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Students who choose to study abroad in Rome with API at the John Cabot University (JCU) in Rome can study a wide variety of disciplines in English. Most API students choose to complete an Italian language course along with several other elective courses taught in English. It is highly recommended that students enroll in at least one Italian language course per semester. Italian language courses are taught at all levels.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Meal Plan (20 meals)

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.7 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Rome programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

  • Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Tuscany

    To explore the wonders the Tuscany region has to offer is a relaxing and incomparable experience. The area features many hilltop towns, famous for the production of wine and olive oil. Thanks to ancient volcanic activity, natural hot springs are plentiful in the region. Of course, no visit to this region would be complete without a stop in one of these towns: Siena, San Gimignano, Pienza, Cortona, Arezzo, or Montepulciano.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-17 credits per semester

Students who choose to study abroad in Rome with API at the John Cabot University (JCU) in Rome can study a wide variety of disciplines in English. Most API students choose to complete an Italian language course along with several other elective courses taught in English. It is highly recommended that students enroll in at least one Italian language course per semester. Italian language courses are taught at all levels.

Course registration is conducted online prior to departure. Some courses do fill, so students are advised to have 1-2 alternates pre-approved for each class. Students complete a total of four to five courses and receive 12-17 credit hours per semester session; most courses are equivalent to 3 credits. The program fee includes a maximum of 17 credits per semester session. Courses with site visits require an additional fee. API recommends that students obtain pre-approval from their home university for courses that they plan on taking abroad.

JCU offers both lower division and upper division courses. Course numbers are as follows: 100-299 freshman, sophomore or other introductory level courses; 300-399 junior or senior-level courses (requires a background in the material); 400-499 seniors only. Some courses may have prerequisites listed after the course description. Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for books, labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost. Students are encouraged to make course selections from the online listings when completing the program application as course listings, descriptions, prerequisites and/or lab fees are subject to change.

Most courses taught at JCU require the use of personal computers. While computers are available in the computer labs, students are strongly encouraged to bring a laptop with them.

HONORS CLASSES

Students at JCU who have a minimum G.P.A. of 3.5 have the option of taking specifically designated “Honors Courses.” Honors courses are designated with an “H” on the online course listings and on the student’s final transcript and are worth 4 semester credits each. This option also offers additional educational activities (seminars, papers, projects, etc.) and further mentoring by the professor.

INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

API students have the opportunity to participate in an internship for a semester or academic year while studying at JCU. Internships are only credit-bearing if the student stays for a semester or full academic year and submits all required documents by the API application deadline (though interested students are encouraged to apply early). Internships may or may not require Italian experience; it will depend upon the specific placement. There are no extra charges for the internship. Students who are interested in this opportunity should submit a CV/resume and letter of interest to their API Program Manager in addition to their API application. Once your Program Manager receives all completed supplemental application components for the internship, you will then be contacted by the JCU internship coordinator for follow up.

THE JCU INSTITUTE FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP

JCU has created an innovative Institute for Entrepreneurship, offering students a variety of means to tap into and develop their creative business skills. There are a number of courses on the schedule that fit in this track, along with internship options at the Institute, as well as with local businesses. Involvement with the Institute for Entrepreneurship also exposes students to unique events, workshops, and networking opportunities to meet and learn from successful entrepreneurs and companies.

“ITALY READS” VOLUNTEER PROGRAM

JCU has developed an extensive network of over 45 Italian public high schools as part of its Italy Reads program. In one year alone 70 study abroad students visited Italian high schools to collaborate with Italian high school teachers of English and their students on discussions of a selected novel. For the fall 2013 term, the novel students will be reading is Jhumpa Lahiri’s “The Namesake,” which was specially selected to address multiculturalism in Italian public high schools.

To participate in this program, students will sign up online before they leave, undertake a short not-for-credit training course on the selected novel, and then they receive an additional orientation in Rome before beginning. Upon completion of the program, students receive a certificate. For more information on this option, please contact your API Program Manager.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students will receive a transcript from John Cabot University upon completion of the program. John Cabot University is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Naike Valeriano

    Naike will be one of your Resident Directors in Rome and will be a resource for you while you are in Italy!

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    Alessio Balduini

    Alessio Balduini will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Mariana Delmonte-Gladstone

    Mariana Delmonte-Gladstone will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - mariana.delmonte-gladstone@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

Please note that not all courses are offered every semester or every year.

Be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to class times in order to avoid conflicts. Please make your course selections from these online listings when completing the program application.

If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

CREDIT INFORMATION

API partner universities in Italy issue credit according to the American system, whereby most courses are worth 3-4 U.S. credits each.

JCU Courses

JCU Couse Link

20th-Century Poetry

The course deals with a limited number of poets who have written in the English language. In some terms, the major American poets may be studied, while in others the major figures in British and Irish poetry. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

A World at Arms: The Second World War

This course examines the history of the Second World War in its worldwide dimension. Considerable attention will be given to the political, economic, and ideological determinants of German, Italian, and Japanese expansionism. The military strategies and the political, social, and economic dimension of the conflict will be analyzed in detail. The course also examines the war’s impact on civilian populations, collaboration and resistance, and the economics of the war.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Abnormal Psychology

Issues related to psychopathology will be explored, with an emphasis on methodological problems and the causes of psychopathological conditions. The classification system of DSM-IV, which has become standard in North America and in many other parts of the world, will be examined critically, and other more theoretically coherent nosologies will be studied. Diagnostic categories will be examined from the point of view of three major theoretical approaches: psychodynamic, biological, and cognitive. Through required readings and a research paper, the student will become familiar with contemporary work in the field and will learn to read professional articles in a critical way. Emphasis in the course will be on the understanding and not simply the description of psychopathological states and their multiple complex determinants. Every psychological disorder has its specific content for the person suffering from it.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Advanced Writing

This course, which is conducted in Italian, aims at improving students’ ability to write texts of different types and levels of specialization, focusing on academic and professional purposes. The course has both theoretical and practical components aimed at familiarizing students with the cultural and formal elements that make texts effective, convincing and articulate.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

American Art and Identity

For decades the question What is American about American art? stood at the center of American art history. American painting consequently has been studied and interpreted for its putative relationship to American identity or to aspects of national self-image. Though this paradigm is now questioned, it remains deeply embedded in the study of American art. By studying the paintings along with key essays, the course will examine the historiography of American art as well as the artworks. It will analyze the paintings and the debates about their relationship to socio-political contexts that are thought to be particularly American. It will also consider the significant influence on American art by Italian artistic traditions and American ex-patriot artists.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

American Foreign Policy

A study of major foreign policy issues which have confronted the United States since World War II and the process of foreign policy formulation and implementation.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

American Government

This course examines the main principles of American government – democracy, federalism and the separation of powers – and the legislative, executive and judicial institutions that simultaneously embody and challenge them. Special attention will be paid to such topics as state and local governments, political parties and elections, the role of the people, civil rights, the role of the media, American political culture and foreign policy.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

American Literature

The course deals with a chronological historical coverage of the development of American literature from the 17th century until modern times. Attention is given to the major historical, philosophical and literary movements that shaped American literature such as Puritanism, Transcendentalism, and American realism. Major canon American writers will be studied and analyzed. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.`

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Ancient Philosophy

The philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome debated fundamental questions with an imagination, subtlety, and daring that have captured the attention of thoughtful people in every epoch. For example, they considered the nature and origin of the universe, what changes and does not change, as well as what causes change, how perception and reasoning produce knowledge, the relation between the soul and the body, the meaning of justice and beauty, and the nature of the good life. Through a careful reading of selected texts – in the form of dialogues, poems, aphorisms, or treatises – the course will introduce you to the great questions and controversies of ancient philosophy.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Art History Internship

The For Credit Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term employment opportunity. May be taken only once for academic credit.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Baroque Art and Architecture

["An investigation of the major artistic trends in Western Europe during the 17th century. In Italy (excluding Rome, which is covered in a separate course), southern centers such as Sicily, Naples and Lecce will be examined, along with such major northern centers as Turin and Venice, and specific artists such as Guarini, Juvarra and Tiepolo. Major \u201cnational\u201d schools of painting will be analyzed: the Dutch and Flemish, as embodied by Rembrandt and Rubens","the Spanish, with Velazquez","the French, with Poussin and Claude."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Behavioral Finance

Behavioral Finance studies how individuals and firms make financial decisions, and how those decisions might deviate from those predicted by traditional finance or economic theory. Behavioral finance focuses on persistent decision-making biases that have been documented by psychologists. In fact, according to behavioral finance, many facts about asset prices, investor behavior, and managerial behavior are best understood in models where at least some agents are not fully rational. Therefore, this course introduces the theories developed by research into cognitive biases, individual emotions and other psychological effects of decision making, and explores the applications of these theories in finance, investment, and management. It also introduces students to behavioral and experimental methodologies used in finance, economics and other disciplines.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Visual Culture

The course investigates current trends in visual communication, as well as the methods for how to analyze and contextualize these. Contemporary aspects of media and visual culture will be examined together with modern and historical texts for a well-rounded engagement with the medium as well as the narratives and issues it articulates. Drawing on TV, film, internet memes, contemporary art, digital media, and popular culture, the course may include topics like the impact of celebrity, selfies, postmodern visual practices, identity politics and social movements, memes, and viral media. Students will engage in advanced level visual research and analysis that will foster competencies useful for further cultural studies or media careers.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Cybersecurity and Data Privacy Management

This course will introduce students to the key issues in Cybersecurity Management and Privacy and contribute to raising their awareness of related concerns. It will also cover the basics of Information Security, Business Continuity, and Risk Management. Students will be provided with fundamental knowledge of personal data protection, as well as confidentiality, integrity and availability of individuals’ and companies’ sensitive information and valuable assets. Classes will involve a mixture of lectures, seminar discussions, and in-class activities and labs. Each practical class will culminate in an assessed exercise.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Dante's Divine Comedy

The course is an introduction to a critical reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy in its historical, philosophical, religious, and poetic contexts. Readings of Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise seek to identify Dante’s stylistic and thematic contributions to the literary world as well as to understand their relationship with medieval politics, philosophy, and culture. This course is taught in English.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Digital Disruption: Technological Change and Digital Platforms

The course will offer a short historical overview of the relationships between media change and technological disruption, culminating with the intensification of digital media, networking technologies and digital platforms. The course will explore the impact and changes led by digital disruption on social relationships, business models, entrepreneurial practices and the labor condition, communication and culture, as well as on political processes and engagement. The core question investigated throughout the course is how the disruptive logic of digitalization generates anxieties and hopes that condition networked media platforms.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Directed Readings in Greek

The course will offer students the opportunity to read original Greek texts as well as improve their command of accidence, syntax and vocabulary. Language levels will be determined at the beginning of the course and depending on the levels, texts will be chosen to match those levels. The course will emphasize reading Greek for cultural, historical, and social content as well as improving grammar and vocabulary. Texts may therefore vary but will be chosen from such Greek authors as Herodotus, Xenephon, Plato, Lucian, Cebe or the New Testament.

View Syllabus   

Doing History: The Conquest of the Americas

This course introduces students to the practice of history, that is, how professional historians investigate, reconstruct, and interpret the past. Students will examine a variety of methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives that historians have employed in studying a particular historical problem (the topic varies from semester to semester). Students will also engage directly in practicing history by analyzing a variety of primary and secondary sources and carrying out a significant research project related to the topic of the semester.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Elementary Greek I

This course is a first introduction to the study of the Ancient Greek language. It is designed to equip the student with the basics (grammar, vocabulary, syntax) of Ancient Greek in its most widely known form, that of the dialect of classical Athens. The aim of this course is to give a thorough introduction and preparation for reading original texts written by Homer Aesop, Menander, Xenophon Plato, Biblical Greek and other works from Hellenistic and later Greek. No knowledge of Greek is assumed.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Engineering Fundamentals:Microcontroller Programming and Applications

An introduction to digital systems and microcontroller programming including basic logic functions, microprocessor architecture, input and display devices, sensors, motors, and C programming for microcontrollers. The emphasis is on programming a microcontroller in C for practical applications.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

English Literature II: The Enlightenment to Romanticism

A continuation of the survey begun in EN 230, this course deals with works by major British writers in the period 1660 to 1832. Approximately equal attention is devoted to writers of the Restoration (excluding Milton) and 18th century, and to writers of the Romantic Movement. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Entrepreneurial Marketing

This programme is designed to introduce the participants to marketing strategies through the lens of entrepreneurship.

