impact of purchasing. Students analyze research data and the application in assessing market strategy. The theory of motivation and the reasons underlying the wearing of clothes are also studied.

Fashion Buying Concepts

Retail and the fashion business are stimulating, fascinating, and in a process of continual change. Understanding the dynamics and significance of retail buying concepts will be critical to the success of anyone interested in buying, selling or communicating consumer fashion products and services. Students will study fundamentals of retail buying including planning, assorting, pricing and purchasing fashion inventories. The effect of different retail formats on purchasing, identification and evaluation of resources and ethical issues in sourcing are included. With global fashion industry constantly undergoing change, an important part of this class involves understanding current events and the effect on retail buying. The course is targeted towards students who are looking for careers in fashion buying, merchandising, marketing and should already have taken classes towards these majors. The ability to work in teams and to communicate is strongly emphasized.

Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth

The aim of this course is to examine the reach and impact that Darwins theory of natural selection has had on religion, gender, and race and to uncover some common misconceptions about his work. The Origin of Species brought about a profound intellectual revolution not only in the natural, but also in the social sciences. Part one of the course examines the building blocks of Darwin's theory and its dissemination, reception, and legacy. Part two examines the theoretical basis of modern evolutionary biology and analyzes some of the most popular (and contested) theories of evolutionary psychology relating to human reproduction, gender, relationships, and beauty. The course further offers a critical study of some evolutionary ideas after Darwin, focusing on eugenics, revealing flaws in modern popular scientific discourse as well as potential limitations to the scientific method and culture. Student presentations will consider Darwin's influence on areas such as art and media and also on our understanding of physical and mental disabilities.

Foundations of Visual Communication (Summer only)

This course is essential for all the students that, either as beginners in Graphic Design or with previous experience in Digital Graphics, desire to learn the secrets of "good design." The aim of the course is to assist students in developing intellectual skills and familiarity with the rules which underpin the creation of graphic works that convey both aesthetic quality and communicative power. The course is structured into a series of projects, lectures, analyses, and drawing exercises which, through the application and study of design theories, aim at offering students a methodology for solving graphic and visual projects. Topics include: B/W techniques, layouts and grids, colors and shape balance, mirror and rotational symmetries, repetitive patterns, archetypes and primary shapes, fonts and typography, studies of visual languages and cultural backgrounds, analysis of styles and artworks, rules to derive families of shapes and colors, formats and harmonic proportions such as the diagonal of the square, icons, logotypes and trademarks, studies of 3D models and packaging. The course places emphasis on the learning of Graphic Design principles and concepts that are independent of the tools used for production (digital or manual techniques). There is a focus on learning from the great tradition of Italian design, and the student is encouraged to make the most of the visual and cultural experience offered by the city of Florence.

Italian Renaissance Civilization and Culture

["This course explores the historical, literary and cultural developments of one of the most remarkable and vibrant periods of Italian history: the Renaissance. Students will be introduced to the main historical developments of the Renaissance period from the late fourteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century. The Renaissance is above all the age of the individual and the affirmation of his\/her achievements, best summed up by the credo \"Man \u0096 the measure of all things\". The focus of this course is therefore upon great personalities of the Italian Renaissance mainly in the fields of the visual arts, literature and philosophy, but also drawn from those of politics and civic life. These include key figures of the most prominent Italian families: the Medici, the Sforza, the Della Rovere;","artists and architects: Brunelleschi, Leon Battista Alberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo;","writers, poets and philosophers: Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, as well as merchants and bankers. All these individuals left their mark in Italy between the early 1400s and the late 1500s."]

International Terrorism

This course examines the phenomenon of terrorism, which may be defined as the calculated use of violence (or threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals related to political or religious ideology. It addresses questions like the following: What is a terrorist and how should terrorism be defined? What are the motivations behind the use of terrorism and political violence? What are the policies that states are adopting to combat terrorist attacks? What is the future of terrorism and counter-terrorism? The course looks briefly at the "terror regimes" of previous centuries, and then studies the different forms of terrorism in the 21st century in terms of their geopolitical areas and their goals of the destabilization of governments and democratic systems and gaining political independence. The course includes analysis of current events and case studies.

Italian Regional Food in Cultural Perspective

["Although characterized by unique and distinctive features, Italian cuisine is still perceived as the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over the centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. The course focuses on the different aspects of regional food in Italy, from ingredients to recipe preparation and cooking techniques, with particular attention to the following factors: historical origins and developments;","climate and environmental conditions;","social issues;","food production;","nutrition;","and safety and health. Emphasis will be placed on how food relates to the local lifestyle and culture. Regional economy and local resources will be analyzed and compared. Students will be introduced to the various local products through lectures and class demonstrations."]

Current Trends in Italian Cuisine

This course explores major trends in contemporary Italian cuisine that have been emerging in recent decades. These trends, revealed in both everyday and haute cuisine, involve fresh reinterpretations of regional traditions, revaluation of local products, interest in lighter and healthier diet, and an emphasis on creativity. Driving these trends are such diverse factors as interest in other cuisines, innovations by leading chefs, and especially changes in Italian society and lifestyles. Students learn basic cooking skills as well as some specialized cooking methods and techniques. They discover how to select quality ingredients, and they compare their eating habits with those common in Italy today. Particular focus is given to the following aspects: historical origins and developments of food production, regional dishes, seasonal and environmental conditions, social issues, nutrition, safety and health. In each lesson students learn how to prepare representative recipes, with attention to ingredients, nutritional values, and presentation.

