Spain Seville Plaza De Espana 557010682 Small

Designed for students who wish to study abroad in Seville with no previous knowledge of Spanish, the Contemporary Hispanic Studies program offers a number of cultural courses taught in English, and many also feature some Spanish language instruction.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

@api Online System

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

API Center

On-Site Orientation

Excursions (overnight, day, international)

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Resident Directors

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Volunteer Opportunities

Tutoring

Housing (including meals and laundry with host families and dorms)

Language and Culture Tools

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and Global Leadership Academy

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshman, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to beginning level Spanish speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 12-15 credits per semester

Designed for students who wish to study abroad in Seville with no previous knowledge of Spanish, the Contemporary Hispanic Studies program offers a number of cultural courses taught in English, and many also feature some Spanish language instruction.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students will receive a transcript from the Universidad de Sevilla upon completion of their program.

Courses

COURSE OFFERINGS

Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish, the Contemporary Hispanic Studies program offers a number of cultural courses taught in English and features additional courses in beginning Spanish language instruction. Students may choose 4-5 courses from the following selections offered by the Department of Philology or the Department of Geography & History.

Students with an advanced level of Spanish (3+ semesters of college-level Spanish) may opt to select up to two courses from the Spanish Language & Humanities program.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Each course is equivalent to 3 semester credits. Most API partner universities in Spain operate on the contact hour system, wherein the number of credits earned depends on the time spent in class. To determine the conversion of contact hours to U.S. credits, divide the contact hours available by 15.

FS-02 Conversation and Composition in Spanish for American Students

The purpose of this course is to develop the students’ ability to express themselves orally as well as in writing in basic sociolinguistic contexts, enabling them to interact effortlessly while taking into consideration the contrast with their native tongue.Students learn to initialize and maintain a conversation with a limited vocabulary, to spontaneously produce sentences and elementary conversational routines, to narrate and describe familiar social situations and to write various basic texts paying attention to syntactic and orthographic accuracy.

View Syllabus

FS-03 Keys to Spanish Vocabulary

The aim of this course is to empower participants with an understanding of the nature of words in Spanish, as well as with the ability to take full advantage of them in spoken and written usage. Taught in English and Spanish.

View Syllabus

FS-06 Gender Views in Contemporary Spanish Literature and Cinema

This course explores gender representations (ranging from feminist perspectives, gender performances, or the theory and practice of female writing, to questions of sexual identity, patterns of masculinity and queer theory) within the Spanish literature and cinema produced during the last three decades. Besides analyzing a selection of works by the most representative authors who form part of the contemporary literary panorama in Spain, students will also examine the different critical paradigms and theories within the field of gender and sexuality studies and how they are formulated within a range of cultural texts and contexts.

View Syllabus

FS-07 Introduction to Spanish Cultural Studies

The main goal of this course is to give students a core familiarity with Spanish history and culture. They are expected to come away from the class with a broad sense of the tensions and turning-points that have shaped the Spanish past, as well as of the major historical actors, institutions, and achievements that scholars associated with each period.

View Syllabus

FS-08 The Arab World Today: Contemporary History and International Relations

This course will introduce students to the contemporary history of the Arab world and its international relations during the 20th and 21st centuries. It will describe the major events in the history of the Eastern (Mashreq) and Western (Maghreb) Arab states during this period and of the development of their relations with Europe and the United States. Special attention will be paid to Spain’s relations with the Maghreb region, particularly with Morocco.

View Syllabus

FS-09 Music and Society: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

The aim of this course is to acquire an aural, visual, and theoretical understanding of Flamenco, of the streams of culture which created it, and of its role within Spanish culture, and on using the study of Flamenco as a vehicle to explore the relationship between art and culture, music and society, and the ways in which we think, talk and learn about Flamenco. The intention of the practical part of the course, the Flamenco dance class, is designed to give students an understanding of the mechanics, aesthetics, and basic canons of an art form that is so often described as being purely spontaneous and free. At the end of the course, students will perform the simple choreography they have learned, accompanied by a professional singer and guitarist. This tends to give them an entirely new appreciation of the complexity of both the dance form and the culture in which it is embedded. Evaluation in this part of the class sessions is based on attendance, effort and improvement, each student performing at their own level; ability or prior dance training is not necessary.

View Syllabus

FS-09 Music and Society: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

The aim of this course is to acquire an aural, visual, and theoretical understanding of Flamenco, of the streams of culture which created it, and of its role within Spanish culture, and on using the study of Flamenco as a vehicle to explore the relationship between art and culture, music and society, and the ways in which we think, talk and learn about Flamenco. The intention of the practical part of the course, the Flamenco dance class, is designed to give students an understanding of the mechanics, aesthetics, and basic canons of an art form that is so often described as being purely spontaneous and free. At the end of the course, students will perform the simple choreography they have learned, accompanied by a professional singer and guitarist. This tends to give them an entirely new appreciation of the complexity of both the dance form and the culture in which it is embedded. Evaluation in this part of the class sessions is based on attendance, effort and improvement, each student performing at their own level; ability or prior dance training is not necessary.

View Syllabus

FS-12 Progressive Spanish for English-Speaking Students

This course is aimed at English-speaking students who already have a basic knowledge of Spanish. Its key objective is to improve their communication skills by means of the consolidation of their grammar competence and of the introduction of practical vocabulary so as to enable them to cope with the usual communication situations of everyday life. On the one hand, teaching methodology will be based on the assimilation of grammatical rules and their practical application via specific activities and, on the other hand, will involve the gradual and progressive use of Spanish as a vehicle for communication within the classroom.

