Spain Granada Market 608045261 Small

This program is designed for students at all levels who wish to study abroad in Granada to begin or to improve their knowledge of Spanish language in an immersion setting. Students study Spanish grammar and conversation. Students may earn 80-90 contact hours (5-6 semester credits) per summer term.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions (overnight, day)

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing (including meals and laundry)

Language and Culture Tools

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Spanish speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 5-6 credits per session (up to 12 total)

This program is designed for students at all levels who wish to study abroad in Granada to begin or to improve their knowledge of Spanish language in an immersion setting. Students study Spanish grammar and conversation. Students may earn 80-90 contact hours (5-6 semester credits) per summer term.

An essentially communicative approach is used in these courses along with the use of the most up-to-date audiovisual technology. These courses are designed to suit the needs of all students. Each student’s level of study is based on a placement exam administered upon arrival by the University of Granada.

Students wishing to complete both summer terms have the option of taking the both Summer 1 and Summer 2, OR they may take the Summer 1 Intensive Language program session, and transitioning to the Summer 2 Spanish Language & Culture program session (provided they have a B1.1 level of Spanish).

TRANSCRIPTS

Transcripts are issued by the Universidad de Granada upon completion of their program.

Staff & Coordinators

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    Lauren Daniels

    Lauren Daniels will be your Program Manager for this location and will prepare you to go abroad with us!

    Email - lauren.daniels@apiabroad.com

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    Carmen Chico (Curra) Mohedano

    Curra Mohedano will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

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    Carmen Lopez Marquez

    Carmen Lopez Marquez will be your Resident Director and a resource for you on-site.

COURSE OFFERINGS

CREDIT INFORMATION

Most API partner universities in Spain operate on the contact hour system, wherein the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. credits, divide the contact hours available by 15.

Intensive Spanish Language - 100 Level

Students at the beginning level are introduced to the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. The goal is to teach students basic linguistic skills so that they can understand others and communicate in everyday situations.

A sampling of the topics studied at the beginning level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Agreement
  • Pronouns
  • Ser/estar/hay
  • Present tense
  • Gerund
  • Past tense
  • Positive commands
  • Comparative structures

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Giving and asking basic information (personal, spatial, geographical, etc.)
  • Talking about characteristics
  • Describing
  • Expressing agreement and disagreement
  • Expressing likes and dislikes
  • Giving instructions and advice
  • Proposing activities
  • Communicating in a restaurant

CULTURE

  • General rules for social behavior in Spanish society
  • Perceptions of foreigners by Spanish people and vice versa
  • Everyday life (schedules, food)
  • Family: general characteristics
  • Geographic location and general characteristics of Spain
  • Introduction to flamenco and bullfighting
  • The democratic system (autonomous regions and monarchy)

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: A1-A2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 200 Level

Students at the intermediate level focus on understanding and communicating in general situations that demand an exchange of information. They will also learn how to talk about personal opinions related to familiar topics. A sampling of the topics studied at the intermediate level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Past tenses
  • Present subjunctive
  • Future
  • Conditional
  • Command forms
  • Impersonal “se”
  • Future perfect

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Comparing people, places, situations, and customs
  • Talking about the past
  • Talking about the future
  • Organizing an informative written text
  • Reacting to news. Expressing certainty
  • Expressing probability

CULTURE

  • General features of the social behavior of Spaniards
  • The family as the pillar of life in Spain
  • Spanish youth
  • Dictatorship and democracy
  • Spain and the European Union
  • Spain and America
  • Spanish cultural stereotypes (bullfighting and flamenco)
  • Introduction to literature
  • Introduction to Spanish art
  • Introduction to Spanish film

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: A2+, B1.1, B1.2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 300 & 400 Level

Advanced level students are able to use and understand complex linguistic structures to communicate in a variety of situations that demand an exchange of information and opinions.