Therefore the learning goals are:

  • To understand the differences between managerial and entrepreneurial marketing
  • To appreciate the role of marketing in entrepreneurship
  • To develop viable marketing plan for a new venture

Language of Instruction: English   

Ethics

What is right and wrong, good and bad? Where do ethical ideas and standards come from? How do we make ethical decisions? And why should we be ethical at all? This course introduces students to ethical thinking by studying both concrete issues and more abstract moral theories. Students will explore theoretical ideas like “virtue”, “duty”, and “utility” and philosophers like Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Singer, and Nussbaum. These will be considered in relation to concrete issues such as abortion, charity, climate change, free speech, and genetics.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Ethics of Emerging Technologies

Technological advances continually create new ethical challenges, and even paradigm shifts in many disciplines. The main focus of this course is on selected contemporary topics in the fields of information technology, robotics and artificial intelligence, environment and technology, and artificial life. By exploring these topics, we will try to answer such questions as “can the use of autonomous robots in war be morally justified?”, “is geoengineering the right response to climate change?”, and “does in vitro meat solve the problem of non-human personhood?”.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Existentialism

The course aims at a phenomenological analysis, discussion, and development of the most important theme in existential philosophy: the Self, understood as consciousness, confronting a world and engaged in human action. Beginning with selected writings by Nietzsche and Kierkegaard, the fathers of Existentialism, the course will explore issues such as freedom, responsibility, decision, finitude, and alienation. These issues will be discussed in their existential contexts as they emerge from the works of philosophers such as K. Jaspers, Sartre, Heidegger, etc. A special emphasis will be placed on the relevance and critical significance of these issues to everyday life in contemporary society.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Fixed Income Analysis

This course will cover the basics of fixed income analysis. The main topics covered are: features of fixed income securities and overview of bond sectors and instruments, risks associated with investing in bonds to include interest rate risk and credit risk, introduction to the valuation of fixed income securities to include valuing mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities and bonds with embedded options, study of yield measures, spot rates, and forward rates and the term structure and volatility of interest rates.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Genocide

The course examines such violent forms of identity politics as ethnic cleansing and genocide in an international and historical perspective. The program covers the genocides in Europe against the Jews and Roma, in Armenia, the Balkans, the Ukraine, Cambodia, Rwanda, and the Darfur region.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Global Warming

["The class will examine the chemical, biological, physical, and geological processes involved in that climate change, already evident in the 20th century, and predicted for the 21st century. The human impact upon the \u201cgreenhouse effect\u201d is explained, the merits of the scientific theory are examined in light of available evidence to date. Climate changes apparent at the century time-scale, and longer, are introduced","the physical forcings responsible for these changes are presented. The international treaties (the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol) that address anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are introduced, along with local to regional initiatives developed by the private and public sectors."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Graphic Design: Corporate Identity and Branding

This course is meant for students who wish to deepen their knowledge in the field of corporate identity and branding. It will address how to respond to technical and communication requirements of a design brief, develop visual concepts, create a system of graphical elements that form the basis of an identity, and define a strategy for a brand. The course will also consider the professional standards of preparing artwork for print. The course requires good competence in visual communication and expertise in the major Graphic Design programs.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Health Psychology

["This course will examine five broad areas: the foundations of health psychology including health research","stress, pain and coping","behavioral factors in cardiovascular disease and chronic disease","tobacco, alcohol, drugs, eating, and exercise","and challenges in health psychology."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Historical and Philosophical Aspects of the Italian Renaissance

This course provides an introduction to the history and philosophy of the Italian Renaissance (c. 1300-c. 1550 CE). While multiple dimensions of the era’s history will be investigated, as will a wide range of its philosophical currents, the course's primary focus will be on understanding the Renaissance and Renaissance humanism in their contexts. A particular emphasis will be placed on reconstructing the ways in which those who participated in the Renaissance, as well as those who were excluded from it, lived and understood their experiences.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

History of Photography

The course is an introduction to photography as both a historical and contemporary form of art and communication. It investigates historical and contemporary photographic and related practices, and considers the key theoretical and historical frameworks used to situate them. Informed discussion about photography and its cultural context is central to the course, which covers the invention and early reception of photography, its function as an independent art form, its uses in other practices, scientific investigation, reportage and its relationships to major art movements.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Hitler and Mussolini - HONORS

This course will provide an advanced survey of the Fascist and National Socialist Movements and Regimes. The main emphasis will be on the breakdown of the Italian and German democracies, the emergence of Fascism and National Socialism, their ideology and goals, and the nature and structure of Mussolini’s New State and Hitler’s Third Reich. The major interpretations of Fascism will be examined in the last part of the course.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Human Communication

["This course familiarizes students with a set of diverse scientific perspectives on human communication. These perspectives cover psychological and social aspects of human communication, providing opportunities for students to acquire a critical appreciation of this multifaceted phenomenon. The course covers a number of key topics such as (a) introductory notions about spoken language, signed language, and non-verbal communication","(b) referential communication","(c) the process of grounding","(d) egocentrism and miscommunication","(e) language as a social action. Considering the deep ramifications communication has for the human experience, this course provides valuable insights for students from a wide range of disciplines."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Human Resources Management

["The course explores the Human Resources Management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. Students learn the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, from developing their mission, vision, and strategy to their key organizational features and processes. Students face issues of managing people in organizations, including hierarchy, leadership, and communication;","systems of reward and recognition;","and personnel (from recruitment to training and development). Some attention is given to the expanding role of corporations in dealing with social problems and issues. The course trains students to build skills relevant to leadership and management. These include public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussions, practical and experiential exercises, and case studies."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Human Resources Management

This course introduces students to the functions of people management, from the development of a plan that link people to the strategic plan of the organization, and in those tasks of people’s function which are decentralized, that is, they must also be carried out by those who direct the other functional areas and/or teams in the organizations. NB Course taught with Spanish students

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced   Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Human Resources Management

This course aims to develop the competences of analysis of the main Human Resources policies, their possible applications, and integration with general management

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Institutions and Policies of the European Union

This course aims to provide students with a firm understanding of the origins, dynamics, institutions, and policies central to the process of European integration. In so doing, students will examine such issues as the relationship among the different EU institutions, and their relationships with the Member States, as well as EU trade, monetary, foreign, and security policies.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

International Business Law

This course aims to provide students with the knowledge of legal structures and the operation of international business, tracking the legal forms (trade in goods, protection and licensing of international property rights, foreign direct investment) and basic market entry strategies of firms as they expand into international markets, indicating how law aids, prohibits or influences individual contractual deals.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Business Law

NOTE: This course is offered as part of the spring CIB Global Management and Finance & Accounting tracks. This course will closely examine the legal aspects of the three basic forms of international business: trade, licensing of intellectual property, and foreign direct investment – within the context of managerial decision making. The course will explain fundamental principles of public and private international law, as well as the law of the European Union, as they relate to the regulation of trade, licensing of intellectual property, and direct investment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

International Entrepreneurship

This course introduces students to issues related to international management and entrepreneurship, with particular attention being paid to formulating creative solutions that take into account differences in national cultures and the business environments. The course examines ways to leverage differences in cultures and leadership styles to achieve enhanced entrepreneurial performance in an international setting including the development of team and communication skills. The course is based on the case-study method.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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International Environmental Politics

This course examines public policy challenges in addressing international environmental protection. Students will examine such issues as climate change, sustainable development, protection of biodiversity/ecosystems/species, resource extraction and energy, which involve conflicting value systems enmeshed in complex power relationships. This course draws students’ attention to issues of scale, interconnectedness, boundaries, and the importance of creating solutions that are workable across and between jurisdictions. Students will engage these global challenges in order to develop the knowledge, and the problem solving and communications skills, to facilitate environmental policy work in the international arena.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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International Management

["This course provides an introduction to business management. Topics covered include: the nature of business administration","the functions of management","the role of the manager","company strategy (concept and standards of strategy, the strategic process)","innovation and change of strategy","management of human resources","quality management","international business administration","information systems and decision-making in organizations","the reconciliation of culture and organizational strategy."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Management

This course deals with multiple functions of management, such as organizing, coordinating, planning, and staffing in an international cross-cultural context. It will focus on the complexity of international management, and students will learn how diverse national cultures affect management functions in different ways. Intercultural communication, expatriate compensation, gender issues, and ethical conflicts will also be discussed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

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Internship: Business Administration Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Internship: Digital Media Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Internship: Economics Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Internship: English Language and Literature Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. May be taken only once for academic credit. NOTES: The internship must be obtained through the JCU Career Services Center. It will not be applicable as an English Literature Major Elective and it cannot be used to fulfill English Literature Minor or Creative Writing Minor course requirements."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Internship: Finance Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. May be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Internship: Media Studies Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. This course may be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introduction to Art and Architecture. Rome, a Case Study

No city in the world can boast the wealth of art and architecture that Rome possesses, and the city provides an ideal framework for understanding international trends and changes between the 1st century BC and the present day. The course will consider the historical, political and international contexts that shapes the form and display of art and architecture, as well as provide a foundation for understanding major artistic works and directions.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Art Historical Thinking

What questions do art historians ask, and how do they justify their answers? This introductory course introduces basic components of the discipline of art history: its diversity and art-historical language, its technical terminology, and basic research skills. The course discusses different types of approaches and methodologies to analyze and think about visual evidence.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Artificial Intelligence Concepts

This course is designed for the general student to provide an INTRODUCTORY overview of artificial intelligence (no computer programming skills are necessary). This course will discuss intelligent agents and the building blocks of artificial intelligence: knowledge bases, reasoning systems, problem solving, heuristic search, machine learning, and planning.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Computer Science

["This course offers an overview and an introduction to the capabilities and limitations of computing and digital multimedia","the theoretical foundations of computing that drive future computing and technological advancements","computer software including operating system and application software","fundamentals of computer networks and the Internet","networks types and standard protocols","cloud computing","next generation Internet or Internet of the things","additive manufacturing and 3D printers for business","business intelligence, data analysis, digital contact with customers","privacy and personal data protection on the Internet","\u201cCyber war,\u201d computer risk, and security concerns."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Islam

A detailed introduction to the religion of Islam, introducing the central beliefs that have united Muslims throughout history, as well as the diversity of sects and communities that see themselves as heirs to Muhammad. The course will discuss the origins of Islam, the evolution of Muslim theology, law, and rituals, and include readings of primary sources, together with relevant secondary literature. The emphasis will be on Sunni Islamic thought, although the genesis of other Muslim communities will deserve due attention as well. Major issues in modern Islamic debate will also receive attention.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Music

The aim of this course is to explore the language and structure of classical Western music, through the study of fundamental elements of music theory and its application to musical forms and genres. The course will include elements of music theory, basic approach to melody and harmony, and the study of musical instruments. Designed for students with little or no musical background, the course will provide the foundations for reading music and will study the principal composers who determined the course of history of Western Music. Last, the course will also include concert and opera evenings, on-site visits to the Museum of Musical Instruments, and jazz seminars. SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Teaching Italian as a Second Language

This is an introductory course to teaching Italian as a second language to adult speakers. This is a course which covers theories as well as techniques and practice for the teaching of Italian. It will consider teaching methodology, lesson planning, learning contexts, the role of the teacher, the teaching of the four language skills, the teaching of the three language systems (grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation), the error analysis and the verification and evaluation. Students will also be provided with assisted lesson planning, observed teaching practice, and oral and written feedback. Students will be supervised during their training at John Cabot and will have the opportunity to put in practice the theory in real university classes.

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Introduction to the Study of Italian Literature

["The course will introduce students to the study of Italian literature","it is designed for those students who have reached 300-level proficiency in Italian language and also functions as a preparatory course for those who wish to study Italian literature at higher levels. The first part of the course focuses on a preliminary explanation of basic literary terminology and teaches students to recognize codes and genres in a limited selection of Italian literary texts. In the second part of the course, students will read samples from significant works of Italian literature in conjunction with selected passages from the canon of Italian literary criticism. They will practice their critical and writing skills by applying the concepts learned during the course to the analysis and reading of the literary texts under consideration. At an introductory level, students will begin to appreciate the difference between commentary and criticism and between both historical and formal approaches to the study of Italian literature."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introduction to Theatrical Performance

["During this course students will learn to: collaborate creatively","employ basic acting techniques such as sensory work, the principles of action, objectives, status, etc.","develop an expressive speaking voice","engage with a variety of stage props","analyze the process of placing a dramatic text on stage","critique and enact a variety of theatrical techniques","define specific terms relating to the study of drama and theater","develop an appreciation for theater as an art form and a reflection of society","understand the responsibility of an actor\u2019s work ethic, especially to one's fellow actors","initiate and upkeep a gradable class-by-class journal (either blog or v-log) of their personal growth throughout the course."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Western Civilization I

This survey course explores the foundations of Western societies and cultures and the transformations they underwent from prehistory through the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which diverse ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern peoples interacted to lay the groundwork for Western civilization, the ways in which political structures and cultures changed over the time period covered, and the development of Western religions and cultures. In addition, through the examination and discussion of a range of primary source materials, the course serves as an introduction to the practice of history, i.e., how historians examine the past and draw conclusions about it.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Issues and Trends in Contemporary Art

This course focuses on the major artistic movements since 1960, in Italy and internationally. It provides direct experience of contemporary art through lectures and field trips, and may include guest lectures by critics and other art professionals. It is taught with a firm emphasis on professional curatorial and editing work, and on practical learning opportunities.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Issues in Economic Development

This course examines in-depth selected topics on development that are of current interest.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Italy and the Middle East