View Syllabus

FS-13 Languages of International Development: Healthcare and Voluntary Work

This course will examine a range of international development topics related to healthcare and medicine around the globe. Students will explore contemporary issues affecting the institutions that provide healthcare and the people who seek health services. Students will also look into the how international development takes place and is developed, why it is necessary, and how it is related to healthcare.

View Syllabus

FS-14 Painting in Literary Seville

Understand the city of Seville and its artistic heritage combining the literature of Seville with the practical art of painting. To have a profound knowledge of a city and its heritage requires a very careful study of its most emblematic places. Painting gives one a greater vision of the city. We choose different techniques: pencil, charcoal, watercolor, and ink, etc. The students pass enjoyable sessions in the parks, plazas, streets, and monuments of Seville, the Guadalquivir River, the Alcázar, the Barrio Santa Cruz, taking time to study their subject, its form, and history. They will get to know the city, its hidden places, and architecture like no other student can hope to do. At the end of the semester, the students will have a fine collection of drawings and paintings which make great souvenirs and gifts for their friends and families. Also, they will acquire a great understanding of painting; perspective and composition which will help them appreciate art for the rest of their lives.

View Syllabus

FS-15 Photographing the Literary Seville

This course will examine the literary richness of Seville through the photographic lens. We will learn about how to better control our cameras, fundamental photographic techniques and the history of photography and apply this knowledge to the myths and stories based here. Students will also explore the city and its surroundings during field trips and learn to look at images critically and critique them in a group setting. An SLR digital camera with full manual functions is required.

View Syllabus

FS-16 Literary and Cultural Traditions in Spanish-Speaking Communities

Language, literature, and culture, in general, are the most important aspects of a person’s life; To learn a foreign language, it is important to also learn about their culture, political and religious affiliations, as well as educational, historical, and geographical information so that you can then assess how this affects their society.

View Syllabus

FS-17 A Practical Course in Teaching English as a Foreign Language Methodology

This training course offers a theoretical and practical approach to the teaching of English as a foreign language (EFL) to Spanish-speaking students. Classroom practice will be fostered which includes activities in the class, activities outside the class under the supervision of a tutor and the opportunity to take part of the course in a Spanish school with Spanish students in the city of Seville. This way, not only theoretical content but also the cultural aspects which are involved in the practice of teaching English as a foreign language will be dealt with.

View Syllabus

FS-17 A Practical Course in Teaching English as a Foreign Language Methodology

This training course offers a theoretical and practical approach to the teaching of English as a foreign language (EFL) to Spanish-speaking students. Classroom practice will be fostered which includes activities in the class, activities outside the class under the supervision of a tutor and the opportunity to take part of the course in a Spanish school with Spanish students in the city of Seville. This way, not only theoretical content but also the cultural aspects which are involved in the practice of teaching English as a foreign language will be dealt with.

View Syllabus

GS-01 Spain’s Classical Heritage: Between History and Mythology

The main goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of Spain’s classical heritage. Special attention will be paid to the presence of Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans in Spain, not only from a historical point of view but also taking into account the mythological construction of Spain’s past and Spain’s key cultural traditions. The course also explores Spain’s religious background, mainly the long process of Christianization in southern Spain.

View Syllabus

GS-02 Contemporary Spain: Economy, Society, and Environment

This course will focus on the ways in which relationships between people and the natural environment, as well as patterns of spatial relationships, vary throughout Spain. It will explain how these relationships produce the distinctiveness of particular places, landscapes, and patterns of environmental and human attributes, as well as societies and identities, and provide students with the ability to conceptualize these relationships and their outcomes across a range of scales. Students gain an appreciation of the characteristics of the urban, regional and rural environments of selected areas in Spain and of the geographical processes which underlie their development, as well as an understanding of the practical application of concepts and methods taught in the classroom.

View Syllabus

GS-03 Great Masters and the Major Artistic Trends in Spain During the Twentieth Century

This course will analyze the principal trends in Spanish art during the twentieth century. During the first half of the century, developments in Spanish art were determined by a particular set of historical circumstances. After the arrival of democracy, it will become clear that Spanish artists were more fully integrated into the worldwide art movement. The course has chosen those artists who are representative of certain developments in a key way and through whom, in general terms, Spanish art in the 20th century may be explored.

View Syllabus

GS-04 U.S.-European Relations Since World War II

This course will provide students with the theoretical framework necessary to help them think critically about transatlantic relations at many different, yet inter-related levels: political, military, security-based, cultural, and economic. The first part of the course will focus on the historical context of this key network, while special emphasis will be placed on U.S.-Spain relations. The second part of the course will examine the institutions linked to the transatlantic agenda: of a political, security-based, and economic kind. The third part of the course will focus on cultural issues, including public opinion and anti-Americanism. The last part of the course will look at the future of the transatlantic relationship.

View Syllabus

GS-05 International Marketing

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the marketing decisions within an organization, from a global perspective. With this aim in mind, students are trained to apply the basic concepts and techniques in marketing, so that they become familiar with the duties of a marketing manager. More specifically, students will be exposed to the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing management in a global business environment.