Jewelry Making I (Summer only)

This course is meant to give students a first approach to jewelry making. The main equipment and tools used (machinery, pliers, files, and saw), together with safety regulations will be explained. Students will work at the silversmith's bench, learning the basic techniques for creating simple pieces of jewelry with design transfer, sawing, filing, soldering, polishing, and simple settings for cabochon stones. The course will also introduce the lost wax casting methods and wax carving. The aim of the projects is to develop manual and creative ability.

Mobile Documentary: Capturing Italy

In this introductory course students learn to conceive, plan, direct, and edit a short documentary. Students learn the basics of the expressive language of this genre and exploit the potential of new and easily accessible technologies, while engaging with Italian society and culture. Upon completion of the course students will be able to apply basic technical skills with a certain amount of initiative and creativity, individually and as part of a team. The documentary, a form which allows the portrayal reality with a personal point of view, is currently experiencing a period of broad interest and expansion, also in Italy. For the final project, a short documentary film of about fifteen minutes, students need to research and develop a subject relating to Italy and the city they are living in during the term. While most course activities are practical and follow the several stages of developing a documentary, there are screenings, presentations and discussions about the documentary format, film language, and selected topics concerning Italy.

Introduction to Statistics

["This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of statistics. Topics include: the description of data;","simple probability;","binominal and normal distribution;","confidence interval estimation;","hypothesis testing;","simple regression and chi-squared distribution. \u000bNote: This course in not open to STEM students who should take MAT 280 Statistics for Science Majors."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Introduction to Statistics

The objective of this course is to understand the mathematical language of finance. Students will study some basic rules of finance, analysis, and probabilities. The content will cover anything related to gross and compound interests, cash flow, annuities and probabilities with a specific review of basic statistical distribution functions (normal law, Pareto, Poisson).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Florence Sketchbook - Beginning

In this course students develop basic observation, drawing and watercolor skills in a refreshing way. Students keep a series of sketchbooks and develop finished drawing projects from them. After initial training in fundamental drawing techniques for pencil, pen and other media, the course is dedicated principally to sketching outdoors in the city and environs. Students develop ability in representing a variety of subjects, including the human form, architecture, and landscape. Exploiting the advantages of the site, students explore such themes as historical monuments, street life, and formal gardens. They encounter art of the past, including efforts to sketch the same or similar topics. The course equips students to efficiently capture impressions by drawing in various media at various rates and scales, keeping annotations, ideas, sketches, and analyses of artwork in a journal, and developing personal interests. Students explore the monuments and vibrant street life of Florence, and observe numerous buildings, outdoor sculptures and squares that form part of the outstanding and entrancing artistic heritage of medieval and Renaissance Florence.

Florence Sketchbook - Intermediate

This course consists of gathering research in the traditional form of sketching from the museums, streets, and environments of Florence as artists have done for centuries. This includes sketches taking inspiration from sculptures, paintings, architecture, formal gardens and squares, as well as drawing from life in streets and markets, with an in-depth study of foreshortening and perspective. Students will be encouraged to write annotations and observations as well as to investigate their areas of interest. Students gain firsthand knowledge of original works by direct observation in situ, learn drawing and painting skills in a refreshing way, and learn to create sketchbooks that may serve as source material for future projects.

Intermediate Painting (Summer only)

The course is indended for students who have already taken the foundation level course or have a similar background in painting. It takes students into further studies in oil and will introduce the technique and methods of acrylic painting. Focus is on the nude as well as object painting using a number of different approaches to life painting. Some of the most essential techniques of oil and acrylic painting are covered to provide students with a sound foundation preparing them for more ambitious work. Emphasis is on color mixing, handling of brush strokes, glazing and scumbling, as well as traditional canvas preparation. Exceptional works of art in the city of Florence will be investigated and analyzed as an integral part of the course. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the most essential elements in life painting.

Acting Dante's Inferno

Following the great interest aroused by the novels of Dan Brown, this course offers students in Florence a special approach to the roots of the Italian culture and language, represented by the work of Dante Alighieri and, in particular, the Divine Comedy. Each lesson will be divided into two parts, the first hour will be devoted to preparatory exercises to develop awareness, theatre discipline and cohesion of the working group. The remaining hours will be devoted to the study of some passages (in Italian) of Dante's Inferno taken from cantos V, XXVI and XXXIII (Paolo and Francesca, Ulysses and Count Ugolino). At the end of the course, students will have learned, in a completely dynamic way, the strength, the semantic and evocative power of Dante's language. An evocative performance, in the form of living pictures of extracts from these cantos, will take place at the end of the course, in The Inferno Room inside the museum of the Franco Zeffirelli Foundation.

Introduction to Western Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern Thinkers

While introducing students to philosophy as a discipline in term of methods, contents, and questions, the course examines the evolution of the main schools of philosophical thought. The focus is on its main thinkers and fundamental concerns from the Middle Ages through the rich debates of the late Renaissance, with its reforms and Age of Science. However, since the ideas of many early Western philosophers were rooted in ancient philosophy, the course begins with the study of some key ideas of Greek, Roman, and Early Christian thinkers. Attention is given to the cross-influences between Catholicism and philosophy that are one of the special traits of the Italian cultural heritage. Among the thinkers analyzed are Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Dante, Petrarch, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, Giordano Bruno, and Galileo Galilei.

