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This program is designed for S.T.E.M. majors and minors who want to complete courses in their major while studying abroad in Bilbao, Spain. Students choose their courses from a mix of S.T.E.M., international business, and Spanish language and culture offerings.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing (including meals and laundry with host families and dorms)

Language and Culture Tools

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.75 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to beginning, intermediate, advanced, and superior level Spanish speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Additional supplemental materials
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-15 credits per semester

This program is designed for S.T.E.M. majors and minors who want to complete courses in their major while studying abroad in Bilbao, Spain. Students choose their courses from a mix of S.T.E.M., international business, and Spanish language and culture offerings. Each student’s Spanish level is based on a placement exam administered upon arrival by the University of Deusto. Students can take up to 15 credits per semester and can add additional courses, internships, or a practicum for an extra fee.

DEUSTO TANDEM PROGRAM

API students at Deusto have the exciting opportunity to participate in the Tandem Program, which facilitates intercultural exchange by matching full-time Spanish students with recently arrived study abroad students. It is a program with mutual benefits! The local Spanish students are eager to spend time with their API conversation partner and show them around Bilbao, and the API students are encouraged to integrate with local students and learn more about Spanish life, both inside and out of the university setting.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students will receive a transcript from the Universidad de Deusto upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Andrea Gorricho

    Andrea Gorricho will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Ryan McCann

    Ryan McCann will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - ryan.mccann@apiabroad.com

COURSE OFFERINGS

Depending on their language level, students earn 3-10 U.S. credits of Spanish language and choose 1-4 courses in engineering or business. Students may also elect to participate in an internship for an additional fee.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Most API partner universities in Spain operate on the contact hour system, wherein the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. credits, divide the contact hours available by 15.

Elementary Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Elementary Spanish II

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Elementary Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish II/Conversation

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

View Syllabus   

Advanced Spanish 302: Spanish for Academic and Professional Purposes

This course will focus on the improvement and accuracy of the writing skills of students at an advanced level of Spanish. The aim of the course is to enable those students to produce formal texts in personal, social, professional, and academic settings. They will analyze a range of text types, identify their main and ancillary ideas, and recognize general structural elements in order to be able to produce similar texts of their own. Formal elements such as spelling, punctuation, and quoting will also be addressed.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Advanced Composition

The main goal of this course is to enable students to create different basic descriptive, narrative and argumentative texts in Spanish (narrative, descriptive, argumentative...) by means of exercises involving exposition, reflection, and practice. Students will learn techniques to organize the written speech, as well as style resources that will let them progress within the area of writing in Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Advanced Conversation

The main goal of this course is to provide students with the necessary resources to develop their oral skills in Spanish towards an advanced level, both in formal and informal situations, by focusing on organization techniques of oral speech. Students will also improve their interaction skills in conversation and will be offered the appropriate tools to carry out oral expositions about current topics successfully.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Advanced Spanish 301: Grammar and Communication

The main goal of the course is to provide students with the appropriate atmosphere for them to develop their communicative competence from an intermediate level towards an advanced one. This will be achieved through practice involving the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course will focus on specific grammar aspects that will be approached from a communicative perspective that will assume and value active participation of the students in the class at all times.

The main functional contents of the course will be the following:• Talking about learning habits.• Expressing wishes and opinions.• Assessing actions.• Providing and understanding recipes.• Sequencing actions.• Narrating in the past.• Telling a tale.• Assessing proposals.• Expressing purpose.• Suggesting solutions.• Speculating about the future.• Making predictions.• Expressing obligations and rules.• Expressing prohibition.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

View Syllabus   

Academic Spanish (Writing)

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

View Syllabus   

Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Nowadays, it is popular to see in articles of respectable and well-known newspapers and magazines worldwide, that this subject is a key element if not the most important of all, for any company, to be able to get out of this deep economic crisis. Innovation is a key element in any successful company. Although the skills to foresee improving opportunities can rest on an employee's abilities, usually this task lies on the shoulders of its R&D engineers. By having deep knowledge of the company product technologies, engineers create and engender new ideas which increase business opportunities.Entrepreneurship is the ability to bring these innovative ideas into new real successful products, by means of deeply assessing multidisciplinary aspects surrounding the new idea, well before becoming a real product. Furthermore, it is an inevitable step for any successful product in the market. This competence helps to innovate and having great ideas while teaches keeping the feet on the ground and be realistic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Applied Mechanics

In this course, the principles of Strength of Materials and Mechanisms are studied, as basic areas in which many industrial applications are based. On one hand, Strength of Materials studies the loads that a structural system supports, to test its correct behavior in terms of the deformations, and the possible break of the elements configuring the structure. On the other hand, Mechanisms are the base for the working of machines, which transmit forces and movement (that is, power) from the energy source (e.g. the combustion engine in a vehicle) to the element consuming the power (e.g. the wheels of the vehicle).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Civic and Professional Ethics for Engineers

University student education in the nowadays business world needs to incorporate the ethical dimension that affects both the individual in their professional performance and the company as an organization. For this purpose, it is important for the student to be knowledgeable about the major ethical systems that have marked human thought and are still applicable in our culture. Also required is a deep study of the ethical dimensions of the company's activity, thus enabling students to analyze issues incorporating justice as an unavoidable critical instance. The practice of Engineering is a source of citizenship. It resembles a real and effective possibility for an active and responsible participation in our society. Participation that is based on the development of the rights and obligations inherently incorporated in our condition as members of social groups, with the Human Rights perspective as an unavoidable horizon. By implementing this approach we intend to contribute to our university will to educate graduates who are especially sensitive towards, and concerned about, the human being and theimprovement of society thus contributing with their work to the respect for the fundamental rights and the promotion of equality and democratic culture, at the same time as they help to develop more just, inclusive and egalitarian societies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Digital Fabrication Technologies

This course combines open source and/or commercially available software with rapid prototyping equipment such as computer controlled laser cutter, 3D printers, vinyl cutter and milling machines. Students will digitally fabricate different assignments during the semester learning how to do the fabrication on their own and sharing the experience with others. In this concept, students will "create rather than consume technology" while "locally design and fabricate solutions" removing barriers such as access to equipment or access to expertise or even access to knowhow.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Experience Design

After the industrial revolution, current markets have evolved from the urge of getting manufactured products and services into delivering meaningful experiences. Accordingly, industrial design also needs to adapt itself regarding manufacturing processes but more importantly making experiences the final outcome of the design process. In order to do so, this course offers an introduction to the new paradigm both theoretically and in terms of design practice.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Intelligent Systems

In this course on Intelligent Systems, an emphasis is placed on solving difficult problems, many of them NP-complete, by means of designing and using heuristics for artificial intelligence algorithms, and by developing knowledge-based systems. So, students will learn to formulate search problems and to identify and apply an appropriate solving technique. They will also be able to define and apply good heuristics to solve different problems considered difficult. Besides, they will learn to apply machine learning techniques as a way for an intelligent system to gain a certain degree of autonomy. Finally, students will learn to analyze problems whose resolution requires empirical knowledge and to design knowledge-based systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Interaction Design

Nowadays, electronics are a very important part of most products in the market. Therefore, industrial designers are more likely to design products that include such technologies than they were before. Moreover, current prototyping technologies make it easier and faster for designers to be able to make partially functional prototypes and test them in early stages of the product development cycle. Thus, being able to understand, identify, design and fabricate electronics is a differential skill for industrial designers of today.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Interaction and Multimedia

Any student in ICT (Information and Communication Technology) related engineering should be prepared to design and develop software applications. Many of them are interactive, that is to say, they are intended to establish a dialog with the user. In order to ensure that the application adapts to user needs, it is mandatory for the designer to be familiar with human computer interaction issues. This course provides the tools to develop computer applications that adapt to the characteristics and limitations of the users.In addition to the above, it is more and more common for these applications to include text and images, but also audio, video and animations. These multimedia applications put forward specific challenges, such as data compression and synchronization.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Project Management Office / Technical Office

An engineer at the engineering field develops much of his professional activity engaged in projects that address a need or a problem of a customer or a user in the industrial field. Thus, students must learn to apply their knowledge to tasks and troubleshooting in any phase of an industrial project: user requirements analysis, specification, design, scheduling and budgeting, physical realization of solutions, products receiving, commissioning, etc.This course specifically addresses the practical learning of team participation in an industrial project in the phases of analysis, specification, planning, and budgeting. Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to lead the material execution of a technical project, including the organization of the workload and workforce, the selection of the needed materials, and the redaction of the relations evaluated of the project tasks or phases, along with the technical inspection, control, and surveillance of the documentation for public administrations, industries or companies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Software Process and Quality

One of the top skills in Computing is to be able to undertake the development of a software project in an efficient, effective and quality manner. For that, it is paramount to know the existing software development methodologies and their real applicability to concrete software projects. Besides, it is important to guarantee the maximum quality of the software resulted from that development process. In this course, the skills to apply an agile software development methodology to the needs of a project are obtained. Students will learn and put into practice the software development process management tools that ease their work and coordination withother software developers also taking part in a software project.Among others, students will acquire skills to employ software configuration tools (construction, change control, version control), tests and quality assurance, and software development management (documentation and error management). In summary, the aim of this course is that students learn to successfully accomplish, in a productive and high-quality manner, a software development process, encompassing all the development phases (software requirements, design, tests, deployment, and maintenance), applying an agile methodology and using the set of support tools which help them in code generation, version and error control, documentation, tests andquality assurance.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Software Requirements

One of the main tasks of graduates in Computing Engineering is the development of tools or software solutions. If the life cycle of a software system development process is analyzed, the first step will always be the definition of what this system /tool is supposed to be; those who better know what they want are the system stakeholders, those who are affected by the prospective system. In this subject, students will gain the needed competencies for the definition and modeling of a system in an organized and systematic way, as well as the techniques for gathering the required information from the stakeholders.COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Trends in Design and Social Innovation

Design is an ever-changing discipline that heavily relies on people and society. Therefore, in order to understand the users better and embrace meaningful projects, it is necessary to be able to identify trends and forecast future behavior both from a design and a social perspective. In order to do so, this course provides an overview of existing trends and trend analysis tools that make the students able to better frame all kinds of design projects.

Language of Instruction: English   

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International Business

This course is mainly targeted to help students understand the strategic issues and

tradeoffs in a global context and assess the strategic performance of global companies.

It is intended to cover two basic learning dimensions: The first one seeks to improve

the student´s ability to understand the present global environment and therefore, be

able to identify, analyze, and execute strategies in the global business environment.

Students will be exposed to material from a number of important and recurring

international business challenges including business-government relations, corporate

strategies in a world of multiple regulators, the management of complexity,

opportunities and risks in the global environment and so on. Secondly, students will be

led to understand the strategic management of global companies. We will examine

how, and why, firms decide to develop operations in foreign countries, and how firms

can become successful once their operations cross national boundaries. We will also

examine how individuals and teams manage business activities effectively in such

global companies.

The course draws on a number of different academic disciplines including economics,

political science, international finance, trade and relations, cultural dimensions, etc.

With regard to this approach, the goal is always to understand globalization and its

implications for firms from a trans-disciplinary focus, all integrated into and understood

from a systemic perspective of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Financial Systems

In recent times, the overwhelming development of Information Technologies, together with both globalization and the world spread process of liberalizing markets, has given the Financial Markets a leading role in our Economy and, even, in our lives. The evolution of the interest rate, the objectives of the Central Bank and its autonomy, the Tobin Tax, the role of the IMF and the WB, the so-called Internet Bubble, the sub-prime mortgage crisis, the sovereign debt crisis… finance is a main part of today’s public debate. This course attempts to analyze the structure of the Financial System, studying the different markets and products it offers in order to allow the flows of capital. The student taking this course will acquire a framework for understanding the Financial System, its evolution, and products, being able to evaluate financial instruments in a simple way. The concepts discussed in this course are a sound basis for anyone wanting to work thoroughly in financial markets or instruments. And, furthermore, the student will be able to fully understand the main debates surrounding financial issues. Considering that finance is a sector in which is becoming difficult to separate the national market from the international one, we will consider the International Financial System as the object of study. Anyhow, the European Financial System will be used as a study-case and will provide most of the markets, institutions, and instruments discussed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Economy of the European Union

The course aims are studying the theoretical framework for the process of European integration,

as well as offering a general overview of the EU as a global actor and of how it works. The EU

budget will be analyzed as an economic instrument to accomplish the EU objectives. The

internal market (the economic core of the EU) and the common competition policy will also be

studied. The most important achievement of the EU economy (the Economic and Monetary

Union -the euro) will then be explained. Throughout the course, the role of the EU as one of the

most important global actors in the world trade will be emphasized. The course will also

provide a brief presentation of the most important sectorial policies developed by the EU in

fields like agriculture, regional and social improvement. Finally, students will reflect on the

relevance of the opinion of civil society in the EU decision-making process.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

International Marketing

Nowadays, companies need to take their decisions in a changing and complex environment. Among a galaxy of changes, consumers alter their purchase and shopping habits (due to an increasing number of potential choices regarding what and where to buy), national markets become smaller, leading to globalisation, technological improvements reduce time and distance, distribution evolves, brands multiply, media becomes more and more fragmented and increases its power, at a time when the importance of different stakeholders is growing. Under these circumstances, the key challenge companies have to face is acquiring and nourishing profitable relationships with their customers. Organizations with a strong marketing orientation and a clear brand strategy are the strongest competitors in the market and are typically the leaders in their sector. Effective marketing management is an increasingly key ingredient in corporate success. This course is an introduction to the theory and application of marketing in a global marketplace. Marketing topics covered include marketing research, marketing strategies, marketing policies (product development, pricing, channels, and communication) among others. Furthermore, the last part of the course will be dedicated to a critical view of marketing and the way global companies have been acting during the last century and a half in our planet and the consequences for the future.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Organizational Behavior

This course aims to give students a general overview of Organizational Behavior, since the complementary perspective for the Human Resources Management. The purpose of this course is to enhance your learning about people in organizations and to help prepare you to be an affective organizational leader. Organizational Behavior contributes to an organization's success by improving the performance and well-being of its people. Common research and practice areas for Organizational Behavior include: Job Analysis, Personnel Recruitment and Selection, Work Motivation, Leadership and Executive Coaching, Human Resources (HHRR), Group/Team Performance among others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Sports Management: European Football

The course examines the sports management system of European football (soccer). The main goal is that students become familiar with the basic characteristics of the management of a professional football club. In order to do so, different areas of management are explored, together with the main tasks that underlie each one of them. Real Madrid, F.C. Barcelona, Manchester United or Bayern Munich are perhaps the clearest examples of successful models of sports management, although there are also others closer to home such as Athletic Bilbao, which will also be examined during the course. An essential element around which everything is structured is that football is a game. Practical activities outside the classroom will be organized with this in mind.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Transatlantic Relations: the USA and the EU

The first aim of this course will be to settle the general framework for the relations between the US and the EU. In order to do so, the class will analyze the landmark documents: the Transatlantic Declaration (1990), the New Transatlantic Agenda (1995), and the Transatlantic Economic Partnership (1998). We will analyze the economic relations between those partners. The transatlantic flow of goods, services, and investments is of the highest importance. In those fields, the relationship is usually easy, but there are recurrent problems like steel, aviation industry or GMO. Part of those conflicts is addressed in the WTO. The class will then study the point of view of the US and the EU concerning the environment, and more precisely their approach to global warming, a well-known field of divergence. The course will also study how the issue of fighting terrorism is handled by both partners. The 9/11 attacks are a milestone in the response given by western democracies to international terrorism. Problems and solutions in this field are seen in a different way from each side of the Atlantic. Finally, the class will focus on the foreign affairs policy. Dilemmas like hard power versus soft power and unilateralism versus multilateralism will be exposed and studied in light of different documents. Especial attention will be devoted to the topic of defense.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Basque Culture and Language

The history of the Basque Country has come a long way from the ancient times before the Roman conquest of the Peninsula to the present day. What we can see nowadays is a highly modernized European country which is going through a promising time. The course will help students become familiar with Basque geography, history, and economy, as well as with the Basque culture, traditions, and language (Euskara, an ancient language of unknown origin). These topics, whose aim is to offer a global vision on the Basque Country, will be dealt with by means of group activities and discussions.

Language of Instruction: Spanish Basque   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Business Spanish

The objective of the course is to help students improve their communicative skills in the area of

business. The course is mainly based on a textbook focused on the use of language in different

areas of the working world. The communicative approach (both oral and written) will be used in

the classroom, which means the four language skills will be worked on: listening and written

comprehension, writing and oral skills. The textbook will be implemented with complementary

material taken from newspapers, magazines, and/or other textbooks of Business Spanish,

according to the interests and necessities of the students.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Culture, Politics and Economics in Contemporary Spanish Society

This course offers an introduction to Spanish culture and civilization so that students can become familiar with the social, economic and political structures of Spain today. Our study will be focused on some specific aspects which make Spain both appealing and richly varied: its ancestral monarchy recently restored, its organization in autonomous areas which may be a solution to historical conflicts, the fact that it is one of the main tourist destinations in the world and, at the same time, the country of Don Quijote, Don Juan, Lorca, bullfighting, and soccer. All these features of life, history, and politics will be analyzed all through the course, both in the lectures and in the tour that will take students to some of the most historically relevant cities in Spain.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Europe in the World

The goal of the course is to provide a general vision of current Europe in the world at different levels. It

will focus on the analysis of the European Union both as the main and practically only European actor in

the international scenario, and as one of the main most recent experiences in terms of social

organizations. The so-called European social and economic model and the limits of the European Union

will also be addressed, as well as the role of the E.U. in the field of foreign relations.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Spanish Through Drama

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative competence in Spanish.

Students’ work will focus on literary, drama, and cultural contents by means of tasks based on

actual excerpts of plays by renown Spanish speaking playwrights from different literary periods

(mainly, but not necessarily, from the 20th century). Excerpts will be analyzed as literary texts,

but also as samples of aspects of Spanish culture (with an emphasis on interculturalism), and as

potential starting points of new texts to be created by students. At the end of the course, some or

all of the new scenes will be performed by students for their program mates.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Service Learning: Social Participation and Development

The objective of the course is to favor the holistic training of students as individuals, professionals, and citizens. It focuses on developing attitudes and values such as opening up to social reality and sensitivity towards global injustice, social exclusion, and the situation of the victims of such reality. The course will be based on the service-learning methodology and includes a solidarity service that aims at meeting actual community needs and favoring students’ learning process through experience.

Activities in the SERVICE LEARNING course require a commitment on your part.

-The exact dates and schedule will be provided by instructors on the first week of classes.

-There are two projects you can participate in. One of them involves direct contact with minors; therefore, in order to be able to participate in this project, you will need to bring a state police criminal record with you from your home country. This is a requirement for anyone volunteering with minors in Spain. You need to contact your local or state police in order to get the document, which will then need to be authenticated by an Apostille. The process is simple, but we recommend that you start with it as soon as possible.