A sampling of the topics studied at the advanced level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Correlation of tenses with past tenses and conditional
  • Relative clauses with prepositions
  • Uses of the subjunctive
  • Past tenses: a general and interrelated perspective
  • Time correlation in referred discourse
  • Future for conjecture
  • Conditional for hypothetical situations

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Expressing feelings
  • Giving and asking for advice
  • Establishing conditions
  • Formulating opinions
  • Expressing hypothesis
  • Making unrealistic comparisons
  • Referred discourse

CULTURE

  • Spanish/Andalusian culture
  • The autonomous communities of Spain
  • Islamic past and heritage
  • Bullfight: symbol, ritual and metaphor
  • Family structure in Spain
  • Flamenco and “duende”
  • Religion and folklore
  • Spain and the European Union
  • Spain and Latin America
  • Current situation of women in Spain
  • Spain today: ideological, political and cultural trends
  • Introduction to Spanish art
  • Introduction to Spanish literature
  • Introduction to Spanish film

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: B2.1, B2.2, C1, C2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 100 Level

Students at the beginning level are introduced to the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. The goal is to teach students basic linguistic skills so that they can understand others and communicate in everyday situations.

A sampling of the topics studied at the beginning level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Agreement
  • Pronouns
  • Ser/estar/hay
  • Present tense
  • Gerund
  • Past tense
  • Positive commands
  • Comparative structures

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Giving and asking basic information (personal, spatial, geographical, etc.)
  • Talking about characteristics
  • Describing
  • Expressing agreement and disagreement
  • Expressing likes and dislikes
  • Giving instructions and advice
  • Proposing activities
  • Communicating in a restaurant

CULTURE

  • General rules for social behavior in Spanish society
  • Perceptions of foreigners by Spanish people and vice versa
  • Everyday life (schedules, food)
  • Family: general characteristics
  • Geographic location and general characteristics of Spain
  • Introduction to flamenco and bullfighting
  • The democratic system (autonomous regions and monarchy)

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: A1-A2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 200 Level

Students at the intermediate level focus on understanding and communicating in general situations that demand an exchange of information. They will also learn how to talk about personal opinions related to familiar topics. A sampling of the topics studied at the intermediate level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Past tenses
  • Present subjunctive
  • Future
  • Conditional
  • Command forms
  • Impersonal “se”
  • Future perfect

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Comparing people, places, situations, and customs
  • Talking about the past
  • Talking about the future
  • Organizing an informative written text
  • Reacting to news. Expressing certainty
  • Expressing probability

CULTURE

  • General features of the social behavior of Spaniards
  • The family as the pillar of life in Spain
  • Spanish youth
  • Dictatorship and democracy
  • Spain and the European Union
  • Spain and America
  • Spanish cultural stereotypes (bullfighting and flamenco)
  • Introduction to literature
  • Introduction to Spanish art
  • Introduction to Spanish film

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: A2+, B1.1, B1.2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 300 & 400 Level

Advanced level students are able to use and understand complex linguistic structures to communicate in a variety of situations that demand an exchange of information and opinions.

A sampling of the topics studied at the advanced level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Correlation of tenses with past tenses and conditional
  • Relative clauses with prepositions
  • Uses of the subjunctive
  • Past tenses: a general and interrelated perspective
  • Time correlation in referred discourse
  • Future for conjecture
  • Conditional for hypothetical situations

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Expressing feelings
  • Giving and asking for advice
  • Establishing conditions
  • Formulating opinions
  • Expressing hypothesis
  • Making unrealistic comparisons
  • Referred discourse

CULTURE

  • Spanish/Andalusian culture
  • The autonomous communities of Spain
  • Islamic past and heritage
  • Bullfight: symbol, ritual and metaphor
  • Family structure in Spain
  • Flamenco and “duende”
  • Religion and folklore
  • Spain and the European Union
  • Spain and Latin America
  • Current situation of women in Spain
  • Spain today: ideological, political and cultural trends
  • Introduction to Spanish art
  • Introduction to Spanish literature
  • Introduction to Spanish film

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: B2.1, B2.2, C1, C2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 100 Level

Students at the beginning level are introduced to the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. The goal is to teach students basic linguistic skills so that they can understand others and communicate in everyday situations.

