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Students who choose to study abroad in Rome with API at JCU take 1-2 courses and receive 3-6 credit hours per semester session or approximately 3 credits per course. The program fee for one course includes a maximum of 3 credits per summer session. The program fee for two courses includes a maximum of 6 credits per summer session. Italian language courses are taught at all levels (beginning through advanced) and are taught in Italian. Most other courses are taught in English.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Meal Plan (20 meals)

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.7 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Rome programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Lazio and Umbria: Off the Beaten Path

    The charming land in central Italy between Lazio, Umbria, and Tuscany is surrounded by vineyards, olive groves, and green hills with paths that link lovely ancient villages perched on cliffs overlooking untouched landscapes. Medieval towers and cathedrals, small dwellings fashioned out of colored sone, artisan shopping, picturesque family-run taverns, dot the surrounding green valleys and offer a perfect glimpse of a life without hustle and bustle.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Lazio and Umbria: Off the Beaten Path

    The charming land in central Italy between Lazio, Umbria, and Tuscany is surrounded by vineyards, olive groves, and green hills with paths that link lovely ancient villages perched on cliffs overlooking untouched landscapes. Medieval towers and cathedrals, small dwellings fashioned out of colored sone, artisan shopping, picturesque family-run taverns, dot the surrounding green valleys and offer a perfect glimpse of a life without hustle and bustle.

  • Amalfi Coast/Enchanting Isles

    The Lazio region includes Rome and the three surrounding provinces: Sorrento, Capri, and Vesuvius. Day trips vary with season and terrain, from hill towns to seaside. The Castelli Romani area is dotted with hillside towns like Frascati, famous for its white wine, and Castel Gandolfo, the summer home of the Pope. Students may also visit Latina, a province known for its mozzarella production and numerous seaside towns such as Terracina and Sperlonga, linked along the coast by national parks and archaeological sites. To the west, Tivoli has offered an escape from Rome since the times of Emperor Hadrian, who built his villa there. Up the hill from Hadrian’s Villa, the Renaissance Villa d’Este has been recognized as the most beautiful park in Italy for its majestic, fountain-filled gardens.

  • Lazio and Umbria: Off the Beaten Path

    The charming land in central Italy between Lazio, Umbria, and Tuscany is surrounded by vineyards, olive groves, and green hills with paths that link lovely ancient villages perched on cliffs overlooking untouched landscapes. Medieval towers and cathedrals, small dwellings fashioned out of colored sone, artisan shopping, picturesque family-run taverns, dot the surrounding green valleys and offer a perfect glimpse of a life without hustle and bustle.

  • Amalfi Coast/Enchanting Isles

    The Lazio region includes Rome and the three surrounding provinces: Sorrento, Capri, and Vesuvius. Day trips vary with season and terrain, from hill towns to seaside. The Castelli Romani area is dotted with hillside towns like Frascati, famous for its white wine, and Castel Gandolfo, the summer home of the Pope. Students may also visit Latina, a province known for its mozzarella production and numerous seaside towns such as Terracina and Sperlonga, linked along the coast by national parks and archaeological sites. To the west, Tivoli has offered an escape from Rome since the times of Emperor Hadrian, who built his villa there. Up the hill from Hadrian’s Villa, the Renaissance Villa d’Este has been recognized as the most beautiful park in Italy for its majestic, fountain-filled gardens.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-6 credits per session (up to 12 total)

Students who choose to study abroad in Rome with API at JCU take 1-2 courses and receive 3-6 credit hours per semester session or approximately 3 credits per course. The program fee for one course includes a maximum of 3 credits per summer session. The program fee for two courses includes a maximum of 6 credits per summer session. Italian language courses are taught at all levels (beginning through advanced) and are taught in Italian. Most other courses are taught in English.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP CERTIFICATE OPTION (SUMMER 1)

Offered during the Summer 1 term as part of JCU’s Institute for Entrepreneurship, this Certificate Program provides students with a taste of the entrepreneurial world early on in their careers. To earn the Certificate students will have to satisfactorily complete the following:

  • One entrepreneurial course.
  • Attend 3 entrepreneurship events, workshops or visits organized by IFE.
  • Write a 3- to 5-page reflection paper.

Students may apply prior to arrival or once on-site. This certificate is open to both degree-seeking and visiting students of all majors.

CREATIVE WRITING OPTION (SUMMER 1)

Students who register for one creative writing course will be able to participate in JCU’s Institute for Creative Writing and Literary Translation. Offered during the Summer 1 term, this session features a large selection of creative writing workshops, readings, films, lectures, and concerts, as well as writing and translation contests, and more. The 2018 Writer in Residence at the 9th Annual Institute for Creative Writing and Literary Translation will be Dolen Perkins-Valdez, author of two critically acclaimed historical novels: the New York Times-bestselling Wench and Balm. Former Writers in Residence include Mark Strand, Billy Collins, Joyce Carol Oates, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edmund White, and Frederic Tuten.

Upon completion of the term, JCU will award a certificate to participating students.

COMMUNICATIONS OPTION (SUMMER 2)

Students who register for one communication course during the Summer 2 session are automatically enrolled in JCU’s Summer Institute in International Communication. As part of this program, students have access to special guest lectures, film screenings with Italian directors, and other extracurricular events. Upon completion of the term, JCU awards a certificate to participating students.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students will receive a transcript from John Cabot University upon completion of the program. John Cabot University is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Naike Valeriano

    Naike will be one of your Resident Directors in Rome and will be a resource for you while you are in Italy!

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    Alessio Balduini

    Alessio Balduini will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Mariana Delmonte-Gladstone

    Mariana Delmonte-Gladstone will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - mariana.delmonte-gladstone@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

JCU offers both lower division and upper division courses. Course numbers are as follows: 100-299 freshman, sophomore or other introductory level courses; 300-399 junior or senior-level courses (requires a background in the material); 400-499 seniors only. Course registration is conducted online prior to departure. Some courses will fill so it is advised to have 1-2 alternates pre-approved for each class. API recommends students obtain pre-approval from their home university for courses that they plan on taking abroad.

Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for books, labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost. Students are encouraged to make course selections from the online listings when completing the program application as course listings, descriptions, prerequisites and/or lab fees are subject to change.

Please note that not all courses are offered every semester or every year.

Be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to class times in order to avoid conflicts. Please make your course selections from these online listings when completing the program application.

If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

CREDIT INFORMATION

API partner universities in Italy issue credit according to the American system, whereby most courses are worth 3-4 U.S. credits each.