This course will cover the beginnings of this interaction from the rise of Islam as a faith to Italy’s involvement in the 2011 Libyan war and introduce the students to varying themes that characterize this interaction. This course will transcend wide expanses of time and geographic boundaries. We will cover the study of Muslim societies in Italy ranging from Medieval Muslim communities in Sicily and then jump to the North African Muslim communities of the 20th century. It will examine Italian excursions in the Middle East from the Crusades to the Italian experience in Libya in 1911. It will deal with the Middle Eastern commodities Italy imported from this region, ranging from sugar in the 13th century to oil in the 20th century. To sum up, this course focuses not only on diplomatic and political history, but on the circulation of ideas, the interaction between societies, and how trade and art forms created links between the Middle East and the Italian peninsula from the early Islamic era to the 21st century.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Italy from Mussolini to the Crisis of the First Republic (1918 to present)

An in-depth survey of Italian history from the emergence of Fascism to the crisis of the first Republic in the early 1990s. Focus will be on the breakdown of the Liberal system, the emergence and nature of Fascism, and Mussolini’s “New State,” as well as the achievement and weaknesses of the post-war democratic Republic.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Italy from the Risorgimento to the First World War (1815-1918)

This course explores Italian history from the Congress of Vienna to the eve of World War I. Main emphasis will be on the emergence of modern liberalism and nationalism, the construction of the new Kingdom, the crisis of the end of the century, and the age of Giolitti. Although the principal focus will be on political structures, considerable attention will be given to the history of the Italian economy and society, as well as to the history of culture and ideas.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Literature and Creative Writing: How to Read Like a Writer

To supplement their traditional university study of composition and literary analysis, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop skills at reading literature as a source of help in improving their own writing. Designed primarily for students interested in creative writing, this course focuses on the reading of literature from the point of view of the practice, or craft, of fiction writing. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Making Comics as Visual Literacy

Grading: This course will be graded on a PASS/FAIL scale In this course students will make a mini-comic and in the process develop visual literacy skills. It introduces the basic visual grammar of comics and offers an overview of different visual styles and genres. The core activity of the course involves learning how to go from sketches to final product by developing characters, building a world, constructing panels, sequences, completed stories, and distributing on the Web. Because, comics can visually communicate data and complexity in new and unfamiliar ways, skills developed in this course can be applied to other areas of academic life, such as mathematics, science, information science, literature, history, graphics design, arts, and business education. Learning to make comics will also cultivate entrepreneurial skills, including developing targeted communication, building an audience, developing an identity, and cultivating a public persona.

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Management Information Systems

The Management Information Systems course provides a good understanding of the role of information technology in the modern organization. It covers more or less all areas where a manager can come across with information systems. The objective of this course is not to create CIOs, it is rather to enable students to understand opportunities and threats that are coming along with IT. They have to sharpen their knowledge about new technologies, get open minded for changes, and discover the effects of changes on organizations.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Management Information Systems

The general aim of this undergraduate course is for students to become sufficiently competent using Management Information Systems (MIS) and Information & Communication Technologies (ICT), as applied to Business Management. NOTE: Course offered with Spanish students. The availability of this course (and other courses with local students) will not be determined until on-site registration. Students interested in this course should note that the integrated courses listed on this page are not always available.

Language of Instruction: English   

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Marketing Internship

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. May be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Media Production Workshop

["This media production workshop is designed to enable students to develop new projects or finish an incomplete project developed during their coursework at JCU. Examples include shooting new scenes for a video","producing a podcast based on a script written in Writing Across the Media","shooting a short video based on a project developed in a creative writing class","working on sound design, color correction or editing for a video","editing images for a photojournalism project","or expanding and updating a video essay. The course is supervised by a faculty with technical expertise to help with production issues (editing, sound, color correction, etc.) and will follow each student\u2019s individualized learning plan."]

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Medieval Rome and Its Monuments

Rome City Series - An on-site survey of Roman urbanism, as well as developments in figural media and architecture, from the 4th to the 14th century. While the course will naturally emphasize the abundant religious art remaining in the city, it will also examine such secular achievements as towers, housing, defenses, and roads.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Modern Political Theory

This course introduces students to key modern & contemporary political thinkers and their contributions to the development of political theory and ideas. The class covers a wide range of different European, American and African thinkers shaping political philosophy and political theory from the 19th to the 21st century, such as Edmund Burke, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Carl Schmitt, Antonio Gramsci, Hannah Arendt, Frantz Fanon, Michel Foucault, John Rawls, and Jürgen Habermas. The course examines the way these thinkers appropriate traditions of political thought, and provide their own vocabularies to understand the modern world, the modern state, and modern politics. In so doing, the course addresses and critically discusses these thinkers’ different approaches to key political concepts such as power, political order, rationalism, political violence, community, democracy, sovereignty, justice, legitimacy, plurality, difference, and the rule of law.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Myth and Animation

The course investigates how myths, universal narratives and archetypal paradigms find their way into contemporary media products. Mythology, the body of inherited myths in any culture, is at the core of narrative processes, and any new text recasts one or more fundamental myths for the society that develops it, renewing its validity for the society itself. By using the animated feature films produced by Disney throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, the course traces the use of children’s media in general and how Disney products in particular make use of these traditional narratives, thus providing a valuable observation point from which to survey the relationship between media, social context, and audience.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Native American History and Traditions

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Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Perception of Space: Wallpainting in the Ancient World

The course examines wall painting and painted spaces in the Greek and Roman world. It focuses mainly on fresco painting, and examines the versatility and visual impact of this medium across subject, setting and viewing. Since wall painting is intimately linked to its display setting, the course will examine both the subjects and artistic approach of the paintings, and the nature of the spaces they adorned, as well as the interplay of the two-dimensional medium and its three-dimensional setting. Considerations may hence address aspects such as pictorial illusionism, public and private display, articulation of space, the role of the viewer, and the relationship between movements and viewing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Political Science Internship

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 page \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Politics and Power in Roman Architecture - Augustus to Mussolini

This on-site survey investigates the history of Rome primarily through its monuments—its architecture and urban form. This course will provide the student with a clear grasp of how the city of Rome has changed over the course of two thousand years from a modest Iron Age settlement on the Palatine Hill to a thriving modern metropolis of the twentieth century. The student will become intimately acquainted with the topography, urban makeup and history of the city and its monuments and will acquire the theoretical tools needed to examine, evaluate and critically assess city form, design and architecture.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Politics of Gender

This course explores the ways in which the social and cultural constructions of gender influence the nature and practice of political life. The course revolves around two themes – exclusion and empowerment – and examines the practices, policies and structures that exclude different genders, as well as the strategies and repertoires of different gendered communities to protect their rights and interests and promote equality. The course is organized around a variety of topics, blending issues of exclusion and empowerment. The course begins by laying out debates surrounding gender and key themes used to examine the topic in psychology, biology, sociology and economics. We then move to examine specific synergies between gender and politics, exploring the issues of political representation, political participation, public policy, the body politic, the political economy, development, violence, rights, political mobilization and transnational issues. Using case studies, as well as lessons from practitioners, the course surveys a variety of issues and debates related to gender and politics.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Posthuman Studies: Philosophy, Technology and Media

This course introduces students to some of the most important ethical, philosophical, and artistic questions raised by the rapid technological, scientific, and cultural changes of our era. Students will tackle issues such as biological and genetic enhancement, artificial intelligence, the impacts of new media, and the future of employment in a technology-based society, exploring how these issues take us beyond the standard capacities and dualistic concepts of ‘human’ beings (as disembodied ‘minds’, for instance) into a ‘posthuman’ future. Students will examine the approaches that thinkers such as Katherine Hayles and Julian Savulescu have proposed for grappling with these issues.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Race and Gender in Popular Media

Using contemporary theoretical approaches, this course examines both Race and Gender as social constructions, and the role and function of Cinema and Television texts in circulating and contesting those constructions. Focusing on analyzing Cinema and Television texts for their construction of meaning, this course looks at the complex ideological operations at stake in the operations, maintenance, and resistance to meanings constructed around race and gender.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Race and Gender in Popular Media - HONORS

Using contemporary theoretical approaches, this course examines both Race and Gender as social constructions, and the role and function of Cinema and Television texts in circulating and contesting those constructions. Focusing on analyzing Cinema and Television texts for their construction of meaning, this course looks at the complex ideological operations at stake in the operations, maintenance, and resistance to meanings constructed around race and gender. This course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Religion in the Graeco-Roman World

This course is a survey of the elements of traditional religion in the Graeco-Roman world. It is designed to introduce students to the tenets, beliefs, and spiritual practices of classical antiquity and to familiarize them with the social, cultural and political background surrounding ancient religion. Among the topics covered are the range of religious expressions in Greece and Rome, including the approach to the divine, ritual practices, and the organization of time and space. While the first part of the course is dedicated to Greece, in the second half we will concentrate on Roman religion both as a phenomenon in and of itself and as a factor integrated in the socio-political organization of the empire.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Research and Writing in the Humanities

["This course provides practical preparation for designing and carrying out a significant thesis-length research project and a brief, but sophisticated introduction to key methodologies and theoretical approaches used in humanities disciplines. Students will be guided through the processes of setting up a problem to investigate","determining what kind of sources, how many, and which sources are appropriate to use","evaluating and analyzing those sources","reviewing academic literature in the Humanities on their topics","developing a clear and well-researched thesis proposal","and formulating and writing convincing arguments."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Research Practicum

["This upper level seminar\/practicum provides rigorous, practical preparation for the writing of professional art-historical research papers, including the Senior Thesis, through four discrete units: an individual portfolio review","a research tools and methods seminar","intensive, directed bibliographic research","and the formulation of a presentation to the class on the thesis topic, together with a new 'foundation' portfolio demonstrating mastery of the research skills, competencies, and bibliography necessary for advanced art-historical research writing. The course is intended for JCU Degree Seeking students, but advanced visiting students studying Art History are welcome."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Researching Rome: Fieldwork in the City of Rome

This course guides students interested in executing an independent fieldwork project in the city of Rome. As a unique global city, Rome’s contemporary social, economic and political realities provide a fascinating context for observing and analyzing the production of culture, social and political change, and practices of everyday life. This seminar-style course guides students through the four main phases of their independent research project, helping them to: a) select a manageable and realistic case-study for their research, b) identify and interpret relevant theoretical and empirical literature, c) choose the most appropriate techniques of fieldwork observation, data collection and recording, and apply them in a rigorous, ethical and reflexive manner in the city of Rome, d) create a sophisticated written and visual report of their research findings and conclusions. Students will present their final projects to the JCU community during the last week of the semester. In addition to each student's independent project, the class visits a number of Roman neighborhoods to apply theories and observation techniques learned throughout the course.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Romanticism

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Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Selected Topics in American Literature: Hemingway

This course explores in some depth a particular period, theme(s), or genre in American Literature. Students study the major historical and cultural contexts out of which the works grew. An important aim of the course is to deepen students' knowledge of a certain topic through a choice of representative writers and works. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Selected Topics in World Literature: The Immigrant Novel

This course is an upper-level course designed to provide a thorough investigation of a limited number of texts or of a specific central unifying theme that can be chosen either from Western or non-Western literature. The course invites students to take a closer look both at the text or theme in question and at the world out of which the focal subject developed. Through the comparative analysis of literary texts from diverse cultures, students will come to see how cultural differences can influence such elements as narrative, structure, literary style, plot conventions, point of view, or the construction of character and voice. They will also be able to see how similar literary themes may be handled with different emphases by different cultures, or how cultural biases can result in different or even completely opposite moral conclusions. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Sexuality, Eroticism and Gender in Myth and Literature of Greece and Rome

["This multi-disciplinary (philosophy, literature, history, law, art and archeology) course will examine sexuality and eroticism in antiquity, looking in particular at their role as an initiation to higher levels of thought and cognition","their impetus in defining gender roles","their existence as physiological\/psychological needs versus social constructions","how they have invested modern thought, research, and become enduring models interpreting human behavior. Students will carry out a close study of selections from Greek and Roman lyric poetry, Greek drama, philosophy and essays, Roman satire and Ovid\u2019s epics on love."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Social Science Research Methods

This course presents an introduction to research methods commonly used by political and other social scientists. The course covers the logic of the scientific method, including literature reviews, research design, surveys and experiments, as well as the use of statistical data. Students will hand in a thesis proposal, an outline of their senior thesis topic, and their choice of first and second readers as an exit requirement.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Sociolinguistics: A Changing Language In a Changing Society

This course aims to analyze the interrelation between language and society in contemporary Italy. If we can say that Italian is the national language of Italy, it is not realistic to say that all Italians have always spoken just Italian or the same Italian. The history of the Italian language, in fact, shows how the process of it becoming the unitary language has been slow and how language still varies in time, social, situational and geographic space. The course will try to give an up to date account of linguistic diversity, social variation, special codes and language varieties in the Italian society and in the context of linguistic interaction between Italian and dialect, and between Italian and English within Italy. The course will be conducted entirely in Italian.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Sociolinguistics: A Changing Language In a Changing Society - HONORS

This course aims to analyze the interrelation between language and society in contemporary Italy. If we can say that Italian is the national language of Italy, it is not realistic to say that all Italians have always spoken just Italian or the same Italian. The history of the Italian language, in fact, shows how the process of it becoming the unitary language has been slow and how language still varies in time, social, situational and geographic space. The course will try to give an up to date account of linguistic diversity, social variation, special codes and language varieties in the Italian society and in the context of linguistic interaction between Italian and dialect, and between Italian and English within Italy. The course will be conducted entirely in Italian.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Special Topics in Ancient Art: Greek Temples and Sanctuaries

Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of the art of the ancient world. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Special Topics in Economics: The Italian Economy

An in-depth treatment of a current area of special concern within the field of economics. Topics may vary.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Special Topics in English Literature: Transatlantic Connections: Slavery and Literature

["An in-depth treatment of a current area of special concern within the field of English Literature. Courses offered previously include: Dickens and Englishness","Race, Class, Gender, Culture: The American Dream in Literature","The Innocents Abroad: Perceptions of Italy in American, European and British Writing","Topics in World Literature: Masterpieces in Western Fiction. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing May be taken more than once for credit with different topics."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Special Topics in Marketing: Entrepreneurial Marketing

An in-depth treatment of a current area of special concern within the field of Marketing. Topics may vary. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Supply Chain Management

The course is designed to expand student’s knowledge in the area of supply chain management by applying analytical methodologies and information technology. Supply chains are concerned with the efficient integration of suppliers, factories, warehouses, and stores so that products are supplied to customers in the right quantity and at the right time, while satisfying customer service level requirements at minimum cost. Deficiencies in the SC result in a downgrade of competitiveness. Only over the last few years have firms started to focus on supply chain management (SCM) as a source of competitive advantage. SCM is an area of knowledge which offers tremendous opportunity for most firms.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Surveillance, Privacy and Social Identities: Practices and Representations

The course provides an in-depth analysis of the technical, social, cultural and political contexts and the implications of increasingly ubiquitous surveillance practices. The focus of the course will be in analyzing the deployment and implementation of specific surveillance practices within mediated digital environments and the other spaces of everyday life. Concepts such as privacy and secrecy will be analyzed as they relate to the general field of surveillance. The course will focus on the ways in which these practices circulate within the spaces of culture, cut through specific social formations and are disseminated in the global mediascape. Particular attention will be placed on the ways in which the concept and procedures of surveillance are imagined, represented and contained in popular culture.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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The American Experience I: From the First Colonies to the Closing of the Frontier

This course provides an overview of American history from early European discoveries and settlements to the closing of the frontier. Main emphasis will be on the economic, political, social, cultural, and artistic experiences that shaped the Republic and its people. Main themes will be the wilderness and the frontier, the struggle for independence, slavery and civil rights. Special attention will also be devoted to the impact of Puritanism, the pioneer spirit, democracy and freedom, and Manifest Destiny.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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The Other America: History of the Counterculture in the US

History Research Seminar: 300-level history courses designated by the prefix HS-RS indicate courses being offered as Research Seminars. These courses are writing-intensive and help to train students to carry out original research by guiding them through the preparation of a significant research paper. History majors are encouraged to take these before their senior year, and especially before the semester in which they prepare their thesis. The seminar analyzes the history of Counterculture in the United States and examines the impact that Counterculture had during the Sixties and early Seventies (and the legacy and influence that certain particular experiences and ideas have had on later generations). The Other America also aims through the words of Whitman, Steinbeck, Woody Guthrie, Kerouac, Dylan, Springsteen, and many other writers, poets, activists, and musicians to observe the inequities encountered by different American minorities in the 20th Century and to disclose their strategies of survival as they have sought justice and dignity.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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The Photo-book

["This course focuses both on the creation of photographs and on their presentation in book format. A photo-book is a book in which the primary message is carried by photographs","through its design and the choice of its images the book is itself an expressive artistic medium. The course examines the contemporary status of the photo-book as well as the rich history of the medium. It explores the processes of creating a personal photographic vision, and guides students in producing a final collaborative photo-book."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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The Short Story

By examining short stories, this course develops students’ critical abilities in reading and writing about narrative fiction. The students are introduced to a comparative perspective on literature and learn to identify and evaluate the short story’s formal elements, acquiring the skill to read fiction critically, to look beyond the content, to appreciate the ambiguities and complexities of the literary text, and to communicate their findings in critical papers of academic quality. The selection of short stories may vary, offering a historical perspective, a thematic one, or a selection of masterpieces in the genre.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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The Theory and Practice of Diplomacy

The course Theory and Practice of Diplomacy examines the nature of diplomacy, and its different types and their basic characteristics. Lectures will familiarize students with the activities of diplomats, and what they contribute to the conduct of international relations, within a wider historical and theoretical context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Theories of Personality

Personality is generally defined as an individual’s unique stable pattern of thinking, feeling and behaving, and its study has been an extremely important focus in scientific psychology. This course examines the various theories of personality and, according to each theory, a personality’s structure and development. The scope of theories studied will be from the Freudian tradition through to Trait Theories, Biological Perspectives, Behavioral/Social Learning theories, Humanistic/Existential models and finally to more current Cognitive theories. Students will have opportunities to critically evaluate each theory/perspective, and in each of the theories address a variety of questions.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Venetian Art

Venice is set apart from Italy and from Europe not only by its watery setting, but also by its history, traditions, and sense of cultural identity. From the middle of the 15th century to the late 16th century, Venetian painters created a school of art that became celebrated for color and brushwork, for attention to light and landscape, and for new poetic and sensual themes. The political, religious and social structure in which these painters worked was essentially conservative, and the state, confraternities, and religious orders demanded that artists heed time-honored traditions. The course will be an investigation of major themes, issues, controversies and problems concerning the understanding of Venetian art by means of analysis of selected key works. The mandatory field trip may require a fee.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Venetian Art - HONORS

Venice is set apart from Italy and from Europe not only by its watery setting, but also by its history, traditions, and sense of cultural identity. From the middle of the 15th century to the late 16th century, Venetian painters created a school of art that became celebrated for color and brushwork, for attention to light and landscape, and for new poetic and sensual themes. The political, religious and social structure in which these painters worked was essentially conservative, and the state, confraternities, and religious orders demanded that artists heed time-honored traditions. The course will be an investigation of major themes, issues, controversies and problems concerning the understanding of Venetian art by means of analysis of selected key works. The mandatory field trip may require a fee.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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War, Terrorism, and Violence in Visual Culture

["This course examines violence and terror as inherent structural components of contemporary politics and media. Students will study how the performance of violence in the contemporary media landscape has shaped new visual cultures, such as emergent modes of producing evidence, bearing witness and archiving personal and collective memories of traumatic events. Conversely, the course examines how visual culture has dramatically impacted on the way in which we understand and consume violence and terror. Examples include Hollywood movies","art documentaries","amateur films","photographs","art projects and performances","user-generated videos (including audiovisual material produced by armed groups and terrorist organizations)","and state produced media."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Women in Film

This course introduces the issues that feminist theories pose for the analysis of films and culture. These issues are usually framed in reference to women’s access to and roles in the production of media and women’s representation within these media. Correspondingly, the course offers two major sections of investigation. First, we will explore the historical development of women’s roles in the cinema as creative artists. Second, we will explore the various ways in which women’s roles in the film industry intersect with the wider identity political issues of race, class, sexuality, and national identity.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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World Art II: Visual Culture of the Medieval World

This survey course focuses on the art and architecture of Europe, the Mediterranean, and Western Asia from c. AD 400 to c. AD 1300. The course investigates the arts of the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic areas of western Asia, North Africa, and Europe, with brief considerations of the arts of sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian subcontinent, East Asia, and pre-Columbian America. Special attention will be given to religious traditions and to the languages of art (i.e. the symbolic codes) developed to serve, express, and enrich those traditions.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Advertising Management

This is an advertising management, especially practice-oriented course.

The overall aim is to create a deep understanding of marketing communication

planning and evaluation in general and to make participants of the course able

to efficiently translate local specialties into international communication

programs with respect to cultural differences

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Law

The scope of this subject is limited to one of the Business Law subcategories or areas only, such as the business corporation law (company law). The student who is granted approval in this course shall be able to apply the fundamental concepts and legal framework with regard to the different legal types of companies as forms of business enterprise, their incorporation proceedings, their corporate governance rules including how to apply the balance sheet profit as well as the equity integrity, the supplemental contributions to the capital, the amendments to the articles of association, as well as their member rights and duties, and the legal forms of company affiliation and groupings.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Calculus I

This is a Standard Calculus course using an intuitive approach to the fundamental concepts in the calculus of one variable: limiting behaviors, difference quotients and the derivative, definite integrals, antiderivative and indefinite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Classical Mythology

The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Comparative Politics

As both a subject and a method of study, comparative politics examines the nature, development, structure and functioning of the political systems of a selection of countries with very different cultures, social and economic profiles, political histories and geographic characteristics. Through case studies, students will learn to use the comparativist’s methods to collect and organize the information and develop general explanations.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Contemporary Italian Society

This course introduces students to the complexities of contemporary Italian society, taking a primarily ‘bottom-up’ social science approach by examining a wide variety of contexts and exploring the ways in which Italians express, negotiate and transform their cultural and social identities. By drawing on a growing body of anthropological and sociological research, it provides students with the tools to question rigid and dated assumptions about Italian social life and enables them to analyze its multifaceted, dynamic and often contradictory forms and practices, focusing primarily on the last two decades. Students are first introduced to key theoretical and methodological approaches in the sociological and anthropological study of contemporary Italy. We then examine local identities in urban contexts, how families and gender roles are transforming, and the pressures produced by the current economic crisis, as well as exploring why increasing numbers of Italians are returning to rural livelihoods. Next, we discuss life in the Italian work-place and the effects that de-industrialization, technological development and precarious work contracts are having on professional and class identities. We analyze the rising appeal of populist and ‘anti-political’ discourses and figures and then focus on how Italy’s strong civic movements are struggling to improve social life ‘from below’. Among the issues tackled are ones traditionally relegated to the private domain, such as disabilities and sexual identities. Lastly, we examine how migration is changing social and cultural life as the country becomes increasingly multiethnic, how religious (and secular) identities are expressed, and the effects that Italy’s dramatic brain-drain is having within the country.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Creative Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction

This creative writing workshop is designed to help students develop their writing and editorial skills, as well as the reading habits necessary for the production of works of creative nonfiction. The class will focus upon the creative process and the generation of several different forms within the nonfiction genre including the personal essay, the memoir, travel writing, and the journalistic or magazine profile. Through the examination of superior examples of creative nonfiction, discussions, and critiques, students will become acquainted with the techniques and tools used to build an excellent portfolio of literary and journalistic pieces within the creative nonfiction genre.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

["The course aims to develop the creative, editorial, and reading habits needed for the production of literary fiction","to develop self-editing skills","and to foster an aesthetic sensibility for use in writing literary fiction. Students will read both contemporary literary fiction and materials related to analyzing and editing literary fiction and participate in a traditional creative writing workshop through in-class writing exercises, reading classmates' fiction, and producing and workshopping their own fiction. Students will compile a portfolio of the work they produce during the term. Students completing this workshop course will be familiar with the skills needed to produce literary fiction, to self-edit work in progress, and to discern the characteristics that make quality literary fiction."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Creative Writing Workshop: Mixed Genre

This course provides an introduction to the creative practice of writing fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and stage/screen writing, while probing major issues of literary aesthetics. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution requirement in English Literature.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Economics of Information

This course examines incentive mechanisms at work in a wide range of environments to see if and how coordination can be achieved by informing and motivating individual decision makers. It also examines the performance of agents hired to carry out specific tasks, from taxi drivers, employees, to CEOs. Students will be introduced to a range of economic tools used to study models that explicitly involve contracting in economics and finance under imperfect and asymmetric information. The methods developed can be employed to investigate the performance of various institutions (e.g., voting schemes) to see if they enhance general well-being. Techniques studied include agency theory and signaling models. In addition, some applications of the tools will be covered (e.g., labor market, credit market and insurance markets).