A sampling of the topics studied at the beginning level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Agreement
  • Pronouns
  • Ser/estar/hay
  • Present tense
  • Gerund
  • Past tense
  • Positive commands
  • Comparative structures

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Giving and asking basic information (personal, spatial, geographical, etc.)
  • Talking about characteristics
  • Describing
  • Expressing agreement and disagreement
  • Expressing likes and dislikes
  • Giving instructions and advice
  • Proposing activities
  • Communicating in a restaurant

CULTURE

  • General rules for social behavior in Spanish society
  • Perceptions of foreigners by Spanish people and vice versa
  • Everyday life (schedules, food)
  • Family: general characteristics
  • Geographic location and general characteristics of Spain
  • Introduction to flamenco and bullfighting
  • The democratic system (autonomous regions and monarchy)

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: A1-A2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 200 Level

Students at the intermediate level focus on understanding and communicating in general situations that demand an exchange of information. They will also learn how to talk about personal opinions related to familiar topics. A sampling of the topics studied at the intermediate level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Past tenses
  • Present subjunctive
  • Future
  • Conditional
  • Command forms
  • Impersonal “se”
  • Future perfect

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Comparing people, places, situations, and customs
  • Talking about the past
  • Talking about the future
  • Organizing an informative written text
  • Reacting to news. Expressing certainty
  • Expressing probability

CULTURE

  • General features of the social behavior of Spaniards
  • The family as the pillar of life in Spain
  • Spanish youth
  • Dictatorship and democracy
  • Spain and the European Union
  • Spain and America
  • Spanish cultural stereotypes (bullfighting and flamenco)
  • Introduction to literature
  • Introduction to Spanish art
  • Introduction to Spanish film

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: A2+, B1.1, B1.2  

Intensive Spanish Language - 300 & 400 Level

Advanced level students are able to use and understand complex linguistic structures to communicate in a variety of situations that demand an exchange of information and opinions.

A sampling of the topics studied at the advanced level may include (but are not limited to):

GRAMMAR

  • Correlation of tenses with past tenses and conditional
  • Relative clauses with prepositions
  • Uses of the subjunctive
  • Past tenses: a general and interrelated perspective
  • Time correlation in referred discourse
  • Future for conjecture
  • Conditional for hypothetical situations

ORAL EXPRESSION

  • Expressing feelings
  • Giving and asking for advice
  • Establishing conditions
  • Formulating opinions
  • Expressing hypothesis
  • Making unrealistic comparisons
  • Referred discourse

CULTURE

  • Spanish/Andalusian culture
  • The autonomous communities of Spain
  • Islamic past and heritage
  • Bullfight: symbol, ritual and metaphor
  • Family structure in Spain
  • Flamenco and “duende”
  • Religion and folklore
  • Spain and the European Union
  • Spain and Latin America
  • Current situation of women in Spain
  • Spain today: ideological, political and cultural trends
  • Introduction to Spanish art
  • Introduction to Spanish literature
  • Introduction to Spanish film

Language of Instruction: Spanish    Language Level Required: B2.1, B2.2, C1, C2  

Highlights
  • Classes taught in Spanish
  • Immersive language program

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Granada programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • El Escorial

    The Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial was constructed between 1563-1584 and built in the purest 16th century Renaissance style. Nearly all Bourbon kings and queens of Spain have been buried here. It is a royal palace, a monastery, school and houses the private library of Philip II which contains some of the oldest books in the world.

  • Las Alpujarras

    This region of mountain villages lies on the southern flanks of the Sierra Nevada mountains (Europe’s second highest mountain range after the Alps) with breathtaking valleys and gorges that run down towards the Mediterranean coast. The villages of Capileira, Bubión, and Pampaneira, located at the Poqueira ravine, have a unique whitewashed North African style. The area allows the traveler to experience the natural beauty while hiking the many trails that connect the different villages.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • San José and Cabo de Gata

    Southeastern Andalusia boasts of some of Spain’s most beautiful beaches. Students explore the Cabo de Gata-Nijar Natural Park, based in the town of San José. The park covers approximately 60 km of coastline, accompanied by cliffs of awesome grandeur. It has a wild, elemental feel and is far enough off the beaten track to seem positively deserted compared with most Andalusian beaches. It is a perfect place for hiking, sunbathing, picnicking, and relaxing.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • El Escorial

    The Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial was constructed between 1563-1584 and built in the purest 16th century Renaissance style. Nearly all Bourbon kings and queens of Spain have been buried here. It is a royal palace, a monastery, school and houses the private library of Philip II which contains some of the oldest books in the world.