Twentieth Century Art

Twentieth century art consists of well-known Modernist and Postmodernist styles and movements such as Cubism, Futurism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, installations and earthworks, to name a few. It also encompasses lesser-known movements such as the American urban realists, the Regionalists, Soviet Socialist Realism. But what does Modernism mean and how does it relate to the century’s dramatic modernization of daily life, social organization, commercial development, political and cultural nationalism, and two World Wars? Through an analysis of the art, artists, and critical discourses in question, the course will consider the fundamental questions: what is art’s relationship to the larger culture? What is the artist’s role in society? What do aesthetic concerns have to do with life? While these questions are always pertinent, they demand particular attention in the century largely defined by the ideology of art’s autonomy, pure creativity, and individual expression.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Calculus I

This is a Standard Calculus course using an intuitive approach to the fundamental concepts in the calculus of one variable: limiting behaviors, difference quotients and the derivative, definite integrals, antiderivative and indefinite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Calculus II

This course builds on the fundamentals of the calculus of one variable, and includes infinite series, power series, differential equations of first and second order, numerical integration, and an analysis of improper integrals. It also covers the calculus of several variables: limits, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Classical Mythology

The course examines the principal myths of Classical Greece and Rome, with some reference to their evolution from earlier local and Mediterranean legends, deities and religions. The importance of these myths in the literature and art of the Western World will be discussed.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Computer Office Applications

This course helps students develop the advanced skills that are necessary in personal productivity office applications, such as word processing, data management and analysis, and presentation/slide design. The course follows best practices and reviews available internet tools for data storage.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

["The course aims to develop the creative, editorial, and reading habits needed for the production of literary fiction","to develop self-editing skills","and to foster an aesthetic sensibility for use in writing literary fiction. Students will read both contemporary literary fiction and materials related to analyzing and editing literary fiction and participate in a traditional creative writing workshop through in-class writing exercises, reading classmates' fiction, and producing and workshopping their own fiction. Students will compile a portfolio of the work they produce during the term. Students completing this workshop course will be familiar with the skills needed to produce literary fiction, to self-edit work in progress, and to discern the characteristics that make quality literary fiction."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Digital Storytelling and Community Engagement

This course allows students the opportunity to combine digital media art skills with community engagement. In partnership with a Rome-based nonprofit working with disadvantaged or marginalized communities, students will create 2-3 short documentary projects that will be created collaboratively with the community at the non-profit organization. The aim is to use media tools as a means of cultural exchange and to facilitate the telling of stories that emerge from this community. The process will be one that privileges the community voice and shared authorship. Students will be expected to have basic understanding of the skills and concepts involved with the camerawork, lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Engineering Fundamentals: Fluid Mechanics

This course covers theory and application of fluid statics, momentum transfer, and viscous fluid flow. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work covers both open-channel and conduit (pipe) flow. The fluid statics and dynamics of incompressible and compressible fluids are considered.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Engineering Fundamentals: Statics

["This course provides an introduction to statics, the branch of mechanics that is concerned with the analysis of loads (force and torque, or moment) on physical systems in static equilibrium, that is, in a state where the relative positions of subsystems do not vary over time, or where components and structures are at a constant velocity. When in static equilibrium, the system is either at rest, or its center of mass moves at constant velocity. Course content includes vector algebra, forces, couples, moments, resultants of force couple systems","friction, equilibrium analysis of particles and finite bodies, centroids","and applications."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Engineering Fundamentals:Microcontroller Programming and Applications

An introduction to digital systems and microcontroller programming including basic logic functions, microprocessor architecture, input and display devices, sensors, motors, and C programming for microcontrollers. The emphasis is on programming a microcontroller in C for practical applications.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Finance

This course examines both the theoretical and applied foundations required to make decisions in financial management. The main areas covered include an overview of the financial system and the efficiency of capital markets, evaluation of financial performance, time value of money, analysis of risk and return, basic portfolio theory, valuation of stocks and bonds, capital budgeting, international financial management, capital structure management, and the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Financial Accounting

["This course is an introduction to basic accounting methods and concepts","preparation of principal financial statements","application of accounting principles to the main asset, liability, and owners\u2019 equity accounts."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Foundations of Digital Video Production

This course introduces students to the technical, conceptual, and aesthetic skills involved in video production through the single camera mode of production. Still the most dominant mode of film and video production, the single camera mode places an emphasis on using the camera to fullest capacity of artistic expression. In addition to the multiple skills and concepts involved with the camera, the course also introduces students to the principles and technologies of lighting, audio recording and mixing, and non-linear digital video editing. Special focus is given to producing content for successful web distribution.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

International Business

In this course, students will apply theories, tools, and insights found in the field of international management to common real world scenarios mainly through the use of case studies (specially from the Harvard Business Publishing). Students will demonstrate an understanding of the similarities and differences among the peoples of the world and how they affect business management. The course will discuss how various legal, political, economic, and cultural systems affect business attitudes and behavior, exploring the managerial issues related to strategic planning, human resource management, motivation, and leadership that may arise in an international context.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Business

The increasing globalization of the marketplace affects all who are involved with business or who must make business decisions. Even those who are not directly involved in international business are affected in their domestic operations by international events and by the business activities of foreign entities. Therefore, it is imperative to be knowledgeable about the international business systems. This decade will pose many challenges and opportunities, particularly for newly industrialized countries (NIC). Three primary causes of these challenges are: first, these countries have become fierce competitors for the manufacture of high tech goods. Second, integration of the European Community has now created the largest trade block. Third, the acute international debt crisis keeps threatening the world financial structure and economic growth. This crisis has redirected the trade pattern away from the poor countries to the richest and likewise has concentrated capital flows among the rich countries. However, in recent times we have been observing a shift back to LCD’s, particularly in industries that are labor intensive

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Business

This course is mainly targeted to help students understand the strategic issues and tradeoffs in a global context and assess the strategic performance of global companies. It is intended to cover two basic learning dimensions: The first one seeks to improve the student´s ability to understand the present global environment and therefore, be able to identify, analyze, and execute strategies in the global business environment. Students will be exposed to material from a number of important and recurring international business challenges including business-government relations, corporate strategies in a world of multiple regulators, the management of complexity, opportunities and risks in the global environment and so on. Secondly, students will be led to understand the strategic management of global companies. We will examine how, and why, firms decide to develop operations in foreign countries, and how firms can become successful once their operations cross national boundaries. We will also examine how individuals and teams manage business activities effectively in such global companies.