-Please notice that, if you bring this police record, you will have access to both projects in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced/Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Practicum Course – Spanish Through Gastronomy

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative and cultural competence in Spanish. Meal times and the development of personal and professional relations around meals are very important aspects of the Spanish culture. Students will become familiar with Spanish food culture by focusing on vocabulary and grammar structures pertaining to the topic, as well as on habits and traditions in different regions in Spain. They will also get to know the process of cooking some of the most typical dishes of Spanish cuisine and, particularly, of Basque cuisine (tortilla de patata, paella, natillas…). An additional fee of $215 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Engineering Internship

Students will participate in an internship in a local Spanish company. This opportunity is aimed at students with an advanced level of Spanish proficiency. Placements are available for students in the fields of Technology, Computer Science, and Engineering. An additional fee of $290 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Production Management

The course provides detailed content of how production and services are managed in a company. For this, a hierarchical focus will be applied on three levels, strategic, tactical and operational. Specifically, this course will cover the study and application of techniques for demand forecasting, generating aggregate master and materials plans as well as capacity plans and production schedules. On completing this course, students are expected to be able to explain the existing engineering techniques for production planning in companies and assess decisions relating to aggregate and master planning using economic and technical criteria. In addition, they must be able to formulate the existing techniques for materials planning, detailed capacity planning, and production scheduling, and apply them correctly to specific cases.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Control Systems

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Thermal Engineering

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Design Laboratory II

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Smart Products

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Design Laboratory III: Services and Experiences Design

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Elementary Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Elementary Spanish II

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Elementary Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish II/Conversation

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

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Advanced Spanish 302: Spanish for Academic and Professional Purposes

This course will focus on the improvement and accuracy of the writing skills of students at an advanced level of Spanish. The aim of the course is to enable those students to produce formal texts in personal, social, professional, and academic settings. They will analyze a range of text types, identify their main and ancillary ideas, and recognize general structural elements in order to be able to produce similar texts of their own. Formal elements such as spelling, punctuation, and quoting will also be addressed.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Advanced Composition

The main goal of this course is to enable students to create different basic descriptive, narrative and argumentative texts in Spanish (narrative, descriptive, argumentative...) by means of exercises involving exposition, reflection, and practice. Students will learn techniques to organize the written speech, as well as style resources that will let them progress within the area of writing in Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Advanced Conversation

The main goal of this course is to provide students with the necessary resources to develop their oral skills in Spanish towards an advanced level, both in formal and informal situations, by focusing on organization techniques of oral speech. Students will also improve their interaction skills in conversation and will be offered the appropriate tools to carry out oral expositions about current topics successfully.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Advanced Spanish 301: Grammar and Communication

The main goal of the course is to provide students with the appropriate atmosphere for them to develop their communicative competence from an intermediate level towards an advanced one. This will be achieved through practice involving the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course will focus on specific grammar aspects that will be approached from a communicative perspective that will assume and value active participation of the students in the class at all times.

The main functional contents of the course will be the following:• Talking about learning habits.• Expressing wishes and opinions.• Assessing actions.• Providing and understanding recipes.• Sequencing actions.• Narrating in the past.• Telling a tale.• Assessing proposals.• Expressing purpose.• Suggesting solutions.• Speculating about the future.• Making predictions.• Expressing obligations and rules.• Expressing prohibition.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

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Academic Spanish (Writing)

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

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Electrotechnics

The goal of the course is to provide the student a wide knowledge of electric circuits. That is, upon successful completion, students will identify and apply different methods for the resolution of electric circuits and will be able to apply the related terminology and formulation. Electrotechnics is the basis on top of which students will learn to design, analyze and implement any low tension electrical installation, to distinguish and choose the most suitable electrical machine for any given particular need, and to predict their behavior after installation, as well as to determine the most suitable device to solve a problem of control and adaptation of electricenergy and to incorporate it in power electronic systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Energy and Environmental Technology

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to evaluate the most interesting technologies and methods for energy generation and to analyze the energy requirements for different engineering systems. They will also learn about environmental technologies and their implementation. The main objective of this course is to educate engineers with enough energy and environmental background to work in such a dynamic and relevant sector as Energy and to cope with the environmental most demanding legislation requirements and solutions. Nevertheless, knowledge about energy is crucial since it applies to a wide spectrum of production sectors. As aconclusion, course contents focus on the production, transport, and commercialization of energy and/or the management of environmental issues provoked by industrial activity and society.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Management Skills for Engineers

Skills and competencies are practical capacities that generate an added value. In that sense, engineers must be competent in two distinct areas: processes and projects. Both of them are deployed with a clear focus on stakeholder satisfaction. Customers, workers, suppliers, shareholders, and citizens demand organizations that are structured by improvement teams and individuals with a high performance-based culture.This course is based on management practice and three stages. Firstly, a systematic description of the main management competencies used in public and private companies. Secondly, a review of the most relevant role models and best-in-class companies in this matter, using competence templates and schemes. Thirdly, some exercises and practice using media presentations and dynamic tools.The main goal is to determine and develop the skills necessary for a real deployment in industrial and service companies. After that, we must perform practical mechanisms to reinforce these skills through the study of the best-in-class companies methods and the use of practical templates and schemes based on the sound approach of a practical competence map.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Intelligent Control Systems with LabVIEW

Engineering students must become familiar with the use of control techniques and technologies of industrial process automation. LabVIEW is currently a standard tool in the industry for the design and implementation of industrial control, especially in the areas of control, instrumentation, and electronics. This course focuses on providing students with sufficient theoretical, practical, and technological knowledge to address the planning and proposal of industrial control solutions. The course also uses LabVIEW as a design and implementation tool deepening in the development of industrial control applications. These are topics usually related to most of the working environments for engineers in industry.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Robotics and Vision

The actual productive layouts are not based on the use of intensive workmanship, as it was more usual some decades ago. Nowadays, they are defined taking the industrial automation as a basis. In Europe, the competitiveness of the industrial companies is mainly supported by automation technologies. Within these technologies, industrial robotics stands out. Now, the robotized manipulators are given more cognitive power, to broaden their application fields. Machine Vision systems are also integrated with the robots, to perceive the working environment, making possible more value-added processes. After successfully completing the course, students will be able to work in a robotics and vision integrated system. They will be able to identify its principal elements, analyze the application, coordinate actions and also carry out technical specifications based on them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Software Design

One of the key roles of graduates in Computing is the design and implementation of software solutions. If we analyze the life cycle of a software system, the second fundamental step is the design of the product to be built. In this course, students acquire the skills necessary for the design of distributed object-oriented software solutions, using UML as modeling notation and applying well-known design patterns, as well as heuristics and best practices. Therefore, this subject's contribution to the professional profile (from a competence perspective) is related to problem-solving skills and system, component and application design, using a systemic approach (as well as creative and innovative), starting from existing requirements and taking into consideration different criteria for the evaluation of alternative solutions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Statistics

The main goal of the course is to provide students with a set of competencies for the understanding and application of statistical concepts and techniques in engineering disciplines. Students will learn to represent data information using tables, graphs, and parameters in order to facilitate comprehension and decisions; they will be able to identify situations with random behavior and calculate the probability of these phenomena. Besides, they will know, identify and classify random variables from different sources of information. Students will learn to identify and solve problems in which the variable under study follows a known probability distribution. They will elaborate, build up and validate statistical models suitable for real problems. They will make use of estimation and inference for studying the behavior of a population model from a sample of the population under study. The student will study two or more variables set identifying independence and interdependence situations, and be able to assess the importance of statistics and its proper use in specific engineering problems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Nowadays, it is popular to see in articles of respectable and well-known newspapers and magazines worldwide, that this subject is a key element if not the most important of all, for any company, to be able to get out of this deep economic crisis. Innovation is a key element in any successful company. Although the skills to foresee improving opportunities can rest on an employee's abilities, usually this task lies on the shoulders of its R&D engineers. By having deep knowledge of the company product technologies, engineers create and engender new ideas which increase business opportunities.Entrepreneurship is the ability to bring these innovative ideas into new real successful products, by means of deeply assessing multidisciplinary aspects surrounding the new idea, well before becoming a real product. Furthermore, it is an inevitable step for any successful product in the market. This competence helps to innovate and having great ideas while teaches keeping the feet on the ground and be realistic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Business

This course is mainly targeted to help students understand the strategic issues and

tradeoffs in a global context and assess the strategic performance of global companies.

It is intended to cover two basic learning dimensions: The first one seeks to improve

the student´s ability to understand the present global environment and therefore, be

able to identify, analyze, and execute strategies in the global business environment.

Students will be exposed to material from a number of important and recurring

international business challenges including business-government relations, corporate

strategies in a world of multiple regulators, the management of complexity,

opportunities and risks in the global environment and so on. Secondly, students will be

led to understand the strategic management of global companies. We will examine

how, and why, firms decide to develop operations in foreign countries, and how firms

can become successful once their operations cross national boundaries. We will also

examine how individuals and teams manage business activities effectively in such

global companies.

The course draws on a number of different academic disciplines including economics,

political science, international finance, trade and relations, cultural dimensions, etc.

With regard to this approach, the goal is always to understand globalization and its

implications for firms from a trans-disciplinary focus, all integrated into and understood

from a systemic perspective of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Financial Systems

In recent times, the overwhelming development of Information Technologies, together with both globalization and the world spread process of liberalizing markets, has given the Financial Markets a leading role in our Economy and, even, in our lives. The evolution of the interest rate, the objectives of the Central Bank and its autonomy, the Tobin Tax, the role of the IMF and the WB, the so-called Internet Bubble, the sub-prime mortgage crisis, the sovereign debt crisis… finance is a main part of today’s public debate. This course attempts to analyze the structure of the Financial System, studying the different markets and products it offers in order to allow the flows of capital. The student taking this course will acquire a framework for understanding the Financial System, its evolution, and products, being able to evaluate financial instruments in a simple way. The concepts discussed in this course are a sound basis for anyone wanting to work thoroughly in financial markets or instruments. And, furthermore, the student will be able to fully understand the main debates surrounding financial issues. Considering that finance is a sector in which is becoming difficult to separate the national market from the international one, we will consider the International Financial System as the object of study. Anyhow, the European Financial System will be used as a study-case and will provide most of the markets, institutions, and instruments discussed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Economy of the European Union

The course aims are studying the theoretical framework for the process of European integration,

as well as offering a general overview of the EU as a global actor and of how it works. The EU

budget will be analyzed as an economic instrument to accomplish the EU objectives. The

internal market (the economic core of the EU) and the common competition policy will also be

studied. The most important achievement of the EU economy (the Economic and Monetary

Union -the euro) will then be explained. Throughout the course, the role of the EU as one of the

most important global actors in the world trade will be emphasized. The course will also

provide a brief presentation of the most important sectorial policies developed by the EU in

fields like agriculture, regional and social improvement. Finally, students will reflect on the

relevance of the opinion of civil society in the EU decision-making process.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

Nowadays, companies need to take their decisions in a changing and complex environment. Among a galaxy of changes, consumers alter their purchase and shopping habits (due to an increasing number of potential choices regarding what and where to buy), national markets become smaller, leading to globalisation, technological improvements reduce time and distance, distribution evolves, brands multiply, media becomes more and more fragmented and increases its power, at a time when the importance of different stakeholders is growing. Under these circumstances, the key challenge companies have to face is acquiring and nourishing profitable relationships with their customers. Organizations with a strong marketing orientation and a clear brand strategy are the strongest competitors in the market and are typically the leaders in their sector. Effective marketing management is an increasingly key ingredient in corporate success. This course is an introduction to the theory and application of marketing in a global marketplace. Marketing topics covered include marketing research, marketing strategies, marketing policies (product development, pricing, channels, and communication) among others. Furthermore, the last part of the course will be dedicated to a critical view of marketing and the way global companies have been acting during the last century and a half in our planet and the consequences for the future.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Organizational Behavior

This course aims to give students a general overview of Organizational Behavior, since the complementary perspective for the Human Resources Management. The purpose of this course is to enhance your learning about people in organizations and to help prepare you to be an affective organizational leader. Organizational Behavior contributes to an organization's success by improving the performance and well-being of its people. Common research and practice areas for Organizational Behavior include: Job Analysis, Personnel Recruitment and Selection, Work Motivation, Leadership and Executive Coaching, Human Resources (HHRR), Group/Team Performance among others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sports Management: European Football

The course examines the sports management system of European football (soccer). The main goal is that students become familiar with the basic characteristics of the management of a professional football club. In order to do so, different areas of management are explored, together with the main tasks that underlie each one of them. Real Madrid, F.C. Barcelona, Manchester United or Bayern Munich are perhaps the clearest examples of successful models of sports management, although there are also others closer to home such as Athletic Bilbao, which will also be examined during the course. An essential element around which everything is structured is that football is a game. Practical activities outside the classroom will be organized with this in mind.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Transatlantic Relations: the USA and the EU

The first aim of this course will be to settle the general framework for the relations between the US and the EU. In order to do so, the class will analyze the landmark documents: the Transatlantic Declaration (1990), the New Transatlantic Agenda (1995), and the Transatlantic Economic Partnership (1998). We will analyze the economic relations between those partners. The transatlantic flow of goods, services, and investments is of the highest importance. In those fields, the relationship is usually easy, but there are recurrent problems like steel, aviation industry or GMO. Part of those conflicts is addressed in the WTO. The class will then study the point of view of the US and the EU concerning the environment, and more precisely their approach to global warming, a well-known field of divergence. The course will also study how the issue of fighting terrorism is handled by both partners. The 9/11 attacks are a milestone in the response given by western democracies to international terrorism. Problems and solutions in this field are seen in a different way from each side of the Atlantic. Finally, the class will focus on the foreign affairs policy. Dilemmas like hard power versus soft power and unilateralism versus multilateralism will be exposed and studied in light of different documents. Especial attention will be devoted to the topic of defense.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Basque Culture and Language

The history of the Basque Country has come a long way from the ancient times before the Roman conquest of the Peninsula to the present day. What we can see nowadays is a highly modernized European country which is going through a promising time. The course will help students become familiar with Basque geography, history, and economy, as well as with the Basque culture, traditions, and language (Euskara, an ancient language of unknown origin). These topics, whose aim is to offer a global vision on the Basque Country, will be dealt with by means of group activities and discussions.

Language of Instruction: Spanish Basque   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Business Spanish

The objective of the course is to help students improve their communicative skills in the area of

business. The course is mainly based on a textbook focused on the use of language in different

areas of the working world. The communicative approach (both oral and written) will be used in

the classroom, which means the four language skills will be worked on: listening and written

comprehension, writing and oral skills. The textbook will be implemented with complementary

material taken from newspapers, magazines, and/or other textbooks of Business Spanish,

according to the interests and necessities of the students.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Culture, Politics and Economics in Contemporary Spanish Society

This course offers an introduction to Spanish culture and civilization so that students can become familiar with the social, economic and political structures of Spain today. Our study will be focused on some specific aspects which make Spain both appealing and richly varied: its ancestral monarchy recently restored, its organization in autonomous areas which may be a solution to historical conflicts, the fact that it is one of the main tourist destinations in the world and, at the same time, the country of Don Quijote, Don Juan, Lorca, bullfighting, and soccer. All these features of life, history, and politics will be analyzed all through the course, both in the lectures and in the tour that will take students to some of the most historically relevant cities in Spain.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Europe in the World

The goal of the course is to provide a general vision of current Europe in the world at different levels. It

will focus on the analysis of the European Union both as the main and practically only European actor in

the international scenario, and as one of the main most recent experiences in terms of social

organizations. The so-called European social and economic model and the limits of the European Union

will also be addressed, as well as the role of the E.U. in the field of foreign relations.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Spanish Through Drama

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative competence in Spanish.

Students’ work will focus on literary, drama, and cultural contents by means of tasks based on

actual excerpts of plays by renown Spanish speaking playwrights from different literary periods

(mainly, but not necessarily, from the 20th century). Excerpts will be analyzed as literary texts,

but also as samples of aspects of Spanish culture (with an emphasis on interculturalism), and as

potential starting points of new texts to be created by students. At the end of the course, some or

all of the new scenes will be performed by students for their program mates.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Service Learning: Social Participation and Development

The objective of the course is to favor the holistic training of students as individuals, professionals, and citizens. It focuses on developing attitudes and values such as opening up to social reality and sensitivity towards global injustice, social exclusion, and the situation of the victims of such reality. The course will be based on the service-learning methodology and includes a solidarity service that aims at meeting actual community needs and favoring students’ learning process through experience.

Activities in the SERVICE LEARNING course require a commitment on your part.

-The exact dates and schedule will be provided by instructors on the first week of classes.

-There are two projects you can participate in. One of them involves direct contact with minors; therefore, in order to be able to participate in this project, you will need to bring a state police criminal record with you from your home country. This is a requirement for anyone volunteering with minors in Spain. You need to contact your local or state police in order to get the document, which will then need to be authenticated by an Apostille. The process is simple, but we recommend that you start with it as soon as possible.

-Please notice that, if you bring this police record, you will have access to both projects in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced/Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Practicum Course – Spanish Through Gastronomy

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative and cultural competence in Spanish. Meal times and the development of personal and professional relations around meals are very important aspects of the Spanish culture. Students will become familiar with Spanish food culture by focusing on vocabulary and grammar structures pertaining to the topic, as well as on habits and traditions in different regions in Spain. They will also get to know the process of cooking some of the most typical dishes of Spanish cuisine and, particularly, of Basque cuisine (tortilla de patata, paella, natillas…). An additional fee of $215 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Engineering Internship

Students will participate in an internship in a local Spanish company. This opportunity is aimed at students with an advanced level of Spanish proficiency. Placements are available for students in the fields of Technology, Computer Science, and Engineering. An additional fee of $290 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Telematics

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Thermodynamics

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Methodology and Creativity

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Social and Cultural Connections between Spain and Latin America

This course offers an approach to socio-cultural relations between Spain and Latin America, a vast, complex and ever-changing network made up of not one but a variety of different cultures.

Throughout the length of the course, different subjects will be studied in order to guarantee that students have access to this previously mentioned cultural diversity. These topics are the following: the history of colonization and independence of the Americas, natural wealth and variety of the landscape, the history of the Spanish language and its varieties, commercial activities on both sides of the Atlantic, the world of art from different points of view, the employment system and the education system, as well as some of the most representative ceremonies and festivals of Hispanic culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

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Community Service in a Global World

The objective of the course is to favor the holistic training of students as individuals, professionals and citizens. It focuses on developing attitudes and values such as opening up to social reality and sensitivity towards global injustice, social exclusion, and the situation of the victims of such reality. The course will be based on the service learning methodology, and includes a solidarity service that aims at meeting actual community needs and favoring students’ learning process through experience.

GOALS

1. To contribute to the improvement of the personal and social development of underprivileged individuals in the community through service.

2. To implement service with the study of today’s global context and the need to broaden the perspective of one’s responsibility as a citizen.