International Conflict Resolution

The course presents concepts and theories related to the peaceful transformation of international violent conflicts, illustrating them with examples taken both by global peace initiatives and Italian experiences in the field. Approaches to International Conflict Resolution have become widely used and discussed in the last decade. New roles and tasks have emerged for international organizations such as the United Nations and the OSCE. At the same time, civil society organizations have increasingly played an important role in conflict resolution, through second-track or citizens' diplomacy, conflict sensitive approaches to development, as well as third party nonviolent intervention. In Italy, several peace organizations have their roots in Christian Catholic values. The strong tradition of self-government has also encouraged municipalities and regions to work on development and peace issues. At the end of the course participants will have a clear understanding of international conflict resolution and will have gained an insight into concrete examples from both global and Italian organizations.

Psychology of Crime

This course approaches the knowledge and understanding of criminal behavior and its impact upon individuals and society from developmental, cognitive-behavioral, and other psychological perspectives. The basic premise of this course is that multiple variables affect peoples behavior and for this reason this study requires attention to personality factors and how they interact with situational variables. Topics include: criminological theories, biological and psychological models of criminal behavior, crime and mental disorders, human aggression and violence, sexual assault, and criminal homicide. Students will acquire a new framework for interpreting criminal behavior. Students will be familiarized with different perspectives on criminal behavior as well as etiology, risk factors, assessment, and treatment in relation to different criminal behaviors as well as etiology, risk factors, assessment, and treatment in relation to different criminal behaviors. Recent research findings will be incorporated.

Yoga: Breathing, Meditation, Spirituality

Exploration of yoga as a historical religious phenomenon, set of physical practices, and also as an element of modern culture;","includes both lecture and practical components. We will analyze yoga\u0092s roots in ancient India and such texts as the Upanishad and Pantajali\u0092s Yoga Sutras, as well as its popularity and place in contemporary culture. Students will examine yoga as a spiritual, mental, and physical practice;","in other words, as a path to attain spiritual realization and union with the divine, as a quieting and focusing technique, and as a healing and balancing physical exercise. Hence, we will study various breathing (pranayama) and meditation techniques along with ayurveda, an ancient Indian healing system and \u0093science of life.\u0094 Included is an overview of such different forms of yoga such as Hatha, Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Iyengar, Kundalini, Yin, as well as Laughter, Restorative, Bikram and yoga therapies for eating and addictive disorders. Finally, students will explore the interactions between practitioners of yoga and social, political, and environmental activism.

Travel Writing

Throughout history, Italy has inspired writers and poets to wax lyrical as few other countries have done. Countless English-language novels, stories, and poems have woven a bel paese of words around the Italian experience. This course provides an opportunity for students to focus first-hand on the art and craft of travel writing, with particular emphasis on cities in Italy, but also with excursions into other worlds -- real or imaginary. Through reading, writing, and visits in and around the city center, students will explore places of historic, artistic, cultural, and personal interest. They will learn "by example" from a selection of great travel literature about the world in general, and about Italy in particular. And they will learn "by doing," via a series of guided exercises and assignments that explore the distinctive qualities of travel writing its combination of history, culture, information, rumination, musings, and memory and the ways in which this particular art can lead to a deeper understanding of their own experiences and cultural identity.

Ancient Rome

["This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the \"Fall of Rome\" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history;","the political organization of the Roman state;","the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere;","Roman religion and the spread of Christianity;","the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society;","the historiographical \"myth of Rome.\" In order to stimulate students\u0092 critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources."]

Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation, and the desire to further investigate this field.

Palaces of Florence

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.

Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts

This course explores all aspects of artistic activity at the major Italian courts during the fifteenth century. This analysis will not only be confined to an art historical approach, but will also consider various aspects of court life - the chivalric tradition, hunting, jousting, scholarship, and court festivals - which influenced the visual arts. Comparisons will be made with Northern European courts of the same period. The main focus will be on Pisanello and the courts of Ferrara and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Mantegna and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Francesco Cossa at the D'Este court in Ferrara, Piero della Francesca and Laurana at the court of Federico da Montefeltro in Urbino, and Piero della Francesca and Alberti at the Malatesta court in Rimini. The students will become familiar with the special patronage conditions which dictated the nature of Renaissance art at the princely courts of Italy and acquire a detailed knowledge of the work of five court artists as well as a broader familiarity with three others.

Principles of Marketing

Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 Ps, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Marketing

The importance of marketing in management science The variety of fundamental concepts in marketing Marketing vocabulary to help with analysis of marketing phenomenon Oral presentation skills and teamwork

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture

The course offers students a first-hand experience of the historical city of Florence, which from 1252 was divided into four "quartieri" or quarters. Each quarter, which was named after the main church of the district, presents its own particular social, political and urban characteristics, and these form the central themes of the course. Students will discover the prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities and historical events that have characterized the development of each quarter from the medieval period to the modern age. Site visits will form an essential part of the learning experience.

Wine and Culture I: Wines of Italy

This course investigates Italian wine in the context of the extraordinary history, philosophy, culture. and lifestyle of Italy. In this context wine is not only a much-loved drink, but also forms an essential part of rich cultural traditions going back to the Etruscans and the ancient Romans. From the study of wine we learn about the practices of earlier cultures, about their values and our own, and we gain a unique perspective on Italy today. The course focuses on the distinct traditions and economic, geographic, and climatic aspects of each area of Italian wine production. Students explore grape varieties and different techniques used to make wine, and the national and regional classifications. They also subject representative wines to organoleptic analysis (visual, olfactory, and gustative). Each wine is studied in terms of its characteristics, history, and traditions, and in relationship to the particular foods meant to accompany it.

