Italy Tuscania Fountain 481966552

API students who choose to study abroad at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute – Tuscania may select from a variety of courses in the fields of Italian language and culture, humanities, sciences, and studio arts.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing (some meals with host families)

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.8 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Italian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Tuscania programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Pompeii, Sorrento, Capri

    Pompeii is one of the most significant proofs of Roman civilization and provides outstanding information on the art, customs, trades and everyday life of the past. The city was badly damaged by an earthquake in 63 AD and was completely demolished in 79 AD by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Life came to a permanent standstill in what had been one of the most active and splendid Roman centers. Although this tragic event ended the lives of 20,000 Pompeian residents, the ash that buried the town served as a sort of mummification for the entire city. The eruption thus captured a moment in time.

    Sorrento is a resort town set atop rocky, picturesque cliffs along the Amalfi Coast. South of Sorrento, the Amalfi Coast is dotted with numerous beach towns that offer great shopping and dining, as well as breathtaking views of the sea.

    One of the beautiful islands off the coast of Sorrento in the Gulf of Naples, Capri is a top tourist destination. Famous for its limestone crags and the Blue Grotto, students will enjoy the laid-back, serene nature of this exotic retreat.

  • Arezzo

    Located in southeastern Tuscany, Arezzo sits atop a hill at the crossroads of four valleys: Val Tiberina, Casentino, Valdarno, and Valdichiana. Each of these, comprising unique landscapes where natural beauty blends harmoniously with historic heritage and masterpieces of art. Nature and a thousand years of man’s labor come together to create a millenary masterpiece that never ceases to astonish and enchant. Its Medieval center still offers plenty of monuments, churches, and museums to give visitors a chance to step back into history. Great Italian artists such as Piero della Francesca, Masaccio, Michelangelo, and Vasari all left signs of their creativity and genius in Arezzo.

  • Florence

    Florence is a city that welcomes visitors, artists, and students to walk its streets, to relive past discoveries in the arts and sciences and to glimpse the rich history that permeates every inch of the city. Florence is situated on the banks of the Arno River, surrounded by rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside. Some of the medieval artisan traditions are still alive today, as seen in the daily open-air markets. API introduces students to the sights, sounds, and art that embrace a visitor at every turn in the flowering city of Florence.

  • Rome

    With an almost uninterrupted history as an important center of power for more than two millennia, Rome is as close to eternal as it gets. The “Eternal City” was once the administrative center of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today, it remains the seat of the Italian government and the world’s biggest open air museum.

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-16 credits per semester

API students who choose to study abroad at Lorenzo de’ Medici – The Italian International Institute – Tuscania may select from a variety of courses in the fields of Italian language and culture, humanities, sciences, and studio arts.

Students are required to take at least 1 Italian language course and then may choose 3-4 additional courses from the aforementioned subject areas (detailed on the course information page).

SERVICE-LEARNING AND INTERNSHIPS

API students have the opportunity to earn valuable credits through service-learning and internship experiences with LdM in Tuscania! Students earn 3 credits for their project, which is counted toward their total academic load for the semester, and appear on the academic transcript along with a pass/fail notation. Students are assessed based on a weekly journal, a minimum of two papers, and an evaluation by their academic advisor/tutor at LdM. Options are listed on the API/LdM course schedules on the website and will focus on placements in organizations engaged in socially meaningful tasks. These may include:

  • Service-learning: Working with women, children, elderly, disabled, and/or immigrants; Language exchange with local high school; Environmental projects
  • Internships: Marketing/Advertising

Students should indicate their interest in an internship or service-learning option upon application, and submit a résumé/C.V., essay, and portfolio. The essay should discuss the student’s reason for applying, expectations about the placement, and a detailed description of the duties in which the student would like to partake in. An on-site interview is required of all service-learning participants. Placements are limited, so students are encouraged to apply early!

TRANSCRIPTS

Students receive a transcript from U.S.-accredited Marist College for courses taken at LdM. Marist College is a four-year, fully accredited U.S. college in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Matteo Berni

    Matteo will be your Resident Director in Tuscania and a resource for you while you are in Italy!