The course draws on a number of different academic disciplines including economics, political science, international finance, trade and relations, cultural dimensions, etc. With regard to this approach, the goal is always to understand globalization and its implications for firms from a trans-disciplinary focus, all integrated into and understood from a systemic perspective of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Business

This course develops international and European knowledge about the cultures of the different European countries. Business relationships, economics and business environment, protocol rules, European politics, negotiation strategies and export procedures are evaluated. Countries such as Spain, France, Germany, UK, and Italy are analyzed in great depth.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Business

This course covers the cultures of European countries. Business relationships, economics and business environment, protocol rules, European politics, negotiation strategies and export procedures are evaluated. Countries such as Spain, France, Germany, UK, and Italy are analyzed in great depth.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Finance

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the complex world of international finance. Topics include the increasing globalization of financial markets, international and European monetary systems, foreign exchange markets, direct and indirect international investment.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

International Finance

Given the current concept of a globalized world, this course is addressed to students keen on financial issues and, in particular, international finance. The main purpose of this course is to understand the financial system and to include an international perspective. In its duration of 45 hours, the course examines the determination of exchange rates and operation of exchange markets as well as firm’s management of foreign exchange exposure, cash management, and capital budgeting. The development of International banking and political risk management will also be studied. Emphasis is also placed on the effects of globalization on financial crashes, financial regulation & market efficiency. An updated look at the dynamics of international entrepreneurship is also provided, focusing especially on developed countries and the role of female entrepreneurship. Students will acquire knowledge on the former topics by means of dynamic and practical examples, work projects and group discussions (i.e., essays, role-playing, video, surveys, economic experiments; Financial Times press cuttings on selected controversial issues).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Finance

In order to provide a global picture of financial interactions and increasing interdependence, this course delves into the macroeconomic aspects of international economics with special emphasis on monetary issues. As the tendency is for countries to become more open over time, doing so makes them subject or potentially vulnerable to external events that can substantially affect their performance and that of the firms within them. A good understanding of open-economy macroeconomics is therefore crucial. Specific cases of integration schemes and monetary experiences, such as the European integration, are also debated.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Finance

Given the current concept of a globalized world, this course was desiged specifically for students eager to understand financial issues and, in particular, international finance. The main objective is to understand the financial system from an international perspective, examining exchange rates and the operation of exchange markets as well as a firm’s management of foreign exchange exposure, cash management, and capital budgeting. Students will also study the development of international banking and political risk management with an emphasis on the effects of globalization on financial crashes, financial regulation & market efficiency. The course will also take an up-to-date look at the dynamics of international entrepreneurship, focusing especially on developed countries and the role of female entrepreneurship.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

View Syllabus   

Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course examines the entrepreneurial process, from recognizing opportunity to planning, organizing and growing a new venture. We will highlight innovation and its methods and applications on business opportunity analysis. Topics covered also include significance, status, problems, and requirements of entrepreneurial businesses. Students will have the opportunity to identify a business opportunity and develop the idea to the point of being start-up ready.This course will serve as a foundation for students who might want to own a business, and it is meant to be accessible also for non-business majors.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Introduction to Literature

This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing. Presupposing no previous knowledge in particular of literature, the course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in the three genres of fiction, drama, and poetry. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned texts, use various critical approaches, and write several critical essays on specified readings.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Introductory Italian II

A continuation of IT101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Italian I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Material and Energy Balances

This course will introduce the student to chemical engineering and the fundamental principles of chemical process analysis. The student will gain experience in the application of problem-solving techniques in a variety of process-related problems. Aspects of professional development as a chemical engineer will be presented and integrated into course material.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Nineteenth-Century Europe and the World

This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of nineteenth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the development of new political ideologies and systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Organizational Behavior

This course is about understanding how people and groups in organizations behave, react, and interpret events. It also describes the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping behavior, and explains how organizations really work. Drawing from fields including management, anthropology, sociology, and psychology, Organizational Behavior provides a foundation for the effective management of people in organizations.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Organizational Behavior

During the course important topics of organizational behaviour are discussed, such as the diversity of individuals, perceptions and communication, motivation, groups, teams and leadership. We analyse for example how young employees can understand their own motivation, assess corporate cultures and co-operate in teams. We also discuss managerial issues such as how business leaders and successful managers can transform individual and group behaviour into productive economic performance.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

View Syllabus   

Organizational Behavior

This course will focus on the challenges faced by individuals in international corporations with respect to Interpersonal relationships, communication, diversity, individual decision making, motivating self and workforce, group behavior and leadership, corporate culture, and change and stress management.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Marketing

Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 Ps, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Principles of Marketing

Initially students will learn why financial accounting is essential to the running of corporations. This will be followed up with a discussion about the basic principles of accounting and the major elements of financial statements. Other elements will include journal entry and practical book keeping, showing the students how the accounts of companies are actually prepared working up to producing short financial statements. This will also include stock valuation methods and analysis of financial statements.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5  

View Syllabus   

Principles of Microeconomics

["Economic analysis is one of the most useful tools for understanding social phenomena. Principles of Microeconomics introduces students to the basics of economic ways of thinking. Economic theory is explained through the study of methods of analysis, assumptions and theories about how firms and individuals behave and how markets work. The course is useful for students in the applied social sciences, and is a necessary foundation for students wishing to continue the study of economics and business in their academic careers. The course is divided into four parts: The first is an introduction to languages, methods, and modeling used in microeconomics;","the second part focuses on the firm production process and market strategy;","the third analyses consumer theory and the way in which individual behavior is modeled by economists;","and the fourth and last part studies how the competitive and non-competitive market works. We will make extensive use of case studies and policy issues. which will be discussed in class."]

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Statistics I

The main purpose of this course is to enable students to know the most important inferential statistical methods and being to identify and apply the adequate method to each specific real situation in business and institutional environments, with the help of statistical software.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Street Photography

Street photography is an informal genre of photography using natural light, usually outdoors, that takes advantage of spontaneous discoveries. Street photography is a branch of both fine art photography and journalistic photography. The work of significant photographers in this genre, like Henri Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, and Robert Frank, will serve as examples. Since it often involves candid shots of people going about their business in the bustle of urban life, one aim of this course is to give students more confidence in photographing and approaching people with a camera.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Survey of Hip Hop Media, Production, and Culture

This class aims to introduce you to the world of hip-hop by examining recordings, music videos, films, fashion, dance styles and other creative media relevant to the development of hip hop culture. This course will consider hip-hop as a framework for understanding community, cultural identity, entrepreneurship, and creativity. These concepts will be put into practice through audio assignments such as the creation of original music.Students will also learn the basics of digital audio production and editing software as well as practical skills for creating musical compositions.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Technology of The Ancient World: Aqueducts, Armor, Automata

The course is an upper-level survey of technology in the ancient world, with particular emphasis on Greece and Rome. The course provides an in-depth familiarity and appreciation of the multifaceted nature of ancient technology through which students will gain a firm understanding of the links between technological innovation (history of engineering) and the development of human civilization (social history). It examines the architecture, waterworks, war machinery, and entertainment industry that framed and generated technological innovations, as well as production techniques related to the working of metal, wood and ceramics. The course will draw on both archaeological and text-based sources, and students will gain an awareness of field-specific methods and research theories: historical, philological and archaeological.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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The Music Video: From Popular Music to Film, Video and Digital Media

Since its emergence in the late 1970s, the music video has become the dominant means of advertising popular music and musicians, as well as one of the most influential hybrid media genres in history. This course will investigate the ways in which popular (recorded) music and visual cultures have reciprocally influenced one another. Music videos will be examined alongside various other media forms including videogames, live concert films, film and television music placement and curation, television title sequences and end credits, user generated content on YouTube, remixes, and mashups. The course will take a particular look at experimental, avant-garde film and video traditions and how they inform music video. Ultimately, the course will specifically treat music videos as a distinct multimedia artistic genre, different from film, television and the popular recorded music they illuminate and help sell.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Wine and the Culture of Drinking in Classical Antiquity