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Elementary Latin I

This course is a first introduction to the study of the Latin language. The course introduces all forms of nouns and pronouns in the five declensions and all tenses of the verb in the indicative and imperative. It emphasizes vocabulary development and the acquisition of reading skills in Latin prose. Assignments include considerable reading of continuous passages and translation from Latin to English and English to Latin. Attention is also given to Latin proverbs, abbreviations and cognates in English.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Finance

This course examines both the theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The main areas covered include an overview of the financial system and the efficiency of capital markets, evaluation of financial performance, time value of money, analysis of risk and return, basic portfolio theory, valuation of stocks and bonds, capital budgeting, international financial management, capital structure management, and the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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General Psychology

Introduces the study of psychology, the study of the human mind, in some of its many facets: epistemological issues, the brain, perception, learning, language, intelligence, motivation, development, personality, emotion, social influences, pathology and therapy, and prevention. These will be seen from the scientific and scholarly point of view, but with emphasis on their relevance to everyday life. An important focus of the course will be the significance of theories and how they influence the gathering of data, as well as the difficulty of objectivity when the object of study is also its primary tool: the human mind. One of the goals of the course will also be to prepare the student to read psychological literature with a critical eye, keeping in mind the difficulties involved in attempting to study human subjectivity in an objective way.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Human Trafficking and Contemporary Slavery

After a brief, comparative overview of historical practices, this course will examine contemporary manifestations, focusing in particular on chattel slavery, religious slavery, domestic servitude, bonded labor/debt bondage, forced prostitution and sexual slavery, early and forced marriages, forced labor, and human trafficking. Less familiar forms of human trafficking, such as trafficking for the purpose of illegal adoptions and organ sales, and the difference between human trafficking and the smuggling of migrants will also be studied. Special attention will be given to understanding what should be done to fight against these contemporary exploitative practices.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Intensive Italian II

This course meets four times per week and covers the equivalent of a full year of intermediate language study (IT 201 and IT 202) in one semester. Designed for highly motivated students who wish to consolidate language skills in a short time.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intermediate French I

A continuation of French 102. This course focuses on consolidating the student’s ability to use French effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings and films acquaint students with French and francophone culture.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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International Economics

International economics is divided into two broad subfields: international trade and international money. International trade focuses on real transactions in the international economy, that is, on those transactions that involve a physical movement of goods. On the other hand, international money focuses on financial transactions and refers to the monetary side of the international economy. This course deals with the first aspect of international economics, i.e. the real transactions and focuses on two main aspects of it: international trade theory and evidence and international trade policy.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Economics

The aim of this course is for students to become familiar with the most relevant concepts and methods of analysis in the field of international economics. Students will be provided with the fundamental tools for analyzing the global economy and will delve deeper into the main features of the world economy. Pre-requisite: Previous coursework in Macro and Microeconomics

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Economics

The course introduces students to the main theories and methods of international economics. The first half of the course deals with the basic models explaining international trade, such as the theory of comparative advantages, the Hecksher-Ohlin model, and various alternative trade theories. The effects and reasons of government intervention in international trade, a topic of growing importance today, will be discussed, along with the pros and cons of protectionism. During the second part of the semester the course will discuss other topics of international economics, such as international factor flows, international finance and foreign exchange. The course combines rigorous economic analysis with attention to issues of economic policy alive and important today. Special attention is given to analyzing current world economic events, as well as the relevance of empirical application of the theories and models discussed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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International Finance

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the complex world of international finance. Topics include the increasing globalization of financial markets, international and European monetary systems, foreign exchange markets, direct and indirect international investment.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Finance

Given the current concept of a globalized world, this course is addressed to students keen on financial issues and, in particular, international finance. The main purpose of this course is to understand the financial system and to include an international perspective. In its duration of 45 hours, the course examines the determination of exchange rates and operation of exchange markets as well as firm’s management of foreign exchange exposure, cash management, and capital budgeting. The development of International banking and political risk management will also be studied. Emphasis is also placed on the effects of globalization on financial crashes, financial regulation & market efficiency. An updated look at the dynamics of international entrepreneurship is also provided, focusing especially on developed countries and the role of female entrepreneurship. Students will acquire knowledge on the former topics by means of dynamic and practical examples, work projects and group discussions (i.e., essays, role-playing, video, surveys, economic experiments; Financial Times press cuttings on selected controversial issues).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Finance

In order to provide a global picture of financial interactions and increasing interdependence, this course delves into the macroeconomic aspects of international economics with special emphasis on monetary issues. As the tendency is for countries to become more open over time, doing so makes them subject or potentially vulnerable to external events that can substantially affect their performance and that of the firms within them. A good understanding of open-economy macroeconomics is therefore crucial. Specific cases of integration schemes and monetary experiences, such as the European integration, are also debated.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Finance

Given the current concept of a globalized world, this course was desiged specifically for students eager to understand financial issues and, in particular, international finance. The main objective is to understand the financial system from an international perspective, examining exchange rates and the operation of exchange markets as well as a firm’s management of foreign exchange exposure, cash management, and capital budgeting. Students will also study the development of international banking and political risk management with an emphasis on the effects of globalization on financial crashes, financial regulation & market efficiency. The course will also take an up-to-date look at the dynamics of international entrepreneurship, focusing especially on developed countries and the role of female entrepreneurship.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

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International Marketing

International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Marketing

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of international marketing in terms of both the challenges and opportunities. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic marketing terms and have a basic to mid understanding of marketing concepts. The course will examine the concepts related to international marketing, while students analyze case studies and propose ideas through assignments to attain the objectives of the course.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the marketing decisions within an organization, from a global perspective. Students will be exposed to the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing management in a global business environment.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

This course provides an introduction to international marketing. Topics include: analytical techniques used in international market research","determining prices and distribution channels in an international context","and marketing across linguistic and cultural borders.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Marketing

This course provides a general introduction to international marketing dealing with topics such as: making business in a global economy, strategies in export trade, international logistics, the impact of the new technologies in the world trade, the role of the media and of advertising in a consumer oriented society, different approaches for different targets, etc.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

This course will provide an understanding of the elements that makes up the international environment, examining the development of an international marketing strategy and providing practical information on how to expand into international markets.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

The main purpose of this course is to enable students to apply the specifics of international marketing to real situations in the business environment

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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International Marketing

This course will strengthen the concepts already acquired in international marketing by focusing on the all new marketing strategies as well as the differences between international marketing and domestic marketing.The main focus will be on ethnic marketing, viral marketing, and yield management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

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International Marketing

This module will examine the global aspects of marketing and students will learn to apply the basic concepts, practices and principles of marketing in an international context. The course will cover: the international marketing environment; the specificities of international marketing: increased complexity of the environment (economy, history and geography, cultures, politics, legal environment); the international marketing triad: segmenting, targeting and positioning in an international context; global competitive analysis and strategy; international market selection; international market entry strategies and expansion; understanding licensing, investment, and strategic alliances; global branding decisions; the 4 Ps in an international context, international product decisions, international pricing, international distribution, global communication strategies; implementing an international marketing plan and control.

NOTE: This course is offered as part of the fall CIB certificate program.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

International Marketing

THIS COURSE IS OFFERED DURING THE SECOND TWO WEEKS

In this course, students will have the opportunity to:

  • Acquire analytical, strategic and promotional tools to optimize marketing performance.
  • Discover how global companies are using cultures.
  • Develop sales and negotiation skills through an interactive sales game.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Internship: Digital Journalism Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 page \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. May be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introduction to Literature

This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing. Presupposing no previous knowledge in particular of literature, the course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in the three genres of fiction, drama, and poetry. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned texts, use various critical approaches, and write several critical essays on specified readings.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Political Theory

An introduction to the history of political thought, from Ancient Greece to the 19th century. Through a close reading of selected canonical texts, students will examine the evolution of ideas about democracy, liberty, equality, justice, political authority, the social contract, different conceptions of human nature and the role of the individual in society. The theorists examined may include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, de Tocqueville and John Stuart Mill.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory French I

This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in French. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory Italian II

A continuation of IT101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Italian I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory Spanish I

This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Spanish. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Italian Composition

In this course students will be guided through a variety of types of writing and styles (e.g., journalistic, business and professional, essay). Although mainly designed for advanced non-native speakers, the course may also be taken by native speakers who wish to improve their writing skills. Students will reinforce their knowledge of grammar and syntax, as well as develop vocabulary. In addition, students will learn fundamental writing techniques, such as organizing ideas, selecting examples, drawing conclusions, and using the appropriate style for the given genre or mode of discourse.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Legal Environment of Business

This course provides students with an overview of the law in general, beginning with the foundations of the legal and regulatory environment, the law-making processes, and the implementation of legal rules. Students examine some areas of substantive law, including bodies of law that are regulatory in nature. Particular attention is given to aspects of business transactions in an international context.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Long-Term History of Globalization

Contemporary discussions of globalization often suffer from a certain short-sightedness. It is all-too-frequently treated as a recent creation of twentieth- and twenty-first-century world economies and information networks. Both its advocates and its critics too often assume that the history of globalization has been the history of the “westernization” of economic and cultural practices. This course provides a deeper and longer term introduction to the complex forces and far-from-one-sided cross-cultural interactions that have been “globalizing” our planet since the development of settled agriculture. Among the aspects of globalization’s history that are covered are the development of market conventions, the spread of religious and cultural traditions, ecological exchanges, transport technologies and networks, migration, the role of violence, and industrialization and deindustrialization.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Managerial Accounting

The course is designed to develop the knowledge and understanding of students on the principles and concepts relating to managerial accounting and apply the calculation techniques that form industry standards.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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New Product Management

This course investigates the process of new product management, starting from idea and concept generation through to project evaluation and development. The course is designed to be a workshop for new product development, allowing students to explore market opportunities and propose new concepts to the market.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Organizational Behavior

This course is about understanding how people and groups in organizations behave, react, and interpret events. It also describes the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping behavior, and explains how organizations really work. Drawing from fields including management, anthropology, sociology, and psychology, Organizational Behavior provides a foundation for the effective management of people in organizations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Organizational Behavior

This course will focus on the challenges faced by individuals in international corporations with respect to Interpersonal relationships, communication, diversity, individual decision making, motivating self and workforce, group behavior and leadership, corporate culture, and change and stress management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

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Politics of Developing Countries

The definition of Third World has been applied to countries which, albeit located in different geographic areas of the globe, are affected by similar features and problems: recent independence from colonial rule, limited economic development, overpopulation, insufficient infrastructures and availability of public hygiene/health care/education, persisting dependency on developed countries and attempts at reducing or altogether eliminating it. The course will explore the various patterns with an emphasis on three aspects. The first will examine comparative theories of social backwardness and belated development, particularly those elaborated by Bairoch, Gerschenkron, Barrington Moore jr., Skocpol and others. The second will discuss geography and historical issues: colonialism, imperialism, decolonization and the impact of the Cold War being the main ones. The third will focus on the past couple of decades and the current situation. In examining country studies, particularly focused on the roots of democratic systems and of stability, the dichotomies of dictatorship and democracy, national sovereignty and human rights, globalization and autarchy will be analyzed and assessed

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Professional Skills for Career Development

["Grading: This course will be graded on a PASS\/FAIL scale. The main goal of this course is to prepare students for their career: the course provides students with an understanding of the mechanisms regulating the job market as well as uncertain, competitive and challenging work environments. The course is also a tool to learn the art of personal branding","students learn how to develop individual soft skills such as leadership style, communication skills, and organization skills. The course prepares students to successfully enter the job market","participants will learn about the different interviewing techniques and will learn how to apply for a position in an effective manner. In the end, attention is given to external relationships and professional network: the course explains how to build and maintain professional relationships, and how to handle conflict in the working environment."]

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Programming Concepts and Applications

This course introduces fundamental computer programming concepts using a high-level language and a modern development environment. Programming skills include sequential, selection, and repetition control structures, functions, input and output, primitive data types, basic data structures including arrays and pointers, objects, and classes. Software engineering skills include problem solving, program design, and debugging practices. The goal of this course is to advance students’ computational thinking, educate them to use programs as tools in their own field of study, and to provide them with fundamental knowledge of programming strategies.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Public International Law

The course Public International Law will provide the students with a thorough understanding of the nature and basic features of International Law, as well as its role in contemporary International Relations. Students will be able to understand the legal foundation of the international states system and to apply international rules and legal principles in the analysis of international problems and conflicts.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Senior Capstone Project

This senior capstone course culminates the coursework in communications by focusing on the study and application of ethical standards in a variety of communication environments. Classical and alternative ethical frameworks are explored in order to evaluate and respond to communication problems in the context of global media and cultural citizenship. Through the analysis of case studies, students explore how the structure of media organizations impact ethical decision making and learn to develop self-reflective media practices.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Statistics II

The main purpose of this course is to enable students to know the most important inferential statistical methods and being to identify and apply the adequate method to each specific real situation in business and institutional environments, with the help of statistical software.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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The Popes of Rome: History of the Catholic Church

The history of the Catholic church is essentially intertwined with the history of Western Civilization over the past 2,000 years. The aspirations and struggles of Christendom constitute the fabric of the Christian tradition as it unfolds throughout time. This course represents an historical survey of the Church from its primitive beginnings in Jerusalem (c. 33 A.D.) to the Pontificate of John Paul II (1920-2005). The development of the course will trace the major events, ideas and people that went into the shaping of the Western Church, without ignoring the fundamental importance and influence of the doctrine of Jesus Christ regarding the institution he founded.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Web Design II

The course provides students with the technical knowledge required to deal with the professional process of designing, developing, installing and maintaining a business web site.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Western European Politics

The course examines the political systems in Western Europe and major political developments affecting Western Europe since 1945 through a comparative lens. Looking at historical legacies, political cultures, types of government, and party systems shaping the major Western European powers, students will gain an understanding of the constitutive features, and transnational developments, challenges and changes in Western European states.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Advanced Composition

The main goal of this course is to enable students to create different basic descriptive, narrative and argumentative texts in Spanish (narrative, descriptive, argumentative...) by means of exercises involving exposition, reflection, and practice. Students will learn techniques to organize the written speech, as well as style resources that will let them progress within the area of writing in Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Advanced Grammar and Conversation

This course is designed to help students gain fluency and confidence in speaking while reviewing the advanced structures of Italian grammar. Contemporary literary and journalistic texts offer an introduction to Italian culture and provide the basis for class discussions geared toward expanding vocabulary and reinforcing the idiomatic use of the language.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Advanced Media Theory

