Scotland Edinburgh 27212329

The aim of this program is to introduce students to key aspects of Scottish and British politics and culture by means of academic instruction, followed by placements in the Parliament, built around a research project designed to aid the work of the host MSP (Member of the Scottish Parliament).

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Historic Scotland Tourism Card

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • 3.0 G.P.A.
  • Open to juniors & seniors
  • Completed API Application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One non-academic reference
  • Resume/C.V.
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Program of study statement
  • Completion of a minimum of four courses in politics, international relations, government, or social/public policy with grades of B or higher
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with Tier 4 visa

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 15-17 semester credits

The aim of this program is to introduce students to key aspects of Scottish and British politics and culture by means of academic instruction, followed by placements in the Parliament, built around a research project designed to aid the work of the host MSP (Member of the Scottish Parliament).

The objective of the course is to give students an understanding of how Scotland has evolved as a society, especially in the context of the United Kingdom, how key aspects of its cultural development reflect that process, as well as focusing on the policy-making process in Scotland and the impact the Scottish Parliament has had since it was ‘re-convened’ in 1999.

NOTE: This program is highly competitive, and is restricted to no more than 20 students per semester. It is strongly advised that you APPLY EARLY.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive their transcript from the University of Edinburgh upon completion of their program.

Courses

COURSE OFFERINGS

In the first five weeks of the program, students are required to take three courses: British Politics, Scottish Politics, and Scottish Society & Culture Monday through Wednesday. On the same days, up to two hours in the afternoon will be used to deepen the topics dealt with in the morning sessions – by visiting institutions, having guest lectures, and through other guided activities. Thursday evenings throughout the 5 weeks of tuition are reserved for compulsory video/film sessions complementing the courses. The video night then switches to Monday night from Week 6.

Following the completion of coursework, students will be assigned to a Member of Scottish Parliament (MSP). A research project (on a topic agreed between intern and MSP, and approved by the Director of Studies) will be undertaken.

CREDIT INFORMATION

This program is worth 70 credits at the University of Edinburgh. Credits at the University of Edinburgh are roughly equivalent to twice the amount of ECTS credits (European Credit Transfer System), which in turn are roughly equivalent to twice the amount of U.S. semester credits.

Government and Politics in the United Kingdom

This course provides an overview of the government and politics of the United Kingdom. It examines the development of the UK state, the impact of constitutional reform and European integration, the nature of the British party system and ideological change, the electoral system and its consequences. It is intended to give students an insight into key features of the British political system, to provide insight into the relative strength and positions occupied by the main parties, and to provide an understanding of the continuing relevance of the UK politics for Scotland.

Scottish Politics

This offers an historical overview of the origins and development of modern Scottish politics and government. It considers the government structures, political decisionmaking and party politics in Scotland. These will be discussed in the context of debates, conceptualizations and theories of political science. ii. The course will provide necessary backdrop for an internship in the Scottish Parliament. Discussion will include a strong practical element aimed to furnish students with competing understandings of Scottish politics and government.

Public Policy in Scotland

The course sets out to prepare students for working with MSPs. MSPs perform various roles and functions and different MSPs interpret these roles differently. A day in the life of any MSP is likely to be very varied and subjects requiring attention can change rapidly but most MSPs attempt to specialize to some extent whether in a particular area (especially so for constituency Members) and/or subject matter(s). The subjects covered by MSPs usually reflect the powers and responsibilities of the Scottish Parliament including the business and the economy, environment, law and order, public safety, health, education, social services, arts and culture, housing, urban and rural affairs but will also include matters such as aspects of the UK constitution, Brexit and even foreign affairs though these might not formally come under the Parliamentżs remit.
The course will focus on the roles and functions of Members: the implications of having constituency and regional list Members; Members of different parties and party work; constituency work; committee and chamber work; and both local and other campaigns. As well as understanding these functions, it will be important to understand the institutional landscape of Scottish politics and decision-making processes including the relationship between MSPs and Scottish Government, local government, other public, private and voluntary bodies. The powers and responsibilities of the Scottish Parliament and current issues that are likely to be addressed by Parliamentarians will be discussed. An indicative list of subjects covered (subject to change reflecting the evolution of the politics of devolution) include:
- Members of the Scottish Parliament: who are they? What do they do?
- Policy-Making: Interest Groups, Access and Lobbying
- Delivering services
- Scotland's "wicked problems"
- Public Service Reform

The aim is to equip students with analytical and methodological skills in public policy analysis that will be relevant to completing projects, writing briefs and undertaking research while working in the office of a Member of the Scottish Parliament. It will marry academic studies with practical examples drawing on concerns and issue dealt with by MSPs.