  • Mariana

    Mariana Delmonte-Gladstone

    Mariana Delmonte-Gladstone will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - mariana.delmonte-gladstone@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

Be sure to check for any course additions, cancellations, or closures, and remember to pay close attention to prerequisites and class times in order to avoid conflicts.Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost.

Courses are available at lower- and upper-division levels. In general, 100 level courses are elementary, 200–300 level courses are intermediate, and 400 level courses are advanced. Students who choose intermediate level Italian or higher must complete a placement exam upon arrival to verify their level of proficiency. Students who do not meet proficiency standards are assigned to the appropriate course.

Note that all students must take at least one language course per semester.

When obtaining pre-approval for course selections, students should refer to the Marist College course codes and titles, as these will appear on the transcript. If you have any questions while looking at the course schedule or filling out your application, please call the API office at (800) 844-4124.

CREDIT INFORMATION

API partner universities in Italy issue credit according to the American system, whereby most courses are worth 3-4 U.S. credits each.

SERVICE-LEARNING AND INTERNSHIP OPTIONS (FOR CREDIT)

API students have the opportunity to earn valuable credits through service-learning and internship experiences with LdM in Tuscania! Students earn 3 credits for their project, which is counted toward their total academic load for the semester, and appear on the academic transcript along with a pass/fail notation. Students are assessed based on a weekly journal, a minimum of two papers, and an evaluation by their academic advisor/tutor at LdM. Options are listed on the API/LdM course schedules on the website and will focus on placements in organizations engaged in socially meaningful tasks. These may include:

  • Service-learning: Working with women, children, elderly, disabled, and/or immigrants; Language exchange with local high school; Environmental projects
  • Internships: Marketing/Advertising

Students should indicate their interest in an internship or service-learning option upon application, and submit a résumé/C.V., essay, and portfolio. The essay should discuss the student’s reason for applying, expectations about the placement, and a detailed description of the duties in which the student would like to partake in. An on-site interview is required of all service-learning participants. Placements are limited, so students are encouraged to apply early!

STUDIO ART COURSES

The class schedules on the API website indicate that many of the studio art courses involve two time blocks; students enrolled in those courses must attend both time blocks.

Placement exams for studio art courses are mandatory for any student wishing to register for any course at a level other than beginning. Studio art placement tests are administered during the first week of classes. Students are provided with the exact meeting time during orientation.

COURSE MATERIALS AND LAB FEES

Many studio art classes require that students purchase their own materials. The cost of materials varies depending on the type of course. While students may want to bring some basic, easily transportable materials (such as brushes or pastels) with them, most course materials should be purchased in Italy once classes start. Students can speak directly with their instructors to make sure they buy exactly what is required for the course. Many studio arts and cuisine courses require a lab fee that is paid by students upon arrival. In addition, several courses from different departments require that students pay for visits and field trips as noted in the descriptions for such courses.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts . The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom, which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Advanced 2

This course focuses on the ability to understand extended speech, as well as technical and specialized texts. At the end of the course students will develop the ability to use language flexibly for social and professional purposes. They will be able to recognize idiomatic uses of the language and to apply register shifts. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom, which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Agricultural Economics

["The course is intended as an introduction to basic economics concepts which frames the agricultural sector within a theoretical framework. The very first part is basically an overview of the economic principles for consumer and producer behavior, price determination, elasticity, profit, demand and supply. These concepts are then applied to agriculture: definition of agriculture and introduction to it as a business;","agri-food marketing principles;","leading concepts of economics of natural resources. In the last part the course treats the economic, social and environmental roles of agriculture in relation to the challenges of food security and climate change: why should we care, and how? The course concludes with a comparative analysis of the very different roles of government in agricultural policy, in Europe and other regions."]

Wine Business

This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.

Medieval Civilization and Culture

["This course explores the remarkable series of transitions that Western civilization underwent between the years 313 and 1400 CE, dates corresponding to Emperor Constantine\u0092s official acceptance of Christianity, and the advent of humanistic culture. In culture, politics, and society, this long period witnessed a reorientation of values and enormous shifts in the configuration of Europe. In the visual arts, efforts to interpret classical artistic language were accompanied by innovative contributions from different cultures. As students study historical and literary sources, archaeology as well as architecture, sculpture and painting, they acquire a chronological map of the essential developments, learning to distinguish between eras, and to interrelate political, social, economic, and cultural trends. Rejecting the popular notion of a \"dark age\" of culture in the Middle Ages, we shall emphasize the concept of historic evolution. Topics include: the Late Roman Empire, the Barbarian invasions, monasticism, medieval Christianity, the Crusades, the rise of the Italian city-states, the Black Death, and the roots of the Renaissance;","Early Christian, Carolingian, Ottoman, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic Art. Italian developments and monuments receive special attention, and site visits in Tuscania, neighboring towns (such as Viterbo, Bolsena, Orvieto), and Rome, form an essential component of the course."]