View Syllabus

GS-06 Spanish Cuisine, Spanish Cuisines

This course is designed as an introduction to the diversity of Spain’s cuisines. It is not intended to deal with every aspect of Spanish cuisine, but does aim to open a small window so students may become seduced by the view, the aromas and tastes of Spain’s gastronomic achievements.

View Syllabus

GS-07 Photography: Theory and Technique

The course has the following objectives; Learning how to read photographs and its meanings, develop technical photographic skills, understand the possibilities of photography as a way of expression and information, the importance of new technologies applied to photography, improve an analytic vision of contemporary images., improve social skills and group work.

View Syllabus

Social Psychology

This course will provide students with an introduction to the field of social psychology. Social psychology is a subfield of the science of psychology that focuses on the perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals and groups within a social context. This class will give students a broad overview of the major theories and findings of social psychology.

Film Editing

The subject agenda for this course can be divided into two blocks which can be summed up as canon and style. Each block has different topics covering the whole subject spectrum. However, the teacher reserves the right to modify these topics, adding new ones, updating them or replacing them, always looking for the students to have a better experience.The first block introduces different fields of the audiovisual language. At the end of the block, the goal is for the students to understand the basic filming and editing rules. The aim is them being able to plan, shoot and edit a fiction scene.During the second block, students will make an approach to diverse editing techniques, styles and movements from classic Hollywood model to nowadays audiovisual fictions. The goal is for the students to be able to identify different montage styles and the expressive intentions attached. The course also wants to motivate the students to engage in creative editing.

View Syllabus

FS-18 Psychology and Foreign Language Learning

This course is an introduction to second language acquisition, that is, a first acquaintance with how a non-native language (L2) is learned once a first language (L1) has already been developed. Second language acquisition is a dynamic process that millions of individuals worldwide are engaged in; it is also a growing interdisciplinary field of study within the mega field of applied linguistics.

GS-12 Wine in Spain: History and Wine Tasting

Wine has long been part of human society and today is an important part of Spanish culture. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the world of wine. Students will meet the main Spanish wine regions and grapes, they will learn how to store and serve wine effectively, and explore different wines through sight, smell, and taste, and the principles of food and wine pairings. This course also covers a variety of topics related to the Spanish wine industry, from wine styles and winegrowing areas to sustainable production and tourism.

FS-06 Gender Views in Contemporary Spanish Literature and Cinema

This course explores gender representations (ranging from feminist perspectives, gender performances, or the theory and practice of female writing, to questions of sexual identity, patterns of masculinity and queer theory) within the Spanish literature and cinema produced during the last three decades. Besides analyzing a selection of works by the most representative authors who form part of the contemporary literary panorama in Spain, students will also examine the different critical paradigms and theories within the field of gender and sexuality studies and how they are formulated within a range of cultural texts and contexts.

View Syllabus

FS-08 The Arab World Today: Contemporary History and International Relations

This course will introduce students to the contemporary history of the Arab world and its international relations during the 20th and 21st centuries. It will describe the major events in the history of the Eastern (Mashreq) and Western (Maghreb) Arab states during this period and of the development of their relations with Europe and the United States. Special attention will be paid to Spain’s relations with the Maghreb region, particularly with Morocco.

View Syllabus

FS-09 Music and Society: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

The aim of this course is to acquire an aural, visual, and theoretical understanding of Flamenco, of the streams of culture which created it, and of its role within Spanish culture, and on using the study of Flamenco as a vehicle to explore the relationship between art and culture, music and society, and the ways in which we think, talk and learn about Flamenco. The intention of the practical part of the course, the Flamenco dance class, is designed to give students an understanding of the mechanics, aesthetics, and basic canons of an art form that is so often described as being purely spontaneous and free. At the end of the course, students will perform the simple choreography they have learned, accompanied by a professional singer and guitarist. This tends to give them an entirely new appreciation of the complexity of both the dance form and the culture in which it is embedded. Evaluation in this part of the class sessions is based on attendance, effort and improvement, each student performing at their own level; ability or prior dance training is not necessary.

View Syllabus

FS-09 Music and Society: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

The aim of this course is to acquire an aural, visual, and theoretical understanding of Flamenco, of the streams of culture which created it, and of its role within Spanish culture, and on using the study of Flamenco as a vehicle to explore the relationship between art and culture, music and society, and the ways in which we think, talk and learn about Flamenco. The intention of the practical part of the course, the Flamenco dance class, is designed to give students an understanding of the mechanics, aesthetics, and basic canons of an art form that is so often described as being purely spontaneous and free. At the end of the course, students will perform the simple choreography they have learned, accompanied by a professional singer and guitarist. This tends to give them an entirely new appreciation of the complexity of both the dance form and the culture in which it is embedded. Evaluation in this part of the class sessions is based on attendance, effort and improvement, each student performing at their own level; ability or prior dance training is not necessary.

View Syllabus

FS-12 Progressive Spanish for English-Speaking Students

This course is aimed at English-speaking students who already have a basic knowledge of Spanish. Its key objective is to improve their communication skills by means of the consolidation of their grammar competence and of the introduction of practical vocabulary so as to enable them to cope with the usual communication situations of everyday life. On the one hand, teaching methodology will be based on the assimilation of grammatical rules and their practical application via specific activities and, on the other hand, will involve the gradual and progressive use of Spanish as a vehicle for communication within the classroom.

