Scotland Stirling Castle Emblem 184010993

Students who choose to study abroad in Stirling with API will choose from summer modules/classes offered over two four-week blocks. Each module consists of in-class and excursion components, giving students the opportunity to enjoy university teaching both in and out of the classroom. Modules are assessed by a combination of exam, essay, presentation, and fieldwork.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Housing

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 3.0 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors & seniors
  • Completed API Application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport and supporting documents (Tier 4 visa required if participating in an internship)

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-6 credits per session (up to 12 total)

Students who choose to study abroad in Stirling with API will choose from summer modules/classes offered over two four-week blocks. Each module consists of in-class and excursion components, giving students the opportunity to enjoy university teaching both in and out of the classroom. Modules are assessed by a combination of exam, essay, presentation, and fieldwork.

There is an internship option available in the 2nd summer session. Students who are interested in this option must also participate in the summer 1 session, and are strongly encouraged to apply early, as placements fill quickly.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive their transcripts from the University of Stirling upon completion of their program.

Courses

COURSE OFFERINGS

The summer modules/classes are offered over two four-week blocks. Each module consists of in-class and excursion components, giving students the opportunity to enjoy university teaching both in and out of the classroom. Modules are assessed by a combination of an exam, essay, presentation, and fieldwork. Courses at the University of Stirling are assigned credit based on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF). Each Stirling module earns 10 SCQF credits or approximately 3 U.S. credits. Students are thus able to earn 6 U.S. credits (during a four-week block) or 9 to 12 U.S. credits (during an eight-week block).

Examples of the course syllabi are available from the API Scotland program manager upon request.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Summer students at the University of Stirling can earn 3 credits per course for a total of 3-12 U.S. semester credits over a four-eight week period.

Brief Encounters: An Introduction to Writing Short Stories ISS9BE

This module has been designed to help students realize their creative potential by producing original and stimulating short fiction. Teaching will consist of specialist workshops conducted by an expert in the field. In addition to engaging with practical aspects of craft and technique, students will learn how to create believable, compelling characters and how to make them live (and die!) on the page. They will also have the opportunity to visit sites of historic importance and natural beauty to inspire their writing.

Excursion(s): The course will culminate in a live ‘reading’ at a leading local arts center when students will have the chance to share the stage with a prominent Scottish writer.

Education and Learning: A Scottish Perspective ISS9EL

In this module, students explore the purposes of education and how this translates into the UK education system, and the wider issues of learner identities, some of which are unique to the UK. What are the implications of social class? Does school uniform impact on learning? How is behavior management constructed and why? What impact might regional languages and culture, ethnicity or sexuality have? This module will also normally include interaction with pupils. This module normally will include a visit to a local school to observe the Scottish education system in action. In addition, an excursion to the Scotland Street Museum in Glasgow will also be included. This is not only a famous Charles Rennie Macintosh building which was a functioning school until 1979 but is now a museum about education in Scotland.

Marketing and Branding Scotland ISS9BS

This module introduces the importance of culture in marketing operations with specific reference to Scotland. Framed within a review of Scotland’s economic and cultural history from both a Scottish and global perspective, it examines the relevance of national identity and country-of-origin effect (also known as nation branding) in the creation of brand value. Contemporary case studies within food and drink production and the cultural industries will be used to illustrate core course concepts. Special attention will be given to the internationalization process of small- and medium-sized enterprises, citing Scottish examples. A multi-disciplinary approach makes this course accessible and interesting to students with a limited marketing background but also useful and informative to business and marketing students who wish to develop their knowledge in this niche area. The instructor will lead an excursion to either a Scottish beverage maker/food producer or Scotland’s national tourism agency.

Photographing the Urban ISS9PU

This art history module draws inspiration from Scottish historical architecture and explores the representation of the built environment through various artistic genres including painting, media, optics, and photography. Underpinning the module is an acquisition of skills in fine art digital photography. Students will research and create their own photographic portfolios based on class assignments and lecture material about the history of photography. During the course, students will have the opportunity to develop skills and new knowledge in the following areas: fine art digital photography; principles of photo documentation; location photography; and image editing. This module includes a one-day excursion to relevant local sites and a 19th-century Scottish mansion, complementing what is learned in the classroom. Note: digital camera required.

Religion and Conflict ISS9RC

Everywhere we look today, from our television screens to the streets of our cities, we see conflict in the name of religion. Some at a verbal level, some at a military level, some at a catastrophic level. Why does it appear that religion and conflict seem to go hand in hand? This course will explore the nature of this supposed relationship, first by looking at what actually constitutes ‘conflict’ (is it the same as ‘violence’, for example?), second, by looking at whether such conflict is actually inherent in what we perceive as ‘religion’ today, and third, by looking at the role the media plays in defining these terms and their relationship for us. Finally, this module broadens its perspective to focus on what global lessons can be learned from Europe. The course gives a more critical perspective on what we see happening around us in the name of religion, and to understand why some religions struggle more than others with the nature of conflict. Students will visit the St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art, in Glasgow.