3. To reflect on the possibilities of civil and political participation for the construction of more egalitarian social conditions, focusing on respect and promotion of diversity as the way for social transformation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3s   Contact Hours: 6

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English Poetry and Drama

The skills acquired in this course are crucial towards the consolidation of the Modern Languages/ English Studies Track / Literary Studies Track academic profile as the focus will be on a wide range of twentieth-century and twenty-first-century poetry written in English and modern and contemporary Irish drama. The aim is to help students increase their creative responsiveness to the interplay between text and context and between language and social approach to literary language that is consistently contextualized. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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European Literature

De todos los contenidos mencionados por la materia Discurso, aluden expresamente a esta asignatura los siguientes: La construcción de los géneros literarios y el paradigma literario occidental; la creación del canon a lo largo de la historia literaria europea y sus problemas, los periodos y movimientos literarios en Europa en sus contextos históricos, filosóficos y culturales; clasicismo y anticlasicismo.Los contenidos de la asignatura se dividen en dos grandes bloques, uno de los cuales trata la cuestión del canon literario y se corresponde con la primera unidad. El segundo bloque de cinco unidades consiste en un repaso de los grandes periodos que convencionalmente se distinguen en la literatura europea moderna, con algunos de sus movimientos, géneros, autores y obras más representativos. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Gender Studies

The interdisciplinary fields of gender and women¿s studies constitute one of the most innovative and challenging areas of recent scholarship that pervades not only the social sciences and the arts, but also disciplines apparently alien such as computing, engineering, health, or the natural sciences. Departing from a transdisciplinary approach, the main aim of this course is to provide students with a critical framework for thinking of gender identity as an integral component of the human condition that pervades both the real and symbolic orders of social life, and intersects with other social and cultural identities such as race, class, nationality, or religion. Together with this main goal, this course aims at:

  • analyzing the construction of women as social and cultural subjects
  • exploring how gender identities are constructed, and to identify the dominant cultural fabric of stereotypes and prejudices that underlie an apparently neutral reality.
  • getting acquainted with the main trends of feminism and theoretical thinking on women's studies in the past, and the challenges for the future.
  • promoting gender justice by identifying the challenges of gender inequality in contemporary societies, in order to gain mutual understanding and a fairer society.
  • It will also improve their communicative skills in English and show them how to use proficiently the key concepts in disciplines related to the Humanities.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Hispanic Narrative Fiction

Esta asignatura forma parte de la materia de Literatura Hispánica y contribuye a la completa preparación de los estudiantes matriculados en el grado de Lenguas Modernas. Tiene por objeto proporcionar una doble formación, por un lado, en relación al género y sus características formales y, por otro, en relación a la producción novelística española desde el siglo XVI hasta la actualidad.Siendo el género más abierto y flexible, la novela presenta una indudable relevancia hoy en día. Además, desde sus orígenes, con formatos y fórmulas diversas, y pese a su ausencia en las Poéticas clásicas, ha tenido la virtud de conectar con el público y ser un valioso exponente de los cambios sociales. Un análisis de las características que presenta, en cuanto a contenidos, estructura y recursos formales, proporcionará al estudiante herramientas muy útiles tanto desde una perspectiva histórica, como específicamente literaria.Tras el estudio de los rasgos caracterizadores del género, que remitirá a importantes autores del contexto internacional, el curso se centrará en el análisis de las tendencias y obras más significativas de la literatura hispánica, desde las novelas cervantinas y picarescas hasta el experimentalismo del siglo XX. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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History of Political Thought

Esta asignatura se inscribe dentro del módulo "Fundamentos de las Relaciones Internacionales" y de la materia "Historia" y, como todas las asignaturas de esta materia y módulo, tiene como objetivo que el estudiante adquiera los marcos conceptuales y las bases científicas propias de las disciplinas que estudian el funcionamiento de la sociedad internacional.En concreto, se abordará la historia de las ideas que conforman, en la tradición occidental, la reflexión sobre la forma en la que el ser humano ha organizado la convivencia política. Se hará especial hincapié en las ideas que han articulado las relaciones intercomunitarias y en la conformación histórica del concepto moderno de "relaciones internacionales". COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Latin American Literature

Esta asignatura forma parte de la materia LITERATURA HISPÁNICA, dentro de la Mención de Estudios Hispánicos y Mención de Literatura del Grado de Lenguas Modernas. La asignatura aporta conocimientos fundamentales sobre la Literatura Hispanoamericana que le permitan al titulado la comprensión cultural y formal de la producción literaria en Hispanoamérica. Asimismo contribuye a la formación mediante el desarrollo de competencias dedicadas aldesarrollo de herramientas metodológicas en su formación de expertos en literatura. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Literary Landmarks in English

This course contributes to the profile of the Modern-Language student who majors in English by helping him gain a deeper knowledge of a small number of authors whose work has been central to the development of literary culture, and whose influence has been particularly strong on their successors. It is also intended that the student comes to a good understanding of the historical context in which the selected authors produced their works. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Multiculturalism and Intercultural Dialogue

This course contributes to the consolidation of the students’ academic- professional profile by showing them that nowadays the reality in most Western countries is highly diverse and multicultural. They will also learn that this ethnic diversity has produced all kinds of new socio-cultural phenomena that need to be investigated in order to tackle the problems our societies are facing. The texts students will be reading present them with new challenges that cannot be adequately dealt with by using traditional approaches. They will be encouraged and taught to find both effective and ethical solutions to these challenges.The main aims of this course are: to make students think of social and cultural diversity as integral components of the human condition, to promote dialogue in order to gain mutual understanding and a fairer society. It will also improve their communicative skills in English and show them how to use proficiently the key concepts in disciplines related to the Humanities. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Social and Cultural Anthropology

La Antropología social estudia cómo investigar y conocer a unas sociedades definidas por su "alteridad" y su "no occidentalidad".

Esta asignatura es una introducción a la Antropología Social para conocer y aplicar qué es y cómo se estudia la alteridad, la diversidad cultural. El estudio del análisis de la variabilidad y d la evolución cultural en los ámbitos del parentesco, la economía, la política, la religión y las representaciones simbólicas enseña cómo percibir, pensar y vivir las diferencias y similitudes culturales.Para los estudiantes de Relaciones Internacionales esta asignatura capacita, mediante la práctica del pensamiento y del razonamiento antropológico, para captar y entender el sentido y el significado de la diversidad de las relaciones humanas y sus diferentes manifestaciones en el mundo contemporáneo. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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The Study of Language

One thing that distinguishes human beings from other animals, even relatively smart ones like chimps and elephants, is our ability to use productive and combinatory language. Language plays an important role in how we think about abstract notions, or, at the very least, language appears to be structured in such a way that it allows us to express abstract notions. Sentences are how we get at expressing abstract thought processes. Thus, this course is aboutone seminal aspect of how language works -- how sentences are structured: Syntax. The study of syntax is an important foundation stone for understanding how we communicate and interact with each other as humans. The syntax is what mediates between the sounds that someone produces and the meaning they intend to convey.The aim of this course is to introduce students to sentence structure, syntax parsing, tree diagram representation, and the basic terminology of syntax. It will be shown how traditional concepts are used and reinterpreted within the framework of Generative Grammar. We shall try to decide what sort of internal grammar native speakers of English have at their disposal and to determine what it is that makes a sentence acceptable or unacceptable, what sort of grammatical principles can be advocated and to what extent these are universal or language- specific. For the practical component of this course, the students will be presented with data from English as well as from other languages and will be expected to develop skills to piece these data together, construct hypotheses, check these and ultimately discover the explanation for the evidence assembled.The course is mostly practical in nature since it relies on the students’ regular submission of short exercises and their constant improvement thanks to the feedback received from the instructor. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Economics and International Policy Issues

This particular subject makes a contribution to the Degree in Business Administration of the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration by giving the necessary tools to each student in order to know and understand the interactions between economics and international relationships, so that each student may understand how those interactions affect decision making in firms. This subject is contributing also to the general objective of the Degree in Business Administration of the University of Deusto, which is to train professionals and persons having the general and specific competencies to understand, analyze, decide, plan and act inside firms, taking into account the international economic situation and perspectives, generating value for society and firms. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Geopolitics

This subject belongs to Module B “Theory, Organization and Dynamics of International Society” and to the topic “Politics and International Conflicts”. Therefore, as it is the case with the rest of subjects belonging to this module, its aim is that students work on necessary skills and attitudes in order understand the different theories that endeavor to explain the organization of the international society as well as to provide the keys to identify different dynamics that underlie complex processes.

In accordance with the module and topic mentioned above, these subjects develop the generic competence of Analytical Thinking and the specific competence of Geopolitical Analysis. The expected learning results for the generic competence are that the student correctly identifies the main ideas in a complex text, relates and orders qualitative elements and that he/she may correctly describe non-sequential (parallel, several possible lines, reversing) processes. The expected results for the specific competence is to develop the ability to apply the geopolitical analysis method in different case study situations and explain the current international conflicts from the perspective of geopolitics.

Therefore, the main aim of this course is to provide the student of International Relations with the basic concepts of geopolitics. The course adopts a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates strategic, geographic, historical, cultural and economic dimensions in order to facilitate a deeper understanding of contemporary international relations.

Based on the interaction between territory and ideas, both regarding how geography and ideas may positively influence each other or how conceptions of geography may derive in diverse theories. The course aims at making the student aware of the above-stated interaction and to be critical, as well, with many of the geopolitical conceptions, both classical and actual.

The first introductory block of the course looks into the definitions of human geography, political geography, and geopolitics, exploring the foundations for the birth of specifically geopolitical thinking. This serves as the basis for the second block, which critically analyses the evolution of the geopolitical theories since the XIX century until the present time. The third block is devoted to the theory of world-systems, as an explanation of the birth of world capitalism that exemplifies the complex relationship between territory, ideas, institutions, and economy. The fourth block analyzes the key current geopolitical regions. The fifth block analyzes thematic issues and current geopolitical challenges.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Global History

The history of the global world is a key element in understanding the international order, the international relations and the logic of the world as it currently is.The course explores the historical perspective of a set of changes and transformations in the global world, not only economic and technological but also political, cultural and in terms of identity. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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International Institutions and Organizations

This course examines the role of the most relevant international organizations (IOs) in contemporary global governance. Its main focus is on the United Nations (UN) and its many organs and agencies, which form the centerpiece of global governance. At the theoretical level, the course conceives of IOs not only as instruments of member states but also as independent bureaucracies with a political life of their own. At the practical level, the course aims to provide the student with the required skills to interact and participate in a UN-simulated context, training him/her for a future professional career. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

International Promotion and Protection of Human Rights

International Promotion and protection of human rights is an optional subject in the curriculum for students in the last year. Thus placed, the subject contributes to the specialisation of knowledge for students who would like to direct their career development towards the field of international cooperation, development and intervention, be it with international actors, domestic authorities or civil society organisations. This subject gives a wide overview of international protection and promotion mechanisms, both at the global and at regional levels, promoting solid scientific knowledge and critical thinking. Students develop skills to search for information and present data clearly in public. They also develop abilities to discuss and debate, group-work, and understand positions resulting from differentiated ideological and cultural backgrounds. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Introduction to International Relations

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to international relations as a basis of their academic professional profile. It shows an overview of the world of international relations in an era of globalization. Students will understand the complexity of politics and political patterns of interaction in the world and not only between states and will learn the different dynamics, processes, and issues facing the contemporary international system.The introduction to the discipline of international relations its main approaches, concepts and instruments of analysis will enable students to analyze and think how the interrelated parts of the international system connect, interrelate and interact.In this context, it will enable students to integrate different knowledge within the discipline and thus provide them with a foundation for other courses of the degree in international relations. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Political and Economic Integration of the E.U.

This course deepens into the study of rules and case law governing the European internal market and the most relevant aspects of political dimension in the current European Union. This matter is therefore essential for any jurist who wants to work in a European or international institution. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Political Sciences: International Organizations

The subject of International Organizations contributes to the development of the jurist's professional profile, providing knowledge and normative references about international organizations as relevant actors in the global, changing and multipolar context. The course highlights, in particular, the role of international organizations, their capabilities, and influence in the management of responses to global problems and challenges.

For this, the study of International Organizations is addressed not only from its legal dimension but also from the geopolitical perspective and international relations.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Political Theory and Comparative Political Systems

This course contributes to the consolidation of the students’ academic-professional profile by helping them to acquire a significant knowledge of the relevant concepts of political theory and the basic dimension of the political system in comparative perspective. It is part of the module B "Theory, organization and dynamics of international society" and the subject is "political science".

The knowledge of the functioning of the political system, and of its elements, is crucial to understand the State in an international context. The functioning of institutions, as well as the key elements of political culture, party systems, and electoral systems contribute significantly to contextualize the State into the international spectrum.

Significant knowledge in comparative method and comparative approach provides also a key tool for the profile in International Relations. A specific focus is being made on the concept and implications of political systems, and differences between democracies and non democracies highlighting the key theoretical aspects, approaches and paradigms in political science and political theory. More specifically, the student

Establishes relationships between concepts, theories and political phenomena
Explains the structure, evolution and functioning of political systems
Identifies similarities and differences between contemporary political systems
Relates current political institutions with their historical roots
Analyzes political practices from the perspective of different theoretical positions
Actively participates in discussions on topics related to the subject following the appropriate rules and guidelines

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Private International Law

This course provides an explanation of the main ways of solving the problems related to the private social relations with a foreign element. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Basic Psychological Processes I

Procesos Psicológicos Básicos I es la primera parte de una serie de módulos de formación en procesos psicológicos básicos que supone el inicio de familiarización con el conocimiento que será fundamental para entender y analizar los procesos psicológicos superiores y la vida mental. El ámbito de la psicología supone la necesidad de un mayor conocimiento del mundo que le rodea; y este conocimiento se fundamenta necesariamente en los procesos básicos de percepción del mundo real y de los propios procesos psicológicos que se dan en la persona. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biological Bases of Behavior I

In this subject Biological Bases of Behavior, the profile of the clinical psychologist begins to be developed by studying and acquiring the biological foundations of human behavior and its evolutionary development.

The biological bases of behavior study the systems and biological processes that allow the organism to interact actively with the environment.

These systems and biological processes, that is, the structural, physiological and behavioral characteristics, are based on two factors: phylogeny (genetic information that includes the evolutionary history of the species) and the interaction of the organism (genotype) with the environment.

To understand the behavior of an individual, it is necessary to know the biological characteristics of the individual (genotype), the mechanisms that modify genetic information throughout evolution and the neuroendocrine system that allows regulating the active relationship of the individual with their environment and emit a behavior.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Biological Bases of Behavior III

The main role of a psychologist is to understand and predict human behavior. This subject provides students with an insight into Basic Motivators and Emotions, their general features, determining variables, and particularly the Psychobiological Processes involved. Understanding these processes and others related to them will promote professional development in any of the applied fields of Psychology

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Legal and Forensic Psychology

Course description currently unavailable.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Personality Psychology

The course on Personality Psychology is part of the Personality and Psychopathology area, the introduction to the Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatments module. The course intends to offer a conceptual and scientific basis to describe, explain and predict human behavior. It is a key foundation to acquire competencies related to diagnosis, assessment, and psychological treatments. The course facilitates the critical application of constructs and paradigms developed in the science of psychology to describe, explain and predict human behavior and also fosters the acquisition of reflexive thinking regarding the behavior of others and oneself.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Psychology: History Science, and Profession

La psicología actual, tanto en su vertiente científica como en la profesional, apenas puede entenderse si no se tienen conocimientos previos sobre sus raíces intelectuales y sobre las grandes escuelas de psicología que han dominado el pasado siglo XX. La presente asignatura pretende cubrir esta necesidad dotando al estudiante de estos conocimientos básicos sobre los orígenes históricos de su disciplina, así como de las características básicas de la psicología en el presente. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Psychology of Education

Esta asignatura contribuye al perfil del profesorado de Educación Primaria aportando conocimiento de los procesos educativos, especialmente de enseñanza-aprendizaje, y de las variables personales y ambientales implicadas en los mismos. Este conocimiento le permitirá diseñar su actuación educativa con rigor y fundamento científico, establecer relaciones educativas eficaces, hacer frente a las dificultades de aprendizaje y diseñar entornos deaprendizaje adecuados a cada persona y situación.Asimismo, en esta asignatura se ofrecen temas, documentación y estrategias de aprendizaje para aprender a aprender, diseñar acciones psicopedagógicas para favorecer un aprendizaje estratégico y mejorar la propia competencia como aprendiz estratégico. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Contact Hours: 4

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Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Developmental Psychology

This course contributes to the profile of the Psychologist by analyzing the own processes related to the different evolutionary moments of humans throughout the life cycle, such as physical, psychomotor, cognitive, affective and social development. This enables to interpret their behaviors and to optimize the development, by adapting interventions from this evolving reality. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Health and Positive Psychology

The past decade has witnessed a major development of a new movement called Positive Psychology. Advances made, and its application in the different realms of psychological professional activity, grant an introduction to this area given the broadened horizon of research and psychological intervention. The course complements the psychology curriculum offering an overview of the latest developments in the field. The course will focus on health-related issues in Positive Psychology.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: 4  

Psychological Intervention and Treatment III

This subject has two complementary parts.

The first one expects to introduce the techniques derived from Cognitive Therapy. In addition to achieving skills in the implementation of these techniques, their application to different psychological problems, such as depression, aggressive behavior or stress will be reflected on. In the second part, some aspects of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy will be developed. Students are expected to know the theoretical basis of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy as well as its main types and methods.

In the second part of the subject, some aspects of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy will be developed. Students are expected to know the theoretical basis of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy as well as its main types and methods.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Psychological Wellbeing and Community Psychology

Psychological well-being has traditionally centered its interest on personal development, on the style and manner of facing the vital challenges, on the effort and eagerness to achieve our goals and promote development. These objectives connect directly to those established by community psychology.

The subject also aims to provide the profile of the psychologist of social intervention with a conceptual framework, which allows him to observe, analyze, understand and interpret the community reality and psychosocial dynamics from new parameters of well-being, as well as to raise awareness about the transformative potential that This way of approaching reality has.

Community psychology has a clear and preferably applied vocation, however, its contents are presented as founders of other subjects, of a social nature, aimed at different population groups or specific intervention methods. The subjects also contribute to the psychologist of social intervention the basic skills to reflect and try to address psychosocial problems from, with and for the community, favoring the involvement of the group itself, from criteria of justice, equity, and flexibility.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Psychology of Groups and Organizations

.This subject contributes to the Profile of the Psychologist by providing the knowledge and practices necessary for the training of professionals in Psychology in one of the traditional areas of Psychology, which is working with groups and in organizations. It studies what is an organization and the different explanatory models of it and its structure; the role of groups in organizations, understanding this as a group of groups working towards common objectives; the management skills needed to develop an effective organization; and the most current management models in organizations as well as the expected future development. Throughout the course, the role of the psychologist in them is presented and how, from its own formation, it can contribute to the best management of it,

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Elementary Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Elementary Spanish II

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Elementary Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Intermediate Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Intermediate Spanish II/Conversation

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

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Intermediate Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

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Advanced Spanish 302: Spanish for Academic and Professional Purposes

This course will focus on the improvement and accuracy of the writing skills of students at an advanced level of Spanish. The aim of the course is to enable those students to produce formal texts in personal, social, professional, and academic settings. They will analyze a range of text types, identify their main and ancillary ideas, and recognize general structural elements in order to be able to produce similar texts of their own. Formal elements such as spelling, punctuation, and quoting will also be addressed.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Advanced Composition

The main goal of this course is to enable students to create different basic descriptive, narrative and argumentative texts in Spanish (narrative, descriptive, argumentative...) by means of exercises involving exposition, reflection, and practice. Students will learn techniques to organize the written speech, as well as style resources that will let them progress within the area of writing in Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Advanced Conversation

The main goal of this course is to provide students with the necessary resources to develop their oral skills in Spanish towards an advanced level, both in formal and informal situations, by focusing on organization techniques of oral speech. Students will also improve their interaction skills in conversation and will be offered the appropriate tools to carry out oral expositions about current topics successfully.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Advanced Spanish 301: Grammar and Communication

The main goal of the course is to provide students with the appropriate atmosphere for them to develop their communicative competence from an intermediate level towards an advanced one. This will be achieved through practice involving the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course will focus on specific grammar aspects that will be approached from a communicative perspective that will assume and value active participation of the students in the class at all times.