View Syllabus

FS-14 Painting in Literary Seville

Understand the city of Seville and its artistic heritage combining the literature of Seville with the practical art of painting. To have a profound knowledge of a city and its heritage requires a very careful study of its most emblematic places. Painting gives one a greater vision of the city. We choose different techniques: pencil, charcoal, watercolor, and ink, etc. The students pass enjoyable sessions in the parks, plazas, streets, and monuments of Seville, the Guadalquivir River, the Alcázar, the Barrio Santa Cruz, taking time to study their subject, its form, and history. They will get to know the city, its hidden places, and architecture like no other student can hope to do. At the end of the semester, the students will have a fine collection of drawings and paintings which make great souvenirs and gifts for their friends and families. Also, they will acquire a great understanding of painting; perspective and composition which will help them appreciate art for the rest of their lives.

View Syllabus

GS-01 Spain’s Classical Heritage: Between History and Mythology

The main goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of Spain’s classical heritage. Special attention will be paid to the presence of Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans in Spain, not only from a historical point of view but also taking into account the mythological construction of Spain’s past and Spain’s key cultural traditions. The course also explores Spain’s religious background, mainly the long process of Christianization in southern Spain.

View Syllabus

GS-02 Contemporary Spain: Economy, Society, and Environment

This course will focus on the ways in which relationships between people and the natural environment, as well as patterns of spatial relationships, vary throughout Spain. It will explain how these relationships produce the distinctiveness of particular places, landscapes, and patterns of environmental and human attributes, as well as societies and identities, and provide students with the ability to conceptualize these relationships and their outcomes across a range of scales. Students gain an appreciation of the characteristics of the urban, regional and rural environments of selected areas in Spain and of the geographical processes which underlie their development, as well as an understanding of the practical application of concepts and methods taught in the classroom.

View Syllabus

GS-03 Great Masters and the Major Artistic Trends in Spain During the Twentieth Century

This course will analyze the principal trends in Spanish art during the twentieth century. During the first half of the century, developments in Spanish art were determined by a particular set of historical circumstances. After the arrival of democracy, it will become clear that Spanish artists were more fully integrated into the worldwide art movement. The course has chosen those artists who are representative of certain developments in a key way and through whom, in general terms, Spanish art in the 20th century may be explored.

View Syllabus

GS-04 U.S.-European Relations Since World War II

This course will provide students with the theoretical framework necessary to help them think critically about transatlantic relations at many different, yet inter-related levels: political, military, security-based, cultural, and economic. The first part of the course will focus on the historical context of this key network, while special emphasis will be placed on U.S.-Spain relations. The second part of the course will examine the institutions linked to the transatlantic agenda: of a political, security-based, and economic kind. The third part of the course will focus on cultural issues, including public opinion and anti-Americanism. The last part of the course will look at the future of the transatlantic relationship.

View Syllabus

GS-05 International Marketing

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the marketing decisions within an organization, from a global perspective. With this aim in mind, students are trained to apply the basic concepts and techniques in marketing, so that they become familiar with the duties of a marketing manager. More specifically, students will be exposed to the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing management in a global business environment.

View Syllabus

GS-06 Spanish Cuisine, Spanish Cuisines

This course is designed as an introduction to the diversity of Spain’s cuisines. It is not intended to deal with every aspect of Spanish cuisine, but does aim to open a small window so students may become seduced by the view, the aromas and tastes of Spain’s gastronomic achievements.

View Syllabus

GS-07 Photography: Theory and Technique

The course has the following objectives; Learning how to read photographs and its meanings, develop technical photographic skills, understand the possibilities of photography as a way of expression and information, the importance of new technologies applied to photography, improve an analytic vision of contemporary images., improve social skills and group work.

View Syllabus

Social Psychology

This course will provide students with an introduction to the field of social psychology. Social psychology is a subfield of the science of psychology that focuses on the perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals and groups within a social context. This class will give students a broad overview of the major theories and findings of social psychology.

Film Editing

The subject agenda for this course can be divided into two blocks which can be summed up as canon and style. Each block has different topics covering the whole subject spectrum. However, the teacher reserves the right to modify these topics, adding new ones, updating them or replacing them, always looking for the students to have a better experience.The first block introduces different fields of the audiovisual language. At the end of the block, the goal is for the students to understand the basic filming and editing rules. The aim is them being able to plan, shoot and edit a fiction scene.During the second block, students will make an approach to diverse editing techniques, styles and movements from classic Hollywood model to nowadays audiovisual fictions. The goal is for the students to be able to identify different montage styles and the expressive intentions attached. The course also wants to motivate the students to engage in creative editing.

View Syllabus

FS-06 Gender Views in Contemporary Spanish Literature and Cinema

This course explores gender representations (ranging from feminist perspectives, gender performances, or the theory and practice of female writing, to questions of sexual identity, patterns of masculinity and queer theory) within the Spanish literature and cinema produced during the last three decades. Besides analyzing a selection of works by the most representative authors who form part of the contemporary literary panorama in Spain, students will also examine the different critical paradigms and theories within the field of gender and sexuality studies and how they are formulated within a range of cultural texts and contexts.

View Syllabus

FS-08 The Arab World Today: Contemporary History and International Relations

This course will introduce students to the contemporary history of the Arab world and its international relations during the 20th and 21st centuries. It will describe the major events in the history of the Eastern (Mashreq) and Western (Maghreb) Arab states during this period and of the development of their relations with Europe and the United States. Special attention will be paid to Spain’s relations with the Maghreb region, particularly with Morocco.