Rethinking the City

This course provides a general introduction to the design of cities, and how they can be organized and improved, with a particular focus on Scottish New Town design. The course considers, for instance, how the role of social and urban planning of Scottish New Town developments has contributed to our thinking about what makes a livable city. Students will also consider the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (2015) and explore the rights of each person to health, education, shelter, and security and how similar goals informed Scottish town planning. The course has been structured to draw students into conversations on key questions and to provide opportunities to students to use design-thinking to explore how urban centers are designed, and ways in which students might improve them. Students will research and create their own urban plan to identify and evaluate real city examples based on a class excursion, in-class assignments and reading material. Over the duration of the course, students will also be able to develop an understanding of basic concepts of livable city design and will have the opportunity to apply research and critical thinking, photographic skills and social media in their assignments.

Royals and Rascals: Contemporary Studies in British Journalism ISS9JO

For centuries, Britain’s kings and queens have had a powerful impact on society and on its institutions. Following the rise of celebrity culture, members of the British Royal family and other public figures have used their influence and financial muscle to push back journalists in order to reclaim their privacy. This module is aimed at journalism students and others interested in the media and its relationship with public figures, including Britain’s royals, who want to explore fundamental ethical principles and press freedom issues from the vantage point of some of the world’s most fascinating news stories. These cases range from Princess Diana’s death, for which the Paparazzi were blamed, to Prince Harry’s more recent indiscretions, which played out in the digital media.

Excursion (s): Balmoral Castle and a visit to a Scottish newsroom (eg. BBC).

Scotland the What? Contemporary Scottish Literature & Identity ISS9SC

This course examines the literary and political currents shaping contemporary Scottish identity, introducing students to key twentieth- and twenty-first-century texts. The course encounters and explains a range of cultural debates concerning language, class, democracy, and nationhood in Scottish writing.

With attention focused on the question of independence, recent debates concerning Scottish culture and identity gain a heightened political charge. Literature has not only reflected but actively shaped such debate. What role has writing played in political change, and to what extent has Scottish culture escaped its own stereotypes?

Excursion: There will be an excursion to Edinburgh, including a visit to the Scottish Parliament building and Scottish Writers Museum

Scotland on the Screen ISS9SS

This module explores images of Scotland in film and television in the context of historically recurrent Scottish cultural themes, with sideways references to literature and Scottish history, and an introductory approach to the topic of representation. The themes of the module are Scotland in Hollywood: Brigadoon to Braveheart (Scotland on the American screen); Urban Scotland: Culture and Crime; Filmmaking in Scotland: the Importance of Shorts; and the Politics of Representation: Contemporary Scotland in Cinema and Television. This module will include a visit to a celebrated screen location in Central Scotland. In the past, this has been a trip to the Edinburgh International Film Festival, one of the world’s oldest and most established film festivals.

Crime and Justice in Scotland: The Criminal in Scottish Society ISS9CJ

This module is designed to introduce students to the subject of criminology through the lens of the Scottish Criminal Justice System. The module begins with an overview of the Scottish Criminal Justice System before examining the major avenues by which the public obtain information about crime – as victims of crime and from the media and official statistics. The module examines the processes that have developed our definitions of crime and the broader social and political context within which this crime occurs. This module includes a visit to HM Prison Glenochil, an adult male prison near Stirling.

Green Politics: Theory & Practice ISS9GP

This introductory module provides students with an understanding of environmental issues and the characteristic features in environmental problem solving; illustrate the multitude of concepts, ideologies, actors and political settings involved in environmental politics; make you aware of the shared as well as setting-specific dilemmas in environmental politics and policy; evaluate the link between environmental policy intentions and reality. Key areas this module will focus on including political parties, EU / US environmental relations, green consumerism and environmental protest campaigns. This module includes a day visit to Whitelee wind farm in Glasgow, Europe’s largest onshore wind farm.

International Relations ISS9IR

This module explores contemporary issues and debates that shape world politics today. It starts by introducing International Relations (IR) theory before turning to two broad themes that dominate IR: conflict and peace. Key issues covered include nuclear weapons, private military companies, humanitarian intervention and failed states. Students will also apply the themes of conflict and peace to a case study of the Northern Ireland conflict exploring the key political developments and the transition to a post-conflict settlement. This module will also include a workshop that examines the use of wall murals to articulate conflict / post-conflict identity. This module includes a day trip visit to Belfast where students will undertake a historical/political tour of the city taking in the wall murals and other key sites linked to the Northern Ireland conflict. Students taking this module may incur a small additional charge for the trip to Belfast.