This course is designed as an advanced level exploration of major theories and schools of thought in media studies and communications. It surveys foundational theories about media and communication, ranging from mass media in the 19th century to contemporary digital media and cultures. Schools of thought and concepts covered in the course include the study of ideology, hegemony, political economy, culture industries, medium theory, cultural studies, mass media and society, spectacle and spectatorship, race, gender, post-colonialism, semiotics, and postmodernism. Students will apply theories through practical written research projects and analysis of current media practices.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Ancient Rome and Its Monuments

Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the Iron Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. DO NOT TAKE with AH 190.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Applied Data Analytics

This course will examine current trends in data science, including those in big data analytics, and how it can be used to improve decision-making across different fields, such as business, economics, social and political sciences. We will investigate real-world examples and cases to place data science techniques in context and to develop data-analytic thinking. Students will be provided with a practical toolkit that will enable them to design and realize a data science project using statistical software.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Business Communications

This course deals with the definition and analysis of problems and the production of written and oral business reports. Use of appropriate computer software (e.g. word processing, spreadsheets, graphics) is an integral part of the course

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Calculus II

This course builds on the fundamentals of the calculus of one variable, and includes infinite series, power series, differential equations of first and second order, numerical integration, and an analysis of improper integrals. It also covers the calculus of several variables: limits, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Child Development

Follows the development of the child through adolescence, with emphasis on the complexity and continuity of psychological development. The course will emphasize the interaction and interdependence of the various systems: biological, genetic, and environmental, as well as the interaction and the interdependence of cognitive and social factors in the various stages of development, from the prenatal period through adolescence. Particular attention will be placed on attachment theory, the development of the self, and possible pathological outcomes of faulty development.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Cities, Towns & Villas: Rome, Ostia, Pompeii

Rome, Ostia and Pompeii are three of the best- preserved archaeological sites in the world. Through their study, we are able to comprehend the physical and social nature of Roman cities and how they transformed over the course of centuries. We explore the subjects of urban development, public and private buildings, economic and social history, and art incorporated into urban features (houses, triumphal monuments, etc.).

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Cognitive Psychology

This course will examine the structure and function of mental processes, which account for human behavior. Topics include attention, perception, memory, problem solving, decision making, cognitive development, language, and human intelligence. Individual, situational, gender, and cultural differences in cognition will also be explored. An individual research project or research paper is required.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Community Inclusion through Art and Movement

Grading: This course will be graded on a PASS/FAIL basis. The course provides students with theoretical and practical knowledge of techniques and methodologies for teaching and learning through non-verbal communication and bodily movement. While such skills are necessary for all human communication, they are particularly important in socio-humanitarian and helping relationships. The course is therefore geared towards students who intend to pursue a career working with facilitating the social inclusion of disadvantaged groups such as migrants, prison inmates and people with various disabilities.

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Computer Office Applications

This course helps students develop the advanced skills that are necessary in personal productivity office applications, such as word processing, data management and analysis, and presentation/slide design. The course follows best practices and reviews available internet tools for data storage.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Consumer Behavior

This course is designed to explore consumer behavior across a number of domains -- from the cognitive biases that impact daily decisions, to the ways in which consumers are influenced by the environment. This course draws from research in behavioral economics, psychology, and marketing and is intended to broadly survey concepts and case analyses in the study and practice of consumer behavior.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Consumer Behavior

The objective of this course is to enable students to understand the essential theories of consumer behavior in an international perspective. The course will provide students with the basics of the consumer behavior, as a group of people as much as a single individual. In an international perspective, an emphasis is given in regards to cultural, lingual, and environment factors related to the consumer process.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

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Consumer Behavior

Students in this course will gain an understanding of the key concepts of consumer behavior, and how through marketing research, this behavior, once understood, impacts marketing decision making, helping organizations become more customer-focused, and marketing oriented.

NOTE: This course is offered as part of the fall CBS certificate program.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

Creative Writing Workshop: Travel Writing

This creative nonfiction workshop explores the long tradition of travel writing, fostered by the keen observation and thoughtful documentation of landscape and culture that travel inspires. Students will gain exposure to several subgenres encompassed by the term travel writing including, but not limited to, the travel memoir, the travel essay, guidebooks, and food and humor pieces that tandem as travel writing. The course offers instruction in the research and mechanics of travel writing aimed at the generation of articles and essays for newspapers, magazines, guidebooks, the Internet, as well as how to begin drafting ideas for longer-form works.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Digital Media Culture

This course provides students with a number of theoretical approaches to critically assess how digital media function and their expanding and expansive role in contemporary culture. The course further investigates digital media convergence in order to develop a critical lexicon that can both chart its development and engage in intellectual interventions in its use within the transformations occuring in more traditional cultural forms such as television, film, popular music, print, and radio. Special emphasis will be placed on the specific cultural, political, economic, and social issues raised by digital media forms.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Digital Photography

This course is meant for students who wish to deepen their knowledge of digital photography. It will review basic camera functions, lighting, principles of composition and pictorial dynamics, color interactions, and introduce methods of the elaboration of photos on the computer. The course will consider the historical and formal knowledge of photography, as well as including picture-taking in a variety of genres and the preparation of a photo exhibition. Each student must be equipped with a digital camera with a wide lens or a 3x or greater optical zoom, and camera functions selector which includes M,A,S,P. A tripod and modern single-lens reflex (SLR) digital cameras with interchangeable lenses are highly recommended.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Drawing - Rome Sketchbook

["This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself","each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light and the development of volume in space. With practice and growing experience, students become capable of producing drawings governed by conscious intention."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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E-Marketing

This course approaches Internet marketing from a marketing management perspective. The course looks at the Internet both as a tool to be used in the marketing planning process and as an element of a company’s marketing mix. The course explores how traditional marketing concepts such as market segmentation, research, the 4Ps, and relationship marketing are applied using the Internet and other electronic marketing techniques. Website design is not covered.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Econometrics

Econometrics is the use of statistical tools to test economic models. This course will introduce students to the basic principles of econometrics and will provide them with hands-on practical experience in the field. The course starts with a review of statistical tools and continues with the analysis of simple and multiple regression, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity. Some of the teaching time will be spent in the computer lab, where students will learn how to work with software.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Economics of Development

The course focuses on the economics of development, with specific reference to developing countries. While drawing extensively on the tools of standard economic theory, it deals with development issues for which economic theories at best provide only partial answers. It offers a problem-oriented approach, with a historical and institutional perspective, to issues such as poverty, population, income distribution, international trade, investment, aid, and the debt problem.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Elementary Greek II

After a brief review of key grammar and morphology from Greek 101, the course will complete the process of providing students with a sufficient grasp of Greek vocabulary, morphology and syntax to enable them to read unadapted passages from ancient Greek authors (with the aid of a lexicon) by the end of the course. There will be short readings of selections from Aesop, Lucian and Greek epigrams.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Elementary Latin II

This course provides continued study of accidences and syntax, treating all tenses of the verb in the subjunctive, indirect discourse, paraphrastic constructions and deponents. Vocabulary development is continued through intensive reading of selections of Latin prose. Students are also introduced to verse forms and the study of inscriptions. Assignments focus on translation from English to Latin and Latin to English.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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English Composition

This course concentrates on the development of effective paragraph writing in essays while introducing students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN 110. Individual students in EN 105 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Figure Drawing

Figure drawing is the traditional basis for training the artist’s eye and hand. Through specific exercises, students learn to control line and gesture, to model form in light and dark, and to depict accurately the forms and proportions of the human body.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Financial Institutions and Capital Markets

This course covers the structure and role of financial markets and institutions such as commercial banking, investment banking, and major equity, debt, and derivative markets and includes discussion of management, performance, and regulatory aspects. The course also examines the functions of central banks and monetary policy for these financial markets and institutions. Case studies and real life examples are also disseminated throughout the course to allow students the additional exploration of national and international implications of financial markets, including those concerning credit crisis, their causes, and the likely reverberations and regulatory reforms.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Financial Management

This course builds on FIN 301 Finance and completes the overview of theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The course focuses on the interpretation of financial data ratios, cost of capital and long-term financial policy, short-term financial planning and management, issues in international finance, and mergers and acquisitions.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Finite Mathematics

This course develops the quantitative skills which a liberal-arts educated student should acquire. It is intended to give the student an appreciation for the use of mathematics as a tool in business and science, as well as developing problem solving and critical thinking abilities. The course introduces the student to important topics of applied linear mathematics and probability. Topics include sets, counting, probability, the mathematics of finance, linear equations and applications, linear inequalities, an introduction to matrices and basic linear programming.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Foundations of Digital Video Production

This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Fresco Painting

This course will provide students with the material techniques and art-historical context to understand Italian fresco painting. The art of fresco is particularly varied, and includes drawing, painting, color theory and plaster preparation. Students will leave the course with knowledge of these techniques and become familiar with the history of fresco painting and in particular certain masters and their work in Rome. While the course aims to provide an introduction to the history of fresco painting in Italy from 1300 to 1600, we will also study the traditional techniques of fresco painting and engage in the production of fresco work. Students will learn all phases of fresco making, from mortar mixing and surface preparation, drawing studies and transfer, to dry pigment preparation and application.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Game Theory

Situations in which the outcome of your own decisions depends also upon what others do are pervasive in everyday life. Game Theory focuses on the study of strategic interactions, which occur if the payoff (e.g., utility or profit) to an agent depends not only on her own decisions but also on the decisions made by others. In the presence of strategic interactions, choosing an ‘optimal’ course of action requires taking other agents’ behavior and beliefs into account. This is an introductory course in Game Theory which develops the basic tools and concepts necessary to analyze such interactions and understand how rational agents should behave in strategic situations. In recent years, game theoretic methods have become central to the study of networks (e.g, financial networks) and social interactions. In this course they are used to analyze such economic and political issues as oligopoly, the problem of the commons, auctions, bank runs, collusion and cartels, the conduct of monetary policy, bargaining, global warming, competition among political parties, arms races, negotiations and conflict resolution (e.g., contested resources and territorial disputes). Emphasis is placed on applications, practical understanding and a tools-oriented approach. The topics will be presented through a combination of abstract theory and many applied examples.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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History of Ancient Rome and Italy

["This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period","the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan \u2018Principate\u2019","the innovations of the High Empire","and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and\/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intensive English Composition

This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN110. Students who receive a grade ranging from C- to D- can take EN105 or repeat EN103. Students who receive an F must repeat EN103.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intensive Italian I

This course meets four times per week and covers the equivalent of a full year of elementary language study (Introductory Italian I and II) in one semester. Designed for highly motivated students who wish to develop communicative ability in Italian in a relatively short time.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intercultural Communications

An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication—its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots—as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intermediate Algebra

["This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division involving algebraic expressions","factoring of polynomial expressions","exponents and radicals","solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations","and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intermediate French II

A continuation of French 201. While continuing the review of grammar, the course emphasizes the development of reading and composition skills in the context of the French and francophone culture. Literary readings, newspaper articles, and films, are an essential component of this course.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intermediate Italian I

A continuation of IT 102. This course focuses on consolidating the student’s ability to use Italian effectively. Emphasis is given to grammar review and vocabulary expansion. Selected readings and films acquaint students with contemporary Italy.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intermediate Microeconomics

This course delves deeper into the foundations of microeconomic theory, and analyzes the subject from a theoretical rather than practical point of view. Students will become familiar with the tools used by microeconomists in the analysis of consumer and producer behavior. The first part of the course reviews consumer theory and discusses budget constraints, preferences, choice, demand, consumer’s surplus, equilibrium, externalities, and public goods. The second part of the course reviews producer theory: technology, profit maximization, cost minimization, cost curves, firm and industry supply, and monopoly.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Learn how to communicate well in various situations as well as comprehend and write various texts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Students in this course should have a good command of communicative skills for everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s oral and written skills and emphasizes more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Intermediate Spanish I

These courses require that students already understand basic grammatical concepts so they can be introduced to a more advanced stage of the study of the language, so as to reach an overall dominance of the Spanish language system in its diverse contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

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Intermediate Spanish I

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

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Intermediate Spanish I

This course is intended for students who already have basic communication skills. The general aim of the course is to extend students’ ability to communicate on a wider range of topics. Classes emphasize the active acquisition of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Upon completing the course, students will be able to follow or give a short talk on familiar topics, keep up a conversation on a fairly wide range of topics and write short letters and other texts on predictable subjects. Special attention is paid to classic difficulties such as ser vs. estar, para vs. por, pretérito indefinido vs pretérito imperfecto as well as the use of the subjective for expressing possibility, doubt, suggestions, and advice.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

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Intermediate Spanish II

This course emphasizes discourse enrichment, specifically related to description and simple narrations. The content of the course includes vocabulary building and detailed wok with the subjunctive mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 5  

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Intermediate Spanish II

These courses require that students already understand basic grammatical concepts so they can be introduced to a more advanced stage of the study of the language, so as to reach an overall dominance of the Spanish language system in its diverse contexts.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

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Intermediate Spanish II

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

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Intermediate Spanish II

Improve comprehension of texts with both concrete and abstratct themes, learn to communicate with native speakers more fluently, and produce texts with various themes.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate   Course Level: Upper Division   

Course Level: Upper Division   

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International Business

In this course, students will apply theories, tools, and insights found in the field of international management to common real world scenarios mainly through the use of case studies (specially from the Harvard Business Publishing). Students will demonstrate an understanding of the similarities and differences among the peoples of the world and how they affect business management. The course will discuss how various legal, political, economic, and cultural systems affect business attitudes and behavior, exploring the managerial issues related to strategic planning, human resource management, motivation, and leadership that may arise in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Business

The increasing globalization of the marketplace affects all who are involved with business or who must make business decisions. Even those who are not directly involved in international business are affected in their domestic operations by international events and by the business activities of foreign entities. Therefore, it is imperative to be knowledgeable about the international business systems. This decade will pose many challenges and opportunities, particularly for newly industrialized countries (NIC). Three primary causes of these challenges are: first, these countries have become fierce competitors for the manufacture of high tech goods. Second, integration of the European Community has now created the largest trade block. Third, the acute international debt crisis keeps threatening the world financial structure and economic growth. This crisis has redirected the trade pattern away from the poor countries to the richest and likewise has concentrated capital flows among the rich countries. However, in recent times we have been observing a shift back to LCD’s, particularly in industries that are labor intensive

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Business

This course is mainly targeted to help students understand the strategic issues and tradeoffs in a global context and assess the strategic performance of global companies. It is intended to cover two basic learning dimensions: The first one seeks to improve the student´s ability to understand the present global environment and therefore, be able to identify, analyze, and execute strategies in the global business environment. Students will be exposed to material from a number of important and recurring international business challenges including business-government relations, corporate strategies in a world of multiple regulators, the management of complexity, opportunities and risks in the global environment and so on. Secondly, students will be led to understand the strategic management of global companies. We will examine how, and why, firms decide to develop operations in foreign countries, and how firms can become successful once their operations cross national boundaries. We will also examine how individuals and teams manage business activities effectively in such global companies.