View Syllabus

FS-09 Music and Society: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

The aim of this course is to acquire an aural, visual, and theoretical understanding of Flamenco, of the streams of culture which created it, and of its role within Spanish culture, and on using the study of Flamenco as a vehicle to explore the relationship between art and culture, music and society, and the ways in which we think, talk and learn about Flamenco. The intention of the practical part of the course, the Flamenco dance class, is designed to give students an understanding of the mechanics, aesthetics, and basic canons of an art form that is so often described as being purely spontaneous and free. At the end of the course, students will perform the simple choreography they have learned, accompanied by a professional singer and guitarist. This tends to give them an entirely new appreciation of the complexity of both the dance form and the culture in which it is embedded. Evaluation in this part of the class sessions is based on attendance, effort and improvement, each student performing at their own level; ability or prior dance training is not necessary.

View Syllabus

FS-09 Music and Society: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

The aim of this course is to acquire an aural, visual, and theoretical understanding of Flamenco, of the streams of culture which created it, and of its role within Spanish culture, and on using the study of Flamenco as a vehicle to explore the relationship between art and culture, music and society, and the ways in which we think, talk and learn about Flamenco. The intention of the practical part of the course, the Flamenco dance class, is designed to give students an understanding of the mechanics, aesthetics, and basic canons of an art form that is so often described as being purely spontaneous and free. At the end of the course, students will perform the simple choreography they have learned, accompanied by a professional singer and guitarist. This tends to give them an entirely new appreciation of the complexity of both the dance form and the culture in which it is embedded. Evaluation in this part of the class sessions is based on attendance, effort and improvement, each student performing at their own level; ability or prior dance training is not necessary.

View Syllabus

FS-12 Progressive Spanish for English-Speaking Students

This course is aimed at English-speaking students who already have a basic knowledge of Spanish. Its key objective is to improve their communication skills by means of the consolidation of their grammar competence and of the introduction of practical vocabulary so as to enable them to cope with the usual communication situations of everyday life. On the one hand, teaching methodology will be based on the assimilation of grammatical rules and their practical application via specific activities and, on the other hand, will involve the gradual and progressive use of Spanish as a vehicle for communication within the classroom.

View Syllabus

FS-14 Painting in Literary Seville

Understand the city of Seville and its artistic heritage combining the literature of Seville with the practical art of painting. To have a profound knowledge of a city and its heritage requires a very careful study of its most emblematic places. Painting gives one a greater vision of the city. We choose different techniques: pencil, charcoal, watercolor, and ink, etc. The students pass enjoyable sessions in the parks, plazas, streets, and monuments of Seville, the Guadalquivir River, the Alcázar, the Barrio Santa Cruz, taking time to study their subject, its form, and history. They will get to know the city, its hidden places, and architecture like no other student can hope to do. At the end of the semester, the students will have a fine collection of drawings and paintings which make great souvenirs and gifts for their friends and families. Also, they will acquire a great understanding of painting; perspective and composition which will help them appreciate art for the rest of their lives.

View Syllabus

FS-17 A Practical Course in Teaching English as a Foreign Language Methodology

This training course offers a theoretical and practical approach to the teaching of English as a foreign language (EFL) to Spanish-speaking students. Classroom practice will be fostered which includes activities in the class, activities outside the class under the supervision of a tutor and the opportunity to take part of the course in a Spanish school with Spanish students in the city of Seville. This way, not only theoretical content but also the cultural aspects which are involved in the practice of teaching English as a foreign language will be dealt with.

View Syllabus

FS-17 A Practical Course in Teaching English as a Foreign Language Methodology

This training course offers a theoretical and practical approach to the teaching of English as a foreign language (EFL) to Spanish-speaking students. Classroom practice will be fostered which includes activities in the class, activities outside the class under the supervision of a tutor and the opportunity to take part of the course in a Spanish school with Spanish students in the city of Seville. This way, not only theoretical content but also the cultural aspects which are involved in the practice of teaching English as a foreign language will be dealt with.

View Syllabus

GS-01 Spain’s Classical Heritage: Between History and Mythology

The main goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of Spain’s classical heritage. Special attention will be paid to the presence of Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans in Spain, not only from a historical point of view but also taking into account the mythological construction of Spain’s past and Spain’s key cultural traditions. The course also explores Spain’s religious background, mainly the long process of Christianization in southern Spain.

View Syllabus

GS-02 Contemporary Spain: Economy, Society, and Environment

This course will focus on the ways in which relationships between people and the natural environment, as well as patterns of spatial relationships, vary throughout Spain. It will explain how these relationships produce the distinctiveness of particular places, landscapes, and patterns of environmental and human attributes, as well as societies and identities, and provide students with the ability to conceptualize these relationships and their outcomes across a range of scales. Students gain an appreciation of the characteristics of the urban, regional and rural environments of selected areas in Spain and of the geographical processes which underlie their development, as well as an understanding of the practical application of concepts and methods taught in the classroom.

View Syllabus

GS-03 Great Masters and the Major Artistic Trends in Spain During the Twentieth Century

This course will analyze the principal trends in Spanish art during the twentieth century. During the first half of the century, developments in Spanish art were determined by a particular set of historical circumstances. After the arrival of democracy, it will become clear that Spanish artists were more fully integrated into the worldwide art movement. The course has chosen those artists who are representative of certain developments in a key way and through whom, in general terms, Spanish art in the 20th century may be explored.