The main functional contents of the course will be the following:• Talking about learning habits.• Expressing wishes and opinions.• Assessing actions.• Providing and understanding recipes.• Sequencing actions.• Narrating in the past.• Telling a tale.• Assessing proposals.• Expressing purpose.• Suggesting solutions.• Speculating about the future.• Making predictions.• Expressing obligations and rules.• Expressing prohibition.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

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Academic Spanish (Writing)

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

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Electrotechnics

The goal of the course is to provide the student a wide knowledge of electric circuits. That is, upon successful completion, students will identify and apply different methods for the resolution of electric circuits and will be able to apply the related terminology and formulation. Electrotechnics is the basis on top of which students will learn to design, analyze and implement any low tension electrical installation, to distinguish and choose the most suitable electrical machine for any given particular need, and to predict their behavior after installation, as well as to determine the most suitable device to solve a problem of control and adaptation of electricenergy and to incorporate it in power electronic systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Energy and Environmental Technology

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to evaluate the most interesting technologies and methods for energy generation and to analyze the energy requirements for different engineering systems. They will also learn about environmental technologies and their implementation. The main objective of this course is to educate engineers with enough energy and environmental background to work in such a dynamic and relevant sector as Energy and to cope with the environmental most demanding legislation requirements and solutions. Nevertheless, knowledge about energy is crucial since it applies to a wide spectrum of production sectors. As aconclusion, course contents focus on the production, transport, and commercialization of energy and/or the management of environmental issues provoked by industrial activity and society.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Management Skills for Engineers

Skills and competencies are practical capacities that generate an added value. In that sense, engineers must be competent in two distinct areas: processes and projects. Both of them are deployed with a clear focus on stakeholder satisfaction. Customers, workers, suppliers, shareholders, and citizens demand organizations that are structured by improvement teams and individuals with a high performance-based culture.This course is based on management practice and three stages. Firstly, a systematic description of the main management competencies used in public and private companies. Secondly, a review of the most relevant role models and best-in-class companies in this matter, using competence templates and schemes. Thirdly, some exercises and practice using media presentations and dynamic tools.The main goal is to determine and develop the skills necessary for a real deployment in industrial and service companies. After that, we must perform practical mechanisms to reinforce these skills through the study of the best-in-class companies methods and the use of practical templates and schemes based on the sound approach of a practical competence map.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Intelligent Control Systems with LabVIEW

Engineering students must become familiar with the use of control techniques and technologies of industrial process automation. LabVIEW is currently a standard tool in the industry for the design and implementation of industrial control, especially in the areas of control, instrumentation, and electronics. This course focuses on providing students with sufficient theoretical, practical, and technological knowledge to address the planning and proposal of industrial control solutions. The course also uses LabVIEW as a design and implementation tool deepening in the development of industrial control applications. These are topics usually related to most of the working environments for engineers in industry.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Robotics and Vision

The actual productive layouts are not based on the use of intensive workmanship, as it was more usual some decades ago. Nowadays, they are defined taking the industrial automation as a basis. In Europe, the competitiveness of the industrial companies is mainly supported by automation technologies. Within these technologies, industrial robotics stands out. Now, the robotized manipulators are given more cognitive power, to broaden their application fields. Machine Vision systems are also integrated with the robots, to perceive the working environment, making possible more value-added processes. After successfully completing the course, students will be able to work in a robotics and vision integrated system. They will be able to identify its principal elements, analyze the application, coordinate actions and also carry out technical specifications based on them.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Software Design

One of the key roles of graduates in Computing is the design and implementation of software solutions. If we analyze the life cycle of a software system, the second fundamental step is the design of the product to be built. In this course, students acquire the skills necessary for the design of distributed object-oriented software solutions, using UML as modeling notation and applying well-known design patterns, as well as heuristics and best practices. Therefore, this subject's contribution to the professional profile (from a competence perspective) is related to problem-solving skills and system, component and application design, using a systemic approach (as well as creative and innovative), starting from existing requirements and taking into consideration different criteria for the evaluation of alternative solutions.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Statistics

The main goal of the course is to provide students with a set of competencies for the understanding and application of statistical concepts and techniques in engineering disciplines. Students will learn to represent data information using tables, graphs, and parameters in order to facilitate comprehension and decisions; they will be able to identify situations with random behavior and calculate the probability of these phenomena. Besides, they will know, identify and classify random variables from different sources of information. Students will learn to identify and solve problems in which the variable under study follows a known probability distribution. They will elaborate, build up and validate statistical models suitable for real problems. They will make use of estimation and inference for studying the behavior of a population model from a sample of the population under study. The student will study two or more variables set identifying independence and interdependence situations, and be able to assess the importance of statistics and its proper use in specific engineering problems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Nowadays, it is popular to see in articles of respectable and well-known newspapers and magazines worldwide, that this subject is a key element if not the most important of all, for any company, to be able to get out of this deep economic crisis. Innovation is a key element in any successful company. Although the skills to foresee improving opportunities can rest on an employee's abilities, usually this task lies on the shoulders of its R&D engineers. By having deep knowledge of the company product technologies, engineers create and engender new ideas which increase business opportunities.Entrepreneurship is the ability to bring these innovative ideas into new real successful products, by means of deeply assessing multidisciplinary aspects surrounding the new idea, well before becoming a real product. Furthermore, it is an inevitable step for any successful product in the market. This competence helps to innovate and having great ideas while teaches keeping the feet on the ground and be realistic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Applied Mechanics

In this course, the principles of Strength of Materials and Mechanisms are studied, as basic areas in which many industrial applications are based. On one hand, Strength of Materials studies the loads that a structural system supports, to test its correct behavior in terms of the deformations, and the possible break of the elements configuring the structure. On the other hand, Mechanisms are the base for the working of machines, which transmit forces and movement (that is, power) from the energy source (e.g. the combustion engine in a vehicle) to the element consuming the power (e.g. the wheels of the vehicle).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Civic and Professional Ethics for Engineers

University student education in the nowadays business world needs to incorporate the ethical dimension that affects both the individual in their professional performance and the company as an organization. For this purpose, it is important for the student to be knowledgeable about the major ethical systems that have marked human thought and are still applicable in our culture. Also required is a deep study of the ethical dimensions of the company's activity, thus enabling students to analyze issues incorporating justice as an unavoidable critical instance. The practice of Engineering is a source of citizenship. It resembles a real and effective possibility for an active and responsible participation in our society. Participation that is based on the development of the rights and obligations inherently incorporated in our condition as members of social groups, with the Human Rights perspective as an unavoidable horizon. By implementing this approach we intend to contribute to our university will to educate graduates who are especially sensitive towards, and concerned about, the human being and theimprovement of society thus contributing with their work to the respect for the fundamental rights and the promotion of equality and democratic culture, at the same time as they help to develop more just, inclusive and egalitarian societies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Digital Fabrication Technologies

This course combines open source and/or commercially available software with rapid prototyping equipment such as computer controlled laser cutter, 3D printers, vinyl cutter and milling machines. Students will digitally fabricate different assignments during the semester learning how to do the fabrication on their own and sharing the experience with others. In this concept, students will "create rather than consume technology" while "locally design and fabricate solutions" removing barriers such as access to equipment or access to expertise or even access to knowhow.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Experience Design

After the industrial revolution, current markets have evolved from the urge of getting manufactured products and services into delivering meaningful experiences. Accordingly, industrial design also needs to adapt itself regarding manufacturing processes but more importantly making experiences the final outcome of the design process. In order to do so, this course offers an introduction to the new paradigm both theoretically and in terms of design practice.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Intelligent Systems

In this course on Intelligent Systems, an emphasis is placed on solving difficult problems, many of them NP-complete, by means of designing and using heuristics for artificial intelligence algorithms, and by developing knowledge-based systems. So, students will learn to formulate search problems and to identify and apply an appropriate solving technique. They will also be able to define and apply good heuristics to solve different problems considered difficult. Besides, they will learn to apply machine learning techniques as a way for an intelligent system to gain a certain degree of autonomy. Finally, students will learn to analyze problems whose resolution requires empirical knowledge and to design knowledge-based systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Interaction Design

Nowadays, electronics are a very important part of most products in the market. Therefore, industrial designers are more likely to design products that include such technologies than they were before. Moreover, current prototyping technologies make it easier and faster for designers to be able to make partially functional prototypes and test them in early stages of the product development cycle. Thus, being able to understand, identify, design and fabricate electronics is a differential skill for industrial designers of today.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Interaction and Multimedia

Any student in ICT (Information and Communication Technology) related engineering should be prepared to design and develop software applications. Many of them are interactive, that is to say, they are intended to establish a dialog with the user. In order to ensure that the application adapts to user needs, it is mandatory for the designer to be familiar with human computer interaction issues. This course provides the tools to develop computer applications that adapt to the characteristics and limitations of the users.In addition to the above, it is more and more common for these applications to include text and images, but also audio, video and animations. These multimedia applications put forward specific challenges, such as data compression and synchronization.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Project Management Office / Technical Office

An engineer at the engineering field develops much of his professional activity engaged in projects that address a need or a problem of a customer or a user in the industrial field. Thus, students must learn to apply their knowledge to tasks and troubleshooting in any phase of an industrial project: user requirements analysis, specification, design, scheduling and budgeting, physical realization of solutions, products receiving, commissioning, etc.This course specifically addresses the practical learning of team participation in an industrial project in the phases of analysis, specification, planning, and budgeting. Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to lead the material execution of a technical project, including the organization of the workload and workforce, the selection of the needed materials, and the redaction of the relations evaluated of the project tasks or phases, along with the technical inspection, control, and surveillance of the documentation for public administrations, industries or companies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Software Process and Quality

One of the top skills in Computing is to be able to undertake the development of a software project in an efficient, effective and quality manner. For that, it is paramount to know the existing software development methodologies and their real applicability to concrete software projects. Besides, it is important to guarantee the maximum quality of the software resulted from that development process. In this course, the skills to apply an agile software development methodology to the needs of a project are obtained. Students will learn and put into practice the software development process management tools that ease their work and coordination withother software developers also taking part in a software project.Among others, students will acquire skills to employ software configuration tools (construction, change control, version control), tests and quality assurance, and software development management (documentation and error management). In summary, the aim of this course is that students learn to successfully accomplish, in a productive and high-quality manner, a software development process, encompassing all the development phases (software requirements, design, tests, deployment, and maintenance), applying an agile methodology and using the set of support tools which help them in code generation, version and error control, documentation, tests andquality assurance.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Software Requirements

One of the main tasks of graduates in Computing Engineering is the development of tools or software solutions. If the life cycle of a software system development process is analyzed, the first step will always be the definition of what this system /tool is supposed to be; those who better know what they want are the system stakeholders, those who are affected by the prospective system. In this subject, students will gain the needed competencies for the definition and modeling of a system in an organized and systematic way, as well as the techniques for gathering the required information from the stakeholders.COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Trends in Design and Social Innovation

Design is an ever-changing discipline that heavily relies on people and society. Therefore, in order to understand the users better and embrace meaningful projects, it is necessary to be able to identify trends and forecast future behavior both from a design and a social perspective. In order to do so, this course provides an overview of existing trends and trend analysis tools that make the students able to better frame all kinds of design projects.

Language of Instruction: English   

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International Business

This course is mainly targeted to help students understand the strategic issues and

tradeoffs in a global context and assess the strategic performance of global companies.

It is intended to cover two basic learning dimensions: The first one seeks to improve

the student´s ability to understand the present global environment and therefore, be

able to identify, analyze, and execute strategies in the global business environment.

Students will be exposed to material from a number of important and recurring

international business challenges including business-government relations, corporate

strategies in a world of multiple regulators, the management of complexity,

opportunities and risks in the global environment and so on. Secondly, students will be

led to understand the strategic management of global companies. We will examine

how, and why, firms decide to develop operations in foreign countries, and how firms

can become successful once their operations cross national boundaries. We will also

examine how individuals and teams manage business activities effectively in such

global companies.

The course draws on a number of different academic disciplines including economics,

political science, international finance, trade and relations, cultural dimensions, etc.

With regard to this approach, the goal is always to understand globalization and its

implications for firms from a trans-disciplinary focus, all integrated into and understood

from a systemic perspective of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Financial Systems

In recent times, the overwhelming development of Information Technologies, together with both globalization and the world spread process of liberalizing markets, has given the Financial Markets a leading role in our Economy and, even, in our lives. The evolution of the interest rate, the objectives of the Central Bank and its autonomy, the Tobin Tax, the role of the IMF and the WB, the so-called Internet Bubble, the sub-prime mortgage crisis, the sovereign debt crisis… finance is a main part of today’s public debate. This course attempts to analyze the structure of the Financial System, studying the different markets and products it offers in order to allow the flows of capital. The student taking this course will acquire a framework for understanding the Financial System, its evolution, and products, being able to evaluate financial instruments in a simple way. The concepts discussed in this course are a sound basis for anyone wanting to work thoroughly in financial markets or instruments. And, furthermore, the student will be able to fully understand the main debates surrounding financial issues. Considering that finance is a sector in which is becoming difficult to separate the national market from the international one, we will consider the International Financial System as the object of study. Anyhow, the European Financial System will be used as a study-case and will provide most of the markets, institutions, and instruments discussed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Economy of the European Union

The course aims are studying the theoretical framework for the process of European integration,

as well as offering a general overview of the EU as a global actor and of how it works. The EU

budget will be analyzed as an economic instrument to accomplish the EU objectives. The

internal market (the economic core of the EU) and the common competition policy will also be

studied. The most important achievement of the EU economy (the Economic and Monetary

Union -the euro) will then be explained. Throughout the course, the role of the EU as one of the

most important global actors in the world trade will be emphasized. The course will also

provide a brief presentation of the most important sectorial policies developed by the EU in

fields like agriculture, regional and social improvement. Finally, students will reflect on the

relevance of the opinion of civil society in the EU decision-making process.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

Nowadays, companies need to take their decisions in a changing and complex environment. Among a galaxy of changes, consumers alter their purchase and shopping habits (due to an increasing number of potential choices regarding what and where to buy), national markets become smaller, leading to globalisation, technological improvements reduce time and distance, distribution evolves, brands multiply, media becomes more and more fragmented and increases its power, at a time when the importance of different stakeholders is growing. Under these circumstances, the key challenge companies have to face is acquiring and nourishing profitable relationships with their customers. Organizations with a strong marketing orientation and a clear brand strategy are the strongest competitors in the market and are typically the leaders in their sector. Effective marketing management is an increasingly key ingredient in corporate success. This course is an introduction to the theory and application of marketing in a global marketplace. Marketing topics covered include marketing research, marketing strategies, marketing policies (product development, pricing, channels, and communication) among others. Furthermore, the last part of the course will be dedicated to a critical view of marketing and the way global companies have been acting during the last century and a half in our planet and the consequences for the future.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Organizational Behavior

This course aims to give students a general overview of Organizational Behavior, since the complementary perspective for the Human Resources Management. The purpose of this course is to enhance your learning about people in organizations and to help prepare you to be an affective organizational leader. Organizational Behavior contributes to an organization's success by improving the performance and well-being of its people. Common research and practice areas for Organizational Behavior include: Job Analysis, Personnel Recruitment and Selection, Work Motivation, Leadership and Executive Coaching, Human Resources (HHRR), Group/Team Performance among others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sports Management: European Football

The course examines the sports management system of European football (soccer). The main goal is that students become familiar with the basic characteristics of the management of a professional football club. In order to do so, different areas of management are explored, together with the main tasks that underlie each one of them. Real Madrid, F.C. Barcelona, Manchester United or Bayern Munich are perhaps the clearest examples of successful models of sports management, although there are also others closer to home such as Athletic Bilbao, which will also be examined during the course. An essential element around which everything is structured is that football is a game. Practical activities outside the classroom will be organized with this in mind.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Transatlantic Relations: the USA and the EU

The first aim of this course will be to settle the general framework for the relations between the US and the EU. In order to do so, the class will analyze the landmark documents: the Transatlantic Declaration (1990), the New Transatlantic Agenda (1995), and the Transatlantic Economic Partnership (1998). We will analyze the economic relations between those partners. The transatlantic flow of goods, services, and investments is of the highest importance. In those fields, the relationship is usually easy, but there are recurrent problems like steel, aviation industry or GMO. Part of those conflicts is addressed in the WTO. The class will then study the point of view of the US and the EU concerning the environment, and more precisely their approach to global warming, a well-known field of divergence. The course will also study how the issue of fighting terrorism is handled by both partners. The 9/11 attacks are a milestone in the response given by western democracies to international terrorism. Problems and solutions in this field are seen in a different way from each side of the Atlantic. Finally, the class will focus on the foreign affairs policy. Dilemmas like hard power versus soft power and unilateralism versus multilateralism will be exposed and studied in light of different documents. Especial attention will be devoted to the topic of defense.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Basque Culture and Language

The history of the Basque Country has come a long way from the ancient times before the Roman conquest of the Peninsula to the present day. What we can see nowadays is a highly modernized European country which is going through a promising time. The course will help students become familiar with Basque geography, history, and economy, as well as with the Basque culture, traditions, and language (Euskara, an ancient language of unknown origin). These topics, whose aim is to offer a global vision on the Basque Country, will be dealt with by means of group activities and discussions.