Using primary ancient sources (literary texts, artistic representations, and archaeological finds), this course will examine the role of wine drinking in ancient societies. Where and when did viticulture and wine making originate? Where did the custom of the reclining banquet come from, and what social implications did it carry? How was wine served and how was its consumption regulated? What type of entertainment was offered at these banquets? Our primary focus will be Greece and Rome, but important parallels or corollary practices in neighboring and modern cultures will also be considered.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Ancient Rome and Its Monuments

Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the Iron Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. DO NOT TAKE with AH 190.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Business Communications

This course deals with the definition and analysis of problems and the production of written and oral business reports. Use of appropriate computer software (e.g. word processing, spreadsheets, graphics) is an integral part of the course

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Elementary Latin I

This course is a first introduction to the study of the Latin language. The course introduces all forms of nouns and pronouns in the five declensions and all tenses of the verb in the indicative and imperative. It emphasizes vocabulary development and the acquisition of reading skills in Latin prose. Assignments include considerable reading of continuous passages and translation from Latin to English and English to Latin. Attention is also given to Latin proverbs, abbreviations and cognates in English.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Engineering Fundamentals: Thermodynamics

This course provides an introduction to Thermodynamics, a branch of physics concerned with heat and temperature and their relation to energy and work. It defines macroscopic variables, such as internal energy, entropy, and pressure that partly describe a body of matter or radiation. It states that the behavior of those variables is subject to general constraints that are common to all materials, not the peculiar properties of particular materials. These general constraints are expressed in the four laws of thermodynamics, which can be explained by statistical mechanics, in terms of the microscopic constituents. The course includes basic elements of classical thermodynamics, including first and second laws, properties of pure materials, ideal gas law, reversibility and irreversibility, and Carnot cycle; control volume analysis of closed simple systems and open systems at steady state; engineering applications, including cycles; psychrometrics.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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History of Ancient Rome and Italy

This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intermediate Algebra

This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division involving algebraic expressions; factoring of polynomial expressions; exponents and radicals; solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations; and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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International Economics

International economics is divided into two broad subfields: international trade and international money. International trade focuses on real transactions in the international economy, that is, on those transactions that involve a physical movement of goods. On the other hand, international money focuses on financial transactions and refers to the monetary side of the international economy. This course deals with the first aspect of international economics, i.e. the real transactions and focuses on two main aspects of it: international trade theory and evidence and international trade policy.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

International Economics

The aim of this course is for students to become familiar with the most relevant concepts and methods of analysis in the field of international economics. Students will be provided with the fundamental tools for analyzing the global economy and will delve deeper into the main features of the world economy. Pre-requisite: Previous coursework in Macro and Microeconomics

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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International Economics

The course introduces students to the main theories and methods of international economics. The first half of the course deals with the basic models explaining international trade, such as the theory of comparative advantages, the Hecksher-Ohlin model, and various alternative trade theories. The effects and reasons of government intervention in international trade, a topic of growing importance today, will be discussed, along with the pros and cons of protectionism. During the second part of the semester the course will discuss other topics of international economics, such as international factor flows, international finance and foreign exchange. The course combines rigorous economic analysis with attention to issues of economic policy alive and important today. Special attention is given to analyzing current world economic events, as well as the relevance of empirical application of the theories and models discussed.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Introductory Spanish II

A continuation of SPAN101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Spanish I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Mathematical Statistics

This is a calculus-based introduction to mathematical statistics. While the material covered is similar to that which might be found in an undergraduate course of statistics, the technical level is much more advanced, the quantity of material much larger, and the pace of delivery correspondingly faster. The course covers basic probability, random variables (continuous and discrete), the central limit theorem and statistical inference, including parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. It also provides a basic introduction to stochastic processes.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments

Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Shakespeare

This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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The Popes of Rome: History of the Catholic Church

The history of the Catholic church is essentially intertwined with the history of Western Civilization over the past 2,000 years. The aspirations and struggles of Christendom constitute the fabric of the Christian tradition as it unfolds throughout time. This course represents an historical survey of the Church from its primitive beginnings in Jerusalem (c. 33 A.D.) to the Pontificate of John Paul II (1920-2005). The development of the course will trace the major events, ideas and people that went into the shaping of the Western Church, without ignoring the fundamental importance and influence of the doctrine of Jesus Christ regarding the institution he founded.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Advanced Composition

The main goal of this course is to enable students to create different basic descriptive, narrative and argumentative texts in Spanish (narrative, descriptive, argumentative...) by means of exercises involving exposition, reflection, and practice. Students will learn techniques to organize the written speech, as well as style resources that will let them progress within the area of writing in Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Business Ethics

This course discusses a range of topics in business ethics including normative theories, international business ethics, and corporate moral agency. Students will learn about stakeholder relationships and social responsibility along with corporate governance, employee rights and consumer protection. The class will also delve into the environmental responsibilities of businesses, as well as the globalization of ethical decision-making by reviewing specific case studies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Business Ethics

This course explores the ethical challenges facing business today, and how individuals and firms can address those challenges. The course aims to enhance the skills and expertise of participants in through combining examination of ethical and managerial theory with discussion of common ethical problems in context. It aims also to sensitize students with ethical aspects of business decisions. The theory and the practice of business ethics will be discussed during the course. Course material includes individual moral theory, the development of ethical organizational culture, the development of ethical management systems designed to respond to ethical challenges, and wide-ranging discussion regarding major trends, challenges, and opportunities in the field of ethical business.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Creative Writing Workshop: Travel Writing

This creative nonfiction workshop explores the long tradition of travel writing, fostered by the keen observation and thoughtful documentation of landscape and culture that travel inspires. Students will gain exposure to several subgenres encompassed by the term travel writing including, but not limited to, the travel memoir, the travel essay, guidebooks, and food and humor pieces that tandem as travel writing. The course offers instruction in the research and mechanics of travel writing aimed at the generation of articles and essays for newspapers, magazines, guidebooks, the Internet, as well as how to begin drafting ideas for longer-form works.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations. Covered in this course are first order equations, second order equations, laplace transform methods, and systems of linear differential equations (including eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and phase portraits).