Internship for International Summer School ISS9IN

This exciting opportunity, run in partnership with the Career Development Centre at the University of Stirling, will give students opportunities to carry out four-week internships in a number of sectors in the Stirling area. These sectors may include sports, environmental science, politics, charity / non-profit and marketing, though this list is subject to change. Through this internship, students will develop an understanding of the UK labor market and the specific sector of their internship; develop their team working skills, and develop their written and oral communication skills. Students can expect to spend approximately 140 hours in their internship placement and an additional 10 hours on associated classroom sessions, review days, writing reflective journals, and online tutorials run by the Career Development Centre. Assessment will take the form of a presentation given about your internship, completion of your journals, and submission of a project report.

Important note: Students taking this module must enroll full time in ISS Block 1 (and take two modules). Students may also be required to obtain an appropriate UK visa, such as a Tier 4 visa, the cost of which will be additional. Please also note the earlier application deadline.

For testimonials of past internship participants, click here.

*APPLICATION DEADLINE if applying for ISS9IN Internship for International Summer School: March 15.

(Additional application materials will be sent to applicants for the internship.)

Monsters and Vampires: The Impact of British Gothic on Contemporary Popular Culture ISS9MV

Focusing on key texts from the nineteenth century, this course aims to explore the ways in which Gothic tropes established during this period recur throughout contemporary popular culture. Students will discuss the representation of monsters and vampires as they appear in the British nineteenth-century Gothic texts Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights and Dracula and their influence on popular narratives such as those found in fiction, film, tv and music video. Assessment will be through presentation and essay. This course will also include a tour around The Edinburgh Dungeon and a visit to the Gothic theme bar The Jekyll & Hyde. On this excursion, the class will explore ideas of Gothic tourism, Gothic marketing, and end of Gothic.

Sculpting Art

This course provides a general introduction to contemporary art history, with examples and inspiration drawn from the University of Stirling’s public art and sculpture collections. The course is specially designed for students to explore sculptural representation from figurative artworks at the end of the 20th century to the commencement of Modernism and its relationship to new technologies and different forms of art representation. To complement an understanding of this transformational period in art history, the course has also been designed to provide students with a practical approach. In particular, students will be provided with an opportunity to gain knowledge of basic sculptural construction and critique methods. Students will undertake research and create their own art portfolios based on the class excursion, lecture material, and assignments. Portfolio assignments will include the creation of sculptural drawings and/or small models (maquettes) to support student learning of basic sculptural design and concepts.

Scottish History: The Jacobites ISS9TJ

The focus of enduring romanticism and myth, the Jacobites remain an intriguing subject. Themes for this module include royalism, covering the Stewart monarchy in general and James VII in particular; multiple monarchies, looking at relations between Scotland, England, and Ireland; Highlands and Lowlands; the wider European context of Jacobitism; early modern warfare; and spying and espionage. You will be given the opportunity to make use of the University’s own collection of Jacobite material, the Amulree Collection, and to use images and manuscripts which offer an intriguing insight into the world of the Jacobites. This module will include a field trip to Killiecrankie, a key site during the first Jacobite rebellion of 1689 in support of King James VII, and to nearby Sherrifmuir, the site of the famous battle of 1715.

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland ISS9WS

Between 1563 and 1736, during years of political and religious turmoil, around 4,000 people were accused of witchcraft in Scotland. This module will examine this significant aspect of Scottish history, looking at the phenomenon of witchcraft belief as part of the early-modern culture, as well as its prosecution. Other themes that will be covered include religion, popular culture, law and order, illness and death, community tensions and gender issues. Students will also consider the continuity and development of ideas about magic and witchcraft. This module will visit the village of Dunning, Maggie Wall’s monument near Dunning, Robert Kirk’s burial site and the Fairy Tree at Aberfoyle, all sites related to early modern witchcraft in Scotland.

Junkies and Jezebels: Scotland and Gender

Recent advances in feminist and LGBT+ liberation movements have had a visible and global impact on culture, literature, politics, and commerce. This module examines gender and sexuality in a Scottish context. As binary understandings of gender and sexuality are increasingly shown to be outdated and outmoded, developments in our understanding of gender and sexuality are making headlines and becoming a regular part of our daily discourse in both our social and working lives. This course enables students to apply their knowledge of identity politics to a dynamic range of relevant texts.