Language of Instruction: Spanish Basque   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Business Spanish

The objective of the course is to help students improve their communicative skills in the area of

business. The course is mainly based on a textbook focused on the use of language in different

areas of the working world. The communicative approach (both oral and written) will be used in

the classroom, which means the four language skills will be worked on: listening and written

comprehension, writing and oral skills. The textbook will be implemented with complementary

material taken from newspapers, magazines, and/or other textbooks of Business Spanish,

according to the interests and necessities of the students.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Culture, Politics and Economics in Contemporary Spanish Society

This course offers an introduction to Spanish culture and civilization so that students can become familiar with the social, economic and political structures of Spain today. Our study will be focused on some specific aspects which make Spain both appealing and richly varied: its ancestral monarchy recently restored, its organization in autonomous areas which may be a solution to historical conflicts, the fact that it is one of the main tourist destinations in the world and, at the same time, the country of Don Quijote, Don Juan, Lorca, bullfighting, and soccer. All these features of life, history, and politics will be analyzed all through the course, both in the lectures and in the tour that will take students to some of the most historically relevant cities in Spain.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Europe in the World

The goal of the course is to provide a general vision of current Europe in the world at different levels. It

will focus on the analysis of the European Union both as the main and practically only European actor in

the international scenario, and as one of the main most recent experiences in terms of social

organizations. The so-called European social and economic model and the limits of the European Union

will also be addressed, as well as the role of the E.U. in the field of foreign relations.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Spanish Through Drama

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative competence in Spanish.

Students’ work will focus on literary, drama, and cultural contents by means of tasks based on

actual excerpts of plays by renown Spanish speaking playwrights from different literary periods

(mainly, but not necessarily, from the 20th century). Excerpts will be analyzed as literary texts,

but also as samples of aspects of Spanish culture (with an emphasis on interculturalism), and as

potential starting points of new texts to be created by students. At the end of the course, some or

all of the new scenes will be performed by students for their program mates.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Service Learning: Social Participation and Development

The objective of the course is to favor the holistic training of students as individuals, professionals, and citizens. It focuses on developing attitudes and values such as opening up to social reality and sensitivity towards global injustice, social exclusion, and the situation of the victims of such reality. The course will be based on the service-learning methodology and includes a solidarity service that aims at meeting actual community needs and favoring students’ learning process through experience.

Activities in the SERVICE LEARNING course require a commitment on your part.

-The exact dates and schedule will be provided by instructors on the first week of classes.

-There are two projects you can participate in. One of them involves direct contact with minors; therefore, in order to be able to participate in this project, you will need to bring a state police criminal record with you from your home country. This is a requirement for anyone volunteering with minors in Spain. You need to contact your local or state police in order to get the document, which will then need to be authenticated by an Apostille. The process is simple, but we recommend that you start with it as soon as possible.

-Please notice that, if you bring this police record, you will have access to both projects in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced/Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Practicum Course – Spanish Through Gastronomy

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative and cultural competence in Spanish. Meal times and the development of personal and professional relations around meals are very important aspects of the Spanish culture. Students will become familiar with Spanish food culture by focusing on vocabulary and grammar structures pertaining to the topic, as well as on habits and traditions in different regions in Spain. They will also get to know the process of cooking some of the most typical dishes of Spanish cuisine and, particularly, of Basque cuisine (tortilla de patata, paella, natillas…). An additional fee of $215 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Engineering Internship

Students will participate in an internship in a local Spanish company. This opportunity is aimed at students with an advanced level of Spanish proficiency. Placements are available for students in the fields of Technology, Computer Science, and Engineering. An additional fee of $290 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Telematics

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Thermodynamics

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Methodology and Creativity

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Control Systems

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Thermal Engineering

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Design Laboratory II

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Smart Products

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Design Laboratory III: Services and Experiences Design

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cinema in Spain and Latin America

This course is an approach to Spanish and Latin American cinema, especially focused on the productions of the last 20 years. A variety of films from different countries, belonging to this period of time, will be watched and analyzed in class. The students will have the chance to learn about the cultural, social and aesthetic values portrayed. These films will also be used as learning material for students to develop their language skills through activities based on listening and conversation. Such activities include the very process of watching the films followed by class discussion.

The number of full movies to be seen in class may vary from year to year. The lecturer will choose different ones depending on the needs and requirements of the particular group they are in charge of. Some films may not be watched entirely but certain fragments will be selected and analyzed. Of course, students are very welcome to watch these films in full outside the classroom.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Course Level: 6  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: 6  

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Social and Cultural Connections between Spain and Latin America

This course offers an approach to socio-cultural relations between Spain and Latin America, a vast, complex and ever-changing network made up of not one but a variety of different cultures.

Throughout the length of the course, different subjects will be studied in order to guarantee that students have access to this previously mentioned cultural diversity. These topics are the following: the history of colonization and independence of the Americas, natural wealth and variety of the landscape, the history of the Spanish language and its varieties, commercial activities on both sides of the Atlantic, the world of art from different points of view, the employment system and the education system, as well as some of the most representative ceremonies and festivals of Hispanic culture.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

View Syllabus   

Community Service in a Global World

The objective of the course is to favor the holistic training of students as individuals, professionals and citizens. It focuses on developing attitudes and values such as opening up to social reality and sensitivity towards global injustice, social exclusion, and the situation of the victims of such reality. The course will be based on the service learning methodology, and includes a solidarity service that aims at meeting actual community needs and favoring students’ learning process through experience.

GOALS

1. To contribute to the improvement of the personal and social development of underprivileged individuals in the community through service.

2. To implement service with the study of today’s global context and the need to broaden the perspective of one’s responsibility as a citizen.

3. To reflect on the possibilities of civil and political participation for the construction of more egalitarian social conditions, focusing on respect and promotion of diversity as the way for social transformation.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3s   Contact Hours: 6

View Syllabus   

English Poetry and Drama

The skills acquired in this course are crucial towards the consolidation of the Modern Languages/ English Studies Track / Literary Studies Track academic profile as the focus will be on a wide range of twentieth-century and twenty-first-century poetry written in English and modern and contemporary Irish drama. The aim is to help students increase their creative responsiveness to the interplay between text and context and between language and social approach to literary language that is consistently contextualized. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

European Literature

De todos los contenidos mencionados por la materia Discurso, aluden expresamente a esta asignatura los siguientes: La construcción de los géneros literarios y el paradigma literario occidental; la creación del canon a lo largo de la historia literaria europea y sus problemas, los periodos y movimientos literarios en Europa en sus contextos históricos, filosóficos y culturales; clasicismo y anticlasicismo.Los contenidos de la asignatura se dividen en dos grandes bloques, uno de los cuales trata la cuestión del canon literario y se corresponde con la primera unidad. El segundo bloque de cinco unidades consiste en un repaso de los grandes periodos que convencionalmente se distinguen en la literatura europea moderna, con algunos de sus movimientos, géneros, autores y obras más representativos. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Gender Studies

The interdisciplinary fields of gender and women¿s studies constitute one of the most innovative and challenging areas of recent scholarship that pervades not only the social sciences and the arts, but also disciplines apparently alien such as computing, engineering, health, or the natural sciences. Departing from a transdisciplinary approach, the main aim of this course is to provide students with a critical framework for thinking of gender identity as an integral component of the human condition that pervades both the real and symbolic orders of social life, and intersects with other social and cultural identities such as race, class, nationality, or religion. Together with this main goal, this course aims at:

  • analyzing the construction of women as social and cultural subjects
  • exploring how gender identities are constructed, and to identify the dominant cultural fabric of stereotypes and prejudices that underlie an apparently neutral reality.
  • getting acquainted with the main trends of feminism and theoretical thinking on women's studies in the past, and the challenges for the future.
  • promoting gender justice by identifying the challenges of gender inequality in contemporary societies, in order to gain mutual understanding and a fairer society.
  • It will also improve their communicative skills in English and show them how to use proficiently the key concepts in disciplines related to the Humanities.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Hispanic Narrative Fiction

Esta asignatura forma parte de la materia de Literatura Hispánica y contribuye a la completa preparación de los estudiantes matriculados en el grado de Lenguas Modernas. Tiene por objeto proporcionar una doble formación, por un lado, en relación al género y sus características formales y, por otro, en relación a la producción novelística española desde el siglo XVI hasta la actualidad.Siendo el género más abierto y flexible, la novela presenta una indudable relevancia hoy en día. Además, desde sus orígenes, con formatos y fórmulas diversas, y pese a su ausencia en las Poéticas clásicas, ha tenido la virtud de conectar con el público y ser un valioso exponente de los cambios sociales. Un análisis de las características que presenta, en cuanto a contenidos, estructura y recursos formales, proporcionará al estudiante herramientas muy útiles tanto desde una perspectiva histórica, como específicamente literaria.Tras el estudio de los rasgos caracterizadores del género, que remitirá a importantes autores del contexto internacional, el curso se centrará en el análisis de las tendencias y obras más significativas de la literatura hispánica, desde las novelas cervantinas y picarescas hasta el experimentalismo del siglo XX. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

History of Political Thought

Esta asignatura se inscribe dentro del módulo "Fundamentos de las Relaciones Internacionales" y de la materia "Historia" y, como todas las asignaturas de esta materia y módulo, tiene como objetivo que el estudiante adquiera los marcos conceptuales y las bases científicas propias de las disciplinas que estudian el funcionamiento de la sociedad internacional.En concreto, se abordará la historia de las ideas que conforman, en la tradición occidental, la reflexión sobre la forma en la que el ser humano ha organizado la convivencia política. Se hará especial hincapié en las ideas que han articulado las relaciones intercomunitarias y en la conformación histórica del concepto moderno de "relaciones internacionales". COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Latin American Literature

Esta asignatura forma parte de la materia LITERATURA HISPÁNICA, dentro de la Mención de Estudios Hispánicos y Mención de Literatura del Grado de Lenguas Modernas. La asignatura aporta conocimientos fundamentales sobre la Literatura Hispanoamericana que le permitan al titulado la comprensión cultural y formal de la producción literaria en Hispanoamérica. Asimismo contribuye a la formación mediante el desarrollo de competencias dedicadas aldesarrollo de herramientas metodológicas en su formación de expertos en literatura. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Literary Landmarks in English

This course contributes to the profile of the Modern-Language student who majors in English by helping him gain a deeper knowledge of a small number of authors whose work has been central to the development of literary culture, and whose influence has been particularly strong on their successors. It is also intended that the student comes to a good understanding of the historical context in which the selected authors produced their works. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Multiculturalism and Intercultural Dialogue

This course contributes to the consolidation of the students’ academic- professional profile by showing them that nowadays the reality in most Western countries is highly diverse and multicultural. They will also learn that this ethnic diversity has produced all kinds of new socio-cultural phenomena that need to be investigated in order to tackle the problems our societies are facing. The texts students will be reading present them with new challenges that cannot be adequately dealt with by using traditional approaches. They will be encouraged and taught to find both effective and ethical solutions to these challenges.The main aims of this course are: to make students think of social and cultural diversity as integral components of the human condition, to promote dialogue in order to gain mutual understanding and a fairer society. It will also improve their communicative skills in English and show them how to use proficiently the key concepts in disciplines related to the Humanities. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Social and Cultural Anthropology

La Antropología social estudia cómo investigar y conocer a unas sociedades definidas por su "alteridad" y su "no occidentalidad".

Esta asignatura es una introducción a la Antropología Social para conocer y aplicar qué es y cómo se estudia la alteridad, la diversidad cultural. El estudio del análisis de la variabilidad y d la evolución cultural en los ámbitos del parentesco, la economía, la política, la religión y las representaciones simbólicas enseña cómo percibir, pensar y vivir las diferencias y similitudes culturales.Para los estudiantes de Relaciones Internacionales esta asignatura capacita, mediante la práctica del pensamiento y del razonamiento antropológico, para captar y entender el sentido y el significado de la diversidad de las relaciones humanas y sus diferentes manifestaciones en el mundo contemporáneo. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

The Study of Language

One thing that distinguishes human beings from other animals, even relatively smart ones like chimps and elephants, is our ability to use productive and combinatory language. Language plays an important role in how we think about abstract notions, or, at the very least, language appears to be structured in such a way that it allows us to express abstract notions. Sentences are how we get at expressing abstract thought processes. Thus, this course is aboutone seminal aspect of how language works -- how sentences are structured: Syntax. The study of syntax is an important foundation stone for understanding how we communicate and interact with each other as humans. The syntax is what mediates between the sounds that someone produces and the meaning they intend to convey.The aim of this course is to introduce students to sentence structure, syntax parsing, tree diagram representation, and the basic terminology of syntax. It will be shown how traditional concepts are used and reinterpreted within the framework of Generative Grammar. We shall try to decide what sort of internal grammar native speakers of English have at their disposal and to determine what it is that makes a sentence acceptable or unacceptable, what sort of grammatical principles can be advocated and to what extent these are universal or language- specific. For the practical component of this course, the students will be presented with data from English as well as from other languages and will be expected to develop skills to piece these data together, construct hypotheses, check these and ultimately discover the explanation for the evidence assembled.The course is mostly practical in nature since it relies on the students’ regular submission of short exercises and their constant improvement thanks to the feedback received from the instructor. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Economics and International Policy Issues

This particular subject makes a contribution to the Degree in Business Administration of the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration by giving the necessary tools to each student in order to know and understand the interactions between economics and international relationships, so that each student may understand how those interactions affect decision making in firms. This subject is contributing also to the general objective of the Degree in Business Administration of the University of Deusto, which is to train professionals and persons having the general and specific competencies to understand, analyze, decide, plan and act inside firms, taking into account the international economic situation and perspectives, generating value for society and firms. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Geopolitics

This subject belongs to Module B “Theory, Organization and Dynamics of International Society” and to the topic “Politics and International Conflicts”. Therefore, as it is the case with the rest of subjects belonging to this module, its aim is that students work on necessary skills and attitudes in order understand the different theories that endeavor to explain the organization of the international society as well as to provide the keys to identify different dynamics that underlie complex processes.

In accordance with the module and topic mentioned above, these subjects develop the generic competence of Analytical Thinking and the specific competence of Geopolitical Analysis. The expected learning results for the generic competence are that the student correctly identifies the main ideas in a complex text, relates and orders qualitative elements and that he/she may correctly describe non-sequential (parallel, several possible lines, reversing) processes. The expected results for the specific competence is to develop the ability to apply the geopolitical analysis method in different case study situations and explain the current international conflicts from the perspective of geopolitics.

Therefore, the main aim of this course is to provide the student of International Relations with the basic concepts of geopolitics. The course adopts a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates strategic, geographic, historical, cultural and economic dimensions in order to facilitate a deeper understanding of contemporary international relations.

Based on the interaction between territory and ideas, both regarding how geography and ideas may positively influence each other or how conceptions of geography may derive in diverse theories. The course aims at making the student aware of the above-stated interaction and to be critical, as well, with many of the geopolitical conceptions, both classical and actual.

The first introductory block of the course looks into the definitions of human geography, political geography, and geopolitics, exploring the foundations for the birth of specifically geopolitical thinking. This serves as the basis for the second block, which critically analyses the evolution of the geopolitical theories since the XIX century until the present time. The third block is devoted to the theory of world-systems, as an explanation of the birth of world capitalism that exemplifies the complex relationship between territory, ideas, institutions, and economy. The fourth block analyzes the key current geopolitical regions. The fifth block analyzes thematic issues and current geopolitical challenges.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Global History

The history of the global world is a key element in understanding the international order, the international relations and the logic of the world as it currently is.The course explores the historical perspective of a set of changes and transformations in the global world, not only economic and technological but also political, cultural and in terms of identity. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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International Institutions and Organizations

This course examines the role of the most relevant international organizations (IOs) in contemporary global governance. Its main focus is on the United Nations (UN) and its many organs and agencies, which form the centerpiece of global governance. At the theoretical level, the course conceives of IOs not only as instruments of member states but also as independent bureaucracies with a political life of their own. At the practical level, the course aims to provide the student with the required skills to interact and participate in a UN-simulated context, training him/her for a future professional career. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

International Promotion and Protection of Human Rights

International Promotion and protection of human rights is an optional subject in the curriculum for students in the last year. Thus placed, the subject contributes to the specialisation of knowledge for students who would like to direct their career development towards the field of international cooperation, development and intervention, be it with international actors, domestic authorities or civil society organisations. This subject gives a wide overview of international protection and promotion mechanisms, both at the global and at regional levels, promoting solid scientific knowledge and critical thinking. Students develop skills to search for information and present data clearly in public. They also develop abilities to discuss and debate, group-work, and understand positions resulting from differentiated ideological and cultural backgrounds. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Introduction to International Relations

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to international relations as a basis of their academic professional profile. It shows an overview of the world of international relations in an era of globalization. Students will understand the complexity of politics and political patterns of interaction in the world and not only between states and will learn the different dynamics, processes, and issues facing the contemporary international system.The introduction to the discipline of international relations its main approaches, concepts and instruments of analysis will enable students to analyze and think how the interrelated parts of the international system connect, interrelate and interact.In this context, it will enable students to integrate different knowledge within the discipline and thus provide them with a foundation for other courses of the degree in international relations. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Political and Economic Integration of the E.U.

This course deepens into the study of rules and case law governing the European internal market and the most relevant aspects of political dimension in the current European Union. This matter is therefore essential for any jurist who wants to work in a European or international institution. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Political Sciences: International Organizations

The subject of International Organizations contributes to the development of the jurist's professional profile, providing knowledge and normative references about international organizations as relevant actors in the global, changing and multipolar context. The course highlights, in particular, the role of international organizations, their capabilities, and influence in the management of responses to global problems and challenges.

For this, the study of International Organizations is addressed not only from its legal dimension but also from the geopolitical perspective and international relations.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Political Theory and Comparative Political Systems

This course contributes to the consolidation of the students’ academic-professional profile by helping them to acquire a significant knowledge of the relevant concepts of political theory and the basic dimension of the political system in comparative perspective. It is part of the module B "Theory, organization and dynamics of international society" and the subject is "political science".

The knowledge of the functioning of the political system, and of its elements, is crucial to understand the State in an international context. The functioning of institutions, as well as the key elements of political culture, party systems, and electoral systems contribute significantly to contextualize the State into the international spectrum.

Significant knowledge in comparative method and comparative approach provides also a key tool for the profile in International Relations. A specific focus is being made on the concept and implications of political systems, and differences between democracies and non democracies highlighting the key theoretical aspects, approaches and paradigms in political science and political theory. More specifically, the student

Establishes relationships between concepts, theories and political phenomena
Explains the structure, evolution and functioning of political systems
Identifies similarities and differences between contemporary political systems
Relates current political institutions with their historical roots
Analyzes political practices from the perspective of different theoretical positions
Actively participates in discussions on topics related to the subject following the appropriate rules and guidelines

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Private International Law

This course provides an explanation of the main ways of solving the problems related to the private social relations with a foreign element. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Basic Psychological Processes I

Procesos Psicológicos Básicos I es la primera parte de una serie de módulos de formación en procesos psicológicos básicos que supone el inicio de familiarización con el conocimiento que será fundamental para entender y analizar los procesos psicológicos superiores y la vida mental. El ámbito de la psicología supone la necesidad de un mayor conocimiento del mundo que le rodea; y este conocimiento se fundamenta necesariamente en los procesos básicos de percepción del mundo real y de los propios procesos psicológicos que se dan en la persona. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Biological Bases of Behavior I

In this subject Biological Bases of Behavior, the profile of the clinical psychologist begins to be developed by studying and acquiring the biological foundations of human behavior and its evolutionary development.

The biological bases of behavior study the systems and biological processes that allow the organism to interact actively with the environment.