Child Psychology

This course is about the study of child development, from the prenatal period through adolescence, examining theories, findings, approaches and methods of developmental psychology. We will explore such questions as: What knowledge do infants have at birth? Is aggressiveness a stable attribute? Does early exposure to two languages confuse children? What do children understand about the causes of emotion? How do infants become attached? Why do school-age children pay more attention to their peers than their parents? Who raises altruistic children? We will cover the major domains of development -- biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional -- putting emphasis on discovering the many different biological and experiential factors that influence behavior, as well as the roles familial and extra familial factors play in the course of early human development. We will look at the causes and methods of reducing aggression, as well as exploring altruism, and moral development. The course will include practical exercises where students will be expected to conduct observations of children in real-life and/or on video, and plan appropriate methods to collect developmental data, with the opportunity to explore the differences between their own culture and Italian culture.

LdM Courses

To choose your courses, click on this link, and select on the campus and term you are interested in.

LdM Course Link

Organic Agriculture

Organic agriculture of plant products is a method of production that aims to obtain quality food products while respecting the environment of the production process. This means coordinating the elements used in farming and ensuring the renaturalization of an environment compromised by intensive agriculture. Managing a farm that uses the organic agriculture philosophy entails using new operational techniques that permit productivity and quality, while respecting the constraints imposed by legislation, and at the same time optimizing business profitability. In the transition from traditional to organic farming it is important to choose techniques as well as a variety of products that generate the best results in that particular environment. True organic agriculture is not only a question of business management but it also requires knowledge of agronomy and an understanding of the systems methodology and history as well as its cultural aspect, i.e., the social, intellectual, and ethical values of this system. The course includes experiential learning with seasonal activities at a local farm and facilities, horticultural cultivation in Spring and olive harvest and pressing in Fall. The course meets for 45 hours in Fall and 90 hours in Spring.

Communication in Public Administration Internship

["This internship provides professional experience in the field of Communications at a prestigious public office. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten\/twelve hours weekly at the internship site;","student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The internship provides an inside look into Tuscania's Public Administration. With this unique experience the students establish themselves as part of a communications team and learn valuable technical skills, while providing information to the English speaking community of Tuscania. Interns develop and carry out various activities which include, but are not limited to: translating important news and announcements from Italian into English;","finding the main points of an official document and making a short summary of those points for online publication;","using specific databases and updating a bilingual Web site;","drafting translations from English into Italian. \u000bNote: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a writing sample in English, a formal letter of intent in Italian. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an Italian language placement test and an onsite interview during the first week of the term. Proficiency in Italian is required. Since the translations are from Italian into English, high proficiency in writing and reading English is expected."]

Sustainable Food

This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.

Cooking in Context: Traditions of Tuscania

Located between Rome, Tuscany, and Umbria, Tuscania has been an important crossroads for thousands of years, and its cuisine reflects this position and history. Tuscania is a hyperlocal market with an intimate relationship between agriculture and cuisine. Here, farm to table, zero kilometer, and cucina povera are not mere buzzwords but reveal a special perspective and even times of hardship. By engaging hands-on with the recipes and ingredients of the area, we will learn about how traditions are created and confirmed. The course links local practices, representative of central Italian cuisine, to the broader history of modern Italian cuisine, society, identity, and history.

Italian for Conversation (in Italian only)

The course, taught entirely in Italian, aims to improve conversational fluency through different structured teaching techniques (i.e., dramatization, role play, role taking, oral presentation) and also to promote different strategies for listening, another important skill to be developed in order to become a real active participant in conversation. The improvement of speaking and listening abilities, together with reading and writing, will go hand in hand with broadening knowledge of the Italian culture. In this context class discussions and students' oral presentations on themes regarding Italy and Italian people will help them become familiar with Italian society.