The texts in this module examine the decline of the traditional, industrialist, ‘hard man’ masculinities in Scotland. Through an exploration of dynamic, contemporary and highly acclaimed texts, this course examines broken masculinities, resistant femininities, and resurgent Scottish LGBT+ fictions. A select range of relevant secondary sources will accompany this exploration of primary literature, introducing students to iconic theorists, as well as relevant contemporary critics examining Scottish literature from a gendered perspective.

There will be optional opportunities to submit creative work as an alternative to an essay assignment, enabling students to demonstrate an understanding of the stylistic and thematic aspects of the course as creative practitioners.

Brief Encounters: An Introduction to Writing Short Stories ISS9BE

This module has been designed to help students realize their creative potential by producing original and stimulating short fiction. Teaching will consist of specialist workshops conducted by an expert in the field. In addition to engaging with practical aspects of craft and technique, students will learn how to create believable, compelling characters and how to make them live (and die!) on the page. They will also have the opportunity to visit sites of historic importance and natural beauty to inspire their writing.

Excursion(s): The course will culminate in a live ‘reading’ at a leading local arts center when students will have the chance to share the stage with a prominent Scottish writer.

Education and Learning: A Scottish Perspective ISS9EL

In this module, students explore the purposes of education and how this translates into the UK education system, and the wider issues of learner identities, some of which are unique to the UK. What are the implications of social class? Does school uniform impact on learning? How is behavior management constructed and why? What impact might regional languages and culture, ethnicity or sexuality have? This module will also normally include interaction with pupils. This module normally will include a visit to a local school to observe the Scottish education system in action. In addition, an excursion to the Scotland Street Museum in Glasgow will also be included. This is not only a famous Charles Rennie Macintosh building which was a functioning school until 1979 but is now a museum about education in Scotland.

Marketing and Branding Scotland ISS9BS

This module introduces the importance of culture in marketing operations with specific reference to Scotland. Framed within a review of Scotland’s economic and cultural history from both a Scottish and global perspective, it examines the relevance of national identity and country-of-origin effect (also known as nation branding) in the creation of brand value. Contemporary case studies within food and drink production and the cultural industries will be used to illustrate core course concepts. Special attention will be given to the internationalization process of small- and medium-sized enterprises, citing Scottish examples. A multi-disciplinary approach makes this course accessible and interesting to students with a limited marketing background but also useful and informative to business and marketing students who wish to develop their knowledge in this niche area. The instructor will lead an excursion to either a Scottish beverage maker/food producer or Scotland’s national tourism agency.

Photographing the Urban ISS9PU

This art history module draws inspiration from Scottish historical architecture and explores the representation of the built environment through various artistic genres including painting, media, optics, and photography. Underpinning the module is an acquisition of skills in fine art digital photography. Students will research and create their own photographic portfolios based on class assignments and lecture material about the history of photography. During the course, students will have the opportunity to develop skills and new knowledge in the following areas: fine art digital photography; principles of photo documentation; location photography; and image editing. This module includes a one-day excursion to relevant local sites and a 19th-century Scottish mansion, complementing what is learned in the classroom. Note: digital camera required.

Religion and Conflict ISS9RC

Everywhere we look today, from our television screens to the streets of our cities, we see conflict in the name of religion. Some at a verbal level, some at a military level, some at a catastrophic level. Why does it appear that religion and conflict seem to go hand in hand? This course will explore the nature of this supposed relationship, first by looking at what actually constitutes ‘conflict’ (is it the same as ‘violence’, for example?), second, by looking at whether such conflict is actually inherent in what we perceive as ‘religion’ today, and third, by looking at the role the media plays in defining these terms and their relationship for us. Finally, this module broadens its perspective to focus on what global lessons can be learned from Europe. The course gives a more critical perspective on what we see happening around us in the name of religion, and to understand why some religions struggle more than others with the nature of conflict. Students will visit the St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art, in Glasgow.

Rethinking the City

This course provides a general introduction to the design of cities, and how they can be organized and improved, with a particular focus on Scottish New Town design. The course considers, for instance, how the role of social and urban planning of Scottish New Town developments has contributed to our thinking about what makes a livable city. Students will also consider the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (2015) and explore the rights of each person to health, education, shelter, and security and how similar goals informed Scottish town planning. The course has been structured to draw students into conversations on key questions and to provide opportunities to students to use design-thinking to explore how urban centers are designed, and ways in which students might improve them. Students will research and create their own urban plan to identify and evaluate real city examples based on a class excursion, in-class assignments and reading material. Over the duration of the course, students will also be able to develop an understanding of basic concepts of livable city design and will have the opportunity to apply research and critical thinking, photographic skills and social media in their assignments.