These systems and biological processes, that is, the structural, physiological and behavioral characteristics, are based on two factors: phylogeny (genetic information that includes the evolutionary history of the species) and the interaction of the organism (genotype) with the environment.

To understand the behavior of an individual, it is necessary to know the biological characteristics of the individual (genotype), the mechanisms that modify genetic information throughout evolution and the neuroendocrine system that allows regulating the active relationship of the individual with their environment and emit a behavior.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Biological Bases of Behavior III

The main role of a psychologist is to understand and predict human behavior. This subject provides students with an insight into Basic Motivators and Emotions, their general features, determining variables, and particularly the Psychobiological Processes involved. Understanding these processes and others related to them will promote professional development in any of the applied fields of Psychology

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Legal and Forensic Psychology

Course description currently unavailable.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Personality Psychology

The course on Personality Psychology is part of the Personality and Psychopathology area, the introduction to the Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatments module. The course intends to offer a conceptual and scientific basis to describe, explain and predict human behavior. It is a key foundation to acquire competencies related to diagnosis, assessment, and psychological treatments. The course facilitates the critical application of constructs and paradigms developed in the science of psychology to describe, explain and predict human behavior and also fosters the acquisition of reflexive thinking regarding the behavior of others and oneself.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Contact Hours: 6

Psychology: History Science, and Profession

La psicología actual, tanto en su vertiente científica como en la profesional, apenas puede entenderse si no se tienen conocimientos previos sobre sus raíces intelectuales y sobre las grandes escuelas de psicología que han dominado el pasado siglo XX. La presente asignatura pretende cubrir esta necesidad dotando al estudiante de estos conocimientos básicos sobre los orígenes históricos de su disciplina, así como de las características básicas de la psicología en el presente. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Psychology of Education

Esta asignatura contribuye al perfil del profesorado de Educación Primaria aportando conocimiento de los procesos educativos, especialmente de enseñanza-aprendizaje, y de las variables personales y ambientales implicadas en los mismos. Este conocimiento le permitirá diseñar su actuación educativa con rigor y fundamento científico, establecer relaciones educativas eficaces, hacer frente a las dificultades de aprendizaje y diseñar entornos deaprendizaje adecuados a cada persona y situación.Asimismo, en esta asignatura se ofrecen temas, documentación y estrategias de aprendizaje para aprender a aprender, diseñar acciones psicopedagógicas para favorecer un aprendizaje estratégico y mejorar la propia competencia como aprendiz estratégico. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Contact Hours: 4

View Syllabus   

Social Psychology

The understanding of the social bases of behavior is an essential part of the training of the psychologist. This subject helps to understand the psycho-social principles of how individuals operate in groups. Experimental situations are used to reflect on the cognitive and social processes in order to explain the way in which individuals perceive and interpret the conduct of other individuals in groups and the way in which they influence each other and interact.The contents and activities making up the subject will facilitate the analysis of social situations linked to the beliefs, attitudes and aggressiveness, prejudice, altruism and other current key themes, by fostering reflection and questioning beyond a strict ethical code. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Bible and Culture

The Bible, far from being the cultural heritage of a religious group or a creed, is part of the cultural heritage of humanity and is in itself a crossroads of cultures and examples of voices and traditions, sometimes in dialogue with others. The themes, characters and stories narrated in it are still a source of inspiration for essays, novels, films, paintings, sculptures, music ... This subject wants to show some reasons for these inexhaustible texts, explain the historical circumstances of their composition and development, reveal some of the interests that are hidden behind them and after their interpretations throughout history, ... learn, in short, to read them with a critical and open mind.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Contemporary Novel in English

The contemporary novel in English contributes to the consolidation of the academic-professional profile of Modern Languages students by providing a comprehensive approach to 20th-century narrative writing in English, both in the British Isles and English speaking countries. It explores the development of the contemporary novel in English by focusing on two important periods for the development of the English narrative: the 1920's or the so-called Modernist literature; and the post-war period that yields to the decolonization process and the beginning of postcolonial movements. One-quarter of the world population lives in one of the 54 countries once colonized by Great Britain. They share a fairly recent colonial history and the often violent consequences of the decolonization process. But above all this, they share a common language: English. This course intends to explore some expressions of colonial and post-colonial literature in English, as well as the circumstances that helped shape these texts as expressions of a complex and multilayered reality. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Contemporary Spanish Literature

Esta asignatura forma parte de la materia LITERATURA HISPÁNICA, dentro de la Mención de Estudios Hispánicos y Mención de Literatura del Grado de Lenguas Modernas. La asignatura aporta conocimientos fundamentales sobre la Literatura Española del siglo XX-XXI que le permiten al titulado la comprensión cultural y formal de la producción literaria en España. Asimismo contribuye a la formación mediante el desarrollo de competencias dedicadas al desarrollo de herramientas metodológicas y formación de expertos en literatura. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Critical Choices in Social Life

The subject aims to promote reflection on relevant issues of the global world and stimulate the formation of an ethical spirit in different areas of social life in which it will have to position itself. It seeks thus to support the process of integral formation of the person, basic objective of the University of Deusto.

The contents and methodologies of the subject help the students in the first place, to perceive the complexity and conflicts of interest in the socio-economic, political and cultural context in which they live. Second, to be aware that you make decisions with consequences for other people and the environment. Third, to recognize the values on which their decisions are based. Fourth, to promote an ethical attitude towards decision options and their consequences.

In this process, our reference will be Christian Social Thought that approaches social issues from the defense, respect, and promotion of the fundamental value of human dignity. The fundamental intuitions of the common good, the universal destiny of goods, the principle of subsidiarity, solidarity, the preferential option for the poor, participation and social justice are closely linked to this fundamental value.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cultural Studies

Como parte de una materia transversal común a los grados de Humanidades y Lenguas, esta asignatura contribuye al perfil académico-profesional del estudiante proporcionándole un bagaje adecuado para enfrentarse a los fenómenos culturales de nuestro tiempo, con visión crítica capaz de ir de lo local a lo global, de lo uno a lo diverso. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Literature and Cinema

This course contributes to the consolidation of the academic-professional profile of Modern Languages students by showing them that national cultures are a mosaic of written and visual “texts” constantly interacting with each other. Fidelity, authenticity, intertextuality, genre boundaries, hybridity, reading conventions, and notions of the kind are all integral to the analysis of the transference occurring between different art forms. This course focuses specifically on adaptation issues. It also investigates how the introduction of new communication technologies has transformed our perception of fictional texts and reality.Literature and Cinema explore the type of “translation” that literary works undergo when they are taken to the screen. Since both arts rely on quite distinctive industries and semiotic systems, it will soon become apparent that our analyses of both “texts” are highly conditioned by the medium. As a result, such aspects as the relationship between the reader/viewer and the “text”, the concepts and protocols of analysis, the conventions to interpret each kind of narrative and the ideological implications are necessarily different in each of the two media. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Modern and Contemporary History

This course aims to present an introduction to the contemporary world, through an overview of global history over the last two centuries. The justification of this course rests on the importance of understanding relevant historic processes in order to contextualize the courses which make up the Modern Languages and Modern Languages and Management degrees.

The course will cover issues such as the creation of the Modern State, the main political revolutions, the evolution of the collective mentalities and their influence on the creation of new political systems, the impact and development of the main social movements, or the economic reforms and transformations, which are necessary for a rigorous interpretation of the information and knowledge obtained in other courses.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

The East and the West in its Great Religious Traditions

The religious fact has been present in all cultures and has helped to shape the societies of all time; We are, therefore, faced with a highly significant universal phenomenon to know and deepen the human experience and identity. The subject East and West in its great religious traditions show how under the term religion hides an enormous diversity of forms, rites, practices, expressions, traditions and sensitivities, whose plurality illuminates while deepening the understanding of the religious phenomenon in society current. The subject contributes to the professional profile from an interdisciplinary perspective, attending to the systemic formation of a person, whose activity must be guided by the principles of respect and the promotion of Human Rights. It aims to train students to integrate into an increasingly globalized world, where the encounter between different cultures and religions seems inescapable. Knowledge of other traditions will allow you to assess the contributions and limits of your own religious context, as well as to respect and appreciate diversity in public life and the necessary dialogue to build a future for humanity in peace. Along with this, the interdisciplinary dimension of university education must be attentive - beyond the areas of knowledge of a certain professional activity- to ethical, philosophical, cultural and religious elements that consolidate systemic formation of the person and that trains to integrate and integrate in the different areas of public life(manifestations of culture, religion, education, work, coexistence in a plural society, etc.).

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Unseen Translation

This subject sees the translation from Spanish into English as a means to improve not only the skills to understand the "source language", but also, as a way to enhance the writing skills of the "target language". It also deepens the specific translation skills. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Varieties of English

Language is a multifaceted reality, and so are languages. What we designate with a single name 'English' (or any other, for that matter), actually hides heterogenous forms and components. In this class, we will examine some of the main axes of variation for different forms of English: diachronic and dialectal variation. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Ethical Challenges in a Global World

This course, aimed at students of all the degrees of the UD, responds to one of the essential principles of the "Deusto University Project": the training of students not only as competent professionals but also as people with certain values. More specifically, as people who contribute, from their specific professional skills to the world in which we live is more human, fair and supportive.

In this direction, the subject "Ethical challenges in the global world" (from the module "Human Formation in Values") tries to contribute precisely to the student's critical reflection on the global world in which we live and the economic, political, and cultural consequences, ethical, religious and ecological that produces the process of globalization. All this with the aim of helping the student to become aware of the main ethical challenges that arise in this process (economic-social injustice, intercultural coexistence, violation of human rights, climate change, etc.), and to know the different analysis and positions around these challenges, so that it is able to elaborate its own position and argue it in a convenient and convincing way.

With all this, we will approach the initial objective that students can contribute, from their respective professional fields and as citizens of the global world, to the construction of a more just, democratic and egalitarian society.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

European Union Law

This subject provides essential knowledge about European Union Law as a supranational legal system, focusing mainly on its system of sources and the principles that govern its effective application in domestic law. As a specific material area, fundamental economic freedoms are studied in the context of the European Internal Market. These contents and the active methodology applied in their learning provide students with the necessary training to perceive the European dimension of the issues and problems whose diagnosis and solution they should address in their professional life.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Foreign Policy

Course description currently unavailable.COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Globalization, Citizenship, and Intercultural Skills

Plurality is one of the most outstanding characteristics of postmodern societies, where dealing with the difference, whatever its origin, will be a mainstay in any profession. This subject is offered within the framework of the Identity and Mission Module of Deusto University. UD explicitly proclaims its commitment to the social and cultural reality as well as with social justice. Consequently, this course includes a theoretical approach to the situation, factors, and consequences of globalization and plurality. But it goes beyond that approach. From the beginning, a proactive attitude is incorporated, in order to generate awareness about the role we play in professional and personal relations and to look for an effective and appropriate communication with people of different origins, cultures, beliefs and other differences. In sum, it is a subject related to the essential elements of the practice of citizenship today. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

History of International Relations

This course examines the role of the most relevant international organizations (IOs) in contemporary global governance. Its main focus is on the United Nations (UN) and its many organs and agencies, which form the centerpiece of global governance. At the theoretical level, the course conceives of IOs not only as instruments of member states but also as independent bureaucracies with a political life of their own. At the practical level, the course aims to provide the student with the required skills to interact and participate in a UN-simulated context, training him/her for a future professional career.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Media and International Relations

This course contributes to the consolidation of the students' academic-professional profile by helping them to improve their analytical abilities, communications skills (oral and written), initiative, judgment, team building, and critical thinking in discipline-specific contexts. The students will be exposed to relevant and diverse readings and will practice a variety of speaking activities of particular importance in their study field (mainly presentations and debates). They will also become aware of the importance of accuracy, organization, coherence, originality, credibility, and persuasiveness. The course is practical in nature since it relies entirely on relevant readings and regular submission of writing tasks and oral presentations (in group or individual), with close facilitation and regular feedback from the instructor and their own (and their peers') analysis and revision. It will focus on the role of media organizations and their coverage of issues such as: the globalisation process, climate change, state sovereignty and nationalism, the foreign policy of key states, international security and terrorism, ecological sustainability, economic and sustainable development, economic crisis, global finance, organised crime and money laundering, human rights, and the roles inter-governmental organisations (IGO), campaigning organisations [including international non-governmental organisations (INGO) and non-governmental organisations (NGO)], and multinational corporations (MNC).

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Public International Law

This course is part of the module "Foundations of International Relations" and the subject "law".

Being essentially a set of rules that govern the interaction between states, Public International Law provides a regulatory framework that defines and constrains the behavior of states with the aim of ensuring peaceful coexistence and enhancing international cooperation in a globalizing world.

The course Public International Law will provide the students with a thorough understanding of nature and basic features of International Law, as well as its role in contemporary International Relations. Students will be able to understand the legal foundation of the international states system and to apply international rules and legal principles in the analysis of international problems and conflicts. Thereby, students will also be able to conduct a critical analysis of the role of International Law in the context of global economic competition and power politics. Therefore, understanding Public International Law is fundamental for anyone who wants to act internationally, whether as a diplomat, in an international organization or as an international specialist in a private company or non-governmental organization.

The course develops the general competence of problem-solving through a method focused on applying the concepts and rules of international law to specific cases, in order to identify the legal and political nature of international problems as well as the legal basis of possible solutions.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: French   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Regional Integration Processes and Policies

This course is part of the module "Theory, organization and dynamics of international society" and the subject "International organization and theory"

The course aims to provide the student with a solid understanding of the politics and processes of regional integration

across the globe and how and why these differ from the European experience. Regionalism is conceptualized as an

intrinsic part of the EU's ideology and foreign policy and the course seeks to understand to what extent the European

model of post-sovereign governance is applicable in other parts of the world.

The theoretical point of departure is in the different integration theories studied in the course: federalism, neo-functionalism, inter-governmentalism, constructivism etc. whereas the empirical component of the course has two main dimensions: Firstly, a study of the general features of processes of regional integration in other parts of the world and, second, a group project analyzing a specific case of regional integration. Thereby, the student obtains both a theoretically grounded general understanding of regional integration as well as in-depth knowledge of a specific regional case.

The competence of critical thinking is developed through project seminars, where students will provide and receive feedback as well as reflect on their own group process.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Developmental Psychology

This course contributes to the profile of the Psychologist by analyzing the own processes related to the different evolutionary moments of humans throughout the life cycle, such as physical, psychomotor, cognitive, affective and social development. This enables to interpret their behaviors and to optimize the development, by adapting interventions from this evolving reality. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Health and Positive Psychology

The past decade has witnessed a major development of a new movement called Positive Psychology. Advances made, and its application in the different realms of psychological professional activity, grant an introduction to this area given the broadened horizon of research and psychological intervention. The course complements the psychology curriculum offering an overview of the latest developments in the field. The course will focus on health-related issues in Positive Psychology.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: 4  

Psychological Intervention and Treatment III

This subject has two complementary parts.

The first one expects to introduce the techniques derived from Cognitive Therapy. In addition to achieving skills in the implementation of these techniques, their application to different psychological problems, such as depression, aggressive behavior or stress will be reflected on. In the second part, some aspects of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy will be developed. Students are expected to know the theoretical basis of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy as well as its main types and methods.

In the second part of the subject, some aspects of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy will be developed. Students are expected to know the theoretical basis of the psychoanalytic psychotherapy as well as its main types and methods.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Psychological Wellbeing and Community Psychology

Psychological well-being has traditionally centered its interest on personal development, on the style and manner of facing the vital challenges, on the effort and eagerness to achieve our goals and promote development. These objectives connect directly to those established by community psychology.

The subject also aims to provide the profile of the psychologist of social intervention with a conceptual framework, which allows him to observe, analyze, understand and interpret the community reality and psychosocial dynamics from new parameters of well-being, as well as to raise awareness about the transformative potential that This way of approaching reality has.

Community psychology has a clear and preferably applied vocation, however, its contents are presented as founders of other subjects, of a social nature, aimed at different population groups or specific intervention methods. The subjects also contribute to the psychologist of social intervention the basic skills to reflect and try to address psychosocial problems from, with and for the community, favoring the involvement of the group itself, from criteria of justice, equity, and flexibility.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Psychology of Groups and Organizations

.This subject contributes to the Profile of the Psychologist by providing the knowledge and practices necessary for the training of professionals in Psychology in one of the traditional areas of Psychology, which is working with groups and in organizations. It studies what is an organization and the different explanatory models of it and its structure; the role of groups in organizations, understanding this as a group of groups working towards common objectives; the management skills needed to develop an effective organization; and the most current management models in organizations as well as the expected future development. Throughout the course, the role of the psychologist in them is presented and how, from its own formation, it can contribute to the best management of it,

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Elementary Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Elementary Spanish II

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Elementary Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish or with very basic knowledge at the elementary level. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Beginning  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish II/Conversation

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish I

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

View Syllabus   

Intermediate Spanish III

This course is designed for those students who have a previous knowledge of basic or elementary Spanish. This course is aimed at international students studying abroad, who will learn the language not only in the classroom but also in real context.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

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Advanced Spanish 302: Spanish for Academic and Professional Purposes

This course will focus on the improvement and accuracy of the writing skills of students at an advanced level of Spanish. The aim of the course is to enable those students to produce formal texts in personal, social, professional, and academic settings. They will analyze a range of text types, identify their main and ancillary ideas, and recognize general structural elements in order to be able to produce similar texts of their own. Formal elements such as spelling, punctuation, and quoting will also be addressed.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Advanced Composition

The main goal of this course is to enable students to create different basic descriptive, narrative and argumentative texts in Spanish (narrative, descriptive, argumentative...) by means of exercises involving exposition, reflection, and practice. Students will learn techniques to organize the written speech, as well as style resources that will let them progress within the area of writing in Spanish.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Advanced Conversation

The main goal of this course is to provide students with the necessary resources to develop their oral skills in Spanish towards an advanced level, both in formal and informal situations, by focusing on organization techniques of oral speech. Students will also improve their interaction skills in conversation and will be offered the appropriate tools to carry out oral expositions about current topics successfully.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Advanced Spanish 301: Grammar and Communication

The main goal of the course is to provide students with the appropriate atmosphere for them to develop their communicative competence from an intermediate level towards an advanced one. This will be achieved through practice involving the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course will focus on specific grammar aspects that will be approached from a communicative perspective that will assume and value active participation of the students in the class at all times.