Religion and Culture in Italy

This course examines the interaction between culture and religion in Italy, above all modern Italy. The peninsula has been the almost uninterrupted home of the Catholic church and the Vatican State, a factor of great importance for centuries and still today in the development of Italian culture and society. At the same time Italy is a relatively young nation, democratic, industrialized, and multicultural. In the lively Italian cultural landscape religion can mean oceanic crowds at sanctuaries or a papal appearance, fierce newspaper debates, small parishes, and Muslims or Christians praying in rented spaces. Italy, indeed, epitomizes key issues in religion and culture generally. Students move between themes of diversity in religious belief and practice, coexistence of communities, continuity of tradition and local heritage, the political interface, secularism, religion in the media and popular culture, national identity, and educational, social, and health policies and activities. The course exploits the special opportunity to investigate various religious communities in Italy.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 1

This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before: it is the first of six levels and its aim is to give the basis of the language, allowing students to deal with the most common everyday situations by expressing themselves in the present and past tenses. At the end of the course students will be able to understand familiar words and basic phrases and to interact in a simple way in order to satisfy their immediate needs. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Elementary 2

This course focuses on the consolidation of basic structures of the language and the acquisition of some new structures, such as the means to describe one's personal background and environment, to express wishes and talk about future plans, respond to simple direct questions or requests for information. At the end of the course students will be able to understand simple exchanges of information on familiar activities and use short phrases to describe in simple terms people and living conditions. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 1

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts . The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Intermediate 2

This course focuses on the acquisition of complex language structures and skills, such as the means to express personal opinions, preferences, doubts and hypothesis, the combination of different tenses when narrating past events, switching the focus in writing. In this level emphasis is given to social discourse, to the ability to effectively sustain social interactions and contribute significantly to discussions. At the end of the course students will achieve a deeper awareness of the language and a wider repertoire of vocabulary and texts. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Advanced 1

In this level the focus is on the ability to manage conversation and cooperating strategies, to employ a wide range of language to build clear, connected and effective texts. At the end of the course students will be able to take an active part in conversations, accounting for their points of view, to give clear presentations on a range of subjects related to their interests both in speaking and in writing. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom, which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

4-Hour Italian Language Advanced 2

This course focuses on the ability to understand extended speech, as well as technical and specialized texts. At the end of the course students will develop the ability to use language flexibly for social and professional purposes. They will be able to recognize idiomatic uses of the language and to apply register shifts. The course is specifically designed to make the most of the immersive learning environment, with activities outside the classroom, which provide a useful complement to the academic experience and help students to build their linguistic self-confidence.

Highlights
  • Classes taught in English and Italian
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (Marist College)
  • Immersive setting
  • Agricultural Studies and Technologies Options!
  • Internships and service-learning options available (for credit)
  • Lauren Lund Memorial Scholarship

Housing for API students is usually located within 20-25 minutes walking distance of the school.

The host family option is recommended for students who are studying Italian at the intermediate or advanced levels, for students who are Italian majors/minors, and for students who are seeking greater insight into Italian culture. Host families provide three meals per day Monday through Friday, as well as laundry service. Most students live in single rooms.

Apartments are typically a 10-15 minute walk from the school. Most students will share a room with only 1-2 other students. All apartments come equipped with a kitchen, bathroom, and common areas. Washing machines are available, and students are responsible for their own meals. Students in apartments will be given 4 meal tickets per week, and are responsible for preparing the remainder of their own meals. Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included.

Apartment In Tuscania 8947241581 O
Apartment In Tuscania 8947863614 O
Apartment In Tuscania 8947864398 O
Api Tuscania Host Family Christine Mattappillil 4833878113 O
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring Jan 27, 2020 - May 15, 2020 $13,990 Oct 15, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Spring Jan 28, 2019 - May 18, 2019 $13,990 Oct 15, 2018 Nov 1, 2018
Academic Year Aug 26, 2019 - May 15, 2020 $26,980 Jun 1, 2019 Jun 15, 2019
Fall Aug 26, 2019 - Dec 13, 2019 $13,990 Jun 1, 2019 Jun 15, 2019