Royals and Rascals: Contemporary Studies in British Journalism ISS9JO

For centuries, Britain’s kings and queens have had a powerful impact on society and on its institutions. Following the rise of celebrity culture, members of the British Royal family and other public figures have used their influence and financial muscle to push back journalists in order to reclaim their privacy. This module is aimed at journalism students and others interested in the media and its relationship with public figures, including Britain’s royals, who want to explore fundamental ethical principles and press freedom issues from the vantage point of some of the world’s most fascinating news stories. These cases range from Princess Diana’s death, for which the Paparazzi were blamed, to Prince Harry’s more recent indiscretions, which played out in the digital media.

Excursion (s): Balmoral Castle and a visit to a Scottish newsroom (eg. BBC).

Scotland the What? Contemporary Scottish Literature & Identity ISS9SC

This course examines the literary and political currents shaping contemporary Scottish identity, introducing students to key twentieth- and twenty-first-century texts. The course encounters and explains a range of cultural debates concerning language, class, democracy, and nationhood in Scottish writing.

With attention focused on the question of independence, recent debates concerning Scottish culture and identity gain a heightened political charge. Literature has not only reflected but actively shaped such debate. What role has writing played in political change, and to what extent has Scottish culture escaped its own stereotypes?

Excursion: There will be an excursion to Edinburgh, including a visit to the Scottish Parliament building and Scottish Writers Museum

Scotland on the Screen ISS9SS

This module explores images of Scotland in film and television in the context of historically recurrent Scottish cultural themes, with sideways references to literature and Scottish history, and an introductory approach to the topic of representation. The themes of the module are Scotland in Hollywood: Brigadoon to Braveheart (Scotland on the American screen); Urban Scotland: Culture and Crime; Filmmaking in Scotland: the Importance of Shorts; and the Politics of Representation: Contemporary Scotland in Cinema and Television. This module will include a visit to a celebrated screen location in Central Scotland. In the past, this has been a trip to the Edinburgh International Film Festival, one of the world’s oldest and most established film festivals.

Crime and Justice in Scotland: The Criminal in Scottish Society ISS9CJ

This module is designed to introduce students to the subject of criminology through the lens of the Scottish Criminal Justice System. The module begins with an overview of the Scottish Criminal Justice System before examining the major avenues by which the public obtain information about crime – as victims of crime and from the media and official statistics. The module examines the processes that have developed our definitions of crime and the broader social and political context within which this crime occurs. This module includes a visit to HM Prison Glenochil, an adult male prison near Stirling.

Green Politics: Theory & Practice ISS9GP

This introductory module provides students with an understanding of environmental issues and the characteristic features in environmental problem solving; illustrate the multitude of concepts, ideologies, actors and political settings involved in environmental politics; make you aware of the shared as well as setting-specific dilemmas in environmental politics and policy; evaluate the link between environmental policy intentions and reality. Key areas this module will focus on including political parties, EU / US environmental relations, green consumerism and environmental protest campaigns. This module includes a day visit to Whitelee wind farm in Glasgow, Europe’s largest onshore wind farm.

International Relations ISS9IR

This module explores contemporary issues and debates that shape world politics today. It starts by introducing International Relations (IR) theory before turning to two broad themes that dominate IR: conflict and peace. Key issues covered include nuclear weapons, private military companies, humanitarian intervention and failed states. Students will also apply the themes of conflict and peace to a case study of the Northern Ireland conflict exploring the key political developments and the transition to a post-conflict settlement. This module will also include a workshop that examines the use of wall murals to articulate conflict / post-conflict identity. This module includes a day trip visit to Belfast where students will undertake a historical/political tour of the city taking in the wall murals and other key sites linked to the Northern Ireland conflict. Students taking this module may incur a small additional charge for the trip to Belfast.

Internship for International Summer School ISS9IN

This exciting opportunity, run in partnership with the Career Development Centre at the University of Stirling, will give students opportunities to carry out four-week internships in a number of sectors in the Stirling area. These sectors may include sports, environmental science, politics, charity / non-profit and marketing, though this list is subject to change. Through this internship, students will develop an understanding of the UK labor market and the specific sector of their internship; develop their team working skills, and develop their written and oral communication skills. Students can expect to spend approximately 140 hours in their internship placement and an additional 10 hours on associated classroom sessions, review days, writing reflective journals, and online tutorials run by the Career Development Centre. Assessment will take the form of a presentation given about your internship, completion of your journals, and submission of a project report.

Important note: Students taking this module must enroll full time in ISS Block 1 (and take two modules). Students may also be required to obtain an appropriate UK visa, such as a Tier 4 visa, the cost of which will be additional. Please also note the earlier application deadline.

For testimonials of past internship participants, click here.

*APPLICATION DEADLINE if applying for ISS9IN Internship for International Summer School: March 15.

(Additional application materials will be sent to applicants for the internship.)