The course draws on a number of different academic disciplines including economics, political science, international finance, trade and relations, cultural dimensions, etc. With regard to this approach, the goal is always to understand globalization and its implications for firms from a trans-disciplinary focus, all integrated into and understood from a systemic perspective of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Business

This course develops international and European knowledge about the cultures of the different European countries. Business relationships, economics and business environment, protocol rules, European politics, negotiation strategies and export procedures are evaluated. Countries such as Spain, France, Germany, UK, and Italy are analyzed in great depth.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Business

This course covers the cultures of European countries. Business relationships, economics and business environment, protocol rules, European politics, negotiation strategies and export procedures are evaluated. Countries such as Spain, France, Germany, UK, and Italy are analyzed in great depth.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Business Seminar

["This heavily case-based capstone course will enable students to integrate and consolidate previous learning and examine in-depth real-life issues of policy, competitive advantage and barriers to trade","regional and global strategy","the challenges and benefits of operating and managing internationally and cross-culturally","and the major ways in which international business is currently changing, with a consideration of the implications for future business graduates."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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International Organizations

["The Course will explore the historical idea of International Organization that emerged in\nEurope in the 18th century","its development in the 19th century","and finally its rise in the 20th\ncentury, to become the major factor in international life of states."]

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Internship: Communications Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introduction to Cinema

This course is designed as an introduction to the art, history, and business of film. It presents an introduction to film aesthetics and the formal properties of film, locating specific styles and narrative forms within specific classical and alternative film movements. Film theories and critical strategies for the analysis of film will be investigated. The course will be divided into weekly screenings and lectures.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Classical Archaeology

This is an introduction to the major cultures of the classical world, ca. 2000 BC to AD 400, with archaeology as the primary body of evidence. Following an introduction to the history of classical archaeology and current archaeological theory and methods, the course traces the development of society in the Mediterranean basin from the Minoans and Mycenaeans to the complex system of the Roman Empire. The course involves lectures and museum visits and integrates information from current archaeological projects.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course examines the entrepreneurial process, from recognizing opportunity to planning, organizing and growing a new venture. We will highlight innovation and its methods and applications on business opportunity analysis. Topics covered also include significance, status, problems, and requirements of entrepreneurial businesses. Students will have the opportunity to identify a business opportunity and develop the idea to the point of being start-up ready.This course will serve as a foundation for students who might want to own a business, and it is meant to be accessible also for non-business majors.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introduction to Graphic Design

The aim of this course is to give students a comprehensive introduction to visual communication and to demonstrate how Graphic Design can be an effective and powerful tool for business. It covers a broad spectrum of different design disciplines, ranging from corporate identity, branding, brochure design, poster design, to packaging and illustration, and provides precious insight into the world of Graphic Design. The course is open to all students, particularly those who do not have a background in design, and complements other courses including Business, Management, Marketing and Communication.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art

A survey of art and architecture in Italy from the 14th to the early 16th century, this course gives primary emphasis to Florence as an artistic center while including exploration of the contributions of Siena, Rome, and Venice. The course is intended for students with little or no background in art history and will cover the principal artists and trends of the Italian Renaissance, from Giotto to Michelangelo. Lectures and on-site visits, including a trip to Florence, will help build a visual vocabulary of monuments in a general historical overview. Mandatory field trip may require a fee.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theories

Designed as an introduction to the theoretical approaches to literature, the course will stimulate students to think and write critically through the study of the principal topics of literary theory. The course will adopt both a historical approach, covering each theory in the chronological order of its appearance on the scene, and a critical approach - putting the theories to the test by applying them to a literary text. The course will also help students to move on to an advanced study of literature by introducing them to the research methods and tools for the identification, retrieval, and documentation of secondary sources.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to News Reporting and Writing

This course introduces writing and reporting techniques for the mass media. It focuses on the essential elements of writing for the print, online and broadcast media. The course also covers media criticism, ethics in media, and the formats and styles of public relations.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Philosophical Thinking

We all have opinions about what is true and false, right and wrong, what is just, divine, and beautiful, what the self, mind, and soul are, or what makes us free. But can we justify our opinions about such things? Have we given rational and open-minded consideration to criticisms and alternatives, or are our opinions perhaps based only on prejudices and assumptions? In this course you will learn to use philosophical thinking to test and improve your opinions and your ability to evaluate the claims of important philosophers. Through the study and discussion of philosophical texts, classic or contemporary, you will grapple with issues of fundamental human importance and develop your capacities for careful reading, clear writing and speaking, and logical argumentation.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Photography

This course creates a foundation of knowledge of photographic history, theory, and practice, and is recommended as preparation for further study in photography. Students will encounter technical issues concerning both film and digital photography, including basic issues of camera functions and controls, darkroom procedures, and digital techniques and software. The course examines a broad range of subjects such as: the early history of photography, photographic genres, use of artificial and of natural light, and various modes of presentation and archival management. Shooting pictures is balanced with classroom work. The course will help students develop a formal and critical vocabulary, an understanding of the uses of photography, and inspiration for more advanced photo courses.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to the Novel

The course traces various developments in the genre of the novel from the 17th to the 20th centuries through a reading of selected representative texts. In addition, students are required to consider these works alongside of the development of theories about the novel. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Visual Communication

["From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics","the historical practice of looking","visual media analysis","spectatorship","historic evolution of visual codes","impact of visual technologies","media literacy","information graphics literacy","and global visual culture."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory German I

This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in German. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to German culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory German II

A continuation of GER 101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory German I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory Italian I

This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Italian Cinema

This course surveys films, directors, and film movements and styles in Italy from 1945 to the present. The films are examined as complex aesthetic and signifying systems with wider social and cultural relationships to post-war Italy. The role of Italian cinema as participating in the reconstitution and maintenance of post-War Italian culture and as a tool of historiographic inquiry is also investigated. Realism, modernism and post-modernism are discussed in relation to Italian cinema in particular and Italian society in general. Films are shown in the original Italian version with English subtitles.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Linear Algebra

This course introduces students to the techniques of linear algebra and to the concepts upon which the techniques are based. Topics include: vectors, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, and related geometry in Euclidean spaces. Fundamentals of vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Literature and Society in Ancient Rome

This course focuses on the literature of Ancient Rome and its role in shaping modern notions about the customs, social practices, and ideas of its citizens. Emphasis will be placed on using Roman literature as a means of studying Roman civilization, while simultaneously examining stylistics and literary techniques particular to the genres of comedy, rhetoric, epic and lyric poetry, satire and history. Texts, which vary, are chosen from Terence, Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Tacitus, and Juvenal. All texts are studied in translation.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Living the Good Life: Religious and Philosophical Ethics

What is right and wrong, good and bad? Where do ethical ideas and standards come from? How do we make ethical decisions? And why should we be ethical at all? This course introduces students to ethical thinking by studying both concrete issues and more abstract moral theories, including religious ideas. Philosophers studied may include Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine, Hume, Kant, and Mill, and religious ideas those of Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism. These will be considered in relation to concrete issues such as abortion, climate change, punishment, and free speech.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Made in Italy: The Italian Business Environment

The course analyzes the Italian Business environment, the characteristics of its culture and its inner workings. Students will be able to understand the different types of Italian corporate cultures and the role of family businesses in Italy. The course allows students to assess some of the most popular Italian brands and learn why made in Italy is a leading brand in the world, despite recent influences and threats from foreign investors. Company cases and special guests will be an important part of this course and will allow students to relate theory to practice.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Market and Marketing Research

This course covers the basic methods and techniques of marketing research. Discusses the tools and techniques for gathering, analyzing, and using information to aid marketing decision- making. Covers topics such as problem definition, research design formulation, measurement, research instrument development, sampling techniques, data collection, data interpretation and analysis, and presentation of research findings. Students choose a marketing research project, formulate research hypotheses, collect primary and secondary data, develop a database, analyze data, write a report, and present results and recommendations.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Media, Culture and Society

This course examines the mass media as complex social institutions that exercise multiple roles in society—none more crucial than the circulation and validation of social discourses. Introducing students to a variety of theoretical approaches, the course focuses on media operations and textual analysis.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Mystics, Saints, and Sinners: Studies in Medieval Catholic Culture

Through a close study of both primary and secondary materials in theology, spirituality, aesthetics, and social history, this course will introduce students to the major forms and institutions of religious thought and practice in medieval, Christian Europe (from Saint Augustine to the rise of humanism). The course will begin by studying the theological foundations of self and world in the work of Augustine and Pseudo-Dionysius, before turning to an elucidation of central religious institutions such as the papacy (and its relationship to imperial Rome), the monastery (we will study the rule of Saint Benedict and visit a Benedictine monastery), the cathedral (we will visit San Giovanni in Laterano and Saint Peter’s), and the university (and the scholastic philosophy to which it gave rise). We will then turn to alternative expressions of medieval religious faith in the work of several mystics, notably Meister Eckhart and Angela of Foligno. Finally we will study the reactions of the Church to the rise of science in the fifteenth century (we will look at the trial of Giordano Bruno) and will end with an appraisal of the continuity and renewal of Renaissance Humanism and its influence on the humanities as studied in a Liberal Arts Curriculum today.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Nineteenth-Century Europe and the World

This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of nineteenth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the development of new political ideologies and systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Operations Management

This course focuses on topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. These include quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Painting

This course introduces the basic issues of oil painting through a series of classic problems: the still life, figure study, portrait and others. Emphasis is on control of color and light and dark value, while building form in a coherent pictorial space. Oil is the preferred medium, and students buy their own materials. The course introduces connections between studio work and the history of painting

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Philosophy of Art and Beauty

On this course we will examine philosophers’ fascinating attempts to understand art and explore the multiple roles that it can play in our lives. We will consider such issues as what ‘art’, ‘beauty’, ‘creativity’, ‘expression’, and ‘imagination’ can mean, whether our judgments about them can ever be objective, how art relates to our feelings and to our understanding of the external world, how it reflects society, religion, and politics, and the radical differences between contemporary, modern, and classical kinds of art.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Pre-Calculus

This course provides an introduction to Calculus that focuses on functions and graphs. The properties of absolute value, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions will be studied, along with the techniques for solving equations and inequalities involving those functions.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Principles of Macroeconomics

Economics is the study of choice under conditions of scarcity: The resources needed to produce goods and services are limited compared to human desires. Economics is divided into two major areas. Microeconomics studies the choices of consumers, firms, and governments, and describes the working of markets. Macroeconomics studies the behavior of the entire economy. It explains phenomena such as growth, business cycle, inflation, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to economics. The basic principles of economics will be presented and applied in order to explain some features of the modern economy.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Principles of Management

The objective of this course is to develop students’ understanding of modern management practices and to provide the background for further studies of management related subjects. Through the lectures, case studies and brainstorming exercises the students will improve their critical thinking and decision-making skills.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

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Principles of Marketing

Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 Ps, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Marketing

The importance of marketing in management science The variety of fundamental concepts in marketing Marketing vocabulary to help with analysis of marketing phenomenon Oral presentation skills and teamwork

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

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Principles of Microeconomics

["Economic analysis is one of the most useful tools for understanding social phenomena. Principles of Microeconomics introduces students to the basics of economic ways of thinking. Economic theory is explained through the study of methods of analysis, assumptions and theories about how firms and individuals behave and how markets work. The course is useful for students in the applied social sciences, and is a necessary foundation for students wishing to continue the study of economics and business in their academic careers. The course is divided into four parts: The first is an introduction to languages, methods, and modeling used in microeconomics;","the second part focuses on the firm production process and market strategy;","the third analyses consumer theory and the way in which individual behavior is modeled by economists;","and the fourth and last part studies how the competitive and non-competitive market works. We will make extensive use of case studies and policy issues. which will be discussed in class."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Professional Skills for the Italian Job Market

["This course is taught in Italian and is designed for those interested in doing business with or in Italy. It focuses on Italian business language, with the aim of developing students\u2019 written and oral skills while providing them with technical vocabulary and professional expressions that are most often used in business situations. The course prepares students to successfully enter the job market","participants will learn about different interviewing techniques and will learn how to apply for a position in an effective manner."]