Italian Food and Culture: Pairing Food &Wine

Italian cuisine is the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. Thanks in recent years to a greater availability of wines from different regions, the pairing of food and wine, always a traditional aspect of Italian cuisine, has become more important in the organization of a menu and the presentation of a meal. In this course the various ways of pairing Italian food and wine will be analyzed and used for menu planning. This involves research into aspects of both wine and food, with special emphasis on classification and technical terminology, nutritional and health issues, chemical composition, sensory and other evaluation techniques, as well as cooking skills that will be practiced regularly in class. Not suitable for vegetarians.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex structures of the language, such as the means to express personal opinions and preferences. In this level emphasis is given to the ability to maintain interaction and to cope flexibly both in speaking and writing with problems in everyday life. At the end of the course students will be able to manage conversations on topics of personal interest or everyday life, to describe experience and to narrate a story.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts . The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing.

Italian Grand Tour: Italy through the Eyes of Famous Travellers

This course is an introduction to the literature generated by the "Grand Tour" experiences between the 18th and the 19th centuries and to its continuation and development in the 20th century. The main focus will be the textual analysis of the memoirs, letters and diaries written by some of the most famous artists, writers, and intellectuals who resided and traveled in Italy. Our selection will include British, German, and American writers. Another important aspect of the course will be the study of the history, the works of art, the monuments, and the folklore events of the main Grand Tour destinations: Venice, Florence, Rome. Students will learn about the different experiences of famous foreign travelers in Italy through the centuries and will be able to understand some stereotypes, prejudices, and idealized views about Italy and Italians that still survive.

The Food of Italy: A Gastronomic Tour of the Regions

Although characterized by unique and distinctive features, Italian cuisine is still perceived as the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. The students will virtually travel down the Italian peninsula learning about cultural traditions tied to foods and regional differences comparing them to their own experience of Italian food. They will also learn a little about the history of the three most popular Italian foods: Pasta, Pizza and Gelato. During each lesson the students, guided by the teacher, will prepare dishes for everyone to taste, therefore learning basic culinary skills and how to prepare easy recipes.

Foundation Oil Painting (Summer only)

["An introduction to the traditional techniques of oil paining. Fundamental skills are constructed progressively in highly structured lessons that involve demonstrations and guided work. Areas addressed include observational skills, the perception and buildup of form, tone, and color on a two-dimensional surface, color theory and mixing, linear perspective, and composition. The focus is on still-life subjects. Exceptional works of art in the city are referenced and analyzed as an integral part of the course. Prior studio training is not required;","non-majors are admitted."]

Introduction to Digital Photography (Summer only)

The course provides a basic approach to how the digital camera works. Students gain broad knowledge of the history of photography and an appreciation of aesthetic concerns that enable them to express themselves in a more cohesive and creative manner. Basic classic photography skills including an understanding of focal length, aperture, shutter speed, composition, and quality of light are integrated with techniques specific to digital capture and the manipulation of images in Photoshop. Photoshop software is used to process and print photographic imagery. During the term specific assignments help students learn all basic digital techniques. In the course students acquire confidence in understanding how to use their camera well, increased technical control of the medium, and in developing a more critical eye.At the Florence site only this course is 80% digital and 20% film and darkroom, with some basic black and white developing and printing techniques.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Social Psychology

Social psychology is concerned with how we think about, influence, and relate to other people. This course is about the study of human social behavior, examining theories, findings, approaches, and methods in social psychology, as viewed from an interpersonal perspective. Topics include: the role of others in shaping self-concepts, as well as the formation of person perception, attitudes, attribution theory, obedience, conformity, and social relations. We will further look at the causes and methods of reducing prejudice and aggression, as well as exploring altruism, the development of gender roles, stereotypes, and nonverbal behavior. Readings and activities assigned will enhance discussion, broaden students' knowledge of and perspectives on human social interactions and give them a framework to interpret social behavior. In addition, since this course is taught in Florence, Italy, it provides a natural opportunity to compare and contrast the influence of culture on individuals. Living for even this short period in another country helps you to see and understand the relationship between the individual (self) and society, and a chance to view your own culture from a distance.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

Social Psychology

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive view of Social Psychology and its most important phenomena. Our approach will depart from the theoretical basis of social psychology but our learning process will be directly connected to our daily lives. This means that learning will combine the theoretical dimension with a set of new ways of looking at reality, at social others, and at yourself. To combine these two dimensions in our classes, we will complement the theoretical dimension with examples that will help us to identify and understand the theory on the basis of materials such as films, songs, conferences, and presentations of students’ research projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Florence and Southern Italy Restoration Workshop (Summer only)

The course comprises three weeks in Florence and a field week in southern Italy. Students gain knowledge and practical skills concerning historical painting and restoration techniques, working with original polychrome wooden sculptures and mural paintings. In Florence participants learn the original fresco techniques, from the mixing of fresco mortar (intonaco) to its application on support, and the use of pigments. Each participant makes a sinopia (preliminary underdrawing for fresco) and completes a small fresco on a terracotta support. Restoration techniques are pursued, including the detachment of the participants own fresco from its support, a wall painting conservation method. Participants work with original works of art from the 16th to 17th centuries as they learn how to use the principal modern painting restoration techniques. The course surveys historical oil and tempera painting techniques, aided by museum visits, and students learn to recognize the century in which paintings were created. During the field workshop week students work in the main church of Rocca Imperiale near Cosenza in Calabria, southern Italy. This town near the Taranto Gulf, an important ancient Greek settlement and a notable archaeological area, is also famous for its medieval fortress. Students apply appropriate materials and conservation and restoration techniques to authentic works of art. Following diagnostic study of the artwork in order to understanddating and conservation conditions, students concentrate on cleaning and consolidating the artwork. Next students learn to use different products for the restoration of the surface layers. As the last step students work on the pictorial layer and may do some painting.