  • Las Alpujarras

    This region of mountain villages lies on the southern flanks of the Sierra Nevada mountains (Europe’s second highest mountain range after the Alps) with breathtaking valleys and gorges that run down towards the Mediterranean coast. The villages of Capileira, Bubión, and Pampaneira, located at the Poqueira ravine, have a unique whitewashed North African style. The area allows the traveler to experience the natural beauty while hiking the many trails that connect the different villages.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • San José and Cabo de Gata

    Southeastern Andalusia boasts of some of Spain’s most beautiful beaches. Students explore the Cabo de Gata-Nijar Natural Park, based in the town of San José. The park covers approximately 60 km of coastline, accompanied by cliffs of awesome grandeur. It has a wild, elemental feel and is far enough off the beaten track to seem positively deserted compared with most Andalusian beaches. It is a perfect place for hiking, sunbathing, picnicking, and relaxing.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Barcelona

    Barcelona is home to a remarkable cultural energy, unique cuisine and fiercely individual spirit. The glorious modernist architecture (Art Nouveau) studs the city streets and avenues, and is mainly represented by the various works by Antoni Gaudí including the Sagrada Familia Church. The city also boasts an artistic legacy, from important Romanesque and Gothic works to major galleries.

  • Granada Coast

    Granada’s coastal area has dozens of beaches and small coves with crystal-clear water, 320 sunny days a year and an average temperature of 20 degrees. These are the basic facts that sum up the 73 kilometers of tropical coastline in the province of Granada, which gets its name from the exceptionally good weather it enjoys all year round. Water sports such paddling, windsurf, kite surf, sailing can also be enjoyed on this trip!

  • El Escorial

    The Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial was constructed between 1563-1584 and built in the purest 16th century Renaissance style. Nearly all Bourbon kings and queens of Spain have been buried here. It is a royal palace, a monastery, school and houses the private library of Philip II which contains some of the oldest books in the world.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Barcelona

    Barcelona is home to a remarkable cultural energy, unique cuisine and fiercely individual spirit. The glorious modernist architecture (Art Nouveau) studs the city streets and avenues, and is mainly represented by the various works by Antoni Gaudí including the Sagrada Familia Church. The city also boasts an artistic legacy, from important Romanesque and Gothic works to major galleries.

  • Granada Coast

    Granada’s coastal area has dozens of beaches and small coves with crystal-clear water, 320 sunny days a year and an average temperature of 20 degrees. These are the basic facts that sum up the 73 kilometers of tropical coastline in the province of Granada, which gets its name from the exceptionally good weather it enjoys all year round. Water sports such paddling, windsurf, kite surf, sailing can also be enjoyed on this trip!

API students in Granada may choose to live with a host family, Residencia, or in a shared apartment with other students. Internet access is available in all three options.

Students who choose to live with families typically share a double room with a fellow API student and are provided with three meals per day, laundry, and cleaning service. Families provide an amazing opportunity to experience Spanish culture firsthand. Host families serve as a unique introduction into Spanish culture and may be made up of a married couple with children, a divorced or widowed woman, some of them with children still at home, or a family with some members living at home and others living outside the home. Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee.

Students who choose the shared apartment option generally live with other students. Shared apartments may be made up of API students, local and/or international students. Students benefit from having meals, laundry, and cleaning provided by the Spanish owner. Three meals per day are also provided with this option. On Sundays and during holidays, meals may not be served. Shared apartments may be run by dorms or families. In some cases, a family member may share the apartment. Some families spend a great deal of time with the students, while others may not join the students for meals or other activities.

Residencias offer students the opportunity to live with local Spanish, international students, and other API program participants. Residencias are not like American “dorms”, but rather, they are arranged more like traditional boarding houses. Students may share a room and a common bathroom. Everyone has access to the common living and TV areas, and internet access. Three meals/day are included in a common dining hall (at specified dining times), laundry service or facilities are available and regular cleaning provided. Mealtimes are set according to each residencia, and the meal schedule will be posted upon arrival. On Sundays and during holidays meals may not be served but students may use a small kitchen equipped with a refrigerator, microwave oven, etc. Most of the Residencias are co-ed.

Note: Housing between the fall and spring semesters is not included.

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Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 1 May 25, 2019 - Jul 3, 2019 $4,680 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 10, 2019
Summer 1 and 2 Combined May 25, 2019 - Aug 1, 2019 $7,980 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 10, 2019
Summer 2 Jun 27, 2019 - Aug 1, 2019 $4,680 Apr 1, 2019 Apr 10, 2019