View Syllabus

GS-04 U.S.-European Relations Since World War II

This course will provide students with the theoretical framework necessary to help them think critically about transatlantic relations at many different, yet inter-related levels: political, military, security-based, cultural, and economic. The first part of the course will focus on the historical context of this key network, while special emphasis will be placed on U.S.-Spain relations. The second part of the course will examine the institutions linked to the transatlantic agenda: of a political, security-based, and economic kind. The third part of the course will focus on cultural issues, including public opinion and anti-Americanism. The last part of the course will look at the future of the transatlantic relationship.

View Syllabus

GS-05 International Marketing

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the marketing decisions within an organization, from a global perspective. With this aim in mind, students are trained to apply the basic concepts and techniques in marketing, so that they become familiar with the duties of a marketing manager. More specifically, students will be exposed to the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing management in a global business environment.

View Syllabus

GS-06 Spanish Cuisine, Spanish Cuisines

This course is designed as an introduction to the diversity of Spain’s cuisines. It is not intended to deal with every aspect of Spanish cuisine, but does aim to open a small window so students may become seduced by the view, the aromas and tastes of Spain’s gastronomic achievements.

View Syllabus

GS-07 Photography: Theory and Technique

The course has the following objectives; Learning how to read photographs and its meanings, develop technical photographic skills, understand the possibilities of photography as a way of expression and information, the importance of new technologies applied to photography, improve an analytic vision of contemporary images., improve social skills and group work.

View Syllabus

Social Psychology

This course will provide students with an introduction to the field of social psychology. Social psychology is a subfield of the science of psychology that focuses on the perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals and groups within a social context. This class will give students a broad overview of the major theories and findings of social psychology.

Film Editing

The subject agenda for this course can be divided into two blocks which can be summed up as canon and style. Each block has different topics covering the whole subject spectrum. However, the teacher reserves the right to modify these topics, adding new ones, updating them or replacing them, always looking for the students to have a better experience.The first block introduces different fields of the audiovisual language. At the end of the block, the goal is for the students to understand the basic filming and editing rules. The aim is them being able to plan, shoot and edit a fiction scene.During the second block, students will make an approach to diverse editing techniques, styles and movements from classic Hollywood model to nowadays audiovisual fictions. The goal is for the students to be able to identify different montage styles and the expressive intentions attached. The course also wants to motivate the students to engage in creative editing.

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GS-12 Wine in Spain: History and Wine Tasting

Wine has long been part of human society and today is an important part of Spanish culture. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the world of wine. Students will meet the main Spanish wine regions and grapes, they will learn how to store and serve wine effectively, and explore different wines through sight, smell, and taste, and the principles of food and wine pairings. This course also covers a variety of topics related to the Spanish wine industry, from wine styles and winegrowing areas to sustainable production and tourism.

FS-18 Psychology and Foreign Language Learning

This course is an introduction to second language acquisition, that is, a first acquaintance with how a non-native language (L2) is learned once a first language (L1) has already been developed. Second language acquisition is a dynamic process that millions of individuals worldwide are engaged in; it is also a growing interdisciplinary field of study within the mega field of applied linguistics.

Highlights
  • Classes taught in Spanish and English
  • Great program for novice Spanish speakers!
  • International excursion

Faculty

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    Juan Calvo

    Juan will be one of your Resident Directors in Seville and will be a resource for you while you are in Spain!

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    Lola Bernal

    Lola Bernal will be one of your Resident Directors in Seville and will be a resource for you while you are in Spain!

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    Marta Herencia

    Marta Herencia will be one of your Resident Directors in Seville and will be a resource for you while in Spain.

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    Hannah Stack

    Hannah Stack will be your Program Coordinator and prepare you to go abroad!

    Email - hannah.stack@apiabroad.com

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Seville programs. All excursions are subject to change.

  • Cordoba

    Córdoba’s rich cultural legacy stretches back over 2,000 years. Once the capital of one of the Roman provinces, it was captured in 716 by the Muslims. At that time, it was one of the largest and most sophisticated cities in the world, with a population ranging between 250,000 and 500,000 inhabitants. Its unique mosque was constructed 1,100 years ago and has 1,000 columns. Other sites of interest include the Roman bridge over the Guadalquivir, the Plaza de la Corredera, and the Jewish barrio and synagogue.

  • El Escorial

    The Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial was constructed between 1563-1584 and built in the purest 16th century Renaissance style. Nearly all Bourbon kings and queens of Spain have been buried here. It is a royal palace, a monastery, school and houses the private library of Philip II which contains some of the oldest books in the world.

  • Extremadura

    Several towns are “musts” in this region. First is Mérida, home of the largest number of Roman ruins outside of Italy, as well as a Museum of Roman Art, an amphitheater and aqueducts. Second is Cáceres, a Medieval and Renaissance city with walls that were built by the Romans and Almohads. The third is Trujillo, the cradle of more than 500 conquerors. Walking through this city will offer the opportunity to see many historical monuments and the Moorish castle. The mountain-town within the region of Las Villuercas leads to the historic village of Guadalupe, home of the Sanctuary-Monastery of Our Lady of Guadalupe, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

  • Grazalema

    Grazalema (Cádiz province) is one of Spain’s most stunning natural parks. In 1977 this area was declared a “Reserve of the Biosphere” by UNESCO due to the exceptional variety and wealth of its fauna and flora. It consists of a massif karstic limestone with closed river basins, headstreams of the Guadalete and Majacete’s Rivers and tributaries of the Guadiaro. It also comprises a mountain lagoon called ‘Laguna del Perezoso’. The park status envelopes several beautiful towns and villages; Grazalema, El Bosque, Ubrique, Zahara de la Sierra, Benaocaz, Benamahoma, Prado del Rey, and Villaluenga del Rosario are within the Cadiz side of the park.

