Italy Florence David Statue 43981867

The January Intersession Program provides the opportunity for students to study abroad in Florence for a short period and earn academic credit, as well as a chance for independent or adult students to study abroad for professional development or career advancement. Students can enroll in one or two classes during the January session.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Excursions (day)

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport

API students participate in excursions each session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Florence programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-7 semester credits

The January Intersession Program provides the opportunity for students to study abroad in Florence for a short period and earn academic credit, as well as a chance for independent or adult students to study abroad for professional development or career advancement. Students can enroll in one or two classes during the January session. If this program is taken along with a semester program, a discount is applied.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive transcripts from U.S.-accredited Marist College for courses taken at LdM. Marist College is a four-year, fully accredited U.S. college in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Staff & Coordinators

  • 15Cnxd6Tt7Ytuupq2Os7

    Ellen Oyasaeter

    Ellen Oyasaeter will be one of your Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you on-site.

  • IMG 20180727 060216

    Federica Guerrieri

    Federica Guerrieri is our Italy Regional Director and a resource for you on-site.

  • Nltylskqsvk8Wpqekxji

    Monica Gabbrielli

    Monica will be one of our Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while you are in Italy!

  • Nd2D68Oszuke9Rutdbli

    Ryan McCann

    Ryan McCann will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - ryan.mccann@apiabroad.com

  • Semekpretlisca1Orfio

    Valentina Scalini

    Valentina will be one of your Resident Directors in Florence and a resource for you while living in Italy with us!

  • Img 1493

    Lauren Daniels

    Lauren Daniels will be your Program Manager for this location and will prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - lauren.daniels@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

Be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to prerequisites and class times in order to avoid conflicts. Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost.

Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who are taking Italian courses above the Elementary 101 level must take a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency. Students who do not meet proficiency standards are assigned to the appropriate course.

When obtaining pre-approval for course selections, students should refer to the Marist College course codes and titles, as these will appear on the transcript. If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

COURSE LISTINGS

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence

This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.

Food and Culture

If you are what you eat, just why do you eat the way you do? This course considers the relationships between the multiple meanings of food and the acts of preparing and eating food, and further explores food and personal and social identity. Students will examine why different people make different food choices in their daily lives, why individuals from certain social classes will avoid or appreciate particular foods, and, in general, how food serves as a factor in self-definition. Because a person's attitude toward food can reveal not just personal identity traits, but a whole food ideology, this course will also analyze the role of food in the construction of ethnic identity, in the display of religious beliefs and in the negotiation of gender roles. Students learn how cultures and values are transmitted and preserved through food. Through personal essays and interdisciplinary secondary literature students will be guided to analyze the complex and fascinating relationships between people and food, helping them to understand how cultures (including their own) ultimately determine all human food choices.

Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance

This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.

Palaces of Florence

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.

Principles of Marketing

Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 Ps, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Marketing

Initially students will learn why financial accounting is essential to the running of corporations. This will be followed up with a discussion about the basic principles of accounting and the major elements of financial statements. Other elements will include journal entry and practical book keeping, showing the students how the accounts of companies are actually prepared working up to producing short financial statements. This will also include stock valuation methods and analysis of financial statements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Wine Business

This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.

Love and Natural Selection: Science and Myth

The aim of this course is to examine the reach and impact that Darwins theory of natural selection has had on religion, gender, and race and to uncover some common misconceptions about his work. The Origin of Species brought about a profound intellectual revolution not only in the natural, but also in the social sciences. Part one of the course examines the building blocks of Darwin's theory and its dissemination, reception, and legacy. Part two examines the theoretical basis of modern evolutionary biology and analyzes some of the most popular (and contested) theories of evolutionary psychology relating to human reproduction, gender, relationships, and beauty. The course further offers a critical study of some evolutionary ideas after Darwin, focusing on eugenics, revealing flaws in modern popular scientific discourse as well as potential limitations to the scientific method and culture. Student presentations will consider Darwin's influence on areas such as art and media and also on our understanding of physical and mental disabilities.

Digital Graphic Techniques Fundamentals (Summer and Intersession)

This course trains students in the basics of computer graphics, developing foundational techniques and skills within the standard set of software applications for the design field. Image optimization and manipulation, graphic illustration basics and Web design principles are covered extensively. Students work on individual practical projects, image make-ups, graphic illustrations, and Web layout design. Professional printing skills are developed in the context of a commercial printing center.

Italian Regional Food in Cultural Perspective

["Although characterized by unique and distinctive features, Italian cuisine is still perceived as the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over the centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. The course focuses on the different aspects of regional food in Italy, from ingredients to recipe preparation and cooking techniques, with particular attention to the following factors: historical origins and developments;","climate and environmental conditions;","social issues;","food production;","nutrition;","and safety and health. Emphasis will be placed on how food relates to the local lifestyle and culture. Regional economy and local resources will be analyzed and compared. Students will be introduced to the various local products through lectures and class demonstrations."]

Italian Food and Culture: Pairing Food &Wine

Italian cuisine is the result of many different regional culinary traditions that, although merged and diluted over centuries, still maintain their particular flavors and distinct ingredients. Thanks in recent years to a greater availability of wines from different regions, the pairing of food and wine, always a traditional aspect of Italian cuisine, has become more important in the organization of a menu and the presentation of a meal. In this course the various ways of pairing Italian food and wine will be analyzed and used for menu planning. This involves research into aspects of both wine and food, with special emphasis on classification and technical terminology, nutritional and health issues, chemical composition, sensory and other evaluation techniques, as well as cooking skills that will be practiced regularly in class. Not suitable for vegetarians.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Language of Instruction: Italian   

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts . The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Language of Instruction: Italian   

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Language of Instruction: Italian   

4-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom, which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Organized Crime: Sociology and History of Italian Mafia

One of a long list of Italian words adopted in many other languages, mafia is now applied to a variety of criminal organizations around the world. This course examines organized crime in Italy in historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its growth from the nineteenth century to the present. The chief focus is on the Sicilian mafia as the original and primary form. Similar organizations in other Italian regions, as well as the mafia in the United States, an outgrowth of Sicilian mafia, are also considered. The course analyzes sociological aspects of the mafia including language, message systems, the code of silence, the role of violence, structures of power, and social relationships. Also examined are the economics of organized crime and its impact on Italian society and politics.

Highlights
  • Classes taught in English and Italian with international students
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (Marist College)
  • Jan-term program
  • Combine multiple intensive months in other API locations and/or an API internship program to create a custom quarter program

API students in Florence will live in apartments located within the historic district of Florence. Apartments are typically a 25-30 minute walk from the school. Some API apartments can house as many as 10 students, although most students will share a room with only 1-2 other students. All apartments come equipped with a kitchen, 1-3 bathrooms, and common areas. Washing machines are available, and students are responsible for their own meals. Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee. Apartments in Florence vary in size and layout.

The program fees listed below are for the 1-course option. Students interested in taking the 2-course option will incur an additional fee of $1,100.

*Please note the application deadline has been extended for the Spring session. Additional fees may apply.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring Jan 2, 2020 - Jan 22, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $5,480

Oct 15, 2019 Nov 1, 2019 Nov 1, 2019