Monsters and Vampires: The Impact of British Gothic on Contemporary Popular Culture ISS9MV

Focusing on key texts from the nineteenth century, this course aims to explore the ways in which Gothic tropes established during this period recur throughout contemporary popular culture. Students will discuss the representation of monsters and vampires as they appear in the British nineteenth-century Gothic texts Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights and Dracula and their influence on popular narratives such as those found in fiction, film, tv and music video. Assessment will be through presentation and essay. This course will also include a tour around The Edinburgh Dungeon and a visit to the Gothic theme bar The Jekyll & Hyde. On this excursion, the class will explore ideas of Gothic tourism, Gothic marketing, and end of Gothic.

Sculpting Art

This course provides a general introduction to contemporary art history, with examples and inspiration drawn from the University of Stirling’s public art and sculpture collections. The course is specially designed for students to explore sculptural representation from figurative artworks at the end of the 20th century to the commencement of Modernism and its relationship to new technologies and different forms of art representation. To complement an understanding of this transformational period in art history, the course has also been designed to provide students with a practical approach. In particular, students will be provided with an opportunity to gain knowledge of basic sculptural construction and critique methods. Students will undertake research and create their own art portfolios based on the class excursion, lecture material, and assignments. Portfolio assignments will include the creation of sculptural drawings and/or small models (maquettes) to support student learning of basic sculptural design and concepts.

Scottish History: The Jacobites ISS9TJ

The focus of enduring romanticism and myth, the Jacobites remain an intriguing subject. Themes for this module include royalism, covering the Stewart monarchy in general and James VII in particular; multiple monarchies, looking at relations between Scotland, England, and Ireland; Highlands and Lowlands; the wider European context of Jacobitism; early modern warfare; and spying and espionage. You will be given the opportunity to make use of the University’s own collection of Jacobite material, the Amulree Collection, and to use images and manuscripts which offer an intriguing insight into the world of the Jacobites. This module will include a field trip to Killiecrankie, a key site during the first Jacobite rebellion of 1689 in support of King James VII, and to nearby Sherrifmuir, the site of the famous battle of 1715.

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland ISS9WS

Between 1563 and 1736, during years of political and religious turmoil, around 4,000 people were accused of witchcraft in Scotland. This module will examine this significant aspect of Scottish history, looking at the phenomenon of witchcraft belief as part of the early-modern culture, as well as its prosecution. Other themes that will be covered include religion, popular culture, law and order, illness and death, community tensions and gender issues. Students will also consider the continuity and development of ideas about magic and witchcraft. This module will visit the village of Dunning, Maggie Wall’s monument near Dunning, Robert Kirk’s burial site and the Fairy Tree at Aberfoyle, all sites related to early modern witchcraft in Scotland.

Junkies and Jezebels: Scotland and Gender

Recent advances in feminist and LGBT+ liberation movements have had a visible and global impact on culture, literature, politics, and commerce. This module examines gender and sexuality in a Scottish context. As binary understandings of gender and sexuality are increasingly shown to be outdated and outmoded, developments in our understanding of gender and sexuality are making headlines and becoming a regular part of our daily discourse in both our social and working lives. This course enables students to apply their knowledge of identity politics to a dynamic range of relevant texts.

The texts in this module examine the decline of the traditional, industrialist, ‘hard man’ masculinities in Scotland. Through an exploration of dynamic, contemporary and highly acclaimed texts, this course examines broken masculinities, resistant femininities, and resurgent Scottish LGBT+ fictions. A select range of relevant secondary sources will accompany this exploration of primary literature, introducing students to iconic theorists, as well as relevant contemporary critics examining Scottish literature from a gendered perspective.

There will be optional opportunities to submit creative work as an alternative to an essay assignment, enabling students to demonstrate an understanding of the stylistic and thematic aspects of the course as creative practitioners.

Highlights
  • Ranked #1 in U.K. for welcoming international students, campus environment; #2 in U.K. for sports facilities; top 10 in U.K. for extra-curricular activities/societies; 15 in U.K. for library
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 5 in U.K. for Criminology - Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 10 in U.K. for Media/Film Studies, Social Policy - Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 15 in U.K. for Education - Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #2 in Scotland, top 15 in U.K. for Sociology
  • Ranked 1st in Scotland and 8th in U.K. in The Times Higher Education "100 under 50" table, which ranks the world's best 100 universities under 50 years old
  • Scotland's "university of sporting excellence"
  • Internships available in summer 2 session (for credit)

Faculty

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    Kelsey Patton

    Kelsey Patton will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - kelsey.patton@apiabroad.com

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    Alexis Webster

    Alexis Webster will be your Resident Coordinator and a resource for you on-site.