  • Lisbon

    Lisbon is a European city like no other. It boasts as grand a cultural and historical heritage as many other European cities but also has an earthier side that sets it apart. An impressive Gothic cathedral, the Hieronymites Monastery, St. George’s Castle and Torre de Belém are all part of the colorful cityscape. Another side of Lisbon is discovered wandering around the narrow lanes of Alfama, Rossio and Barrio Alto Quarters, and taking in the sounds and rhythm of the city. One experiences a step back in time through visits to the cultural sites in Lisbon, while also gaining an impression of the differences between Portugal and Spain.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • Puerto Santa Maria

    El Puerto de Santa María is one of the most well-known towns in the Cádiz province due to its beautiful beaches, wonderful food and plentiful wineries. The wine produced in this location (typical of the Jerez area) is an important part of Spanish culture.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Cádiz

    Cádiz has over 3000 years of history and is one of the oldest cities in Europe. For many years, Cádiz was the link between Europe and the New World which explains the many similarities between Cádiz and Havana, Cuba. A walk around the city center is a joy to the senses with the sea, the streets, the Cathedral dome and the colorful houses along the coast.

  • Granada

    Granada is one of the most enchanting cities in Spain. With more than a thousand years of recorded history, Granada enjoys one of Spain’s most important cultural and architectural patrimonies. Important sites in Granada include the Alhambra and the historical Moorish Albaicín quarter, both designated as World Heritage sites by the UNESCO.

  • Cordoba

    Córdoba’s rich cultural legacy stretches back over 2,000 years. Once the capital of one of the Roman provinces, it was captured in 716 by the Muslims. At that time, it was one of the largest and most sophisticated cities in the world, with a population ranging between 250,000 and 500,000 inhabitants. Its unique mosque was constructed 1,100 years ago and has 1,000 columns. Other sites of interest include the Roman bridge over the Guadalquivir, the Plaza de la Corredera, and the Jewish barrio and synagogue.

  • El Escorial

    The Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial was constructed between 1563-1584 and built in the purest 16th century Renaissance style. Nearly all Bourbon kings and queens of Spain have been buried here. It is a royal palace, a monastery, school and houses the private library of Philip II which contains some of the oldest books in the world.

  • Grazalema

    Grazalema (Cádiz province) is one of Spain’s most stunning natural parks. In 1977 this area was declared a “Reserve of the Biosphere” by UNESCO due to the exceptional variety and wealth of its fauna and flora. It consists of a massif karstic limestone with closed river basins, headstreams of the Guadalete and Majacete’s Rivers and tributaries of the Guadiaro. It also comprises a mountain lagoon called ‘Laguna del Perezoso’. The park status envelopes several beautiful towns and villages; Grazalema, El Bosque, Ubrique, Zahara de la Sierra, Benaocaz, Benamahoma, Prado del Rey, and Villaluenga del Rosario are within the Cadiz side of the park.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • Puerto Santa Maria

    El Puerto de Santa María is one of the most well-known towns in the Cádiz province due to its beautiful beaches, wonderful food and plentiful wineries. The wine produced in this location (typical of the Jerez area) is an important part of Spanish culture.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Sierra de Arecena

    The chestnut and olive tree-covered hills of “Sierra de Aracena y Picos de Aroche” is one of the hidden jewels of Andalusian parks. This natural reserve, located northeast of Seville, is the second biggest protected park in Andalucía, covering over 28 different small whitewashed villages.

  • Cádiz

    Cádiz has over 3000 years of history and is one of the oldest cities in Europe. For many years, Cádiz was the link between Europe and the New World which explains the many similarities between Cádiz and Havana, Cuba. A walk around the city center is a joy to the senses with the sea, the streets, the Cathedral dome and the colorful houses along the coast.

  • Granada

    Granada is one of the most enchanting cities in Spain. With more than a thousand years of recorded history, Granada enjoys one of Spain’s most important cultural and architectural patrimonies. Important sites in Granada include the Alhambra and the historical Moorish Albaicín quarter, both designated as World Heritage sites by the UNESCO.

  • Paris

    One of the most intriguing cities in the world, Paris is brimming with amazing museums, architecture, fashion, and beauty. Innumerable monuments built to reflect the glory of France and its rulers stand testament to the city’s rich history.

  • Cordoba

    Córdoba’s rich cultural legacy stretches back over 2,000 years. Once the capital of one of the Roman provinces, it was captured in 716 by the Muslims. At that time, it was one of the largest and most sophisticated cities in the world, with a population ranging between 250,000 and 500,000 inhabitants. Its unique mosque was constructed 1,100 years ago and has 1,000 columns. Other sites of interest include the Roman bridge over the Guadalquivir, the Plaza de la Corredera, and the Jewish barrio and synagogue.