Ceramics (Summer only)

This course is suitable for students who do not have any experience with clay or have only basic knowledge regarding hand building and wheel throwing with clay. Students will be instructed in the fundamental notions regarding this topic. Special attention will be given to the correct and healthy positions for the spine, hands, fingers and wrist. Students will receive technical information about clay and firing, and at the end of the course, they will be able to decorate their objects with slips and glazes.

Organized Crime: Sociology and History of Italian Mafia

One of a long list of Italian words adopted in many other languages, mafia is now applied to a variety of criminal organizations around the world. This course examines organized crime in Italy in historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its growth from the nineteenth century to the present. The chief focus is on the Sicilian mafia as the original and primary form. Similar organizations in other Italian regions, as well as the mafia in the United States, an outgrowth of Sicilian mafia, are also considered. The course analyzes sociological aspects of the mafia including language, message systems, the code of silence, the role of violence, structures of power, and social relationships. Also examined are the economics of organized crime and its impact on Italian society and politics.

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

Ancient Rome

["This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the \"Fall of Rome\" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history;","the political organization of the Roman state;","the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere;","Roman religion and the spread of Christianity;","the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society;","the historiographical \"myth of Rome.\" In order to stimulate students\u0092 critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources."]

Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation, and the desire to further investigate this field.

Palaces of Florence

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.

Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts

This course explores all aspects of artistic activity at the major Italian courts during the fifteenth century. This analysis will not only be confined to an art historical approach, but will also consider various aspects of court life - the chivalric tradition, hunting, jousting, scholarship, and court festivals - which influenced the visual arts. Comparisons will be made with Northern European courts of the same period. The main focus will be on Pisanello and the courts of Ferrara and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Mantegna and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Francesco Cossa at the D'Este court in Ferrara, Piero della Francesca and Laurana at the court of Federico da Montefeltro in Urbino, and Piero della Francesca and Alberti at the Malatesta court in Rimini. The students will become familiar with the special patronage conditions which dictated the nature of Renaissance art at the princely courts of Italy and acquire a detailed knowledge of the work of five court artists as well as a broader familiarity with three others.

Principles of Marketing

Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 Ps, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Marketing

The importance of marketing in management science The variety of fundamental concepts in marketing Marketing vocabulary to help with analysis of marketing phenomenon Oral presentation skills and teamwork

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

The Quarters of Florence: History and Culture

The course offers students a first-hand experience of the historical city of Florence, which from 1252 was divided into four "quartieri" or quarters. Each quarter, which was named after the main church of the district, presents its own particular social, political and urban characteristics, and these form the central themes of the course. Students will discover the prestigious families, major buildings, artistic masterpieces, economic activities and historical events that have characterized the development of each quarter from the medieval period to the modern age. Site visits will form an essential part of the learning experience.

Wine and Culture I: Wines of Italy

This course investigates Italian wine in the context of the extraordinary history, philosophy, culture. and lifestyle of Italy. In this context wine is not only a much-loved drink, but also forms an essential part of rich cultural traditions going back to the Etruscans and the ancient Romans. From the study of wine we learn about the practices of earlier cultures, about their values and our own, and we gain a unique perspective on Italy today. The course focuses on the distinct traditions and economic, geographic, and climatic aspects of each area of Italian wine production. Students explore grape varieties and different techniques used to make wine, and the national and regional classifications. They also subject representative wines to organoleptic analysis (visual, olfactory, and gustative). Each wine is studied in terms of its characteristics, history, and traditions, and in relationship to the particular foods meant to accompany it.

Italian Food and Culture: Pairing Food &Wine

Italian cuisine is the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. Thanks in recent years to a greater availability of wines from different regions, the pairing of food and wine, always a traditional aspect of Italian cuisine, has become more important in the organization of a menu and the presentation of a meal. In this course the various ways of pairing Italian food and wine will be analyzed and used for menu planning. This involves research into aspects of both wine and food, with special emphasis on classification and technical terminology, nutritional and health issues, chemical composition, sensory and other evaluation techniques, as well as cooking skills that will be practiced regularly in class. Not suitable for vegetarians.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs.

3-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course is directed towards the acquisition of more complex structures of the language, such as the means to express personal opinions and preferences. In this level emphasis is given to the ability to maintain interaction and to cope flexibly both in speaking and writing with problems in everyday life. At the end of the course students will be able to manage conversations on topics of personal interest or everyday life, to describe experience and to narrate a story.

3-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts . The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

3-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing.

Italian Grand Tour: Italy through the Eyes of Famous Travellers

This course is an introduction to the literature generated by the "Grand Tour" experiences between the 18th and the 19th centuries and to its continuation and development in the 20th century. The main focus will be the textual analysis of the memoirs, letters and diaries written by some of the most famous artists, writers, and intellectuals who resided and traveled in Italy. Our selection will include British, German, and American writers. Another important aspect of the course will be the study of the history, the works of art, the monuments, and the folklore events of the main Grand Tour destinations: Venice, Florence, Rome. Students will learn about the different experiences of famous foreign travelers in Italy through the centuries and will be able to understand some stereotypes, prejudices, and idealized views about Italy and Italians that still survive.