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Differential Equations

This course provides an introduction to ordinary differential equations. These equations contain a function of one independent variable and its derivatives. The term ordinary is used in contrast with the term partial differential equation which may be with respect to more than one independent variable. Ordinary differential equations and applications, with integrated use of computing, student projects","first-order equations","higher order linear equations","systems of linear equations, Laplace transforms","introduction to nonlinear equations and systems, phase plane, stability.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Drawing - Rome Sketchbook

This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light and the development of volume in space. With practice and growing experience, students become capable of producing drawings governed by conscious intention.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intercultural Communications

An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication—its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots—as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory Italian I

This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Public Speaking: Oral Rhetoric and Persuasion

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication, and how these principles and concepts lead to effective public speaking. Students will learn how to prepare and organize persuasive speeches by learning the fundamental structures of the persuasive speech. In addition, students will begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement and support it through a specific line of reasoning using idea subordination, coordination, and parallel structure.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Rome: Modern City (On-site)

This on-site course, which will be conducted in English, aims to introduce students to a sociological analysis of contemporary Rome. It focuses on the changes which are occurring in the city’s populations, its neighborhoods and patterns of daily life and commerce, and challenges conventional images of what it is to be a Roman today. On-site classes will be held in a variety of neighborhoods in the city in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. We will examine the issues and problems facing Rome today, such as housing, degradation and renewal, environmental questions, transportation, multiculturalism, wealth and poverty, social conflict and political identities. These issues will be contextualized within theories of urban sociology and also within an explanation of Rome’s urban development over the centuries and, in particular, since it became the national capital in 1870. Through readings, film clips, interviews and guest speakers, students will also analyze the way the city is narrated by some of its residents.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Consumer Behavior JCU

This course focuses on the study of consumer decision processes, consumer behavior models and their impact on the development of marketing strategies. The emphasis is on researching and in-depth understanding of the consumer decision process. Teaching methodology includes case studies and an emphasis on experiential research.

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International Marketing

This course examines the process of planning and conducting transactions across national borders in a global environment. Topics include factors in assessing world marketing opportunities, international marketing of products, pricing, distribution, and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems and planning and organizing for export-import operations.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Bioethics

Bioethics is the application of ethics to the field of medicine and healthcare. It is a multidisciplinary area of study which blends philosophy, theology, history, and law with medicine, nursing, health policy, and medical humanities. In this course, students will discuss topics such as What is bioethics?, Ethical Approaches, The beginning of life, Bodies and bodily parts, Information problems, The end of life, Global health-care issues, Research ethics, Health systems and institutions and Teaching and practice of bioethics.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Brand Management

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of the subjects of brands, brand equity and brand management. We highlight the specific characteristics of diverse brands such as retailer brands, country brands, luxury brands. The central theoretical model of the course is the customer-based brand equity model, both its sources and outcomes will be covered. We also focus on brand growth options and discuss the opportunities of brand architecture, brand extensions, brand revitalization and global branding. The course is designed for business students and requires basic marketing knowledge.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Brand Management

This module will focus on the concept, challenges, and issues related to - Brand management: launching new brands, managing existing brands and reviving old brands. Concepts overviewed will include luxury brand management, the functions of brands for customers and organizations and brand equity: conceptualization, measurement, management, and alternatives to brand equity NOTE: This course is offered as part of the spring CIB Marketing & Advertising and Fashion & Design and tracks.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 2.5   Contact Hours: 5

Creative Writing Workshop: Mixed Genre

This course provides an introduction to the creative practice of writing fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and stage/screen writing, while probing major issues of literary aesthetics. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution requirement in English Literature.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Cybsersecurity and Data Privacy Management

This course will introduce students to the key issues in Cybersecurity Management and Privacy and contribute to raising their awareness of related concerns. It will also cover the basics of Information Security, Business Continuity, and Risk Management. Students will be provided with fundamental knowledge of personal data protection, as well as confidentiality, integrity and availability of individuals’ and companies’ sensitive information and valuable assets. Classes will involve a mixture of lectures, seminar discussions, and in-class activities and labs. Each practical class will culminate in an assessed exercise.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Food and Agriculture

This is a survey course of agriculture, emphasizing the important food plants of the 21st century. The aim is to learn key processes which lead to the wide array of foods, which are available in developed countries. We start from the events of domestication, pass through the Green Revolution, and end with major plant crop commodities (such as bananas and coffee) being cultivated by “agribusiness” or also by “sustainable” farming methods. We also look at major issues related to agriculture today: for example, the development of biofuels which may use food stocks, and diseases and pests which threaten important monocultures. We look at the major achievements in agriculture of the 20th century, and try to anticipate the important uses and vulnerabilities of plant crops in the 21st century.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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General Psychology

Introduces the study of psychology, the study of the human mind, in some of its many facets: epistemological issues, the brain, perception, learning, language, intelligence, motivation, development, personality, emotion, social influences, pathology and therapy, and prevention. These will be seen from the scientific and scholarly point of view, but with emphasis on their relevance to everyday life. An important focus of the course will be the significance of theories and how they influence the gathering of data, as well as the difficulty of objectivity when the object of study is also its primary tool: the human mind. One of the goals of the course will also be to prepare the student to read psychological literature with a critical eye, keeping in mind the difficulties involved in attempting to study human subjectivity in an objective way.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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History of the Counterculture in the US

The course analyzes the history of Counterculture in the United States and examines the impact that Counterculture had during the Sixties and early Seventies (and the legacy and influence that certain particular experiences and ideas have had on later generations). The Other America also aims through the words of Whitman, Steinbeck, Woody Guthrie, Kerouac, Dylan, Springsteen, and many other writers, poets, activists, and musicians to observe the inequities encountered by different American minorities in the 20th Century and to disclose their strategies of survival as they have sought justice and dignity.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Human Trafficking and Contemporary Slavery - HONORS

After a brief, comparative overview of historical practices, this course will examine contemporary manifestations, focusing in particular on chattel slavery, religious slavery, domestic servitude, bonded labor/debt bondage, forced prostitution and sexual slavery, early and forced marriages, forced labor, and human trafficking. Less familiar forms of human trafficking, such as trafficking for the purpose of illegal adoptions and organ sales, and the difference between human trafficking and the smuggling of migrants will also be studied. Special attention will be given to understanding what should be done to fight against these contemporary exploitative practices.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Integrated Marketing Communications

This course first examines the basic principles underlying consumer information processing and how marketing can influence this process. It then addresses the design, coordination, and management of marketing communications, focusing on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, particularly as it relates to branding. The second part of the course may take the form of an extended case study/IMC plan or may address special topics: for example, the relationship between public relations (PR) and marketing, the history and development of advertising and public relations, public opinion and its role in IMC planning, media relations, research for campaign design, global communication, and crisis management.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Internship: Marketing Field

["The For Credit (FC) Internship course combines academic learning with a short-term (generally 3 to 6 months, full or part-time with a minimum of 120 hours) employment opportunity. Field experience allows participants to combine academic learning with hands-on work experience. For-Credit internships may be paid or unpaid. The organization or firm must be sponsored by the JCU Career Services Center (CSC). After being selected for an internship and having the CSC verify the course requirements are met, the intern may enroll in the Internship course corresponding to the academic discipline of interest. Course requirements include: attending the internship class which will is scheduled for 10 in-class hours over the semester, verification of the minimum number of hours worked in the internship by the CSC","completion of a daily internship log","in-depth interview with the internship sponsor or organization","and a 2500 to 3500 word \u201cWhite Paper\u201d presenting a position or solution to a problem encountered by their employer. This course is graded on a \u201cpass\/no pass\u201d basis. The course will begin the 4th week of each semester. Students will determine with the Registrar\u2019s Office or their Advisor which semester corresponds most closely with the timing of their internship. May be taken only once for academic credit."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introduction to Political Theory