Scottish Parliamentary Internship

Following the completion of course work, students will be assigned to a Member of Scottish Parliament (MSP). A research project (on a topic agreed between intern and MSP, and approved by the Director of Studies) will be undertaken.

Recent research projects by parliamentary interns have included a wide range of subject matters and topics, including:

  • ‘Why does Scotland have no plumbers?!?’ An Investigation into Scotland’s Skills Shortage
  • Beyond the Numbers: Female Representation in the Scottish Parliament
  • Business and Educational Achievements by the Scottish Executive and their Communication
  • Class Size isn’t Everything: A Study of Class Size Reduction Policy in Scotland
  • Comparative Analysis between American and Scottish Election Campaigns
  • Controlling Firearms in Scotland
  • The Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 and its Effects on the Criminal Courts
  • Suicide in Scotland: The Need for a Hotline
  • A Study of Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) in Scotland
  • Connecting with young People: Labour Approaches to Democratic Engagement through the Scottish Parliament
  • Comprehensive View of Higher Education: Scotland
  • What’s the Scottish Parliament ever done for me? A Study on the Awareness of Scottish Parliament Policy Amongst Older People

Interns will be provided with study space in the new Parliament building while continuing to have a permanent academic base and office facilities in the University’s Institute of Governance, whose members will support interns in their research. Interns will carry out responsible work, and will contribute meaningfully to the development of Scottish political life.

The Internship phase of the program comprises a two-week transition, in which coursework is completed and preparations for residency at the Parliament are finalized; and an eight-week period in which the Interns, at their new base at the Parliament, focus upon their research project, returning to the University, one day a week, for a compulsory session organized by the Institute.

Assessment for the internship takes three forms: course requirements, a report and journal. The academic course work will count 40% towards the final mark; the report and journal will make up the other 60%.

Government and Politics in the United Kingdom

This course provides an overview of the government and politics of the United Kingdom. It examines the development of the UK state, the impact of constitutional reform and European integration, the nature of the British party system and ideological change, the electoral system and its consequences. It is intended to give students an insight into key features of the British political system, to provide insight into the relative strength and positions occupied by the main parties, and to provide an understanding of the continuing relevance of the UK politics for Scotland.

Scottish Politics

This offers an historical overview of the origins and development of modern Scottish politics and government. It considers the government structures, political decisionmaking and party politics in Scotland. These will be discussed in the context of debates, conceptualizations and theories of political science. ii. The course will provide necessary backdrop for an internship in the Scottish Parliament. Discussion will include a strong practical element aimed to furnish students with competing understandings of Scottish politics and government.

Public Policy in Scotland

The course sets out to prepare students for working with MSPs. MSPs perform various roles and functions and different MSPs interpret these roles differently. A day in the life of any MSP is likely to be very varied and subjects requiring attention can change rapidly but most MSPs attempt to specialize to some extent whether in a particular area (especially so for constituency Members) and/or subject matter(s). The subjects covered by MSPs usually reflect the powers and responsibilities of the Scottish Parliament including the business and the economy, environment, law and order, public safety, health, education, social services, arts and culture, housing, urban and rural affairs but will also include matters such as aspects of the UK constitution, Brexit and even foreign affairs though these might not formally come under the Parliamentżs remit.
The course will focus on the roles and functions of Members: the implications of having constituency and regional list Members; Members of different parties and party work; constituency work; committee and chamber work; and both local and other campaigns. As well as understanding these functions, it will be important to understand the institutional landscape of Scottish politics and decision-making processes including the relationship between MSPs and Scottish Government, local government, other public, private and voluntary bodies. The powers and responsibilities of the Scottish Parliament and current issues that are likely to be addressed by Parliamentarians will be discussed. An indicative list of subjects covered (subject to change reflecting the evolution of the politics of devolution) include:
- Members of the Scottish Parliament: who are they? What do they do?
- Policy-Making: Interest Groups, Access and Lobbying
- Delivering services
- Scotland's "wicked problems"
- Public Service Reform

The aim is to equip students with analytical and methodological skills in public policy analysis that will be relevant to completing projects, writing briefs and undertaking research while working in the office of a Member of the Scottish Parliament. It will marry academic studies with practical examples drawing on concerns and issue dealt with by MSPs.