  • El Escorial

    The Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial was constructed between 1563-1584 and built in the purest 16th century Renaissance style. Nearly all Bourbon kings and queens of Spain have been buried here. It is a royal palace, a monastery, school and houses the private library of Philip II which contains some of the oldest books in the world.

  • Extremadura

    Several towns are “musts” in this region. First is Mérida, home of the largest number of Roman ruins outside of Italy, as well as a Museum of Roman Art, an amphitheater and aqueducts. Second is Cáceres, a Medieval and Renaissance city with walls that were built by the Romans and Almohads. The third is Trujillo, the cradle of more than 500 conquerors. Walking through this city will offer the opportunity to see many historical monuments and the Moorish castle. The mountain-town within the region of Las Villuercas leads to the historic village of Guadalupe, home of the Sanctuary-Monastery of Our Lady of Guadalupe, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

  • Grazalema

    Grazalema (Cádiz province) is one of Spain’s most stunning natural parks. In 1977 this area was declared a “Reserve of the Biosphere” by UNESCO due to the exceptional variety and wealth of its fauna and flora. It consists of a massif karstic limestone with closed river basins, headstreams of the Guadalete and Majacete’s Rivers and tributaries of the Guadiaro. It also comprises a mountain lagoon called ‘Laguna del Perezoso’. The park status envelopes several beautiful towns and villages; Grazalema, El Bosque, Ubrique, Zahara de la Sierra, Benaocaz, Benamahoma, Prado del Rey, and Villaluenga del Rosario are within the Cadiz side of the park.

  • Lisbon

    Lisbon is a European city like no other. It boasts as grand a cultural and historical heritage as many other European cities but also has an earthier side that sets it apart. An impressive Gothic cathedral, the Hieronymites Monastery, St. George’s Castle and Torre de Belém are all part of the colorful cityscape. Another side of Lisbon is discovered wandering around the narrow lanes of Alfama, Rossio and Barrio Alto Quarters, and taking in the sounds and rhythm of the city. One experiences a step back in time through visits to the cultural sites in Lisbon, while also gaining an impression of the differences between Portugal and Spain.

  • Madrid

    Spain’s capital blends the modern with an important cultural and artistic heritage. Three of the most important art galleries in the world (the Prado, Reina Sofia and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums) are all located in the center of Madrid. All this, combined with the momentum of a society that is dynamic, liberal and welcoming, has turned this metropolis into one of the western world’s great capitals.

  • Puerto Santa Maria

    El Puerto de Santa María is one of the most well-known towns in the Cádiz province due to its beautiful beaches, wonderful food and plentiful wineries. The wine produced in this location (typical of the Jerez area) is an important part of Spanish culture.

  • Toledo

    Toledo, located south of Madrid, was declared ‘City of Mankind’s Heritage’ by UNESCO in 1986. It was capital of Spain from mid-6th to the mid-16th centuries, as evidenced by its impressive medieval architecture. Known as the “City of the Three Cultures,” it served as a hub for Jews, Moors and Christians and has today become a symbol of religious tolerance. Walking through Toledo is like taking a magic journey into the past.

  • Sierra de Arecena

    The chestnut and olive tree-covered hills of “Sierra de Aracena y Picos de Aroche” is one of the hidden jewels of Andalusian parks. This natural reserve, located northeast of Seville, is the second biggest protected park in Andalucía, covering over 28 different small whitewashed villages.

  • Cádiz

    Cádiz has over 3000 years of history and is one of the oldest cities in Europe. For many years, Cádiz was the link between Europe and the New World which explains the many similarities between Cádiz and Havana, Cuba. A walk around the city center is a joy to the senses with the sea, the streets, the Cathedral dome and the colorful houses along the coast.

  • Granada

    Granada is one of the most enchanting cities in Spain. With more than a thousand years of recorded history, Granada enjoys one of Spain’s most important cultural and architectural patrimonies. Important sites in Granada include the Alhambra and the historical Moorish Albaicín quarter, both designated as World Heritage sites by the UNESCO.

  • Paris

    One of the most intriguing cities in the world, Paris is brimming with amazing museums, architecture, fashion, and beauty. Innumerable monuments built to reflect the glory of France and its rulers stand testament to the city’s rich history.

API students in Seville can choose from two different housing options – students may choose to live with a host family or in a residencia. Internet access is included in both options.

Students who choose to live with families share a double room with a fellow API student and are provided with three meals per day and laundry service. Families provide an amazing opportunity to experience Spanish culture firsthand. Host families serve as a unique introduction into Spanish culture and may be made up of a married couple with children, a divorced or widowed woman with children still at home, or a family with some members living at home and others living outside the home. Students can opt for a single room for an additional fee.

Students in Seville may also choose to live in a residencia. Residencias are usually small, family-run student residences that house international students and occasionally Spanish students. Traditionally 1-2 students share a bedroom, and a bathroom is shared by multiple students. All students have access to living, TV, and common areas. Residencias are generally co-ed and accommodate 2-30 students. Students are provided with three meals per day. Single rooms may be available for an additional fee.

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Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Fall Sep 15, 2019 - Dec 14, 2019 $9,980 Jun 10, 2019 Jul 1, 2019
Academic Year Sep, 2019 - May, 2020 $18,980 Jun 10, 2019 Jul 1, 2019
Spring Jan 27, 2019 - May 15, 2019 $9,980 Oct 15, 2018 Nov 1, 2018