An introduction to the history of political thought, from Ancient Greece to the 19th century. Through a close reading of selected canonical texts, students will examine the evolution of ideas about democracy, liberty, equality, justice, political authority, the social contract, different conceptions of human nature and the role of the individual in society. The theorists examined may include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, de Tocqueville and John Stuart Mill.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introduction to Visual Communication

["From photojournalism to Instagram, 21st century communication is primarily image-based. Whether its mass media, individual expression, social media or alternative media, images are used for promoting ideas, products, information and political discourses. In this course students investigate the role of visual culture in daily life, exploring fine art, popular culture, film, television, advertising, business communications, propaganda, viral social media and information graphics. As a critical introduction to visual communication, this course mixes theory, analysis and practical activities for an applied understanding of key issues, including the relationship between images, power and politics","the historical practice of looking","visual media analysis","spectatorship","historic evolution of visual codes","impact of visual technologies","media literacy","information graphics literacy","and global visual culture."]

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Linear Algebra

This course introduces students to the techniques of linear algebra and to the concepts upon which the techniques are based. Topics include: vectors, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, and related geometry in Euclidean spaces. Fundamentals of vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Multimedia Strategic Communications

This course introduces students to the art and craft of multimedia storytelling for strategic business communications in the profit and not for profit sector. It provides background and analysis for how storytelling has evolved in the digital landscape, requiring communicators to rethink concepts of audience, engagement, use of trusted sources, and dynamic updating. In this context, students will take part in the hands-on, beginning-to-end creation of multimedia projects. Depending on each project’s concept, content, and goals, various off-the-shelf software platforms will be explored and utilized for content management and creative presentation in the form of basic apps, interactive storytelling, blogs, bots, and more. A key challenge to strategic communications—dissemination, making stories stand out in today’s sea of content—will be incorporated from the start into decision making and production.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Pinhole Photography

inhole photography is lens-free photography, a method of capturing images using a simple light-tight box with a single pinhole in one end. This course is designed to introduce students to the photographic process through the use of the pinhole camera and the traditional darkroom (B&W film) with its chemical processes. Sessions will include lectures, demonstrations, projects, and exhibition. The course is suitable for students with a good understanding of manual camera control who want to improve the quality of their B&W photographs.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Pre-Calculus

This course provides an introduction to Calculus that focuses on functions and graphs. The properties of absolute value, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions will be studied, along with the techniques for solving equations and inequalities involving those functions.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Principles of Macroeconomics

Economics is the study of choice under conditions of scarcity: The resources needed to produce goods and services are limited compared to human desires. Economics is divided into two major areas. Microeconomics studies the choices of consumers, firms, and governments, and describes the working of markets. Macroeconomics studies the behavior of the entire economy. It explains phenomena such as growth, business cycle, inflation, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to economics. The basic principles of economics will be presented and applied in order to explain some features of the modern economy.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 4   Course Level: Lower Division  

Social Psychology

Social psychology is concerned with how we think about, influence, and relate to other people. This course is about the study of human social behavior, examining theories, findings, approaches, and methods in social psychology, as viewed from an interpersonal perspective. Topics include: the role of others in shaping self-concepts, as well as the formation of person perception, attitudes, attribution theory, obedience, conformity, and social relations. We will further look at the causes and methods of reducing prejudice and aggression, as well as exploring altruism, the development of gender roles, stereotypes, and nonverbal behavior. Readings and activities assigned will enhance discussion, broaden students' knowledge of and perspectives on human social interactions and give them a framework to interpret social behavior. In addition, since this course is taught in Florence, Italy, it provides a natural opportunity to compare and contrast the influence of culture on individuals. Living for even this short period in another country helps you to see and understand the relationship between the individual (self) and society, and a chance to view your own culture from a distance.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 45

Social Psychology

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive view of Social Psychology and its most important phenomena. Our approach will depart from the theoretical basis of social psychology but our learning process will be directly connected to our daily lives. This means that learning will combine the theoretical dimension with a set of new ways of looking at reality, at social others, and at yourself. To combine these two dimensions in our classes, we will complement the theoretical dimension with examples that will help us to identify and understand the theory on the basis of materials such as films, songs, conferences, and presentations of students’ research projects.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

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Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Ancient Rome and Its Monuments

Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the Iron Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment. DO NOT TAKE with AH 190.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Business Communications

This course deals with the definition and analysis of problems and the production of written and oral business reports. Use of appropriate computer software (e.g. word processing, spreadsheets, graphics) is an integral part of the course

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Elementary Latin I

This course is a first introduction to the study of the Latin language. The course introduces all forms of nouns and pronouns in the five declensions and all tenses of the verb in the indicative and imperative. It emphasizes vocabulary development and the acquisition of reading skills in Latin prose. Assignments include considerable reading of continuous passages and translation from Latin to English and English to Latin. Attention is also given to Latin proverbs, abbreviations and cognates in English.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Engineering Fundamentals: Thermodynamics

This course provides an introduction to Thermodynamics, a branch of physics concerned with heat and temperature and their relation to energy and work. It defines macroscopic variables, such as internal energy, entropy, and pressure that partly describe a body of matter or radiation. It states that the behavior of those variables is subject to general constraints that are common to all materials, not the peculiar properties of particular materials. These general constraints are expressed in the four laws of thermodynamics, which can be explained by statistical mechanics, in terms of the microscopic constituents. The course includes basic elements of classical thermodynamics, including first and second laws, properties of pure materials, ideal gas law, reversibility and irreversibility, and Carnot cycle; control volume analysis of closed simple systems and open systems at steady state; engineering applications, including cycles; psychrometrics.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

History of Ancient Rome and Italy

This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intermediate Algebra

This course provides a review of elementary algebra for students who need further preparation for pre-calculus. Students enroll in this course on the basis of a placement examination. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division involving algebraic expressions; factoring of polynomial expressions; exponents and radicals; solving linear equations, quadratic equations and systems of linear equations; and applications involving these concepts. This course does not satisfy the General Distribution Requirement in Mathematics and Science.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Introductory Spanish II

A continuation of SPAN101. This course aims at developing and reinforcing the language skills acquired in Introductory Spanish I, while placing special emphasis on oral communication.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Mathematical Statistics

This is a calculus-based introduction to mathematical statistics. While the material covered is similar to that which might be found in an undergraduate course of statistics, the technical level is much more advanced, the quantity of material much larger, and the pace of delivery correspondingly faster. The course covers basic probability, random variables (continuous and discrete), the central limit theorem and statistical inference, including parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. It also provides a basic introduction to stochastic processes.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

View Syllabus   

Renaissance Rome and Its Monuments

Rome City Series - This on-site course will study the monuments of Renaissance Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture produced by such masters as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo, all attracted to the lucrative service of popes, cardinals and nobles of the Roman court. On-site classes will investigate examples of palace and villa architecture, chapel decoration that encompasses altarpieces and funerary sculpture, as well as urbanistic projects where the city itself was considered as a work of art.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