Scottish Parliamentary Internship

Following the completion of course work, students will be assigned to a Member of Scottish Parliament (MSP). A research project (on a topic agreed between intern and MSP, and approved by the Director of Studies) will be undertaken.

Recent research projects by parliamentary interns have included a wide range of subject matters and topics, including:

  • ‘Why does Scotland have no plumbers?!?’ An Investigation into Scotland’s Skills Shortage
  • Beyond the Numbers: Female Representation in the Scottish Parliament
  • Business and Educational Achievements by the Scottish Executive and their Communication
  • Class Size isn’t Everything: A Study of Class Size Reduction Policy in Scotland
  • Comparative Analysis between American and Scottish Election Campaigns
  • Controlling Firearms in Scotland
  • The Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 and its Effects on the Criminal Courts
  • Suicide in Scotland: The Need for a Hotline
  • A Study of Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) in Scotland
  • Connecting with young People: Labour Approaches to Democratic Engagement through the Scottish Parliament
  • Comprehensive View of Higher Education: Scotland
  • What’s the Scottish Parliament ever done for me? A Study on the Awareness of Scottish Parliament Policy Amongst Older People

Interns will be provided with study space in the new Parliament building while continuing to have a permanent academic base and office facilities in the University’s Institute of Governance, whose members will support interns in their research. Interns will carry out responsible work, and will contribute meaningfully to the development of Scottish political life.

The Internship phase of the program comprises a two-week transition, in which coursework is completed and preparations for residency at the Parliament are finalized; and an eight-week period in which the Interns, at their new base at the Parliament, focus upon their research project, returning to the University, one day a week, for a compulsory session organized by the Institute.

Assessment for the internship takes three forms: course requirements, a report and journal. The academic course work will count 40% towards the final mark; the report and journal will make up the other 60%.

Government and Politics in the United Kingdom

This course provides an overview of the government and politics of the United Kingdom. It examines the development of the UK state, the impact of constitutional reform and European integration, the nature of the British party system and ideological change, the electoral system and its consequences. It is intended to give students an insight into key features of the British political system, to provide insight into the relative strength and positions occupied by the main parties, and to provide an understanding of the continuing relevance of the UK politics for Scotland.

Scottish Politics

This offers an historical overview of the origins and development of modern Scottish politics and government. It considers the government structures, political decisionmaking and party politics in Scotland. These will be discussed in the context of debates, conceptualizations and theories of political science. ii. The course will provide necessary backdrop for an internship in the Scottish Parliament. Discussion will include a strong practical element aimed to furnish students with competing understandings of Scottish politics and government.

Public Policy in Scotland

The course sets out to prepare students for working with MSPs. MSPs perform various roles and functions and different MSPs interpret these roles differently. A day in the life of any MSP is likely to be very varied and subjects requiring attention can change rapidly but most MSPs attempt to specialize to some extent whether in a particular area (especially so for constituency Members) and/or subject matter(s). The subjects covered by MSPs usually reflect the powers and responsibilities of the Scottish Parliament including the business and the economy, environment, law and order, public safety, health, education, social services, arts and culture, housing, urban and rural affairs but will also include matters such as aspects of the UK constitution, Brexit and even foreign affairs though these might not formally come under the Parliamentżs remit.
The course will focus on the roles and functions of Members: the implications of having constituency and regional list Members; Members of different parties and party work; constituency work; committee and chamber work; and both local and other campaigns. As well as understanding these functions, it will be important to understand the institutional landscape of Scottish politics and decision-making processes including the relationship between MSPs and Scottish Government, local government, other public, private and voluntary bodies. The powers and responsibilities of the Scottish Parliament and current issues that are likely to be addressed by Parliamentarians will be discussed. An indicative list of subjects covered (subject to change reflecting the evolution of the politics of devolution) include:
- Members of the Scottish Parliament: who are they? What do they do?
- Policy-Making: Interest Groups, Access and Lobbying
- Delivering services
- Scotland's "wicked problems"
- Public Service Reform

The aim is to equip students with analytical and methodological skills in public policy analysis that will be relevant to completing projects, writing briefs and undertaking research while working in the office of a Member of the Scottish Parliament. It will marry academic studies with practical examples drawing on concerns and issue dealt with by MSPs.