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Stirling programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Edinburgh

    Edinburgh is Scotland’s capital city, with a skyline that is dominated by the impressive 12th century Edinburgh Castle, perched on an extinct volcano and occupied since the 9th-century BC (!). Edinburgh’s streets, whether in the medieval Old Town or the Georgian New Town, are steeped in history and are home also to the Scottish Parliament, The Palace of Holyrood House, the Royal Mile, the Royal Yacht Britannia and Arthur’s Seat. Edinburgh has a thriving cultural scene and you can also visit The Elephant House coffee shop where J.K. Rowling wrote the early Harry Potter books! Just outside Edinburgh is the enigmatic 15th-century Rosslyn Chapel, of Da Vinci Code fame, where practically every surface of the chapel is covered with stone carvings of figures and scenes and the atmosphere is one of deep mystery.

  • Glasgow

    Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and is home to an outstanding variety of museums, galleries and performance venues. Once the 2nd city of the British Empire and a major center of trade with the USA, Glasgow now wears its Victorian splendor with pride. Everything from impressionistic paintings to medieval armor is on display at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Other attractions are the Gallery of Modern Art, the social history museum Peoples Palace, Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis, the bustling Merchant City, and the Provands Lordship.

  • Loch Ness and the Western Highlands

    Steeped in history and legend, the Highlands of Scotland is one of the last pristine regions of Europe. This is a land of high mountains, breathtaking islands, spectacular glens and deep, mysterious lochs. There are nature and wildlife to enjoy, imposing castles to explore and tales of folklore, heroes, and legends to savor. Also, there is Glenfinnan, home to the Glenfinnan Viaduct – most famous for its appearance in Harry Potter as the bridge that the Hogwarts Express crosses. And of course, last but not least, Loch Ness – home to the Loch Ness monster. People have claimed to have spotted the infamous monster for hundreds of years but you can make up your own mind!

  • Saint Andrews

    Saint Andrews is a stunning medieval city and home to the oldest university in Scotland where Prince William and Kate Middleton studied and met. It is also, of course, the home of golf. There are several golf courses in the town including the world famous Old Course and the town also has its own Golf Museum – great for those of us maybe not keen to play but who want to find out more about this famous sport! On top of all this is a stunning medieval cathedral and a beautiful ruined castle, which both played an important part in the reformation here in Scotland, surrounded by beautiful blue flag beaches!

  • Eastern Highlands

    The Highlands are the northern region of Scotland, steeped in legend and ancient tradition. While the Highlands have a shared culture, once being ruled by clans and chieftains, there are many villages and towns in the region which stand out for reasons all their own. Some have unique histories, while others are home to incredible scenery, monuments, or architecture. As we depart you will feel transported to another time, another world. Over the two days, API students will visit palaces and castles, as well as some magnificent Scottish landscapes! There will be plenty of stops for photo opportunities, and tales of history will be told as we delve deeper into Scotland and its past. On the second day, the group will return to the Central Belt by driving along the eastern coast of Scotland, where the group will spend the day at an authentic Highland Games! There will be men in kilts tossing capers (logs), highland dancing, bagpipes, and so much more. We hope you are ready for a proper Scottish Highland experience!

  • Edinburgh

    Edinburgh is Scotland’s capital city, with a skyline that is dominated by the impressive 12th century Edinburgh Castle, perched on an extinct volcano and occupied since the 9th-century BC (!). Edinburgh’s streets, whether in the medieval Old Town or the Georgian New Town, are steeped in history and are home also to the Scottish Parliament, The Palace of Holyrood House, the Royal Mile, the Royal Yacht Britannia and Arthur’s Seat. Edinburgh has a thriving cultural scene and you can also visit The Elephant House coffee shop where J.K. Rowling wrote the early Harry Potter books! Just outside Edinburgh is the enigmatic 15th-century Rosslyn Chapel, of Da Vinci Code fame, where practically every surface of the chapel is covered with stone carvings of figures and scenes and the atmosphere is one of deep mystery.

  • Glasgow

    Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and is home to an outstanding variety of museums, galleries and performance venues. Once the 2nd city of the British Empire and a major center of trade with the USA, Glasgow now wears its Victorian splendor with pride. Everything from impressionistic paintings to medieval armor is on display at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Other attractions are the Gallery of Modern Art, the social history museum Peoples Palace, Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis, the bustling Merchant City, and the Provands Lordship.

  • Loch Ness and the Western Highlands

    Steeped in history and legend, the Highlands of Scotland is one of the last pristine regions of Europe. This is a land of high mountains, breathtaking islands, spectacular glens and deep, mysterious lochs. There are nature and wildlife to enjoy, imposing castles to explore and tales of folklore, heroes, and legends to savor. Also, there is Glenfinnan, home to the Glenfinnan Viaduct – most famous for its appearance in Harry Potter as the bridge that the Hogwarts Express crosses. And of course, last but not least, Loch Ness – home to the Loch Ness monster. People have claimed to have spotted the infamous monster for hundreds of years but you can make up your own mind!