The Food of Italy: A Gastronomic Tour of the Regions

Although characterized by unique and distinctive features, Italian cuisine is still perceived as the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. The students will virtually travel down the Italian peninsula learning about cultural traditions tied to foods and regional differences comparing them to their own experience of Italian food. They will also learn a little about the history of the three most popular Italian foods: Pasta, Pizza and Gelato. During each lesson the students, guided by the teacher, will prepare dishes for everyone to taste, therefore learning basic culinary skills and how to prepare easy recipes.

Foundation Oil Painting (Summer only)

["An introduction to the traditional techniques of oil paining. Fundamental skills are constructed progressively in highly structured lessons that involve demonstrations and guided work. Areas addressed include observational skills, the perception and buildup of form, tone, and color on a two-dimensional surface, color theory and mixing, linear perspective, and composition. The focus is on still-life subjects. Exceptional works of art in the city are referenced and analyzed as an integral part of the course. Prior studio training is not required;","non-majors are admitted."]

Introduction to Digital Photography (Summer only)

The course provides a basic approach to how the digital camera works. Students gain broad knowledge of the history of photography and an appreciation of aesthetic concerns that enable them to express themselves in a more cohesive and creative manner. Basic classic photography skills including an understanding of focal length, aperture, shutter speed, composition, and quality of light are integrated with techniques specific to digital capture and the manipulation of images in Photoshop. Photoshop software is used to process and print photographic imagery. During the term specific assignments help students learn all basic digital techniques. In the course students acquire confidence in understanding how to use their camera well, increased technical control of the medium, and in developing a more critical eye.At the Florence site only this course is 80% digital and 20% film and darkroom, with some basic black and white developing and printing techniques.Note: Each student must be equipped with an SLR digital camera with manual function and with at least one lens.

Social Psychology

Social psychology is concerned with how we think about, influence, and relate to other people. This course is about the study of human social behavior, examining theories, findings, approaches, and methods in social psychology, as viewed from an interpersonal perspective. Topics include: the role of others in shaping self-concepts, as well as the formation of person perception, attitudes, attribution theory, obedience, conformity, and social relations. We will further look at the causes and methods of reducing prejudice and aggression, as well as exploring altruism, the development of gender roles, stereotypes, and nonverbal behavior. Readings and activities assigned will enhance discussion, broaden students' knowledge of and perspectives on human social interactions and give them a framework to interpret social behavior. In addition, since this course is taught in Florence, Italy, it provides a natural opportunity to compare and contrast the influence of culture on individuals. Living for even this short period in another country helps you to see and understand the relationship between the individual (self) and society, and a chance to view your own culture from a distance.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

Social Psychology

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive view of Social Psychology and its most important phenomena. Our approach will depart from the theoretical basis of social psychology but our learning process will be directly connected to our daily lives. This means that learning will combine the theoretical dimension with a set of new ways of looking at reality, at social others, and at yourself. To combine these two dimensions in our classes, we will complement the theoretical dimension with examples that will help us to identify and understand the theory on the basis of materials such as films, songs, conferences, and presentations of students’ research projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Yoga: Breathing, Meditation, Spirituality

Exploration of yoga as a historical religious phenomenon, set of physical practices, and also as an element of modern culture;","includes both lecture and practical components. We will analyze yoga\u0092s roots in ancient India and such texts as the Upanishad and Pantajali\u0092s Yoga Sutras, as well as its popularity and place in contemporary culture. Students will examine yoga as a spiritual, mental, and physical practice;","in other words, as a path to attain spiritual realization and union with the divine, as a quieting and focusing technique, and as a healing and balancing physical exercise. Hence, we will study various breathing (pranayama) and meditation techniques along with ayurveda, an ancient Indian healing system and \u0093science of life.\u0094 Included is an overview of such different forms of yoga such as Hatha, Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Iyengar, Kundalini, Yin, as well as Laughter, Restorative, Bikram and yoga therapies for eating and addictive disorders. Finally, students will explore the interactions between practitioners of yoga and social, political, and environmental activism.

Florence and Southern Italy Restoration Workshop (Summer only)

The course comprises three weeks in Florence and a field week in southern Italy. Students gain knowledge and practical skills concerning historical painting and restoration techniques, working with original polychrome wooden sculptures and mural paintings. In Florence participants learn the original fresco techniques, from the mixing of fresco mortar (intonaco) to its application on support, and the use of pigments. Each participant makes a sinopia (preliminary underdrawing for fresco) and completes a small fresco on a terracotta support. Restoration techniques are pursued, including the detachment of the participants own fresco from its support, a wall painting conservation method. Participants work with original works of art from the 16th to 17th centuries as they learn how to use the principal modern painting restoration techniques. The course surveys historical oil and tempera painting techniques, aided by museum visits, and students learn to recognize the century in which paintings were created. During the field workshop week students work in the main church of Rocca Imperiale near Cosenza in Calabria, southern Italy. This town near the Taranto Gulf, an important ancient Greek settlement and a notable archaeological area, is also famous for its medieval fortress. Students apply appropriate materials and conservation and restoration techniques to authentic works of art. Following diagnostic study of the artwork in order to understanddating and conservation conditions, students concentrate on cleaning and consolidating the artwork. Next students learn to use different products for the restoration of the surface layers. As the last step students work on the pictorial layer and may do some painting.