Scottish Parliamentary Internship

Following the completion of course work, students will be assigned to a Member of Scottish Parliament (MSP). A research project (on a topic agreed between intern and MSP, and approved by the Director of Studies) will be undertaken.

Recent research projects by parliamentary interns have included a wide range of subject matters and topics, including:

  • ‘Why does Scotland have no plumbers?!?’ An Investigation into Scotland’s Skills Shortage
  • Beyond the Numbers: Female Representation in the Scottish Parliament
  • Business and Educational Achievements by the Scottish Executive and their Communication
  • Class Size isn’t Everything: A Study of Class Size Reduction Policy in Scotland
  • Comparative Analysis between American and Scottish Election Campaigns
  • Controlling Firearms in Scotland
  • The Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 and its Effects on the Criminal Courts
  • Suicide in Scotland: The Need for a Hotline
  • A Study of Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) in Scotland
  • Connecting with young People: Labour Approaches to Democratic Engagement through the Scottish Parliament
  • Comprehensive View of Higher Education: Scotland
  • What’s the Scottish Parliament ever done for me? A Study on the Awareness of Scottish Parliament Policy Amongst Older People

Interns will be provided with study space in the new Parliament building while continuing to have a permanent academic base and office facilities in the University’s Institute of Governance, whose members will support interns in their research. Interns will carry out responsible work, and will contribute meaningfully to the development of Scottish political life.

The Internship phase of the program comprises a two-week transition, in which coursework is completed and preparations for residency at the Parliament are finalized; and an eight-week period in which the Interns, at their new base at the Parliament, focus upon their research project, returning to the University, one day a week, for a compulsory session organized by the Institute.

Assessment for the internship takes three forms: course requirements, a report and journal. The academic course work will count 40% towards the final mark; the report and journal will make up the other 60%.

Highlights
  • Work alongside members of the Scottish Parliament!
  • Ranked #6 in the U.K. (#27 in world) - Times Higher Education Rankings
  • Ranked #21 in Philosophy, #22 in Earth Sciences, top 50 in Psychology - QS World Rankings
  • Largest history department in the U.K.
  • Top-rated Philosophy, Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience in Scotland
  • Top-rated Music programs in the U.K.
  • One of the oldest universities in the U.K. (1583)
  • Founding member of elite Russel Group of universities

Faculty

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    Kelsey Patton

    Kelsey Patton will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - kelsey.patton@apiabroad.com

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    Alexis Webster

    Alexis Webster will be your Resident Coordinator and a resource for you on-site.

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Edinburgh programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Isle of Skye and Loch Ness

    Steeped in history and legend, the Highlands of Scotland is one of the last pristine regions of Europe. This is a land of high mountains, breathtaking islands, spectacular glens and deep, mysterious lochs. There is nature and wildlife to enjoy, imposing castles to explore and tales of folklore, heroes, and legends to savor. You will find beautiful sites such as Glencoe with its Three Sisters, a trio of iconic stunning mountains. Also, there is Glenfinnan, home to the Glenfinnan Viaduct – most famous for its appearance in Harry Potter as the bridge that the Hogwarts Express crosses. And of course, last but not least, Loch Ness – home to the Loch Ness monster. People have claimed to have spotted the infamous monster for hundreds of years but you can make up your own mind!

    Sitting off Scotland’s west coast is the Isle of Skye. With a fairytale-like atmosphere, the imposing Cuilins (pronounced koo-lin) dominate the southern end of the island with the Fairy Pools, which are said to give eternal beauty to whoever bathes in them, sitting at their foot. The Fairy Glen is like many of Scotland’s great geographical features in miniature and is said to be the entrance to the ancient fairy kingdom. There are small fishing towns and stunning geographical features and formations to discover on this island. We challenge you to not be amazed!

  • Loch Lomand and the Trossachs National Park

    Loch Lomond is the largest freshwater lake in the UK and Scotland’s second most famous loch after Loch Ness. You may be familiar with the loch from the song “Loch Lomond”. The loch certainly lives up to the description it is given in the song – that is as having “bonnie, bonnie banks” (bonnie is a Scottish word for pretty!). At the south end the landscape surrounding the loch is fairly flat but as it reaches the north banks the landscape becomes more mountainous and imposing, meeting with Scotland’s Highlands. There are various viewing points and charming little villages surrounding the loch. Part of the West Highland Way, a 96-mile walk undertaken by many visitors to Scotland, which goes from just outside Glasgow up to Fort William runs by the banks of the river.