The main functional contents of the course will be the following:• Talking about learning habits.• Expressing wishes and opinions.• Assessing actions.• Providing and understanding recipes.• Sequencing actions.• Narrating in the past.• Telling a tale.• Assessing proposals.• Expressing purpose.• Suggesting solutions.• Speculating about the future.• Making predictions.• Expressing obligations and rules.• Expressing prohibition.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

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Academic Spanish (Writing)

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: High Advanced/Superior  

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Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Nowadays, it is popular to see in articles of respectable and well-known newspapers and magazines worldwide, that this subject is a key element if not the most important of all, for any company, to be able to get out of this deep economic crisis. Innovation is a key element in any successful company. Although the skills to foresee improving opportunities can rest on an employee's abilities, usually this task lies on the shoulders of its R&D engineers. By having deep knowledge of the company product technologies, engineers create and engender new ideas which increase business opportunities.Entrepreneurship is the ability to bring these innovative ideas into new real successful products, by means of deeply assessing multidisciplinary aspects surrounding the new idea, well before becoming a real product. Furthermore, it is an inevitable step for any successful product in the market. This competence helps to innovate and having great ideas while teaches keeping the feet on the ground and be realistic.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Applied Mechanics

In this course, the principles of Strength of Materials and Mechanisms are studied, as basic areas in which many industrial applications are based. On one hand, Strength of Materials studies the loads that a structural system supports, to test its correct behavior in terms of the deformations, and the possible break of the elements configuring the structure. On the other hand, Mechanisms are the base for the working of machines, which transmit forces and movement (that is, power) from the energy source (e.g. the combustion engine in a vehicle) to the element consuming the power (e.g. the wheels of the vehicle).

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Civic and Professional Ethics for Engineers

University student education in the nowadays business world needs to incorporate the ethical dimension that affects both the individual in their professional performance and the company as an organization. For this purpose, it is important for the student to be knowledgeable about the major ethical systems that have marked human thought and are still applicable in our culture. Also required is a deep study of the ethical dimensions of the company's activity, thus enabling students to analyze issues incorporating justice as an unavoidable critical instance. The practice of Engineering is a source of citizenship. It resembles a real and effective possibility for an active and responsible participation in our society. Participation that is based on the development of the rights and obligations inherently incorporated in our condition as members of social groups, with the Human Rights perspective as an unavoidable horizon. By implementing this approach we intend to contribute to our university will to educate graduates who are especially sensitive towards, and concerned about, the human being and theimprovement of society thus contributing with their work to the respect for the fundamental rights and the promotion of equality and democratic culture, at the same time as they help to develop more just, inclusive and egalitarian societies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Digital Fabrication Technologies

This course combines open source and/or commercially available software with rapid prototyping equipment such as computer controlled laser cutter, 3D printers, vinyl cutter and milling machines. Students will digitally fabricate different assignments during the semester learning how to do the fabrication on their own and sharing the experience with others. In this concept, students will "create rather than consume technology" while "locally design and fabricate solutions" removing barriers such as access to equipment or access to expertise or even access to knowhow.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Experience Design

After the industrial revolution, current markets have evolved from the urge of getting manufactured products and services into delivering meaningful experiences. Accordingly, industrial design also needs to adapt itself regarding manufacturing processes but more importantly making experiences the final outcome of the design process. In order to do so, this course offers an introduction to the new paradigm both theoretically and in terms of design practice.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Intelligent Systems

In this course on Intelligent Systems, an emphasis is placed on solving difficult problems, many of them NP-complete, by means of designing and using heuristics for artificial intelligence algorithms, and by developing knowledge-based systems. So, students will learn to formulate search problems and to identify and apply an appropriate solving technique. They will also be able to define and apply good heuristics to solve different problems considered difficult. Besides, they will learn to apply machine learning techniques as a way for an intelligent system to gain a certain degree of autonomy. Finally, students will learn to analyze problems whose resolution requires empirical knowledge and to design knowledge-based systems.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Interaction Design

Nowadays, electronics are a very important part of most products in the market. Therefore, industrial designers are more likely to design products that include such technologies than they were before. Moreover, current prototyping technologies make it easier and faster for designers to be able to make partially functional prototypes and test them in early stages of the product development cycle. Thus, being able to understand, identify, design and fabricate electronics is a differential skill for industrial designers of today.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Interaction and Multimedia

Any student in ICT (Information and Communication Technology) related engineering should be prepared to design and develop software applications. Many of them are interactive, that is to say, they are intended to establish a dialog with the user. In order to ensure that the application adapts to user needs, it is mandatory for the designer to be familiar with human computer interaction issues. This course provides the tools to develop computer applications that adapt to the characteristics and limitations of the users.In addition to the above, it is more and more common for these applications to include text and images, but also audio, video and animations. These multimedia applications put forward specific challenges, such as data compression and synchronization.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Project Management Office / Technical Office

An engineer at the engineering field develops much of his professional activity engaged in projects that address a need or a problem of a customer or a user in the industrial field. Thus, students must learn to apply their knowledge to tasks and troubleshooting in any phase of an industrial project: user requirements analysis, specification, design, scheduling and budgeting, physical realization of solutions, products receiving, commissioning, etc.This course specifically addresses the practical learning of team participation in an industrial project in the phases of analysis, specification, planning, and budgeting. Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to lead the material execution of a technical project, including the organization of the workload and workforce, the selection of the needed materials, and the redaction of the relations evaluated of the project tasks or phases, along with the technical inspection, control, and surveillance of the documentation for public administrations, industries or companies.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Software Process and Quality

One of the top skills in Computing is to be able to undertake the development of a software project in an efficient, effective and quality manner. For that, it is paramount to know the existing software development methodologies and their real applicability to concrete software projects. Besides, it is important to guarantee the maximum quality of the software resulted from that development process. In this course, the skills to apply an agile software development methodology to the needs of a project are obtained. Students will learn and put into practice the software development process management tools that ease their work and coordination withother software developers also taking part in a software project.Among others, students will acquire skills to employ software configuration tools (construction, change control, version control), tests and quality assurance, and software development management (documentation and error management). In summary, the aim of this course is that students learn to successfully accomplish, in a productive and high-quality manner, a software development process, encompassing all the development phases (software requirements, design, tests, deployment, and maintenance), applying an agile methodology and using the set of support tools which help them in code generation, version and error control, documentation, tests andquality assurance.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Software Requirements

One of the main tasks of graduates in Computing Engineering is the development of tools or software solutions. If the life cycle of a software system development process is analyzed, the first step will always be the definition of what this system /tool is supposed to be; those who better know what they want are the system stakeholders, those who are affected by the prospective system. In this subject, students will gain the needed competencies for the definition and modeling of a system in an organized and systematic way, as well as the techniques for gathering the required information from the stakeholders.COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Trends in Design and Social Innovation

Design is an ever-changing discipline that heavily relies on people and society. Therefore, in order to understand the users better and embrace meaningful projects, it is necessary to be able to identify trends and forecast future behavior both from a design and a social perspective. In order to do so, this course provides an overview of existing trends and trend analysis tools that make the students able to better frame all kinds of design projects.

Language of Instruction: English   

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International Business

This course is mainly targeted to help students understand the strategic issues and

tradeoffs in a global context and assess the strategic performance of global companies.

It is intended to cover two basic learning dimensions: The first one seeks to improve

the student´s ability to understand the present global environment and therefore, be

able to identify, analyze, and execute strategies in the global business environment.

Students will be exposed to material from a number of important and recurring

international business challenges including business-government relations, corporate

strategies in a world of multiple regulators, the management of complexity,

opportunities and risks in the global environment and so on. Secondly, students will be

led to understand the strategic management of global companies. We will examine

how, and why, firms decide to develop operations in foreign countries, and how firms

can become successful once their operations cross national boundaries. We will also

examine how individuals and teams manage business activities effectively in such

global companies.

The course draws on a number of different academic disciplines including economics,

political science, international finance, trade and relations, cultural dimensions, etc.

With regard to this approach, the goal is always to understand globalization and its

implications for firms from a trans-disciplinary focus, all integrated into and understood

from a systemic perspective of reality.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Financial Systems

In recent times, the overwhelming development of Information Technologies, together with both globalization and the world spread process of liberalizing markets, has given the Financial Markets a leading role in our Economy and, even, in our lives. The evolution of the interest rate, the objectives of the Central Bank and its autonomy, the Tobin Tax, the role of the IMF and the WB, the so-called Internet Bubble, the sub-prime mortgage crisis, the sovereign debt crisis… finance is a main part of today’s public debate. This course attempts to analyze the structure of the Financial System, studying the different markets and products it offers in order to allow the flows of capital. The student taking this course will acquire a framework for understanding the Financial System, its evolution, and products, being able to evaluate financial instruments in a simple way. The concepts discussed in this course are a sound basis for anyone wanting to work thoroughly in financial markets or instruments. And, furthermore, the student will be able to fully understand the main debates surrounding financial issues. Considering that finance is a sector in which is becoming difficult to separate the national market from the international one, we will consider the International Financial System as the object of study. Anyhow, the European Financial System will be used as a study-case and will provide most of the markets, institutions, and instruments discussed.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Economy of the European Union

The course aims are studying the theoretical framework for the process of European integration,

as well as offering a general overview of the EU as a global actor and of how it works. The EU

budget will be analyzed as an economic instrument to accomplish the EU objectives. The

internal market (the economic core of the EU) and the common competition policy will also be

studied. The most important achievement of the EU economy (the Economic and Monetary

Union -the euro) will then be explained. Throughout the course, the role of the EU as one of the

most important global actors in the world trade will be emphasized. The course will also

provide a brief presentation of the most important sectorial policies developed by the EU in

fields like agriculture, regional and social improvement. Finally, students will reflect on the

relevance of the opinion of civil society in the EU decision-making process.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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International Marketing

Nowadays, companies need to take their decisions in a changing and complex environment. Among a galaxy of changes, consumers alter their purchase and shopping habits (due to an increasing number of potential choices regarding what and where to buy), national markets become smaller, leading to globalisation, technological improvements reduce time and distance, distribution evolves, brands multiply, media becomes more and more fragmented and increases its power, at a time when the importance of different stakeholders is growing. Under these circumstances, the key challenge companies have to face is acquiring and nourishing profitable relationships with their customers. Organizations with a strong marketing orientation and a clear brand strategy are the strongest competitors in the market and are typically the leaders in their sector. Effective marketing management is an increasingly key ingredient in corporate success. This course is an introduction to the theory and application of marketing in a global marketplace. Marketing topics covered include marketing research, marketing strategies, marketing policies (product development, pricing, channels, and communication) among others. Furthermore, the last part of the course will be dedicated to a critical view of marketing and the way global companies have been acting during the last century and a half in our planet and the consequences for the future.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Organizational Behavior

This course aims to give students a general overview of Organizational Behavior, since the complementary perspective for the Human Resources Management. The purpose of this course is to enhance your learning about people in organizations and to help prepare you to be an affective organizational leader. Organizational Behavior contributes to an organization's success by improving the performance and well-being of its people. Common research and practice areas for Organizational Behavior include: Job Analysis, Personnel Recruitment and Selection, Work Motivation, Leadership and Executive Coaching, Human Resources (HHRR), Group/Team Performance among others.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Sports Management: European Football

The course examines the sports management system of European football (soccer). The main goal is that students become familiar with the basic characteristics of the management of a professional football club. In order to do so, different areas of management are explored, together with the main tasks that underlie each one of them. Real Madrid, F.C. Barcelona, Manchester United or Bayern Munich are perhaps the clearest examples of successful models of sports management, although there are also others closer to home such as Athletic Bilbao, which will also be examined during the course. An essential element around which everything is structured is that football is a game. Practical activities outside the classroom will be organized with this in mind.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Transatlantic Relations: the USA and the EU

The first aim of this course will be to settle the general framework for the relations between the US and the EU. In order to do so, the class will analyze the landmark documents: the Transatlantic Declaration (1990), the New Transatlantic Agenda (1995), and the Transatlantic Economic Partnership (1998). We will analyze the economic relations between those partners. The transatlantic flow of goods, services, and investments is of the highest importance. In those fields, the relationship is usually easy, but there are recurrent problems like steel, aviation industry or GMO. Part of those conflicts is addressed in the WTO. The class will then study the point of view of the US and the EU concerning the environment, and more precisely their approach to global warming, a well-known field of divergence. The course will also study how the issue of fighting terrorism is handled by both partners. The 9/11 attacks are a milestone in the response given by western democracies to international terrorism. Problems and solutions in this field are seen in a different way from each side of the Atlantic. Finally, the class will focus on the foreign affairs policy. Dilemmas like hard power versus soft power and unilateralism versus multilateralism will be exposed and studied in light of different documents. Especial attention will be devoted to the topic of defense.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Basque Culture and Language

The history of the Basque Country has come a long way from the ancient times before the Roman conquest of the Peninsula to the present day. What we can see nowadays is a highly modernized European country which is going through a promising time. The course will help students become familiar with Basque geography, history, and economy, as well as with the Basque culture, traditions, and language (Euskara, an ancient language of unknown origin). These topics, whose aim is to offer a global vision on the Basque Country, will be dealt with by means of group activities and discussions.

Language of Instruction: Spanish Basque   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Business Spanish

The objective of the course is to help students improve their communicative skills in the area of

business. The course is mainly based on a textbook focused on the use of language in different

areas of the working world. The communicative approach (both oral and written) will be used in

the classroom, which means the four language skills will be worked on: listening and written

comprehension, writing and oral skills. The textbook will be implemented with complementary

material taken from newspapers, magazines, and/or other textbooks of Business Spanish,

according to the interests and necessities of the students.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Culture, Politics and Economics in Contemporary Spanish Society

This course offers an introduction to Spanish culture and civilization so that students can become familiar with the social, economic and political structures of Spain today. Our study will be focused on some specific aspects which make Spain both appealing and richly varied: its ancestral monarchy recently restored, its organization in autonomous areas which may be a solution to historical conflicts, the fact that it is one of the main tourist destinations in the world and, at the same time, the country of Don Quijote, Don Juan, Lorca, bullfighting, and soccer. All these features of life, history, and politics will be analyzed all through the course, both in the lectures and in the tour that will take students to some of the most historically relevant cities in Spain.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Europe in the World

The goal of the course is to provide a general vision of current Europe in the world at different levels. It

will focus on the analysis of the European Union both as the main and practically only European actor in

the international scenario, and as one of the main most recent experiences in terms of social

organizations. The so-called European social and economic model and the limits of the European Union

will also be addressed, as well as the role of the E.U. in the field of foreign relations.

Language of Instruction: English    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Spanish Through Drama

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative competence in Spanish.

Students’ work will focus on literary, drama, and cultural contents by means of tasks based on

actual excerpts of plays by renown Spanish speaking playwrights from different literary periods

(mainly, but not necessarily, from the 20th century). Excerpts will be analyzed as literary texts,

but also as samples of aspects of Spanish culture (with an emphasis on interculturalism), and as

potential starting points of new texts to be created by students. At the end of the course, some or

all of the new scenes will be performed by students for their program mates.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Intermediate  

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Service Learning: Social Participation and Development

The objective of the course is to favor the holistic training of students as individuals, professionals, and citizens. It focuses on developing attitudes and values such as opening up to social reality and sensitivity towards global injustice, social exclusion, and the situation of the victims of such reality. The course will be based on the service-learning methodology and includes a solidarity service that aims at meeting actual community needs and favoring students’ learning process through experience.

Activities in the SERVICE LEARNING course require a commitment on your part.

-The exact dates and schedule will be provided by instructors on the first week of classes.

-There are two projects you can participate in. One of them involves direct contact with minors; therefore, in order to be able to participate in this project, you will need to bring a state police criminal record with you from your home country. This is a requirement for anyone volunteering with minors in Spain. You need to contact your local or state police in order to get the document, which will then need to be authenticated by an Apostille. The process is simple, but we recommend that you start with it as soon as possible.

-Please notice that, if you bring this police record, you will have access to both projects in the course.

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: Advanced/Superior  

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Practicum Course – Spanish Through Gastronomy

The main goal of the course is to improve students’ communicative and cultural competence in Spanish. Meal times and the development of personal and professional relations around meals are very important aspects of the Spanish culture. Students will become familiar with Spanish food culture by focusing on vocabulary and grammar structures pertaining to the topic, as well as on habits and traditions in different regions in Spain. They will also get to know the process of cooking some of the most typical dishes of Spanish cuisine and, particularly, of Basque cuisine (tortilla de patata, paella, natillas…). An additional fee of $215 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Engineering Internship

Students will participate in an internship in a local Spanish company. This opportunity is aimed at students with an advanced level of Spanish proficiency. Placements are available for students in the fields of Technology, Computer Science, and Engineering. An additional fee of $290 applies for this option.

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Production Management

The course provides detailed content of how production and services are managed in a company. For this, a hierarchical focus will be applied on three levels, strategic, tactical and operational. Specifically, this course will cover the study and application of techniques for demand forecasting, generating aggregate master and materials plans as well as capacity plans and production schedules. On completing this course, students are expected to be able to explain the existing engineering techniques for production planning in companies and assess decisions relating to aggregate and master planning using economic and technical criteria. In addition, they must be able to formulate the existing techniques for materials planning, detailed capacity planning, and production scheduling, and apply them correctly to specific cases.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Control Systems

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Thermal Engineering

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Design Laboratory II

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Design Laboratory III: Services and Experiences Design

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Smart Products

Course description currently unavailable.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Bible and Culture

The Bible, far from being the cultural heritage of a religious group or a creed, is part of the cultural heritage of humanity and is in itself a crossroads of cultures and examples of voices and traditions, sometimes in dialogue with others. The themes, characters and stories narrated in it are still a source of inspiration for essays, novels, films, paintings, sculptures, music ... This subject wants to show some reasons for these inexhaustible texts, explain the historical circumstances of their composition and development, reveal some of the interests that are hidden behind them and after their interpretations throughout history, ... learn, in short, to read them with a critical and open mind.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Contemporary Novel in English

The contemporary novel in English contributes to the consolidation of the academic-professional profile of Modern Languages students by providing a comprehensive approach to 20th-century narrative writing in English, both in the British Isles and English speaking countries. It explores the development of the contemporary novel in English by focusing on two important periods for the development of the English narrative: the 1920's or the so-called Modernist literature; and the post-war period that yields to the decolonization process and the beginning of postcolonial movements. One-quarter of the world population lives in one of the 54 countries once colonized by Great Britain. They share a fairly recent colonial history and the often violent consequences of the decolonization process. But above all this, they share a common language: English. This course intends to explore some expressions of colonial and post-colonial literature in English, as well as the circumstances that helped shape these texts as expressions of a complex and multilayered reality. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Contemporary Spanish Literature

Esta asignatura forma parte de la materia LITERATURA HISPÁNICA, dentro de la Mención de Estudios Hispánicos y Mención de Literatura del Grado de Lenguas Modernas. La asignatura aporta conocimientos fundamentales sobre la Literatura Española del siglo XX-XXI que le permiten al titulado la comprensión cultural y formal de la producción literaria en España. Asimismo contribuye a la formación mediante el desarrollo de competencias dedicadas al desarrollo de herramientas metodológicas y formación de expertos en literatura. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Critical Choices in Social Life

The subject aims to promote reflection on relevant issues of the global world and stimulate the formation of an ethical spirit in different areas of social life in which it will have to position itself. It seeks thus to support the process of integral formation of the person, basic objective of the University of Deusto.

The contents and methodologies of the subject help the students in the first place, to perceive the complexity and conflicts of interest in the socio-economic, political and cultural context in which they live. Second, to be aware that you make decisions with consequences for other people and the environment. Third, to recognize the values on which their decisions are based. Fourth, to promote an ethical attitude towards decision options and their consequences.