Shakespeare

This course is a general introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and an in-depth study of a selection of representative plays including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a romance. Through the close reading of the plays selected for the course, students will learn how to analyze a theatrical text, will study the Elizabethan stage in its day, and consider Shakespeare’s cultural inheritance. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

View Syllabus   

The Popes of Rome: History of the Catholic Church

The history of the Catholic church is essentially intertwined with the history of Western Civilization over the past 2,000 years. The aspirations and struggles of Christendom constitute the fabric of the Christian tradition as it unfolds throughout time. This course represents an historical survey of the Church from its primitive beginnings in Jerusalem (c. 33 A.D.) to the Pontificate of John Paul II (1920-2005). The development of the course will trace the major events, ideas and people that went into the shaping of the Western Church, without ignoring the fundamental importance and influence of the doctrine of Jesus Christ regarding the institution he founded.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Ancient Philosophy

The philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome debated fundamental questions with an imagination, subtlety, and daring that have captured the attention of thoughtful people in every epoch. For example, they considered the nature and origin of the universe, what changes and does not change, as well as what causes change, how perception and reasoning produce knowledge, the relation between the soul and the body, the meaning of justice and beauty, and the nature of the good life. Through a careful reading of selected texts – in the form of dialogues, poems, aphorisms, or treatises – the course will introduce you to the great questions and controversies of ancient philosophy.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Cinematic Rome

An analysis of the social, aesthetic, political, and rhetorical implications of cinematic representations of Rome, from silent films to the present. This course will evaluate and discuss ten primary films, along with excerpts from a number of others. We will consider five main topics: Images of Ancient Rome; Before and After World War II; Americans in Rome, and Rome in America; Fellini’s Rome; and Urban Angst, Roman Style. As the semester progresses, we will consider how Rome functions as a character in the movies, as well as how The Eternal City comprises the mise-en-scène. We will assess the artistic representations of Roman monuments and streetscapes on movie sets, as opposed to location shooting. Special attention will be given to memory construction, as well as the rhetoric of places and spaces (how the physical/symbolic setting influences us). In this course, students will visit cinematic landmarks in Rome and write about their experiences.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Digital Media Culture

This course provides students with a number of theoretical approaches to critically assess how digital media function and their expanding and expansive role in contemporary culture. The course further investigates digital media convergence in order to develop a critical lexicon that can both chart its development and engage in intellectual interventions in its use within the transformations occuring in more traditional cultural forms such as television, film, popular music, print, and radio. Special emphasis will be placed on the specific cultural, political, economic, and social issues raised by digital media forms.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Digital Photography

This course is meant for students who wish to deepen their knowledge of digital photography. It will review basic camera functions, lighting, principles of composition and pictorial dynamics, color interactions, and introduce methods of the elaboration of photos on the computer. The course will consider the historical and formal knowledge of photography, as well as including picture-taking in a variety of genres and the preparation of a photo exhibition. Each student must be equipped with a digital camera with a wide lens or a 3x or greater optical zoom, and camera functions selector which includes M,A,S,P. A tripod and modern single-lens reflex (SLR) digital cameras with interchangeable lenses are highly recommended.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Directed Readings in Latin

This course is designed to offer the opportunity to read texts in the original to students with a basic level of Latin language preparation. The level of readings may range from intermediate to advanced. Language levels will be determined at the beginning of the course, and students will be arranged in suitable reading groups. Texts appropriate to each group’s level will be chosen by the professor and the individual students. Texts will vary, but advanced students may choose from among annotated editions of Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, and Livy. All groups will work independently and in weekly reading groups with the professor, when issues of language, grammar, and literary technique will be discussed.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Econometrics

Econometrics is the use of statistical tools to test economic models. This course will introduce students to the basic principles of econometrics and will provide them with hands-on practical experience in the field. The course starts with a review of statistical tools and continues with the analysis of simple and multiple regression, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity. Some of the teaching time will be spent in the computer lab, where students will learn how to work with software.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Engineering Fundamentals: Mechanics of Materials

The course provides a study of the fundamentals of solid mechanics of deformable bodies. The engineering structures covered in this course are determinate and indeterminate assemblies of tension members, columns (including buckling), beams (flexural members), shafts (torsional members), and thin-walled pressure vessels (tanks). The course also contains an introduction to common categories and types of engineering materials and their failure mechanisms. The importance of safety factors and their application in the Allowable Stress Design philosophy is emphasized throughout the course, leading to an enhanced awareness of the professional and ethical responsibilities inherent to the role of the engineer.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Financial Institutions and Capital Markets

This course covers the structure and role of financial markets and institutions such as commercial banking, investment banking, and major equity, debt, and derivative markets and includes discussion of management, performance, and regulatory aspects. The course also examines the functions of central banks and monetary policy for these financial markets and institutions. Case studies and real life examples are also disseminated throughout the course to allow students the additional exploration of national and international implications of financial markets, including those concerning credit crisis, their causes, and the likely reverberations and regulatory reforms.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Genocide

The course examines such violent forms of identity politics as ethnic cleansing and genocide in an international and historical perspective. The program covers the genocides in Europe against the Jews and Roma, in Armenia, the Balkans, the Ukraine, Cambodia, Rwanda, and the Darfur region.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Global Media

This course is an introduction to the current debate around the relationship between globalization and the media. By linking theoretical conceptions with hands-on empirical research and analysis, students will develop a richer and multi-layered perspective around the increasingly relevant yet contested notion of globalization, and specifically on the role that the media have in advancing, challenging and representing social, political and cultural change across multiple regions of the world.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Introductory German I

This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in German. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to German culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Leadership, Mindfulness, and Emotional Intelligence

["This course aims at studying in depth the model of Resonant Leadership and its positive effects on the increase of efficacy, creativity, motivation, conflict resolution, decision-making, and stress reduction within the workplace. Using the latest studies in the fields of Psychology, Neuroscience, Behavior, and Organization participants will learn the theory, research and experience of employing Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence within the work environment. The course will be divided in two parts: a) a theoretical part in which the participants will be introduced to the model of Resonant Leadership informed by Mindfulness, Emotional Intelligence, Neuroscience, and the most recent cognitive research","b) a practical-experiential part in which Mindfulness techniques and the development of Emotional and Social Intelligence will be learned in order to promote resonance in leadership."]