  • Saint Andrews

    Saint Andrews is a stunning medieval city and home to the oldest university in Scotland where Prince William and Kate Middleton studied and met. It is also, of course, the home of golf. There are several golf courses in the town including the world famous Old Course and the town also has its own Golf Museum – great for those of us maybe not keen to play but who want to find out more about this famous sport! On top of all this is a stunning medieval cathedral and a beautiful ruined castle, which both played an important part in the reformation here in Scotland, surrounded by beautiful blue flag beaches!

  • Stirling

    Stirling is the ancient capital of Scotland, laying at the heart of the nation’s history and linked to two of its best-known heroes, William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. Occupying a strategic position in the cultural heartland of Scotland, it is surrounded by glorious countryside and yet under an hour away from both Edinburgh and Glasgow. The cobblestoned streets of the Old Town wind upwards towards the Castle, set on a craggy outcrop 250 feet above the surrounding landscape. Past activities have included, Stirling Castle or the Wallace Monument.

  • Stirling

    Stirling is the ancient capital of Scotland, laying at the heart of the nation’s history and linked to two of its best-known heroes, William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. Occupying a strategic position in the cultural heartland of Scotland, it is surrounded by glorious countryside and yet under an hour away from both Edinburgh and Glasgow. The cobblestoned streets of the Old Town wind upwards towards the Castle, set on a craggy outcrop 250 feet above the surrounding landscape. Past activities have included, Stirling Castle or the Wallace Monument.

  • Glasgow

    Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and is home to an outstanding variety of museums, galleries and performance venues. Once the 2nd city of the British Empire and a major center of trade with the USA, Glasgow now wears its Victorian splendor with pride. Everything from impressionistic paintings to medieval armor is on display at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Other attractions are the Gallery of Modern Art, the social history museum Peoples Palace, Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis, the bustling Merchant City, and the Provands Lordship.

  • Hadrian's Wall and the Borders

    Having conquered most of what is modern day England, the Romans decided that the Scots were simply too ferocious to do battle with. They retreated south and built the infamous Hadrian’s Wall – which runs close to the modern day England-Scotland border. Nowadays sections of the wall still remain intact, as do the ruins of many of the forts the Romans built along the wall’s length to defend themselves. An amazing opportunity to step back in time and imagine life in Roman Britain!

    Students will also have a chance to explore the Scottish Borders, a region covering about eighteen hundred square miles. Rolling hills and moorland and lush agricultural plains characterize this sedate and peaceful part of the country. It is home to several beautiful ruined abbeys and imposing stately homes.

  • Oban and Isles of Mull and Iona

    Although perhaps not as famous as some of Scotland’s Inner Hebrides which include Mull & Iona are not to be missed. Mull is the largest of these islands and features a variety of landscapes including the rolling hills of Glen More and stunning bays visible from the arrival on the ferry. And of course, what would a Scottish island be without a few castles thrown in for good measure as well?

    Iona lies to the southwest of Mull. With a population not even hitting triple figures, it might not seem like much but the island is of great importance to the history of Christianity and is thought to be the birthplace of the religion on the British mainland. The island is surrounded by crystal blue water and covered in lush green grass. It is an ideal peaceful and tranquil getaway from the hustle and bustle of Scotland’s mainland.

    All this is accessible from the idyllic coastal town of Oban – a seafood lover's paradise and home to unique local wildlife. Students are bound to fall in love with this part of Scotland!

API Parliamentary program students are housed within Robertsons Close flats. With 210 single and a couple of twinned study bedrooms, typically in 4-6 roomed flats each sharing kitchen and bathroom facilities, Robertson’s Close is ideally situated in the heart of the city’s vibrant Cowgate area, with a range of entertainment venues and cultural attractions within easy walking distance. It’s also ideally suited for access to the University’s central area and to the fantastic Centre for Sport and Exercise.

Robertson Close Kitchen
Robertson Close External
Robertson Close Common Area
Robertson Close Bedroom
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Fall Sep 6, 2019 - Dec 19, 2019 $20,600 May 1, 2019 Jun 1, 2019
Spring Jan, 2020 - Apr, 2020 $20,600 Oct 15, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Spring Jan 9, 2019 - Apr 27, 2019 $20,600 Oct 15, 2018 Nov 1, 2018