In this process, our reference will be Christian Social Thought that approaches social issues from the defense, respect, and promotion of the fundamental value of human dignity. The fundamental intuitions of the common good, the universal destiny of goods, the principle of subsidiarity, solidarity, the preferential option for the poor, participation and social justice are closely linked to this fundamental value.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Cultural Studies

Como parte de una materia transversal común a los grados de Humanidades y Lenguas, esta asignatura contribuye al perfil académico-profesional del estudiante proporcionándole un bagaje adecuado para enfrentarse a los fenómenos culturales de nuestro tiempo, con visión crítica capaz de ir de lo local a lo global, de lo uno a lo diverso. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Literature and Cinema

This course contributes to the consolidation of the academic-professional profile of Modern Languages students by showing them that national cultures are a mosaic of written and visual “texts” constantly interacting with each other. Fidelity, authenticity, intertextuality, genre boundaries, hybridity, reading conventions, and notions of the kind are all integral to the analysis of the transference occurring between different art forms. This course focuses specifically on adaptation issues. It also investigates how the introduction of new communication technologies has transformed our perception of fictional texts and reality.Literature and Cinema explore the type of “translation” that literary works undergo when they are taken to the screen. Since both arts rely on quite distinctive industries and semiotic systems, it will soon become apparent that our analyses of both “texts” are highly conditioned by the medium. As a result, such aspects as the relationship between the reader/viewer and the “text”, the concepts and protocols of analysis, the conventions to interpret each kind of narrative and the ideological implications are necessarily different in each of the two media. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Modern and Contemporary History

This course aims to present an introduction to the contemporary world, through an overview of global history over the last two centuries. The justification of this course rests on the importance of understanding relevant historic processes in order to contextualize the courses which make up the Modern Languages and Modern Languages and Management degrees.

The course will cover issues such as the creation of the Modern State, the main political revolutions, the evolution of the collective mentalities and their influence on the creation of new political systems, the impact and development of the main social movements, or the economic reforms and transformations, which are necessary for a rigorous interpretation of the information and knowledge obtained in other courses.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Social and Cultural Anthropology

La Antropología social estudia cómo investigar y conocer a unas sociedades definidas por su "alteridad" y su "no occidentalidad".

Esta asignatura es una introducción a la Antropología Social para conocer y aplicar qué es y cómo se estudia la alteridad, la diversidad cultural. El estudio del análisis de la variabilidad y d la evolución cultural en los ámbitos del parentesco, la economía, la política, la religión y las representaciones simbólicas enseña cómo percibir, pensar y vivir las diferencias y similitudes culturales.Para los estudiantes de Relaciones Internacionales esta asignatura capacita, mediante la práctica del pensamiento y del razonamiento antropológico, para captar y entender el sentido y el significado de la diversidad de las relaciones humanas y sus diferentes manifestaciones en el mundo contemporáneo. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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The East and the West in its Great Religious Traditions

The religious fact has been present in all cultures and has helped to shape the societies of all time; We are, therefore, faced with a highly significant universal phenomenon to know and deepen the human experience and identity. The subject East and West in its great religious traditions show how under the term religion hides an enormous diversity of forms, rites, practices, expressions, traditions and sensitivities, whose plurality illuminates while deepening the understanding of the religious phenomenon in society current. The subject contributes to the professional profile from an interdisciplinary perspective, attending to the systemic formation of a person, whose activity must be guided by the principles of respect and the promotion of Human Rights. It aims to train students to integrate into an increasingly globalized world, where the encounter between different cultures and religions seems inescapable. Knowledge of other traditions will allow you to assess the contributions and limits of your own religious context, as well as to respect and appreciate diversity in public life and the necessary dialogue to build a future for humanity in peace. Along with this, the interdisciplinary dimension of university education must be attentive - beyond the areas of knowledge of a certain professional activity- to ethical, philosophical, cultural and religious elements that consolidate systemic formation of the person and that trains to integrate and integrate in the different areas of public life(manifestations of culture, religion, education, work, coexistence in a plural society, etc.).

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Unseen Translation

This subject sees the translation from Spanish into English as a means to improve not only the skills to understand the "source language", but also, as a way to enhance the writing skills of the "target language". It also deepens the specific translation skills. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Varieties of English

Language is a multifaceted reality, and so are languages. What we designate with a single name 'English' (or any other, for that matter), actually hides heterogenous forms and components. In this class, we will examine some of the main axes of variation for different forms of English: diachronic and dialectal variation. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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Economics and International Policy Issues

This particular subject makes a contribution to the Degree in Business Administration of the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration by giving the necessary tools to each student in order to know and understand the interactions between economics and international relationships, so that each student may understand how those interactions affect decision making in firms. This subject is contributing also to the general objective of the Degree in Business Administration of the University of Deusto, which is to train professionals and persons having the general and specific competencies to understand, analyze, decide, plan and act inside firms, taking into account the international economic situation and perspectives, generating value for society and firms. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Ethical Challenges in a Global World

This course, aimed at students of all the degrees of the UD, responds to one of the essential principles of the "Deusto University Project": the training of students not only as competent professionals but also as people with certain values. More specifically, as people who contribute, from their specific professional skills to the world in which we live is more human, fair and supportive.

In this direction, the subject "Ethical challenges in the global world" (from the module "Human Formation in Values") tries to contribute precisely to the student's critical reflection on the global world in which we live and the economic, political, and cultural consequences, ethical, religious and ecological that produces the process of globalization. All this with the aim of helping the student to become aware of the main ethical challenges that arise in this process (economic-social injustice, intercultural coexistence, violation of human rights, climate change, etc.), and to know the different analysis and positions around these challenges, so that it is able to elaborate its own position and argue it in a convenient and convincing way.

With all this, we will approach the initial objective that students can contribute, from their respective professional fields and as citizens of the global world, to the construction of a more just, democratic and egalitarian society.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

European Union Law

This subject provides essential knowledge about European Union Law as a supranational legal system, focusing mainly on its system of sources and the principles that govern its effective application in domestic law. As a specific material area, fundamental economic freedoms are studied in the context of the European Internal Market. These contents and the active methodology applied in their learning provide students with the necessary training to perceive the European dimension of the issues and problems whose diagnosis and solution they should address in their professional life.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Foreign Policy

Course description currently unavailable.COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Globalization, Citizenship, and Intercultural Skills

Plurality is one of the most outstanding characteristics of postmodern societies, where dealing with the difference, whatever its origin, will be a mainstay in any profession. This subject is offered within the framework of the Identity and Mission Module of Deusto University. UD explicitly proclaims its commitment to the social and cultural reality as well as with social justice. Consequently, this course includes a theoretical approach to the situation, factors, and consequences of globalization and plurality. But it goes beyond that approach. From the beginning, a proactive attitude is incorporated, in order to generate awareness about the role we play in professional and personal relations and to look for an effective and appropriate communication with people of different origins, cultures, beliefs and other differences. In sum, it is a subject related to the essential elements of the practice of citizenship today. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

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History of International Relations

This course examines the role of the most relevant international organizations (IOs) in contemporary global governance. Its main focus is on the United Nations (UN) and its many organs and agencies, which form the centerpiece of global governance. At the theoretical level, the course conceives of IOs not only as instruments of member states but also as independent bureaucracies with a political life of their own. At the practical level, the course aims to provide the student with the required skills to interact and participate in a UN-simulated context, training him/her for a future professional career.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Human Resources Management

Esta asignatura introduce a los y las estudiantes en las funciones propias de la dirección de personas, tanto en la elaboración de un plan de personas ligado al plan estratégico de la organización, como en aquellas tareas propias de la función de personas y que se encuentran descentralizadas, esto es, que deben ser realizadas también por quienes dirigen las demás áreas funcionales y/o equipos en las organizaciones. La asignatura aporta al alumnado criterios orientadores para la dirección de personas, además de los procedimientos y herramientas necesarias para llevar a cabo esta función. Además, contribuirá a desarrollar la capacidad de trabajar en equipo. COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

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Media and International Relations

This course contributes to the consolidation of the students' academic-professional profile by helping them to improve their analytical abilities, communications skills (oral and written), initiative, judgment, team building, and critical thinking in discipline-specific contexts. The students will be exposed to relevant and diverse readings and will practice a variety of speaking activities of particular importance in their study field (mainly presentations and debates). They will also become aware of the importance of accuracy, organization, coherence, originality, credibility, and persuasiveness. The course is practical in nature since it relies entirely on relevant readings and regular submission of writing tasks and oral presentations (in group or individual), with close facilitation and regular feedback from the instructor and their own (and their peers') analysis and revision. It will focus on the role of media organizations and their coverage of issues such as: the globalisation process, climate change, state sovereignty and nationalism, the foreign policy of key states, international security and terrorism, ecological sustainability, economic and sustainable development, economic crisis, global finance, organised crime and money laundering, human rights, and the roles inter-governmental organisations (IGO), campaigning organisations [including international non-governmental organisations (INGO) and non-governmental organisations (NGO)], and multinational corporations (MNC).

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Public International Law

This course is part of the module "Foundations of International Relations" and the subject "law".

Being essentially a set of rules that govern the interaction between states, Public International Law provides a regulatory framework that defines and constrains the behavior of states with the aim of ensuring peaceful coexistence and enhancing international cooperation in a globalizing world.

The course Public International Law will provide the students with a thorough understanding of nature and basic features of International Law, as well as its role in contemporary International Relations. Students will be able to understand the legal foundation of the international states system and to apply international rules and legal principles in the analysis of international problems and conflicts. Thereby, students will also be able to conduct a critical analysis of the role of International Law in the context of global economic competition and power politics. Therefore, understanding Public International Law is fundamental for anyone who wants to act internationally, whether as a diplomat, in an international organization or as an international specialist in a private company or non-governmental organization.

The course develops the general competence of problem-solving through a method focused on applying the concepts and rules of international law to specific cases, in order to identify the legal and political nature of international problems as well as the legal basis of possible solutions.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: French   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Regional Integration Processes and Policies

This course is part of the module "Theory, organization and dynamics of international society" and the subject "International organization and theory"

The course aims to provide the student with a solid understanding of the politics and processes of regional integration

across the globe and how and why these differ from the European experience. Regionalism is conceptualized as an

intrinsic part of the EU's ideology and foreign policy and the course seeks to understand to what extent the European

model of post-sovereign governance is applicable in other parts of the world.

The theoretical point of departure is in the different integration theories studied in the course: federalism, neo-functionalism, inter-governmentalism, constructivism etc. whereas the empirical component of the course has two main dimensions: Firstly, a study of the general features of processes of regional integration in other parts of the world and, second, a group project analyzing a specific case of regional integration. Thereby, the student obtains both a theoretically grounded general understanding of regional integration as well as in-depth knowledge of a specific regional case.

The competence of critical thinking is developed through project seminars, where students will provide and receive feedback as well as reflect on their own group process.

COURSE TAUGHT WITH SPANISH STUDENTS

Language of Instruction: English Spanish   

Recommended US semester credits: 4  

Highlights
  • Classes taught in Spanish & English
  • Students can choose to enroll directly in classes with University of Deusto students
  • Internships available (for credit; additional fee)
  • Tandem partner program
  • International excursion

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Bilbao programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Gernika

    Gernika is home to the ‘Tree of Gernika,’ a large oak tree that became symbolic of the traditional rights of the Basque people. In 1937, the Nazis completely destroyed the town of Gernika during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso’s famous painting that has become an international symbol against war in general is named ‘Guernica’ after the atrocities that occurred here. In 1987 (50 years after the bombings) Gernika became known as a symbol of peace. On the way to Gernika lies San Juan de Gaztelugatxe, a tiny island connected to the mainland by a man made bridge. On top of the island there is a hermitage that dates from the 10th century.

  • Winery Tour

    One of Spain’s truly legendary winemaking regions, the region of La Rioja in central-North of Spain is home to some of the world’s best and most exclusive red wines. Laguardia, capital of the Alava region in the Basque country, is a gateway for experiencing the Rioja wine region and it is a good example of a walled village that has not changed much since the 13th century. During the Middle Ages, residents dug deep into the rock below their homes (and sometimes the home of their neighbor) to create places for food storage and refuge during the siege.When wine production became prominent in the region, the underground passages were found to be ideal for the fermenting of wine. The winery Ysios joins tradition with the modernity of facilities designed by Santiago Calatrava and inaugurated in 2001.

  • San Sebastián

    San Sebastián was founded in 1180 and is one of the Basque country’s most beautiful towns. It has been an important vacation spot since the late 1800s after being adopted as the summer home for Madrid’s royalty.

  • Southern France

    Biarritz is in the south-western corner of France, close to the border with Spain. The town is a lively one and a pleasure to explore. It contains very impressive grand 19th-century houses with wrought iron balconies and other decoration, with a faded elegance that adds to its charm. Biarritz has a high reputation as a surfing capital of Europe due to its fine sandy beach in the center of town.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • London

    London is the largest city in Western Europe, home of the Kings and Queens of England since time immemorial. The Tower of London, with its Beefeaters and grisly past, is a prominent landmark and is the place where the Tudor King Henry VIII had two of his queens beheaded! It is situated next to the famous Tower Bridge, which spans the River Thames. Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s Cathedral, the houses of Parliament and Big Ben are all equally famous historical buildings, of which there is no shortage in London. They are presided over by Buckingham Palace, where the current Queen lives, and overlooked by the London Eye. London is a magical city with plenty to offer any visitor.

  • Gernika

    Gernika is home to the ‘Tree of Gernika,’ a large oak tree that became symbolic of the traditional rights of the Basque people. In 1937, the Nazis completely destroyed the town of Gernika during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso’s famous painting that has become an international symbol against war in general is named ‘Guernica’ after the atrocities that occurred here. In 1987 (50 years after the bombings) Gernika became known as a symbol of peace. On the way to Gernika lies San Juan de Gaztelugatxe, a tiny island connected to the mainland by a man made bridge. On top of the island there is a hermitage that dates from the 10th century.

  • Winery Tour

    One of Spain’s truly legendary winemaking regions, the region of La Rioja in central-North of Spain is home to some of the world’s best and most exclusive red wines. Laguardia, capital of the Alava region in the Basque country, is a gateway for experiencing the Rioja wine region and it is a good example of a walled village that has not changed much since the 13th century. During the Middle Ages, residents dug deep into the rock below their homes (and sometimes the home of their neighbor) to create places for food storage and refuge during the siege.When wine production became prominent in the region, the underground passages were found to be ideal for the fermenting of wine. The winery Ysios joins tradition with the modernity of facilities designed by Santiago Calatrava and inaugurated in 2001.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • Santander

    Santander is an elegant city that extends over a wide bay with views of the Cantabrian Sea. Its historic quarter is situated against an incredible natural backdrop of sea and mountains.

  • Paris

    One of the most intriguing cities in the world, Paris is brimming with amazing museums, architecture, fashion, and beauty. Innumerable monuments built to reflect the glory of France and its rulers stand testament to the city’s rich history.

  • Gernika

    Gernika is home to the ‘Tree of Gernika,’ a large oak tree that became symbolic of the traditional rights of the Basque people. In 1937, the Nazis completely destroyed the town of Gernika during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso’s famous painting that has become an international symbol against war in general is named ‘Guernica’ after the atrocities that occurred here. In 1987 (50 years after the bombings) Gernika became known as a symbol of peace. On the way to Gernika lies San Juan de Gaztelugatxe, a tiny island connected to the mainland by a man made bridge. On top of the island there is a hermitage that dates from the 10th century.

  • Winery Tour

    One of Spain’s truly legendary winemaking regions, the region of La Rioja in central-North of Spain is home to some of the world’s best and most exclusive red wines. Laguardia, capital of the Alava region in the Basque country, is a gateway for experiencing the Rioja wine region and it is a good example of a walled village that has not changed much since the 13th century. During the Middle Ages, residents dug deep into the rock below their homes (and sometimes the home of their neighbor) to create places for food storage and refuge during the siege.When wine production became prominent in the region, the underground passages were found to be ideal for the fermenting of wine. The winery Ysios joins tradition with the modernity of facilities designed by Santiago Calatrava and inaugurated in 2001.

  • San Sebastián

    San Sebastián was founded in 1180 and is one of the Basque country’s most beautiful towns. It has been an important vacation spot since the late 1800s after being adopted as the summer home for Madrid’s royalty.

  • Southern France

    Biarritz is in the south-western corner of France, close to the border with Spain. The town is a lively one and a pleasure to explore. It contains very impressive grand 19th-century houses with wrought iron balconies and other decoration, with a faded elegance that adds to its charm. Biarritz has a high reputation as a surfing capital of Europe due to its fine sandy beach in the center of town.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • Santander

    Santander is an elegant city that extends over a wide bay with views of the Cantabrian Sea. Its historic quarter is situated against an incredible natural backdrop of sea and mountains.

  • Paris

    One of the most intriguing cities in the world, Paris is brimming with amazing museums, architecture, fashion, and beauty. Innumerable monuments built to reflect the glory of France and its rulers stand testament to the city’s rich history.

  • Lisbon

    Lisbon is a European city like no other. It boasts as grand a cultural and historical heritage as many other European cities but also has an earthier side that sets it apart. An impressive Gothic cathedral, the Hieronymites Monastery, St. George’s Castle and Torre de Belém are all part of the colorful cityscape. Another side of Lisbon is discovered wandering around the narrow lanes of Alfama, Rossio and Barrio Alto Quarters, and taking in the sounds and rhythm of the city. One experiences a step back in time through visits to the cultural sites in Lisbon, while also gaining an impression of the differences between Portugal and Spain.

API students in Bilbao live with host families with wireless internet included.

Students who live with families generally have their own room, but may share a double room with a fellow API student, and are provided with three meals per day and laundry service. Families provide an amazing opportunity to experience Spanish culture firsthand. Host families serve as a unique introduction into Spanish culture and may be made up of a married couple with children, a divorced or widowed woman with children still at home, or a family with some members living at home and others living outside the home. Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee.

***The apartment option can only be offered if requested by a minimum of 3 students of the same gender. When there is insufficient interest in this housing option, students are placed with host families.***

Student apartments require more independence and provide less cultural interaction with Spaniards, although other apartments in the building are often rented or owned by Spanish families. Each apartment can generally accommodate 3-4 people. The majority of the rooms in student apartments are double rooms. However, based on availability, some students may be assigned to a single room on a first-come, first served basis. Students are responsible for buying and preparing all of their own meals, and kitchens are furnished with the necessary cookware to do so. Sheets and blankets are also provided.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included.

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Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Fall Aug 30, 2019 - Dec 18, 2019 $13,980 Jun 10, 2019 Jul 1, 2019
Academic Year Aug 30, 2019 - May 14, 2020 $27,680 Jun 10, 2019 Jul 1, 2019
Spring Jan 4, 2020 - May 14, 2020 $14,680 Oct 15, 2019 Nov 1, 2019
Spring Jan 4, 2019 - May 16, 2019 $14,680 Oct 15, 2018 Nov 1, 2018