Ceramics (Summer only)

This course is suitable for students who do not have any experience with clay or have only basic knowledge regarding hand building and wheel throwing with clay. Students will be instructed in the fundamental notions regarding this topic. Special attention will be given to the correct and healthy positions for the spine, hands, fingers and wrist. Students will receive technical information about clay and firing, and at the end of the course, they will be able to decorate their objects with slips and glazes.

Organized Crime: Sociology and History of Italian Mafia

One of a long list of Italian words adopted in many other languages, mafia is now applied to a variety of criminal organizations around the world. This course examines organized crime in Italy in historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its growth from the nineteenth century to the present. The chief focus is on the Sicilian mafia as the original and primary form. Similar organizations in other Italian regions, as well as the mafia in the United States, an outgrowth of Sicilian mafia, are also considered. The course analyzes sociological aspects of the mafia including language, message systems, the code of silence, the role of violence, structures of power, and social relationships. Also examined are the economics of organized crime and its impact on Italian society and politics.

Digital Graphic Techniques Fundamentals (Summer and Intersession)

This course trains students in the basics of computer graphics, developing foundational techniques and skills within the standard set of software applications for the design field. Image optimization and manipulation, graphic illustration basics and Web design principles are covered extensively. Students work on individual practical projects, image make-ups, graphic illustrations, and Web layout design. Professional printing skills are developed in the context of a commercial printing center.

Greek and Roman Mythology

Greek and Roman gods and heroes, and their stories, have always been a fundamental subject of Western Art and literature, especially since they were rediscovered by Renaissance humanism. The course will examine the major deities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales. The post-classical afterlife of these myths will also be addressed. Visits to museums, monuments and/or sites will reinforce classroom learning. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.

Principles of Finance

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.

Event Planning

This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.

International Marketing

International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the marketing decisions within an organization, from a global perspective. Students will be exposed to the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing management in a global business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course provides an introduction to international marketing. Topics include: analytical techniques used in international market research","determining prices and distribution channels in an international context","and marketing across linguistic and cultural borders.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course provides a general introduction to international marketing dealing with topics such as: making business in a global economy, strategies in export trade, international logistics, the impact of the new technologies in the world trade, the role of the media and of advertising in a consumer oriented society, different approaches for different targets, etc.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course will provide an understanding of the elements that makes up the international environment, examining the development of an international marketing strategy and providing practical information on how to expand into international markets.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

The main purpose of this course is to enable students to apply the specifics of international marketing to real situations in the business environment

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This course will strengthen the concepts already acquired in international marketing by focusing on the all new marketing strategies as well as the differences between international marketing and domestic marketing.The main focus will be on ethnic marketing, viral marketing, and yield management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

This module will examine the global aspects of marketing and students will learn to apply the basic concepts, practices and principles of marketing in an international context. The course will cover: the international marketing environment; the specificities of international marketing: increased complexity of the environment (economy, history and geography, cultures, politics, legal environment); the international marketing triad: segmenting, targeting and positioning in an international context; global competitive analysis and strategy; international market selection; international market entry strategies and expansion; understanding licensing, investment, and strategic alliances; global branding decisions; the 4 Ps in an international context, international product decisions, international pricing, international distribution, global communication strategies; implementing an international marketing plan and control.

NOTE: This course is offered as part of the fall CIB certificate program.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

International Marketing

THIS COURSE IS OFFERED DURING THE SECOND TWO WEEKS

In this course, students will have the opportunity to:

  • Acquire analytical, strategic and promotional tools to optimize marketing performance.
  • Discover how global companies are using cultures.
  • Develop sales and negotiation skills through an interactive sales game.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Literature and Journalism

This course will examine the principal relationships between literature and journalism in a comparative context, focusing on American and Italian writers. Authors from Poe to Buzzati, from the exponents of American New Journalism (T. Wolfe, N. Mailer, G. Talese, etc.) to postmodern writers (Fallaci and Tabucchi among others), are considered. The course gives particular attention to the reporter as a character, to fiction and non-fiction style, and to ideas and theories of information, news, chronicles, and the art of communication.

War and Media

["This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which the media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet;","the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera;","the role of still and moving images;","the importance of journalists and journalistic conventions;","the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements;","the representation of war in movies and artists\u0092 works;","the media gap between \"North\" and \"South\";","the emergence of \"non-Western\" media;","and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war."]

Introduction to Multicultural Education

["Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, theories and strategies that constitute the five major dimensions of multicultural education as defined by James A. Banks: equity pedagogy;","content integration;","knowledge construction process;","prejudice reduction;","empowerment in school culture and social structure. We will explore these dimensions within the context of the host culture of Italy and analyze these forms of knowledge in terms of cultural differences, inclusions, and exclusions. Students will reflect on and describe how multicultural education connects with their experiences in the communities and in the schools in Italy. Because prior knowledge and cultural experiences shape our beliefs and values, students need to critically analyze their notions of race, culture, and ethnicity. Through immersion and first-hand experiences we will explore and inquire into how culture and different cultural contexts influence one's beliefs and behavior."]

Fashion Marketing

This course explores fashion marketing and merchandising. It focuses primarily on brands, and marketing strategies for product development, advertising, promotion, and retailing. The course analyzes the thinking behind the strategies for fashion products, paying special attention to the emotional aspects of fashion communication. Students will examine current business practices and new and emerging trends and issues that impact the fast-moving environment of the fashion and textile industry. The marketing aspects involved with the globalization of the industry, trade shows, and key events are included. Specialized topics consist of the importance of the European fashion system, with a comparison with some American brands and strategies. Case studies will provide a vision of how companies in todays environment are evolving marketing plans to meet the new consumers demand, in terms of product design, distribution, and communication.