  • Saint Andrews

    Saint Andrews is a stunning medieval city and home to the oldest university in Scotland where Prince William and Kate Middleton studied and met. It is also, of course, the home of golf. There are several golf courses in the town including the world famous Old Course and the town also has its own Golf Museum – great for those of us maybe not keen to play but who want to find out more about this famous sport! On top of all this is a stunning medieval cathedral and a beautiful ruined castle, which both played an important part in the reformation here in Scotland, surrounded by beautiful blue flag beaches!

  • Edinburgh

    Edinburgh is Scotland’s capital city, with a skyline that is dominated by the impressive 12th century Edinburgh Castle, perched on an extinct volcano and occupied since the 9th-century BC (!). Edinburgh’s streets, whether in the medieval Old Town or the Georgian New Town, are steeped in history and are home also to the Scottish Parliament, The Palace of Holyrood House, the Royal Mile, the Royal Yacht Britannia and Arthur’s Seat. Edinburgh has a thriving cultural scene and you can also visit The Elephant House coffee shop where J.K. Rowling wrote the early Harry Potter books! Just outside Edinburgh is the enigmatic 15th-century Rosslyn Chapel, of Da Vinci Code fame, where practically every surface of the chapel is covered with stone carvings of figures and scenes and the atmosphere is one of deep mystery.

  • Glasgow

    Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and is home to an outstanding variety of museums, galleries and performance venues. Once the 2nd city of the British Empire and a major center of trade with the USA, Glasgow now wears its Victorian splendor with pride. Everything from impressionistic paintings to medieval armor is on display at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Other attractions are the Gallery of Modern Art, the social history museum Peoples Palace, Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis, the bustling Merchant City, and the Provands Lordship.

  • Saint Andrews

    Saint Andrews is a stunning medieval city and home to the oldest university in Scotland where Prince William and Kate Middleton studied and met. It is also, of course, the home of golf. There are several golf courses in the town including the world famous Old Course and the town also has its own Golf Museum – great for those of us maybe not keen to play but who want to find out more about this famous sport! On top of all this is a stunning medieval cathedral and a beautiful ruined castle, which both played an important part in the reformation here in Scotland, surrounded by beautiful blue flag beaches!

  • Eastern Highlands

    The Highlands are the northern region of Scotland, steeped in legend and ancient tradition. While the Highlands have a shared culture, once being ruled by clans and chieftains, there are many villages and towns in the region which stand out for reasons all their own. Some have unique histories, while others are home to incredible scenery, monuments, or architecture. As we depart you will feel transported to another time, another world. Over the two days, API students will visit palaces and castles, as well as some magnificent Scottish landscapes! There will be plenty of stops for photo opportunities, and tales of history will be told as we delve deeper into Scotland and its past. On the second day, the group will return to the Central Belt by driving along the eastern coast of Scotland, where the group will spend the day at an authentic Highland Games! There will be men in kilts tossing capers (logs), highland dancing, bagpipes, and so much more. We hope you are ready for a proper Scottish Highland experience!

API students are all housed in 4-7 bedroom apartment-style accommodations on campus. Each student will have their own single-occupancy bedroom along with a shared kitchen, dining, and living areas. Housing is self-catered. With the exception of those participating in the summer school, students will need to provide their own kitchenware (crockery, utensils, etc). Additionally, the university’s catering department offers superb value catering options on campus. Most flats have sinks in the bedrooms and all housing has shared shower and toilet facilities (summer students will have their own private bathrooms). All housing is fully networked, enabling residents to access the university’s computing resources, including internet. 24-hour concierge services are available on site. Bedding packs will be provided for all API students.

Stirling Student Housing 8719879741 O
Stirling Student Housing 8719879747 O
Stirling Student Housing 8721004034 O
Stirling Student Housing 8721004044 O

The prices listed below for the individual Summer 1 and Summer 2 sessions are for 3 semester credits (1 course). Students who are interested in earning 6 semester credits (2 courses) will incur an additional charge of $525.

The prices listed below for the Summer 1 & 2 combined session are for 6 semester credits. Students who are interested in earning 9 semester credits will incur an additional charge of $555. Students who are interested in earning 12 semester credits will incur an additional charge of $1,555.

Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 and 3 Combined Jun 7, 2019 - Aug 3, 2019 $10,225 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 1 Jun 7, 2019 - Jul 6, 2019 $5,755 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019
Summer 2 Jul 5, 2019 - Aug 3, 2019 $5,755 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 15, 2019