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Psychology and Law

The course focuses on applications of concepts and theories from cognitive, social, developmental and clinical psychology, to the administration of justice. Topics include the psychological processes involved in jury selection, jury deliberation and decision making, police interrogation, false confessions, eyewitness testimony, memory for traumatic events, child witnesses, juvenile offenders, and the role of psychologists as trial consultant and expert witnesses.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Public Speaking: Oral Rhetoric and Persuasion

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication, and how these principles and concepts lead to effective public speaking. Students will learn how to prepare and organize persuasive speeches by learning the fundamental structures of the persuasive speech. In addition, students will begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement and support it through a specific line of reasoning using idea subordination, coordination, and parallel structure.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments

Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Retailing Applied to Fashion Industry

This course focuses on issues related to Retail Management in the Fashion industry and requires both an understanding of marketing principles as well as channel management concepts. The course reviews basic concepts related to retail business such as operations, logistics, retail channels management, retail controlling and strategic location development, which develop the student’s ability to understand performance indicators and measure store performance. Students are encouraged to focus on retail buying and stock planning, in order to fully understand how to manage in-store product life cycles. Teaching methodology is project based and team work is emphasized. Teams will be required to apply fashion retailing concepts to companies’ decision making through a proposed retail project, which will require a written strategic retail plan that is adapted to the Italian fashion market.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Rome: Modern City (On-site)

This on-site course, which will be conducted in English, aims to introduce students to a sociological analysis of contemporary Rome. It focuses on the changes which are occurring in the city’s populations, its neighborhoods and patterns of daily life and commerce, and challenges conventional images of what it is to be a Roman today. On-site classes will be held in a variety of neighborhoods in the city in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. We will examine the issues and problems facing Rome today, such as housing, degradation and renewal, environmental questions, transportation, multiculturalism, wealth and poverty, social conflict and political identities. These issues will be contextualized within theories of urban sociology and also within an explanation of Rome’s urban development over the centuries and, in particular, since it became the national capital in 1870. Through readings, film clips, interviews and guest speakers, students will also analyze the way the city is narrated by some of its residents.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Senior Seminar in Economics and Finance

Designed to be a capstone course, emphasis is placed on both theoretical and quantitative methods in the fields of economics and finance. Basic tools of economics and statistics are used to analyze a variety of contemporary economic problems and policy issues. Students read through major papers and may undertake research on specific topics so as to develop their understanding of economics and finance. Papers and topics cover the current issues of interest in the areas of microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics, and finance to include the CFA Professional Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct. Students may be expected to present and write about their research topics as well as demonstrate an ability to work with quantitative information. The course is structured into modules/sections taught by a group of faculty members.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Shakespeare

This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Social Entrepreneurship

Nowadays, significant social problems dramatically affect both the most developed and developing countries in many fields like education, health care, the environment. Most people think that these serious issues should be solved by either the governments or the third sector, which includes voluntary and community organizations like charities and NGOs. Conversely, the mission of a corporate organization is not to solve social problems but to maximize both its profits and the shareholder value. Social entrepreneurship allows to solve social issues using the instruments and the techniques of classic corporate organizations, however, its main goal is its social mission rather than profit maximization. The course explains how to become a social entrepreneur, the different options to organize a social business and to find the requested financial support, and how to use the lean start-up methodology to find both the right business model and market fit in order to solve a significant social problem

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Social Psychology

Social psychology is concerned with how we think about, influence, and relate to other people. This course is about the study of human social behavior, examining theories, findings, approaches, and methods in social psychology, as viewed from an interpersonal perspective. Topics include: the role of others in shaping self-concepts, as well as the formation of person perception, attitudes, attribution theory, obedience, conformity, and social relations. We will further look at the causes and methods of reducing prejudice and aggression, as well as exploring altruism, the development of gender roles, stereotypes, and nonverbal behavior. Readings and activities assigned will enhance discussion, broaden students' knowledge of and perspectives on human social interactions and give them a framework to interpret social behavior. In addition, since this course is taught in Florence, Italy, it provides a natural opportunity to compare and contrast the influence of culture on individuals. Living for even this short period in another country helps you to see and understand the relationship between the individual (self) and society, and a chance to view your own culture from a distance.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

Social Psychology

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive view of Social Psychology and its most important phenomena. Our approach will depart from the theoretical basis of social psychology but our learning process will be directly connected to our daily lives. This means that learning will combine the theoretical dimension with a set of new ways of looking at reality, at social others, and at yourself. To combine these two dimensions in our classes, we will complement the theoretical dimension with examples that will help us to identify and understand the theory on the basis of materials such as films, songs, conferences, and presentations of students’ research projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Statistics I

The main purpose of this course is to enable students to know the most important inferential statistical methods and being to identify and apply the adequate method to each specific real situation in business and institutional environments, with the help of statistical software.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Strategic Decisions in Entrepreneurship

This course considers management problems of founders, owners, managers, and investors in startups. Acquisitions, location, organization control, labor relations, finances, taxation, and other topics of interest to entrepreneurial business management will be analyzed.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Strategic Management

Weighing the ins and outs of crafting, implementing, and executing company strategies forces a total enterprise perspective, demands that many internal and external situational considerations be dealt with at once, and calls for judgments about how all the relevant factors add up. This trait is what makes strategic management an integrative course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success.

Throughout the course, the spotlight will be trained on the foremost issue in running a business enterprise: “What must managers do, and do well, to make the company a winner in the game of business?” The answer that emerges, and which becomes the theme of the course, is that good strategy-making and good strategy execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good management. The mission of the course is to explore why good strategic management leads to good business performance, to present the basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis, and to drill you in the methods of crafting a well-conceived strategy and executing it competently. Videos and case studies in order to develop students’ capacity to think strategically about a company, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the caliber of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining sustainable competitive advantage.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Strategic Management

Present and develop the concepts, methodologies and tools needed for an effective participation in the strategic management process.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Strategic Marketing Management

This course involves the analytical integration of material covered in previous marketing courses. It develops skills in diagnosing marketing problems, formulating and selecting strategic alternatives, and recognizing problems inherent in strategy implementation. The development of a comprehensive marketing plan is a major requirement of the course.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Street photography

Street photography is an informal genre of photography using natural light, usually outdoors, that takes advantage of spontaneous discoveries. Street photography is a branch of both fine art photography and journalistic photography. The work of significant photographers in this genre, like Henri Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, and Robert Frank, will serve as examples. Since it often involves candid shots of people going about their business in the bustle of urban life, one aim of this course is to give students more confidence in photographing and approaching people with a camera.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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The American Experience II: From the Closing of the Frontier to the Present

This course will examine the transformation of the United States from a peripheral country to a world power. The course will analyze the causes of that transformation, focusing on industrialization, the First World War, the Great Depression, changes in American social thought and literature, the Second World War, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the search for a new world order. Special attention will be devoted to democracy and freedom, the role of race, the impact of immigration, as well as the post-war student and protest movements.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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The Economics of China

Chinese economy has gained remarkable growth since 1978 and today is the second largest economy in the world. Due to its size, the country has become a major participant in the world economy and it is currently in a process of large economic and social transformation. The purpose of this course is to help students understand the complexity and challenges of China’s rise and to critically evaluate their implications. After taking this subject, students are expected to understand why China succeeded in maintaining such a high economic growth in the past three decades, the role that the country is playing in the global scenario and what challenges it will be facing in the future.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Travel Photography

Travel photography is the art of documenting places, people and traditions in a manner that the image itself narrates a feeling of time and place, and a portrayal of the art, and landscapes and societies it engages with. Technically, travel photography also hones skills in dealing with diverse light conditions and settings. A sense of history and observation, and an eye for composition and action are hence integral aspects of this type of photography. The course provides a practical engagement with the challenges of natural light photography, and an analytical appreciation of the language of travel reportage photography.

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Twentieth-Century Europe and the World

This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from World War I through the aftermath of the Cold War. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of twentieth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the experience and significance of the World Wars and the Cold War, the development of democratic, authoritarian, and 'totalitarian' political systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Video Essay Workshop

This course aims to introduce students to the various forms and methods associated with the contemporary video essay, and to guide them through the conception and production of their own analytic video essays — a skill which they will be able to transfer to numerous other courses and extracurricular and/or professional contexts. The course will teach students to present and directly elaborate the audio-visual material they engage with (rather than merely writing about it), as well as appreciate and understand the ways in which practical and critical engagement with media can advance active modes of spectatorship and media consumption.

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Web Design I

The premise of this course is that a web site differs from a traditional media publication because its contents can be updated at any moment, many possibilities exist for making it interactive, and reader attention span is short. The course provides students with technical knowledge and skills required to build a web site, while covering design, communication, and computer-human interaction issues. Topics include web history, HTML, style sheets, and effective information searching. As a final project, students create a web site on a liberal arts topic, which will be judged by the instructor and a reader specialized in the chosen topic.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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World Art I: Visual Culture of the Ancient World

This survey course focuses on the art, archaeology and architecture of the Mediterranean world, roughly between 2500 BC – AD 300. The course investigates the material culture of the diverse cultural groups that shaped this cosmopolitan world: Sumerians, Assyrians, Minoans/Mycenaeans, Egyptians, Greeks, Etruscans, Persians, Italics and Romans. Special attention will be given to the interconnectivity and dynamic relationship of inspiration between these cultures.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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World Art III: Visual Culture of the Early Modern World

This survey course focuses on the art and architecture of Europe, South and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas from the late 1200s to c. AD 1750. The course investigates a range of media including painting, woodcuts, sculpture, and architecture, while considering materials and methods of production. Special attention will be given to the socio-economic and political contexts in which these artifacts were commissioned and produced.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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World Art IV: Visual Culture of the Modern and Contemporary World

This survey course focuses on the art of Europe, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from the 1700s to the present. The course investigates all media, including photography, and considers the impact of globalization and new technologies on contemporary art and evidence of cross-cultural influences. Special attention will be given to the new aesthetic languages, traditional cultural sources, and philosophical background of contemporary art, as well as to the broader cultural-historical contexts of their creation.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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World Politics

An introduction to the theory and practice of international affairs, this course discusses the main schools of world politics as well as actors, structures and institutions of international relations. Through this framework the course explores key conflicts and issues in the post-World War II era, including problems of war, armed conflict, and peace, and the impact of recent trends in globalization on world politics.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Writing Across the Media

Introduces various types of encountered in media professions and digital media production

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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JCU Courses

JCU Couse Link

Highlights
  • Classes taught in English and Italian with Italian, international, and American students
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (John Cabot University)
  • Internships available (for credit if taken over academic year)
  • Volunteer opportunities available (not for credit)
  • Meal plan (20 meals) included!
  • “Early Bird” scholarship opportunity – see the API Scholarships Page!
  • API/JCU diversity scholarship opportunity – see the API Scholarships Page!

API students in Rome live in apartments with other API students. Apartments are typically a 25-45 minute commute from JCU or LdM. Some API apartments can house as many as 7 students, although students typically share a room with another student. All apartments come equipped with a kitchen, 1-2 bathrooms, and common areas. Washing machines are available, and students are responsible for their own meals (though students at JCU will receive a meal plan good for 20 complimentary meals on campus during the session). Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included.

Api Rome Housing 7977526456 O
Api Rome Housing 7977527747 O
Api Rome Housing 7977529605 O
Dining Area 5726784068 O
Rome Housing Examples 8470330329 O
Rome Housing Examples 8471426648 O

SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION
*JCU students who apply early will earn an “Early Bird Scholarship” of up to $350 off of their program fee (amount varies per term). Visit our scholarship page for more information.

*Please note the application deadline has been extended for the Spring session. Additional fees may apply.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring Jan 13, 2020 - May 8, 2020 $17,880 Oct 15, 2019 Oct 30, 2019 Nov 1, 2020
Fall Aug, 2020 - Dec, 2020 $17,680 Jun 1, 2020 Jun 15, 2020
Academic Year Aug, 2020 - May, 2021 $34,380 Jun 1, 2020 Jun 15, 2020
Spring Jan 14, 2019 - May 11, 2019 $17,680 Oct 15, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Fall Aug 26, 2019 - Dec 14, 2019 $17,680 Jun 1, 2019 Jun 15, 2019
Academic Year Aug 26, 2019 - May 8, 2020 $34,380 Jun 1, 2019 Jun 15, 2019