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Social Science Research Methods

This course presents an introduction to research methods commonly used by political and other social scientists. The course covers the logic of the scientific method, including literature reviews, research design, surveys and experiments, as well as the use of statistical data. Students will hand in a thesis proposal, an outline of their senior thesis topic, and their choice of first and second readers as an exit requirement.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Web Design I

The premise of this course is that a web site differs from a traditional media publication because its contents can be updated at any moment, many possibilities exist for making it interactive, and reader attention span is short. The course provides students with technical knowledge and skills required to build a web site, while covering design, communication, and computer-human interaction issues. Topics include web history, HTML, style sheets, and effective information searching. As a final project, students create a web site on a liberal arts topic, which will be judged by the instructor and a reader specialized in the chosen topic.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Advanced Composition

The main goal of this course is to enable students to create different basic descriptive, narrative and argumentative texts in Spanish (narrative, descriptive, argumentative...) by means of exercises involving exposition, reflection, and practice. Students will learn techniques to organize the written speech, as well as style resources that will let them progress within the area of writing in Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: Upper Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Upper Division  

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Creative Writing Workshop: Travel Writing

This creative nonfiction workshop explores the long tradition of travel writing, fostered by the keen observation and thoughtful documentation of landscape and culture that travel inspires. Students will gain exposure to several subgenres encompassed by the term travel writing including, but not limited to, the travel memoir, the travel essay, guidebooks, and food and humor pieces that tandem as travel writing. The course offers instruction in the research and mechanics of travel writing aimed at the generation of articles and essays for newspapers, magazines, guidebooks, the Internet, as well as how to begin drafting ideas for longer-form works.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Differential Equations

This course provides an introduction to ordinary differential equations. These equations contain a function of one independent variable and its derivatives. The term ordinary is used in contrast with the term partial differential equation which may be with respect to more than one independent variable. Ordinary differential equations and applications, with integrated use of computing, student projects","first-order equations","higher order linear equations","systems of linear equations, Laplace transforms","introduction to nonlinear equations and systems, phase plane, stability.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Drawing - Rome Sketchbook

This course makes use of the unparalleled resource that is the city of Rome itself; each class meets at a different site around the city. Students work in sketchbook form, creating over the course of the term a diary of visual encounters. Instruction, apart from brief discussions of the sites themselves, focuses on efficient visual note taking: the quick description of form, awareness of light and the development of volume in space. With practice and growing experience, students become capable of producing drawings governed by conscious intention.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Intercultural Communications

An exploration of some of the historical and political conditions that make intercultural communication possible, the barriers that exist to effective intercultural communication, and possible solutions to the problem of intercultural misunderstanding. The course examines examples of differences in communication styles not only between cultures but also within. As a result, issues of race, nation, class, gender, religion, immigration, and sexual orientation will be of significant concern. The course stresses the notion that knowledge of human beings is always knowledge produced from a particular location and for a particular purpose. As a result it encourages students to think carefully about the discipline of Intercultural Communication—its conditions of possibility, its assumptions, and its blind spots—as well the need to be mindful of the limitations and interests of our positioning as investigating subjects.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Introductory Italian I

This course is designed to give students basic communicative ability in Italian. By presenting the language in a variety of authentic contexts, the course also seeks to provide an introduction to Italian culture and society. Students work on all four language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Note: This course carries 4 semester hours of credit during the Fall and Spring terms, 3 hours in Summer.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Public Speaking: Oral Rhetoric and Persuasion

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of rhetoric and how they are applied in oral communication, and how these principles and concepts lead to effective public speaking. Students will learn how to prepare and organize persuasive speeches by learning the fundamental structures of the persuasive speech. In addition, students will begin to acquire basic skills in critical reasoning, including how to structure a thesis statement and support it through a specific line of reasoning using idea subordination, coordination, and parallel structure.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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Rome: Modern City (On-site)

This on-site course, which will be conducted in English, aims to introduce students to a sociological analysis of contemporary Rome. It focuses on the changes which are occurring in the city’s populations, its neighborhoods and patterns of daily life and commerce, and challenges conventional images of what it is to be a Roman today. On-site classes will be held in a variety of neighborhoods in the city in order to analyze the area’s role as a social entity and its relationship with the wider urban context. We will examine the issues and problems facing Rome today, such as housing, degradation and renewal, environmental questions, transportation, multiculturalism, wealth and poverty, social conflict and political identities. These issues will be contextualized within theories of urban sociology and also within an explanation of Rome’s urban development over the centuries and, in particular, since it became the national capital in 1870. Through readings, film clips, interviews and guest speakers, students will also analyze the way the city is narrated by some of its residents.

Course Level: Lower  

Course Level: Lower  

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International Marketing

This course examines the process of planning and conducting transactions across national borders in a global environment. Topics include factors in assessing world marketing opportunities, international marketing of products, pricing, distribution, and promotion program development in dynamic world markets. Marketing practices which various businesses adapt to the international environment are studied. Attention is also given to comparative marketing systems and planning and organizing for export-import operations.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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Business Ethics JCU

This course considers some of the most important ethical issues in business today. Students will examine such issues as businesses’ responsibilities to shareholders, workers and consumers, the pros and cons of a free market, the challenges raised by globalization and environmental destruction, the idea of ethical consumption, and the particular dilemmas faced by Western businesses working in foreign countries. Issues will be studied through a selection of contemporary cases, arguments, and broader theories, along with much class discussion, with the aim of helping students develop a familiarity with the issues and the ability to discuss and defend their own opinions.

Course Level: Upper  

Course Level: Upper  

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International Economics JCU

An introduction to international trade and finance. Analysis of the causes and consequences of international trade and investment. Major topics include international trade theory, international trade policy, exchange rates, open-economy macroeconomics, and international macroeconomic policy.

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Highlights
  • Classes taught in English and Italian with Italian, international, and American students
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (John Cabot University)
  • Meal plan: 20 meals included
  • “Early Bird” scholarship opportunity
  • API/JCU diversity scholarship opportunity
  • Engineering scholarship opportunity
  • Internship opportunities

API students in Rome live in apartments with other API students. Apartments are typically a 25-45 minute commute from JCU or LdM. Some API apartments can house as many as 7 students, although students typically share a room with another student. All apartments come equipped with a kitchen, 1-2 bathrooms, and common areas. Washing machines are available, and students are responsible for their own meals (though students at JCU will receive a meal plan good for 20 complimentary meals on campus during the session). Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee.

Api Rome Housing 7977526456 O
Api Rome Housing 7977527747 O
Api Rome Housing 7977529605 O
Api Rome Housing 7977529692 O
Dining Area 5726784068 O
Rome Housing Examples 8470330329 O

The prices listed below are for 1 course per session. Students who are interested in taking 2 courses per individual session will incur an additional fee of $1,200 per course per session or $2,100 per course for the combined session.

SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION
*JCU students who apply early will earn an “Early Bird Scholarship” of up to $350 off of their program fee (amount varies per term). Visit our scholarship page for more information.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 May 18, 2020 - Jun 27, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $7,680

Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 1 and 2 Combined May 18, 2020 - Aug 8, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $13,880

Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 2 Jun 29, 2020 - Aug 8, 2020

Pricing Additional Information

2 courses: $7,680

Mar 15, 2020 Apr 1, 2020
Summer 1 May 20, 2019 - Jun 29, 2019 $6,480 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined May 20, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $11,780 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019
Summer 2 Jul 1, 2019 - Aug 10, 2019 $6,480 Mar 15, 2019 Apr 1, 2019