Visual Merchandising

This course explores contemporary visual merchandising strategies. It focuses primarily on understanding visual merchandising techniques, concepts and processes, and recognizes how visual merchandising efforts support retailing trends and sales success in retail store spaces. The course analyzes the philosophy behind the creative process and identifies a variety of resources for idea development such as marketplace dynamics and consumer trends. The aim of this course is to prepare students in the process of designing, planning, and organizing visual displays and in-store designs that effectively communicate brand identity. Through lectures students will learn theory and techniques for visual displays. Students will apply this knowledge to the design and creation of model window display and/or in-store designs. This course provides a vision of how retailers in todays environment are adapting visual merchandising and communication strategies to meet consumers' demands.

The Holocaust: Jewish and Christian Responses

This course is an introduction to the legacy of the Holocaust and its implications. The course explores Christian anti-Judaism as one of many factors in the Nazi rise to power and the "Final Solution." It then proceeds to various accounts of life in the Nazi ghettoes and death camps and deals with Christian and Jewish efforts to remember the Holocaust within particular communities and places. The course will focus on the Holocaust of the Italian Jews. It will begin with an analysis of the emergence of the Fascist movement in Italy, which led to the Racial Laws. It will proceed with the study of specific stories of persecution, deportation, and salvation in the various cities of Italy. We will study in depth the reaction of the Vatican to the Holocaust. In addition, we will analyze the reactions of Italian society to the Holocaust, starting right after the war until today.

Exhibit Design (Summer only)

This course is based on an architectural approach to the project of exhibit areas. The project research is developed first in the field of temporary commercial fairs and students learn how to manage space both from the functional and the aesthetic point of view and then in the field of temporary exhibitions in a museum, dealing with the difficulty of organization and presentation. During the course, students examine different basic themes and are introduced to real professional applications. The proposed projects are developed emphasizing conceptual and design research and solutions to functional and distribution problems.Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Italian Crime Fiction

From the middle of the twentieth century, Italian writers such as Gadda and Sciascia began to integrate into their novels and short stories certain aspects of the crime genre, in such a way that the mystery element became an instrument for analyzing contemporary Italian realities. By the 1990's a new generation of writers such as Camilleri, Ammaniti and Lucarelli had developed a specifically Italian approach to an international literary genre, the "Italian noir", which aims at revealing unpleasant truths to a vast audience in an entertaining way. The goal of this course is to explore some of the most representative works of the crime fiction genre in contemporary Italian literature, from its early forms to the present. The study of these works will also involve an analysis of the strong socio-cultural dimensions of contemporary Italy, which are the result of a complex combination of geographical, historical, political and linguistic factors. These in turn affect different forms of organized and unorganized crime, and differences in the relationship between citizens and the law. During the course students will also study the relationship between Italian crime fiction and its foreign counterpart, including the works of authors such as Dibdin, Highsmith and Harris.

The Science of Food, Health, and Well-Being

The primary focus of this course is to analyze the biological properties of the body and the effects that foods have on it. Students learn the basics of nutrition (proteins, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, natural supplements), including how the phytochemicals and nutrients of foods can improve health, and they will study habits, programs and dietary regimens for healthy living. Nutritional healing and wider questions of well-being are also addressed. Includes hands-on preparation of healthy dishes.

Logical, Critical, and Creative: The Power of Reason

This introduction to logic provides students the tools to develop logical thinking and sound reasoning skills. Logic is an essential tool in many academic fields, and it consistently plays a vital role in our daily lives. Logic is the basis for valid arguments to convince others, while analytical and critical thinking skills serve to evaluate positions taken by others, including the powerful and persuasive appeals made by commercial and political advertisers in this digital age. Students will analyze both media and Internet sources and learn how to construct well-reasoned arguments on a variety of topics. The course deals with traditional logic, with concepts and techniques of modern logic, and with some philosophical issues related to critical reasoning. Basic concepts explored early in the course include logic itself, the structure of arguments, how to distinguish arguments from non-arguments, deductive from inductive arguments, and how to evaluate such arguments in terms of their validity, strength, soundness, and cogency. In addition, the course examines formal logic and categorical propositions, and syllogisms. Some attention is given to propositional logic, how to use truth tables and predicate logic.

Highlights
  • Classes taught in English and Italian with international students
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (Marist College)
  • Field-based workshops available
  • Professional development opportunities

API students in Florence will live in apartments located within the historic district of Florence. Apartments are typically a 25-30 minute walk from the school. Some API apartments can house as many as 10 students, although most students will share a room with only 1-2 other students. All apartments come equipped with a kitchen, 1-3 bathrooms, and common areas. Washing machines are available, and students are responsible for their own meals. Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee. Apartments in Florence vary in size and layout.

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The prices listed below are for 1 course per session. Students who are interested in taking 2 courses per session will incur an additional fee of $1,000 per course, per session.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 May 25, 2020 - Jun 26, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $5,480

Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 1 and 2 Combined May 25, 2020 - Jul 30, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $9,980

Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 2 Jun 29, 2020 - Jul 30, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $5,480

Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 1 May 27, 2019 - Jun 28, 2019 $4,980 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined May 27, 2019 - Aug 1, 2019 $8,980 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019
Summer 2 Jul 1, 2019 - Aug 1, 2019 $4,980 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019